Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Sony Introduces 'Project Morpheus' A Virtual Reality Headset For PS4

redletterdave (2493036) writes | about 5 months ago

0

redletterdave (2493036) writes "Sony's gaming subsidiary on Tuesday evening unveiled a virtual reality prototype that works with the PlayStation 4, called 'Project Morpheus.' The VR device is still a prototype at this point, but the current model of Project Morpheus features a head-mounted display with 1080p resolution and a 90 degree field of view that can track users’ head movements and orientation shifts — thanks to a built-in accelerometer, gyroscope and connectivity with PlayStation Camera — to change the virtual landscape based off your motions in real-time. The headset also comes with built-in 3D audio technology from Sony, which also reacts dynamically in real-time to the user’s head movements for a realistic stereoscopic effect. The company offered no price or release date details as the company's president insists Project Morpheus is "still a prototype.""
Link to Original Source

Spacecraft Discovers the Moon's Dust Halo, Finally

sciencehabit (1205606) writes | about 5 months ago

0

sciencehabit (1205606) writes "After decades of searching, NASA scientists have detected the veil of dust kicked up by tiny meteoroid impacts on the moon. The Apollo astronauts and many spacecraft had tried to detect sunlight reflected from the dust and failed. So, instead, the scientists of the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) spacecraft used an onboard instrument that detects micrometer-size dust particles when they hit the instrument at several thousand kilometers per hour and vaporize. Orbiting the moon as low as a few tens of kilometers above the surface, LADEE detected a dust impact every minute or two on average except when a meteoroid shower hitting the moon kicked up many more times the debris. Researchers should be able to use these LADEE observations to see whether the impact debris blown off the moons of Pluto will present a hazard to the New Horizons spacecraft when it flies by the ice dwarf planet in July of next year."
Link to Original Source

Facebook's DeepFace Project Nears Human Accuracy In Identifying Faces

kc123 (3513107) writes | about 5 months ago

0

kc123 (3513107) writes "Facebook has reached a major milestone in computer vision and pattern recognition, with ‘DeepFace,’ an algorithm capable of identifying a face in a crowd with 97.25 percent accuracy, which is pretty much on par with how good the average human is (97.5 percent accurate) at recognizing the faces of other walking, talking meat sacks. To get past the limitations of ordinary facial matching software, Facebook’s researchers have managed to find a way to build 3D models of faces from a photo, which can then be rotated to provide matching of the same face captured at different angles. In the past, facial recognition via computer could be pretty easily foiled if a subject is simply tilting their head in a slightly different direction."

Code Combat: Free Opensource Multiplayer Programming Lessons.

Anonymous Coward writes | about 5 months ago

0

An anonymous reader writes "Looking for something todo this weekend?

Code Combat recently released the first of there multi player levels on the general public.
Enabling users to learn JavaScript it a fun game structured way. Tons of levels teach the basics of programming and JavaScript as users learn to code the AI sending humans against Orc's, from simple single player movement problems all the way to complex multiplayer Warcraft styled battles featuring multiple troop types and heroes.

Best of all. the entire project is up on Github (MIT license) and welcomes new submissions."

Link to Original Source

Judge Denies Feds Search Warrant for Email

Anonymous Coward writes | about 5 months ago

2

An anonymous reader writes "In yet another example of the judicial branch of the government becoming more critical of federal mass acquisition of personal data, federal magistrate judge John Facciola in D.C. 'denied a government warrant request to search an unnamed user’s @mac.com e-mail address, citing the request as being over broad.' The judge further noted, 'This Court should not be placed in the position of compelling Apple to divine what the government actually seeks. Until this Application is clarified, it will be denied.'"

"Robot" Snowden Takes Stage at TED Promising More Spying Revelations

wiredmikey (1824622) writes | about 5 months ago

0

wiredmikey (1824622) writes "Edward Snowden's face appeared on a screen as he maneuvered the wheeled android around a stage at the TED gathering, addressing an audience in Vancouver without ever leaving his secret hideaway. He promised more sensational revelations about US spying programs, saying "some of the most important reporting to be done is yet to come."

