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IBM's Watson to be used for cancer treatment

Beeftopia (1846720) writes | about 8 months ago

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Beeftopia (1846720) writes "The New York Genome Center and IBM will investigate whether Watson can be used to parse cancer genome data and then recommend treatments. The trial involves 20 to 25 glioblastoma patients with poor prognoses. The article states, "It should theoretically be possible to analyze [genomic] data and use it to customize a treatment that targets the specific mutations present in tumor cells. But right now, doing so requires a squad of highly trained geneticists, genomics experts, and clinicians. It's a situation that can't scale to handle the [number of] patients with glioblastoma, much less other cancers. Instead, that gusher of information is going to be pointed at Watson... Watson will figure out which mutations are distinct to the tumor, what protein networks they effect, and which drugs target proteins that are part of those networks. The net result will be a picture of the biochemical landscape inside the tumor cells, along with some suggestions on how clinicians might consider intervening to change the landscape."
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'Chicken From Hell' Unearthed in American Midwest

sciencehabit (1205606) writes | about 8 months ago

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sciencehabit (1205606) writes "A newly described dinosaur might look like a chicken, but don’t be fooled: It was nearly 4 meters long, weighed about 250 kilograms, and lived 66 million years ago in what is today the Hell Creek rock formation in North and South Dakota. That’s why its discoverers are calling it the “chicken from hell,” and indeed it was related to early birds and to feathered, birdlike dinos that brooded over their nests, such as Oviraptor. The creature had a toothless beak, sharp claws, and a tall crest on top of its head. It is the largest Oviraptor-like dinosaur found in North America."
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Time Dilation Drug Could Let Heinous Criminals Serve 1,000 Year Sentences

Hugh Pickens DOT Com (2995471) writes | about 8 months ago

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Hugh Pickens DOT Com (2995471) writes "Like something out of the movie "Inception," Rhiannon Williams reports in the Telegraph that Dr. Rebecca Roache, in charge of a team of scholars focused upon the ways futuristic technologies might transform punishment, claims the prison sentence of serious criminals could be made worse by distorting prisoners' minds into thinking time was passing more slowly. "There are a number of psychoactive drugs that distort people’s sense of time, so you could imagine developing a pill or a liquid that made someone feel like they were serving a 1,000-year sentence," says Roache. Roache says when she began researching this topic, she was thinking a lot about Daniel Pelka, a four-year-old boy who was starved and beaten to death by his mother and stepfather. "I had wondered whether the best way to achieve justice in cases like that was to prolong death as long as possible. Some crimes are so bad they require a really long period of punishment, and a lot of people seem to get out of that punishment by dying. And so I thought, why not make prison sentences for particularly odious criminals worse by extending their lives?" Thirty years in prison is currently the most severe punishment available in the UK legal system. "To me, these questions about technology are interesting because they force us to rethink the truisms we currently hold about punishment. When we ask ourselves whether it’s inhumane to inflict a certain technology on someone, we have to make sure it’s not just the unfamiliarity that spooks us," says Roache. "Is it really OK to lock someone up for the best part of the only life they will ever have, or might it be more humane to tinker with their brains and set them free? When we ask that question, the goal isn’t simply to imagine a bunch of futuristic punishments – the goal is to look at today’s punishments through the lens of the future.""

