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WPA2 wireless security cracked

Anonymous Coward writes | about 4 months ago

0

An anonymous reader writes "Achilleas Tsitroulis of Brunel University, UK, Dimitris Lampoudis of the University of Macedonia, Greece and Emmanuel Tsekleves of Lancaster University, UK, have investigated the vulnerabilities in WPA2 and present its weakness. They say that this wireless security system might now be breached with relative ease by a malicious attack on a network. They suggest that it is now a matter of urgency that security experts and programmers work together to remove the vulnerabilities in WPA2 in order to bolster its security or to develop alternative protocols to keep our wireless networks safe from hackers and malware.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2014-03-w..."

Inside NSA's Efforts to Hunt Sysadmins

Anonymous Coward writes | about 4 months ago

0

An anonymous reader writes "The Snowden revelations continue today with The Intercept releasing an NSA document titled “I hunt sys admins” (PDF on Cryptome). The document details techniques used by the NSA to break into systems administrators' computers in order to gain access to the networks they control. The Intercept has a detailed analysis of the leaked document."
Link to Original Source

Another State Legislature Targets Tesla

nightcats (1114677) writes | about 4 months ago

0

nightcats (1114677) writes "New York joins the growing list of state legislatures aiming to shut down or at least restrict Tesla's business model:

The bill, which would restrict Tesla's ability to sell cars directly to consumers, moved out of the Assembly Codes Committee on Wednesday, one of several necessary steps on its way to a full vote.

Most of this legislation is driven by lobbying from traditional auto dealers working aggressively to protect their business model against an innovative but threatening incursion. Those dealers claim to have the full support of the Cuomo administration. For those keeping score, NY joins Texas and New Jersey in its efforts to keep product that is good for the environment as far away from consumers as possible."

Google Boosts Security of Gmail Infrastructure

wiredmikey (1824622) writes | about 4 months ago

0

wiredmikey (1824622) writes "Google announced on Thursday that its Gmail service would use added encryption to protect against eavesdropping and keep messages secure. "Starting today, Gmail will always use an encrypted HTTPS connection when you check or send email,” Gmail security engineering lead, Nicolas Lidzborski, wrote in a blog post.

Lidzborski said that 100 percent of email messages that Gmail users send or receive are encrypted while moving internally. “This ensures that your messages are safe not only when they move between you and Gmail's servers, but also as they move between Google's data centers—something we made a top priority after last summer’s revelations,” he said.

Joseph Hall, chief technologist at the Center for Democracy and Technology, told AFP that Google's encryption "would make it very difficult" for the NSA or others to tap into email traffic directly. "I'm reluctant to say anything is NSA-proof," Hall said. "But I think what Google is trying to do is make sure they come through the front door and not the back door."

In December, Microsoft said it would “pursue a comprehensive engineering effort to strengthen the encryption of customer data” in order to protect its customers from prying eyes and increase transparency."

Link to Original Source

Symantec Fires CEO Steve Bennett

wiredmikey (1824622) writes | about 4 months ago

0

wiredmikey (1824622) writes "Symantec on Thursday announced that CEO Steve Bennett was terminated by the security company and has been replaced by Michael Brown as interim president and CEO. Bennett, who also resigned from Symantec's board of directors, took the top position at Symantec in July 2012, after former president and CEO Enrique Salem was pushed out by the Board of Directors.

In April 2013, Bennett, told attendees at its own Vision Conference, that the company was changing, and acknowledged that Symantec “lacked strategy” when it came to dealing with acquisitions. His plan was to move the company forward slowly, but consistently and make Symantec easier to do business with. That strategy, or at least the execution of it, hasn't impressed the board of directors, it seems."

Link to Original Source

NASA launches third annual "codeathon" with a new costal flooding challenge

Anonymous Coward writes | about 4 months ago

0

An anonymous reader writes "NASA announced its third annual International Space Apps Challenge, that calls for software and hardware developers to to build mobile applications, software, hardware, data visualization and platform solutions that could help improve life on Earth and contribute to space exploration missions, is adding a new challenge focused on coastal flooding. The reason for this challenge is to help people understand the dangers of inundation. “Solutions developed through this challenge could have many potential impacts,” said Ellen Stofan, chief scientist at NASA. "This includes helping coastal businesses determine whether they are currently at risk from coastal inundation, and whether they will be impacted in the future by sea level rise and coastal erosion.""
Link to Original Source

Firefox 29 Beta Arrives With Mozilla's Major User Interface Overhaul Australis

Anonymous Coward writes | about 4 months ago

0

An anonymous reader writes "Following the release of Firefox 28 just two days ago, Mozilla today updated its Firefox Beta channel to version 29 for Windows, Mac, Linux, and Android. This is a massive release: Firefox Sync has been revamped and is now powered by Firefox Accounts, there’s a new customization mode, and a href="http://people.mozilla.org/~shorlander/mockups-interactive/australis-interactive-mockups/windows8.html">the major user interface overhaul Australis has finally arrived. Release notes are here: Desktop and Android."