Internet creator Tim Berners-Lee briefly joined Snowden's interview with TED curator Chris Anderson, and came down in the hero camp. When Anderson posed the question to the TED audience — known for famous, innovative, and influential attendees — the idea that Snowden was a force for good met with applause. "Hero patriot or traitor; I would say I am an American citizen just like anyone else," Snowden said. "What really matters here is the kind of government we want; the kind of Internet we want.""

Link to Original Source

Ex-Head Of Troubled Health Insurance Site May Sue, Citing 'Cover-Up'

itwbennett (1594911) writes | about 5 months ago

0

itwbennett (1594911) writes "Carolyn Lawson, the former CIO for Oregon's troubled health care insurance website, is alleging that state officials engaged in a 'substantial cover-up' meant to deflect blame away from themselves and onto herself and the project's contractor, Oracle. Lawson, who was forced to resign in December, this week filed a tort claim notice, which is a required precursor to filing a lawsuit against the state."
Link to Original Source

Java 8 Officially Released

darthcamaro (735685) writes | about 5 months ago

0

darthcamaro (735685) writes "Oracle today officially released Java 8, nearly two years after Java 7, and after much delay. The new release includes a number of critical new features including Lambda expressions and the new Nashorn JavaScript engine. Java 8 however is still missing at least critical piece that Java developers have been asking for, for years.

"It’s a pity that some of the features like Jigsaw were dropped as modularity, runtime dependencies and interoperability are still a huge problem in Java," James Donelan, vice president of engineering at MuleSoft said. "In fact this is the one area where I still think Java has a long way to go."

"
Link to Original Source

Moderate solar events could combine to make catastrophic space weather

sciencehabit (1205606) writes | about 5 months ago

0

sciencehabit (1205606) writes "On 23 July 2012, two eruptions on the sun known as coronal mass ejections (CMEs) burst from an active patch of sunspots on the far side of the sun, which is monitored by a probe that circles the sun ahead of Earth in the same orbit. Emerging about 15 minutes apart, the CMEs quickly merged into one shock wave of charged particles that washed over the probe’s sensors just 18.6 hours later. Behind the shock wave, charged particles raced along at about 2250 kilometers per second—five times their normal speed at Earth’s distance from the sun—and the magnetic field strength there was more than 10 times that normally seen at Earth’s orbit. If pointed in our direction, such a combination would have produced the strongest geomagnetic storm to have struck Earth in history and could have knocked out satellites and earthbound power grids, researchers say. The observations of these CMEs will help scientists better model space weather and predict potentially calamitous solar storms."
Link to Original Source

NSA can retrieve, replay all phone calls from a country from the past 30 days.

Anonymous Coward writes | about 5 months ago

0

An anonymous reader writes "The National Security Agency has built a surveillance system capable of recording “100 percent” of a foreign country’s telephone calls, enabling the agency to rewind and review conversations as long as a month after they take place, according to people with direct knowledge of the effort and documents supplied by former contractor Edward Snowden."
Link to Original Source

More troubles for authors of controversial acid-bath stem cell articles.

bmahersciwriter (2955569) writes | about 5 months ago

0

bmahersciwriter (2955569) writes "Reports early this year about a strikingly simple method for deriving pluripotent stem cells were met with amazement and deep scepticism, then claims that the experiments were not reproducible, then accusations of copied and manipulated figures. Now, the first author of one of the papers is being lambasted for having copied the first 20 pages of her doctoral thesis from an NIH primer on stem cells. And an adviser on her thesis committee says he was never asked to review it. Could this get any stranger? Probably!"
Link to Original Source

Setting up a Mysql cluster with MariaDB Galera

John Moses (3473897) writes | about 5 months ago

0

John Moses (3473897) writes "One of the applications I help develop and support uses Mysql as its database. As the application starts to scale we notice the server with Mysql installed begans to have high CPU and memory utilization and sometimes feels like it is slowing down. To be able to scale the database needs to be able to handle more reads and writes. To do that I have chosen to setup MariaDB Galera, a synchronous multi-master cluster for MariaDB."
Link to Original Source

The Air Force Isn't Ready to Replace the A-10

Daniel_Stuckey (2647775) writes | about 5 months ago

1

Daniel_Stuckey (2647775) writes "Would you rather have a Swiss Army knife or a tire iron? Context is, of course, everything, so imagine that your car has been getting flats like crazy, and the Swiss Army knife costs three times as much as the tire iron. Facing a round of deep budget cuts, the Department of Defense is opting for the Swiss Army knife, which is why its planning to ground the A-10 Thunderbolt II—called the "Air Force's most effective weapon"—in favor of long-delayed, over budget, under performing F-35, known as "the stealth fighter...designed for no one."

Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel released a budget proposal to shrink the size of the armed forces to their smallest size in decades. Under the budget as proposed, the Air Force's entire fleet of 350 A-10s would be retired in order to save $3.5 billion over five years, and its former combat roles will be handed over to the newer F-35joint strike fighterand the growing drone fleet.

"The A-10 is a 40-year-old single-purpose airplane originally designed to kill enemy tanks on a Cold War battlefield," Hagel said. "It cannot survive or operate effectively where there are more advanced aircraft or air defenses.""

Link to Original Source

Consumerist releases bracket for 2014 worst company in America

bi$hop (878253) writes | about 5 months ago

0

bi$hop (878253) writes "The Consumerist is proud to present the first round match-ups for this year’s Worst Company in America tournament!

There are several returning competitors, including previous champs EA and Comcast, three-time runner-up (and sort of winner from when it acquired Countrywide) Bank of America, the perennially hated Ticketmaster and PayPal (with their respective corporate counterparts LiveNation and eBay). There are also some new names on the list, like Koch Industries and lawsuit-happy seed company Monsanto. There’s also SeaWorld making a splash on WCIA 2014, presumably because people have been watching that Blackfish documentary.

Voting will begin tomorrow, March 19..."

Firefox 28 Arrives With VP9 Video Decoding, HTML5 Volume Controls

Anonymous Coward writes | about 5 months ago

0

An anonymous reader writes "Mozilla today officially launched Firefox 28 for Windows, Mac, Linux, and Android. Additions include VP9 video decoding, Web notifications on OS X, and volume controls for HTML5 video and audio. Firefox 28 has been released over on Firefox.com and all existing users should be able to upgrade to it automatically. As always, the Android version is trickling out slowly on Google Play."

NSA MYSTIC Surveillance System Can Record an Entire Country's Phone Calls

concertina226 (2447056) writes | about 5 months ago

0

concertina226 (2447056) writes "The NSA has a voice interception system called Mystic that can record the phone calls of an entire country and store the calls for 30 days, according to sources and documents leaked by Edward Snowden to the Washington Post.

Mystic was first used in 2009 and two years later, an additional tool, "Retro", was introduced that had the ability to retrieve and replay voices from any call, a senior manager for the system said. The documents list at least seven target nations where the collection systems were still being used to record "every single" conversation.

Billions of audio files can be stored for 30 days, after which the oldest are deleted unless analysts decide to keep them. Although the analysts listen to less than 1% of all calls, millions of voice clippings are processed and sent to long-term storage every month."

Link to Original Source

Re-Learning How To Interview for a Development Position

Anonymous Coward writes | about 5 months ago

0

An anonymous reader writes "Earlier in my career, when I switched jobs every year or so, I was pretty good at interviewing. I got offers about 75% of the time if I got to a in person. But times have changed... my last 2 jobs have been, longer term gigs.. 5 and 3 years respectively, and I am way out of practice. My resume often gets me the phone interview and I am actually really good at the phone screen.. I am 12 for 12 in the last 6 months phone screen to in person interview. It is the in person interview where I am really having issues. I think I come off wrong or something.. I usually get most of the technical questions, but I am not doing something right because I don't come off very likeable or something.. It is hard to get very much feedback to know exactly what I am doing wrong. I have always gotten very good performance reviews and I am well liked at work, but if there is one area for improvement on my reviews it has always been communication. So I ask, can anyone give out some advice, I have tried toastmasters a few times, but does anyone have other tips or ideas? Has anyone else had a similar experiences?"