Intel Outs Haswell-E and Devil's Canyon CPUs, Ready Mode Technology

MojoKid (1002251) writes | about 8 months ago

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MojoKid (1002251) writes "Intel used the backdrop of the Game Developers Conference in San Francisco to make a handful of interesting announcements that run the gamut from low-power technologies to ultra-high-end desktop chips. In addition to outing a number of upcoming processors—from an Anniversary Edition Pentium to a monster 8-core Haswell-E—Intel also announced a new technology dubbed Ready Mode. Intel's Ready Mode essentially allows a 4th Gen Core processor to enter a low C7 power state, while the OS and other system components remain connected and ready for action. Intel demoed the technology, and along with compatible third party applications and utilities, showed how Ready Mode can allow a mobile device to automatically sync to a PC to download and store photos. The PC could also remain in a low power state and stream media, server up files remotely, or receive VOIP calls. Also, in a move that's sure to get enthusiasts excited, Intel revealed details regarding Haswell-E. Similar to Ivy Bridge-E and Sandy Bridge-E, Haswell-E is the "extreme" variant of the company's Haswell microarchitecture. Haswell-E Core i7-based processors will be outfitted with up to eight processor cores, which will remain largely unchanged from current Haswell-based chips. However, the new CPU will connect to high-speed DDR4 memory and will be paired to the upcoming Intel X99 chipset. Other details were scarce, but you can bet that Haswell-E will be Intel's fastest desktop processor to date when it arrives sometime in the second half of 2014. Intel also gave a quick nod to their upcoming 14nm Broadwell CPU architecture, a follow-on to Haswell. Broadwell will be the first Intel desktop processor to feature integrated Iris Pro Graphics and will also be compatible with Intel Series 9 chipsets."
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Why Buy Microsoft Milk When The Google Cow Is Free?

theodp (442580) writes | about 8 months ago

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theodp (442580) writes "Touring a high school with Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel, Google Chairman Eric Schmidt informed students they're eating Google "dog food" because Microsoft's costs money. "Why would we use Google Docs over like Microsoft Word?" a teacher asked the class. “Because it’s free!" exclaimed a grinning Schmidt. "Schmidt’s comment," writes GeekWire's Blair Hanley Frank, "highlights one of the risks Microsoft faces in the academic world. While Microsoft has started offering schools incentives to use Office 365, including free licenses for their pupils, the company is under greater pressure from its competitors. As more schools like Chicago’s face budget shortfalls, free and discounted products from companies like Google and Apple, especially when attached to financial assistance, start looking better and better." Chicago Teachers Union president Karen Lewis said she’d rather see companies pay more in taxes and fund schools that way, rather than relying on their charity or free software."

US tech giants knew of NSA data collection, agency's top lawyer insists

Advocatus Diaboli (1627651) writes | about 8 months ago

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Advocatus Diaboli (1627651) writes "The senior lawyer for the National Security Agency stated unequivocally on Wednesday that US technology companies were fully aware of the surveillance agency’s widespread collection of data, contradicting months of angry denials from the firms. Rajesh De, the NSA general counsel, said all communications content and associated metadata harvested by the NSA under a 2008 surveillance law occurred with the knowledge of the companies – both for the internet collection program known as Prism and for the so-called “upstream” collection of communications moving across the internet."
Link to Original Source

UK to create Alan Turing Institute

kc123 (3513107) writes | about 8 months ago

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kc123 (3513107) writes "The UK goverment has announced plans to create the Alan Turing Institute intended to tackle problems in Big Data. The government will provide £42m over five years for the project. Turing was a pivotal figure in mathematics and computing. His codebreaking work led to the cracking of the German "Enigma" codes. In December 2013, after a series of public campaigns, Turing received a posthumous royal pardon, for a conviction of homosexual activity in 1952."

Weev Is in Jail Because the Government Doesn't Know What Hacking Is

Daniel_Stuckey (2647775) writes | about 8 months ago

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Daniel_Stuckey (2647775) writes "Last March, weev, the notorious internet troll who seems to be equally celebrated and reviled, was convicted of accessing a computer without authorization and identity fraud, and sentenced to serve 41 months in prison.

"He had to decrypt and decode, and do all of these things I don't even understand," Assistant US Attorney Glenn Moramarco argued. Here, on a Wednesday morning in Philadelphia, before a packed courtroom, the federal prosecution argued that a hacker should spend three and a half years in prison for committing a crime it couldn't fully comprehend.

Previously, Orin Kerr, a law professor at George Washington University and weev's defense attorney, had argued first and foremost that there was no criminal hacking to speak of. According to Kerr, what weev and Daniel Spitler (who pleaded guilty to avoid jail time) had done while working as an outfit called Goatse Security was entirely legal, even though it embarrassed public officials and some of the country's biggest corporations."