A New Killer Virus in China?

sciencehabit (1205606) writes | about 4 months ago

0

sciencehabit (1205606) writes "In June 2012, three men removing slag from a derelict copper mine in southwestern China fell ill with severe pneumonia and died. Six months later, researchers went spelunking in the mine—an artificial cave hewn from a hillside—in search of pathogens. After taking anal swabs from bats, rats, and musk shrews living in the cave, the team has discovered what it says is a new virus that may have felled the workers."
Link to Original Source

How did Bill Nye become the Science Guy?

Anonymous Coward writes | about 4 months ago

0

An anonymous reader writes "Whether he's debating creationists, taking selfies with President Obama, or "Dancing with the Stars," Bill Nye the Science Guy is no stranger to the spotlight. But what about the man behind the public persona? How did Bill Nye become the Science Guy? Bill Nye has made his debut on the PBS series, The Secret Life of Scientists and Engineers, to reveal the story of how he rose from being a young comedian from Seattle to becoming a science icon. In his profile, Bill Nye talks about his early days impersonating Steve Martin, why bow-ties are important in the lab (and with the ladies), and how Carl Sagan's advice helped to shape his hit television show."
Link to Original Source

DirectX 12 promises lower-level hardware access on multiple platforms

crookedvulture (1866146) writes | about 4 months ago

0

crookedvulture (1866146) writes "Microsoft formally introduced its DirectX 12 API at the Game Developers Conference this morning. This next-gen programming interface will extend across multiple platforms, from PCs to consoles to mobile devices. Like AMD's Mantle API, it promises reduced CPU overhead and lower-level access to graphics hardware. But DirectX 12 won't be limited to one vendor's hardware. Intel, AMD, Nvidia, and Qualcomm have all pledged to support the API, which will apparently work on a lot of existing systems. Intel's Haswell CPUs are compatible with DirectX 12, as are multiple generations of existing AMD and Nvidia GPUs. A DirectX 12 update is also coming to the Xbox One. The first games to support the API won't arrive until the holiday season of 2015, though. A preview release is scheduled for this year."

Airborne Iron May Have Helped Cause Past Ice Ages

sciencehabit (1205606) writes | about 4 months ago

0

sciencehabit (1205606) writes "Scientists have found that iron-rich dust floating on the wind fell into the sea at multiple times during Earth's history, sparking various ice ages. The iron nourished marine organisms that suck carbon dioxide from the air. Over time, so much of this greenhouse gas disappeared from the atmosphere that the planet began to cool--in some cases, causing an ice age."
Link to Original Source

Missing Plane Would Have Been Found By Now If Communications Box Had $10 Upgrade

concertina226 (2447056) writes | about 4 months ago

1

concertina226 (2447056) writes "The missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 might have been found by now if a small communications box on the plane had been configured to send out more frequent reports, according to British satellite communications firm Inmarsat.

Critics of the aerospace industry are now calling out its "outdated" accident investigation process and asking for data from the black box to be streamed in-flight to the cloud, which could be expensive, but Inmarsat's Senior VP Chris McLaughlin says that the plane could have been found by now if the communications box buried in the plane's avionics had been configured to send out more frequent reports.

"What we have at the moment would have been fine if the airlines had been mandated to provide data on all their flights. The only area where data is mandated is on the transatlantic route, which is so busy that everyone needs to know where all the other planes are," he said. "We may never know what happened to the plane because the cockpit is not mandated to be monitored in other areas, and we urge regulators to look into this.""

Link to Original Source

College Grads Create Fake Tesla Commercial That Elon Musk Loves

cartechboy (2660665) writes | about 4 months ago

0

cartechboy (2660665) writes "Two University of Southern California grads were looking to start a digital content company so they decided to roll the dice and create a home-made (but incredibly professional looking) television commercial for Tesla — just to see if they could get some attention for it. Well, apparently, mission accomplished. R.J. Collins and James Khabushani took $1,500 and created a 60-second Tesla "faux-mercial" dubbed "Modern Spaceship" that is well, pretty good. Elon Musk noticed, tweeted it and has helped the thing go viral. Makes you wonder why TV commercials cost so much to make when these guys created this for a fraction of what it would normally take."

Gmail Goes HTTPS Only For All Connections

Trailrunner7 (1100399) writes | about 4 months ago

0

Trailrunner7 (1100399) writes "Perhaps no company has been as vocal with its feelings about the revelations about the NSA’s collection methods as Google has, and the company has been making a series of changes to its infrastructure in recent months to make it more difficult for adversaries to snoop on users’ sessions. The biggest of those changes landed Thursday when the company switched its Gmail service to HTTPS only, enforcing SSL encryption on all Gmail connections.

The change is a significant one, especially given the fact that Google also has encrypted all of the links between its data centers. Those two modifications mean that Gmail messages are encrypted from the time they leave a user’s machine to the time they leave Google’s infrastructure. This makes life much more difficult for anyone–including the NSA–who is trying to snoop on those Gmail sessions."