Will pCells really work?

agent elevator (1075679) writes | about 5 months ago

0

agent elevator (1075679) writes "Artemis CEO Steve Perlman says he can deliver all the goals of 5G on 4G phones right now, but IEEE Spectrum's Ariel Bleicher found a lot of skeptical wireless experts. “This is a promising technology, but some of the claims seem too good to be true,” says Lingjia Liu of the University of Kansas, in Lawrence. Indeed, other engineers who've worked on similar concepts think the limits are much lower than what Perlman is claiming. But he may get his chance to prove them wrong with a large-scale trial planned for San Francisco."
Link to Original Source

Enlightenment E19 To Have Full Wayland Support

Anonymous Coward writes | about 5 months ago

0

An anonymous reader writes "Full Wayland support has been added to Enlightenment 0.19. Building upon earlier Wayland support, Enlightenment can now act as its own Wayland compositor by communicating directly with the kernel's DRM drivers instead of having to rely upon Weston. The Wayland support is still considered experimental and doesn't have X11 Wayland compatibility but it's now the first Linux desktop with full Wayland support."
Link to Original Source

Ask Slashdot: Will Older Programmers Always Have A Hard Time Getting A Job?

Theseuss (3552333) writes | about 5 months ago

0

Theseuss (3552333) writes "Given the strong youth culture associated with the modern day Silicon Valley startup scene, many times it falls to the 40 year-old programmer to prove that he can still use the newest up-and-coming technology. Yet the rate at which the tech sector is growing suggests that in 20 years there will be a an order of magnitude more "old-hat" programmers in the industry. As such, do you think the cultural bias towards young programmers will change in the near future?"

Fighting radiological terrorism with changes to medical procedures & technol

Lasrick (2629253) writes | about 5 months ago

0

Lasrick (2629253) writes ""This article lays out changes in medical technology that should be discussed at the upcoming Nuclear Security Summit (March 24-25). Although 'High-risk radiological sources like cobalt 60 and cesium 137 serve valuable purposes in industry and research, particularly in medicine...'these sources are usually located in publicly accessible spaces, like hospitals or universities...' The article details alternative technologies that could be used instead of technology that relies on radioactive sources. One such change could come in the area of blood irradiation: '...a gradual phase-out of cesium chloride use in pre-transfusion blood irradiation on a global scale—a domain in which non-isotopic alternatives are considered to be the most viable in the short-term.' I'm glad someone is thinking about these things.""
Link to Original Source

Flash is Dead, Long Live OpenFL!

lars_doucet (2853771) writes | about 5 months ago

0

lars_doucet (2853771) writes "I am a 15-year Flash veteran and nobody hates to say this more than me: Flash is dying, and the killer is Adobe. Where to now? HTML5 doesn't help me with native targets, and Unity is proprietary just like Flash was — "don't worry, we'll be around forever! And so sorry about that neglected bug report — we're busy."

I'm putting my bets on OpenFL, a Haxe-based, fully open-source implementation of the Flash API that might just please both Flash refugees and longtime Flash haters alike.

My article discusses my experiences with it and gives a brief overview for newcomers. In short — I can keep making flash games if I want, but with the same codebase I can also *natively* target Win/Mac/Linux desktops, mobile, and more, without having to mess with Adobe AIR or other virtual machines."

Link to Original Source

Quantum rewrites the rules of computing

rlinke (3398697) writes | about 5 months ago

0

rlinke (3398697) writes "The CEO of a quantum computing company walked onto a stage at MIT and stood in front of an audience of professors, engineers and computer scientists.

Vern Brownell, CEO of D-Wave Systems Inc., looked out at the crowd and said, "I cannot explain how quantum computing works."

Was he heckled? Did attendees get up and leave? No.

No one in the audience stirred. There was no murmuring. Nobody laughed. No sidelong glances. Nothing.

Quantum computing is just that confusing. Some of the world's best physicists don't understand how it works."