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NSA's PRISM Targets Email Addresses, Not Keywords: Officials

wiredmikey (1824622) writes | about 8 months ago

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wiredmikey (1824622) writes "The US government's PRISM Internet spying program exposed by Edward Snowden targets suspect email addresses and phone numbers but does not search for keywords like terrorism, officials said Wednesday. Top lawyers of the country's intelligence apparatus including the NSA and FBI participated Wednesday in a public hearing on the controversial US data-mining operations that intercept emails and other Internet communications including on social media networks like Facebook, Google or Skype.

"We figure out what we want and we get that specifically, that's why it's targeted collection rather than bulk collection," Robert Litt, general counsel at the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, told the hearing.

Under authority of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, the NSA asks Internet service providers to hand over messages sent from or received by certain accounts such as "terrorist@google.com, the Justice Department's Brad Wiegmann said, using a hypothetical example."

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Survey Finds Nearly 50% in US Believe in Medical Conspiracy Theories

cold fjord (826450) writes | about 8 months ago

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cold fjord (826450) writes "NY Daily News reports, "About half of American adults believe in at least one medical conspiracy theory, according to new survey results. (paywalled, first page viewable) Some conspiracy theories have much more traction than others ... three times as many people believe U.S. regulators prevent people from getting natural cures as believe that a U.S. spy agency infected a large number of African Americans with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). J. Eric Oliver, the study's lead author from University of Chicago, said people may believe in conspiracy theories because they're easier to understand than complex medical information. ... Some 49 percent of the survey participants agreed with at least one of the conspiracies. In fact, in addition to the 37 percent of respondents who fully agreed that U.S. regulators are suppressing access to natural cures, less than a third were willing to say they actively disagreed with the theory." — One of the conspiracy theories, that the US created the AIDs virus, was created for an active disinformation campaign by the Soviet Union against the US as a form of political warfare during the Cold War, and still gets repeated."
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Liquid Cooling Will Get Inside Chips

judgecorp (778838) writes | about 8 months ago

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judgecorp (778838) writes "Liquid cooling can be delivered up close to the processor, running through chips which are built in a 3D layers, according to researchers at EPFL university in Lausanne. The idea, under development for some years, requires fluid running in tiny micro-channels across the chip, some of it will boil, creating efficient "two-phase" cooling. The researchers are working on creating a two-phase where the cooling effect is not ruined by turbulence and hotspots."
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Unreal Engine 4 Launching With Full Source Code

jones_supa (887896) writes | about 8 months ago

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jones_supa (887896) writes "Unreal Engine 4 from Epic to game developers is launching now. Supported platforms are Windows, OS X, iOS and Android, with desktop Linux coming later. The monetization scheme is unique: anyone can get access to literally everything for a $19/month fee. Epic is working to build a company that succeeds when UE4 developers succeed. Therefore, part of the deal is that anyone can ship a commercial product with UE4 by paying 5% of gross revenue resulting from sales to users, helping the ecosystem. The tools you get are the Unreal Editor in ready-to-run form, and the engine's complete C++ source code hosted on GitHub for collaborative development. Provided also is the foundation for the community: chat in the forums, add to the wiki, participate in the AnswerHub Q&A, and join collaborative development projects via GitHub. The company is also shipping lots of ready-made content, samples, and game templates. So, will this effort succeed? That's up to you and your judgment of the engine’s value. Unreal Engine 4 has been built by a team of over 100 engineers, artists and designers around the world, and this launch 'represents all of Epic's hopes and dreams of how major software can be developed and distributed in the future'."
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Pulling an All-Nighter Can Make You Stupid

nani popoki (594111) writes | about 8 months ago

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nani popoki (594111) writes "Skipping a good night's sleep can cause brain damage.

"Are you a truck driver or shift worker planning to catch up on some sleep this weekend? Cramming in extra hours of shut-eye may not make up for those lost pulling all-nighters, new research indicates. The damage may already be done — brain damage, that is, said neuroscientist Sigrid Veasey from the University of Pennsylvania.

The widely held idea that you can pay back a sizeable "sleep debt" with long naps later on seems to be a myth, she said in a study published this week in the Journal of Neuroscience.

Long-term sleep deprivation saps the brain of power even after days of recovery sleep, Veasey said. And that could be a sign of lasting brain injury.
"

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"We need more scientific mavericks"

coondoggie (973519) writes | about 8 months ago

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coondoggie (973519) writes "Gotta love this letter published in the guardian.com this week. It comes from a number of scientists throughout the world who are obviously frustrated with the barriers being thrown up around them — financial, antiquated procedures and techniques to name a few — and would like to see changes. When you speak of scientific mavericks, you might look directly at Improbable Research's annual Ig Nobel awards which recognize the arguably leading edge of maverick scientific work."
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Cloak 'anti-social' app helps you avoid your friends

MightyMait (787428) writes | about 8 months ago

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MightyMait (787428) writes "Not feeling particularly social today? Wishing to avoid running into an ex or an overly-friendly acquaintance? There's an app for that

Cloak uses public location data from other social networks, Foursquare and Instagram, to determine the locations of others you know. Users can choose to receive an alert when certain people are believed to be nearby. It is the latest in the recent trend of "anti-social", or secretive, apps.

"

Google Android Studio vs. Eclipse: Which Fits Your Needs?

Nerval's Lobster (2598977) writes | about 8 months ago

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Nerval's Lobster (2598977) writes "Google’s Android Studio is a development tool for Android based on the IntelliJ IDEA platform, one that managed to attract a lot of hype when it rolled out in mid-2013. Roughly a year later, the platform is still in “early access preview,” and work on it is ongoing. Eclipse, on the other hand, is the granddaddy of IDEs; although it doesn’t offer native Android support, it does have some nice tools to help you build Android applications—one such tool is the Google Plugin for Eclipse, made by Google. Developer and editor Jeff Cogswell compares Eclipse and its Google-made Google Plugin with Google’s own Android Studio, developed with the help of the people who make IntelliJ IDEA. His verdict? Eclipse is beginning to show its age, especially when it comes to Android development, while Android Studio offers some noted benefits. "Android Studio is still in preview mode, without an official release, even if that preview is in pretty fine shape—its status certainly shouldn’t prevent you from using it, at least in my opinion," he writes. Do you agree?"
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It was the worst industrial disaster in US history—and we learned nothing

superboj (3534991) writes | about 8 months ago

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superboj (3534991) writes "Forget Deepwater Horizon or Three Mile Island: The biggest industrial disaster in American history actually happened in 2008, when more than a billion gallons of coal sludge ran through the small town of Kingston Tennessee. This story details how, five years later, nothing has been done to stop it happening again, thanks to energy industry lobbying, federal inaction, and secrecy imposed on Congress."
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Your Car Will Soon Sense If You're Tired Or Not Paying Attention

cartechboy (2660665) writes | about 8 months ago

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cartechboy (2660665) writes "Distracted driving is a large issue, and it's getting worse as we become more entangled with our technology. To help combat this growing problem Volvo is showing off new technology that allows the car to sense when a driver is tired or not paying attention. The system bathes the driver in infrared light that can pick up the driver's position and eye movements. If the driver becomes inattentive or begins to drift off to sleep, it will alert you. Besides the safety aspect of this system, it will also be able to recognize the person sitting behind the wheel, allowing the car to tailor itself to that person's stored preferences. Further, it will be able to adjust the vehicle's exterior lighting in the direction the driver is looking based on the detected eye movement. Volvo's quick to note the system can't photograph the driver. People, the future is coming, and your vehicle is going to be watching you."

Band Earning Money From Spotify With Completely Silent Album

EwanPalmer (2536690) writes | about 8 months ago

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EwanPalmer (2536690) writes "Funk band Vulfpeck have released a fully silent album and are asking fans to stream it constantly in order to generate Spotify royalties.