New Facial Recognition Software May Detect Looming Road Rage

cartechboy (2660665) writes | about 5 months ago

1

cartechboy (2660665) writes "Well, since we have license plate readers tracking drivers, and GPS breaking down we're you're headed — its probably time for someone to know what mood you're in when you're driving. (Quick hint: often not a good one). Researchers at Switzerland's École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne have prototyped a dashboard camera that tracks facial movements and expressions to read a person's emotions while behind the wheel. The team has partnered with PSA Peugeot Citroën to create a version for actual cars to determine when drivers are angry — and have high potential for road rage. One challenge for the technology has been the wide range of expressions drivers have when they're pissed. Some people smile, for example. (Maybe as they raise their middle finger.) The engineers are working on future revs to be able to tell when drivers are fatigued or even just distracted."

Navy Research Might Be Key to Space-Based Solar Power

RocketAcademy (2708739) writes | about 5 months ago

0

RocketAcademy (2708739) writes "A researcher at the US Naval Research Laboratory has developed an electronic module that can be used to capture solar energy in space and transmit it to Earth via microwave beam.

NRL has been studying space-based solar-power systems for several years. It has identified a number of possible applications including supplying power to forward bases, synthfuel production, and powering bistatic radars, sensors, and UAVs.

The military, which often pays much higher prices for energy than civilian customers, especially in remote areas, is seen as a possible anchor tenant for space-based solar power."

Google Android Wear

mrspoonsi (2955715) writes | about 5 months ago

0

mrspoonsi (2955715) writes "Business insider reports: Google today announced that it plans to officially bring Android to smartwatches through its new project entitled Android Wear. The project will enable developers to bring features such as Google Now to wristwatches, and Google notes that Android Wear will also bring health-focused apps and the ability to interact with your phone to the wrist."

New Stanford institute to target bad science

ananyo (2519492) writes | about 5 months ago

1

ananyo (2519492) writes "John Ioannidis, the epidemiologist who published an infamous paper entitled 'Why most published research findings are false', has co-founded an institute dedicated to combating sloppy medical studies. The new institute is to focus on irreproducibility, waste in science and publication bias. The institute, called the Meta-Research Innovation Centre or METRICS, will, the Economist reports, 'create a “journal watch” to monitor scientific publishers’ work and to shame laggards into better behaviour. And they will spread the message to policymakers, governments and other interested parties, in an effort to stop them making decisions on the basis of flaky studies. All this in the name of the centre’s nerdishly valiant mission statement: “Identifying and minimising persistent threats to medical-research quality.”'"
Link to Original Source

GOG.com Bringing Linux Games To The Store

jones_supa (887896) writes | about 5 months ago

0

jones_supa (887896) writes "More great news for Linux gamers: following the footsteps of Steam, GOG.com is preparing delivery of Linux games, with expected showtime being this autumn. The officially supported distributions will be Ubuntu and Mint. Right now they are performing testing on various configurations, training up their teams on Linux-speak, and generally preparing for the rollout of at least 100 titles — DRM-free as usual. This will update some existing games of the catalog with a Linux port and bring new ones to the collection. Further information on specific games is yet not known, but GOG invites fans and customers to their community wishlist to discuss."

Waves Spotted On Titan

minty3 (2942557) writes | about 5 months ago

0

minty3 (2942557) writes "Planetary scientists believe they have observed waves rippling on one of Titan’s seas. The findings, presented on March 17 at the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference, describes how the Cassini spacecraft captured images of sunlight glinting off the Punga Mare, suggesting they are not reflective sunlight but waves."
Link to Original Source

Malware Attack Infected 25,000 Linux/UNIX Servers

wiredmikey (1824622) writes | about 5 months ago

0

wiredmikey (1824622) writes "Security researchers from ESET have uncovered a widespread attack campaign that has infected more than 25,000 Linux and UNIX servers around the world.

The servers are being hijacked by a backdoor Trojan as part of a campaign the researchers are calling 'Operation Windigo.' Once infected, victimized systems are leveraged to steal credentials, redirected web traffic to malicious sites and send as much as 35 million spam messages a day. "Windigo has been gathering strength, largely unnoticed by the security community, for more than two and a half years and currently has 10,000 servers under its control," said Pierre-Marc Bureau, security intelligence program manager at ESET, in a statement.