The album, named Sleepify, has 10 tracks just over 30 seconds long — the required amount of listening time in which a song has to be streamed in order for it to have been registered as listened to by Spotify.

This means if someone was to leave it playing for around seven hours while they slept, they would earn Vulfpeck around $5.39. The band said the money earned from the album will go towards a tour in which each show has free admission."

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Oculus VR releases second devkit

Knutsi (959723) writes | about 8 months ago

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Knutsi (959723) writes "Oculus VR has just announced the second version of the virtual reality devkit that came out of their wildly popular Kickstarter campaign. "The second development kit features many of the key technical breakthroughs and core elements of the consumer Rift including a low-persistence, high-definition display and precise, low-latency positional head tracking". The kit is available for pre-order right now, and ships in July."

OpenSUSE 13.2 To Use Btrfs By Default

Anonymous Coward writes | about 8 months ago

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An anonymous reader writes "OpenSUSE has shared features coming to their 13.2 release in November. The big feature is using Btrfs by default instead of EXT4. OpenSUSE is committed to Btrfs and surprisingly they are the first to use it by default of major Linux distributions, but then again they were also big ReiserFS fans. Other planned OpenSUSE 13.2 features are Wayland 1.4, KDE Frameworks 5, and a new Qt5 front-end to YaST."

Strongest evidence yet of two distinct human cognitive systems

Maria_Celeste (2490696) writes | about 8 months ago

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Maria_Celeste (2490696) writes "New research appears to demonstrate that humans use two distinguishable systems to categorize the objects in their world. They've termed these systems explicit and implicit. Lead author J. David Smith, Ph.D. (University of Buffalo) explains the difference this way in Science Daily. When you select a cereal named 'Chocoholic' from the store shelf, consider why you are doing so. Is it a deliberate, explicit choice, or is it possibly an implicit-procedural chocolate reaction, one triggered by processes, memories and so on, of which you are generally unaware? The paper appears in the the journal Psychological Science."
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First ever coding world championships - Hello World Open 2014

shonkone (3583755) writes | about 8 months ago

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shonkone (3583755) writes "Top coders set to defend their country’s honor in the first World Championship.

This Spring, coding will be brought to the global spotlight in a context we might not be used to. The creative technology company Reaktor, together with the mobile game developer Supercell, will host the first ever Coding World Championships: Hello World Open 2014. About 10 000 teams of top coders are expected to compete.

The challenge of each team is to create an artificial intelligence — also known as a bot — to take part in a digital car racing game."

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Oculus Rift Developer Kit 2 Ready for Pre-order Today for $350

Anonymous Coward writes | about 8 months ago

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An anonymous reader writes "Today at GDC Oculus has revealed the second developer kit of their virtual reality headset, the Oculus Rift DK2 (http://bit.ly/1fHtuHf). The new unit has a 1080p OLED screen with low-persistence capabilities, positional tracking thanks to an IR LED array and compatible camera, and a bunch of other improvements over the DK1. Pre-orders start today for $350 (https://www.oculusvr.com/order/) and are expected to ship in July."
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Security Industry Incapable of Finding Firmware Attackers

BIOS4breakfast (3007409) writes | about 8 months ago

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BIOS4breakfast (3007409) writes "Research presented at CanSecWest has shown that despite the fact that we know that firmware attackers, in the form of the NSA, definitely exists, there is still a wide gap between the attackers' ability to infect firmware, and the industry's ability to detect their presence. The researchers from MITRE and Intel showed attacks on UEFI SecureBoot, the BIOS itself, and BIOS forensics software. Although they also released detection systems for supporting more research and for trustworthy BIOS capture, the real question is, when is this going to stop being the domain of research and when are security companies going to get serious about protecting against attacks at this level?"
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First Automatic Identification Of Flying Insects Allows Hi-Tech Bug Zapping