There are many misconceptions around Linux security, and attacks are not something only Windows users need to worry about. The main threats facing Linux systems aren't zero-day vulnerabilities or malware, but things such as Trojanized applications, PHP backdoors, and malicious login attempts over SSH.

ESET recommends webmasters and system administrators check their systems to see if they are compromised, and has published a detailed report presenting the findings and instructions on how to remove the malicious code if it is present."

Link to Original Source

Microsoft Releases Free Edition of OneNote

yakatz (1176317) writes | about 5 months ago

0

yakatz (1176317) writes "Microsoft announced that OneNote, including the full desktop program, will be free for anyone who wants to use the program. A version of the program for Mac also appeared in the app store yesterday. This means that a native edition of OneNote is available for most platforms (including iPad, iPhone and Android, but not Linux or Blackberry). Microsoft will continue to offer a paid version of OneNote with "business-oriented" features (including SharePoint support, version history and Outlook integration). The partial rebranding of OneNote also includes some new tools like a program specifically designed to make it easier to take a picture of a whiteboard.
Is this a signal that Microsoft decided that they need to compete with Apple by making their productivity applications free?"

Link to Original Source

Google and Viacom Finally Settle Lawsuit

Anonymous Coward writes | about 5 months ago

0

An anonymous reader writes "PC Mag reports: 'It only took seven years, but Viacom and Google's YouTube have finally come to an agreement that settles their long-running copyright case.

Terms of the deal were not disclosed, but the arrangement apparently puts the $1 billion fight to rest.

'Google and Viacom today jointly announced the resolution of the Viacom vs. YouTube copyright litigation," the companies said in a joint statement. "This settlement reflects the growing collaborative dialogue between our two companies on important opportunities, and we look forward to working more closely together.'""

Link to Original Source

Church Committee Members Say New Group Needed to Watch NSA

Trailrunner7 (1100399) writes | about 5 months ago

0

Trailrunner7 (1100399) writes "In a letter sent to President Obama and members of Congress, former members and staff of the Church Committee on intelligence said that the revelations of the NSA activities have caused “a crisis of public confidence” and encouraged the formation of a new committee to undertake “significant and public reexamination of intelligence community practices”.

In the letter sent Monday to Obama and Congress, several former advisers to and members of the Church committee, including the former chief counsel, said that the current situation involving the NSA bears striking resemblances to the one in 1975 and that the scope of what the NSA is doing today is orders of magnitude larger than what was happening nearly 40 years ago.

“The need for another thorough, independent, and public congressional investigation of intelligence activity practices that affect the rights of Americans is apparent. There is a crisis of public confidence. Misleading statements by agency officials to Congress, the courts, and the public have undermined public trust in the intelligence community and in the capacity for the branches of government to provide meaningful oversight,” the letter says."

"Nobel Prize in Computing" goes to distributed computing wrangler Leslie Lamport

alphadogg (971356) writes | about 5 months ago

0

alphadogg (971356) writes "Leslie Lamport, a Microsoft Research principal, has been named the winner of the 2013 ACM A.M. Turing Award, http://amturing.acm.org/ also known as the “Nobel Prize in Computing.” The computer scientist was recognized by the Association for Computing Machinery for “imposing clear, well-defined coherence on the seemingly chaotic behavior of distributed computing systems, in which several autonomous computers communicate with each other by passing messages.” His algorithms, models and verification systems have enabled distributed computer systems to play the key roles they’re used in throughout the data center, security and cloud computing landscapes."
Link to Original Source

A call for rollbacks to previous versions of software

colinneagle (2544914) writes | about 5 months ago

0

colinneagle (2544914) writes "In a blog post, Andy Patrizio laments the trend — made more common in the mobile world — of companies pushing software updates ahead without the ability to roll-back to previous versions in the event that the user simply doesn't like it. iOS 7.1, for example, has reportedly been killing some users' battery power, and users of the iTunes library app TuneUp will remember how the much-maligned version 3.0 effectively killed the company behind it (new owners have since taken over TuneUp and plans to bring back the older version).