KentuckyFC (1144503) writes | about 8 months ago

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KentuckyFC (1144503) writes "Entomologists have never been able to identify flying insects automatically. But not through lack of trying. The obvious approach is to listen out for the frequency of the wing beat. But acoustic microphones aren't up to the job because sound intensity drops with the square of the distance, so flying insects quickly drop out of range. Now a group of researchers has solved this problem using a laser beam pointing at a photosensitive array. Any insect flying through the beam, casts a shadow of its beating wings that can easily be recorded at distances of several metres. Using this new device, the team has created a dataset of millions of wing beat recordings, more than all previous recordings put together. And they've used the dataset to train a Bayesian classifier algorithm to identify flying insects automatically for the first time. That opens the prospect of a new generation of bug zappers that kill only certain insects or just females rather than males. That could have a big impact on human health since mosquitoes and other flying insects kill millions of people each year. It could also help in agriculture where insects threaten billions of dollars worth of crops."

Full-Disclosure Email List Suspended Indefinitely

Anonymous Coward writes | about 8 months ago

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An anonymous reader writes "John Cartwright from Full-Disclosure sent out an email this morning. . . Hi When Len and I created the Full-Disclosure list way back in July 2002, we knew that we'd have our fair share of legal troubles along the way. We were right. To date we've had all sorts of requests to delete things, requests not to delete things, and a variety of legal threats both valid or otherwise. However, I always assumed that the turning point would be a sweeping request for large-scale deletion of information that some vendor or other had taken exception to. I never imagined that request might come from a researcher within the 'community' itself (and I use that word loosely in modern times). But today, having spent a fair amount of time dealing with complaints from a particular individual (who shall remain nameless) I realised that I'm done. The list has had its fair share of trolling, flooding, furry porn, fake exploits and DoS attacks over the years, but none of those things really affected the integrity of the list itself. However, taking a virtual hatchet to the list archives on the whim of an individual just doesn't feel right. That 'one of our own' would undermine the efforts of the last 12 years is really the straw that broke the camel's back. I'm not willing to fight this fight any longer. It's getting harder to operate an open forum in today's legal climate, let alone a security-related one. There is no honour amongst hackers any more. There is no real community. There is precious little skill. The entire security game is becoming more and more regulated. This is all a sign of things to come, and a reflection on the sad state of an industry that should never have become an industry. I'm suspending service indefinitely. Thanks for playing. Cheers — John"

TurboTax sells access to your data

rcharbon (123915) writes | about 8 months ago

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rcharbon (123915) writes "I had the apparently naive expectation that I’d retain some small scrap of privacy by using the TurboTax desktop app instead of the web version. However, their failure to keep a certificate revocation list up to date revealed that Intuit installs third-party cookies from Neustar, an ad service that “provides audience insights that increase online advertising relevancy through the power of verified offline consumer data.”"
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Google Public DNS Hijacked for 22 Minutes in South America

retroworks (652802) writes | about 8 months ago

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retroworks (652802) writes "Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols of ZDNet reports:

"Without the Domain Name System (DNS), we're all lost on the Internet. DNS provides the service that translates our human readable Web addresses such as google.com to their real, but mysterious Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4) addresses, such as 8.8.8.8 or IPv6's 2001:4860:4860::8888. The problem with this master yellow pages directory to the Internet is that DNS records themselves can be corrupted or your communications with the DNS servers interrupted by a man-in-the-middle (MiM) attack. "

While it's only 22 minutes, and apparently only affected internet users in Brazil and Venezuela, the repercussions of DNS hijacking could be huge for online commerce. Since many of these attacks in the past have originated in Eastern Europe, should we all be on guard now that Russia has been sabre-rattling? How likely is this to occur in California-based Google servers? For reaction on Twitter, visit here https://twitter.com/bgpmon/sta..."

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World Bank flies drones in Albania

garymortimer (1882326) writes | about 8 months ago

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garymortimer (1882326) writes "A team from the World Bank used small unmanned aerial systems (sUAS) to pioneer a scalable, cost-effective approach to produce spatial data, thereby allowing local and national government, the private sector and international development projects to use the up-to-date and accurate data for multiple purposes. The initial field campaign was conducted in Albania in December, 2013"
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