The ability to undo a problematic install should be mandatory, but in too many instances it is not. That's because software developers are always operating under the assumption that the latest version is the greatest version, when it may not be. This is especially true in the smartphone and tablet world. There is no rollback to be had for anything in the iOS and Android worlds.

Until the day comes when software developers start releasing perfectly functioning, error-free code, we need the ability to go backwards with all software."

Link to Original Source

MIT Scientists Engineer World's First Bionic Plant

DavidGilbert99 (2607235) writes | about 5 months ago

0

DavidGilbert99 (2607235) writes "They are capable of absorbing light 30% more effectively than normal plants and could be used to monitor pollution or the distribution of chemical weapons. The bionic plants integrate carbon nanotubes into the leaves of regular plants, and the scientists from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) were able to replicate and improve upon a plant's natural ability to photosynthesise."
Link to Original Source

Lit Motors, Danny Kim, and Changing How Americans Drive

Nerval's Lobster (2598977) writes | about 5 months ago

0

Nerval's Lobster (2598977) writes "In early March, Lit Motors founder Danny Kim hit the road to meet investors. The Portland native needed to keep the momentum growing for his small firm, which builds the two-wheeled C-1. His modest lab, located in San Francisco’s SoMa neighborhood, could accommodate another 12 employees—but he needed the money to fund them, and to build a manufacturing facility that could turn his prototype ideas into a reality. Like Elon Musk and other manufacturing savants, Kim is someone who enjoys the challenge of building things—whether it’s eyeglasses, chairs, or motor vehicles from scratch. He’s spent the past five years re-thinking modern transportation, and using those insights to design prototypes of two-wheeled, motor-driven vehicles that can self-balance with a dancer’s grace, thanks to an integrated software platform and a patented gyroscopic system. In a wide-ranging conversation with Slashdot, Kim discussed his plans for manufacturing the C-1, as well as the challenges in convincing consumers to try out a new kind of vehicle. "Seventy-two percent of commuters drive alone, so it just made sense to cut the car in half," he said, explaining the decision to go with two wheels instead of four. "You have to think about this two-wheeled car as a robot because of its stability. It purely uses our AI/stability algorithm so it can balance and you don’t have to. We had to develop our own firmware for our own dynamic system. It is code heavy.""
Link to Original Source

Samsung Galaxy S5 Launch Could be Delayed Due to Camera Module Problems

concertina226 (2447056) writes | about 5 months ago

0

concertina226 (2447056) writes "There's less than a month to go before Samsung launches its new flagship Galaxy S5 smartphone worldwide on 11 April, and the new device has still not gone into mass production due to camera module manufacturing problems.

The 16 megapixel camera module consists of six plastic pieces, one more piece than in the existing 13 megapixel camera modules in the Galaxy S4. The problem that Samsung is having is that even though the number of plastic pieces has gone up, the thickness of each piece has remained the same, so in order to fit the new camera module into the Galaxy S5, the lens makers will likely have to develop new technology to make thinner lenses.

Not only that, joining six pieces together instead of five for the 13 megapixel camera modules increases the risk of optical faults surfacing at the lens manufacturers' plants dramatically."

Link to Original Source

Overuse of Bioengineered Corn Unsurprisingly Gives Rise to Resistant Pests

Anonymous Coward writes | about 5 months ago

0

An anonymous reader writes "Though warned by scientists that overuse of a variety of corn engineered to be toxic to corn rootworms would eventually breed rootworms with resistance to its engineered toxicity, the agricultural industry went ahead and overused the corn anyway with little EPA intervention. The corn was planted in 1996. First reports of rootworm resistance were officially documented in 2011, though agricultural scientists weren't allowed by seed companies to study the engineered corn until 2010. The corn's continued over-use is predicted given current trends, and as resistance eventually spreads to the whole rootworm population, farmers will be forced to start using pesticides once more, thus negating the economical benefits of the engineered corn. 'Rootworm resistance was expected from the outset, but the Bt seed industry, seeking to maximize short-term profits, ignored outside scientists. The next pest-fighting trait “will fall under the same pressure and the insect will win."'"

Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>