Nate Silver's new site stirs climate controversy

taiwanjohn (103839) writes | about 4 months ago

0

taiwanjohn (103839) writes "One of the first articles on Nate Silver’s highly anticipated data-driven news site used flawed data to make its conclusions, according to some of the nation’s top climate scientists.
Silver’s FiveThirtyEight published its first article about climate change on Wednesday, entitled “Disasters Cost More Than Ever — But Not Because of Climate Change.” But climate scientists are condemning the article and its author, Roger Pielke Jr., saying he ignored critical data to produce a “deeply misleading” result.
The crux of Pielke’s article is this: Extreme weather events are costing us more and more money, but that is not because climate change is making extreme weather more frequent or intense. The reason we are losing more money, rather, is because we have more money to lose. Pielke came to this conclusion by measuring rising disaster damage costs alongside the rising global Gross Domestic Product. He also cited a U.N. climate report, along with his own research, to assert that extreme weather events have not been increasing in frequency or intensity."

One Laptop Per Child Project Has Achieved Its Goals, CEO Says

waderoush (1271548) writes | about 4 months ago

0

waderoush (1271548) writes "A blog post at OLPC News last week went viral with the claim that the nine-year-old One Laptop Per Child project, the effort founded by MIT Media Lab Founder to distribute inexpensive laptops to millions of children in poor nations, is dead. Media outlets quickly controverted the assertion, but the response from the OLPC Association itself was brief, saying that its mission is ‘far from over’ and citing ongoing projects to distribute laptops in Central America. In a more lengthy Q&A this week, OLPC chairman and CEO Rodrigo Arboleda says the organization has achieved many of its goals, including demonstrating the value of the ‘Constructionist’ 1:1 learning philosophy originally espoused by Negroponte. With 2.5 million laptops distributed so far, the OLPC vision is ‘on track to being fully realized,’ Arboleda says. He sees ‘commercial greed’ and a ‘status-quo mentality’ within ministries of education and teachers’ unions as the main hurdles holding back faster progress."
Link to Original Source

One Billion Android Devices Open to Privilege Escalation

msm1267 (2804139) writes | about 4 months ago

0

msm1267 (2804139) writes "The first deep look into the security of the Android patch installation process, specifically its Package Management Service (PMS), has revealed a weakness that puts potentially every Android device at risk for privilege escalation attacks.

Researchers from Indiana University and Microsoft published a paper that describes a new set of Android vulnerabilities they call Pileup flaws, and also introduces a new scanner called SecUP that detects malicious apps already on a device lying in wait for elevated privileges.
The vulnerability occurs in the way PMS handles updates to the myriad flavors of Android in circulation today. The researchers say PMS improperly vets apps on lower versions of Android that request OS or app privileges that may not exist on the older Android version, but are granted automatically once the system is updated.

The researchers said they found a half-dozen different Pileup flaws within Android’s Package Management Service, and confirmed those vulnerabilities are present in all Android Open Source Project versions and more than 3,500 customized versions of Android developed by handset makers and carriers; more than one billion Android devices are likely impacted, they said."

Link to Original Source

Mathematician Teaches How to Win $1 Billion on NCAA Basketball

Hugh Pickens DOT Com (2995471) writes | about 4 months ago

0

Hugh Pickens DOT Com (2995471) writes "Jake Simpson reports at The Atlantic that Mathematician Tim Chartier, a Davidson College professor who specializes in ranking methods, teaches a math-heavy form of bracketology — the science of predicting the annual NCAA college basketball tournament at Davidson College in North Carolina. Chartier’s academic research is in ranking methods where he looks at things like the page-ranking algorithms of Google. "In 2009, my collaborator Amy Langville said: “You know what? ESPN has this huge online bracket tournament. Let’s create brackets with our ranking methods, just to see if it’s creating meaningful information.” Chartier’s formula, an evolving code-based matrix that ranks each of the 68 tournament teams, has helped several Davidson students score in the 96th percentile (or higher) in ESPN’s bracket challenge and this year, Chartier’s goal is to help someone win the $1 billion prize offered by Warren Buffett to anyone who correctly predicts all 63 games of the men’s tournament. Chartier uses two methods. One is the Colley Method, named after astrophysicist Wesley Colley who developed a method used by the BCS for college football (PDF). His basketball method only counts wins and losses, not margin of victory. The other method is the Massey method created by sports statistician Kenneth Massey (PDF), which does integrate scores. Chartier has not been banned from any office pools — at least none that he knows of. But as a result of coming pretty darn close to filling out a perfect bracket just by crunching the numbers, brackets have become a labor of love. "Now that the brackets are actually out, I've had students in and out of my office all week, sharing new ideas," says Chartier. "For me, that's more fun than filling out a bracket. They will all be filling out brackets, so it's like I'm doing parallel processing. I know what might work, but watching them figure out the odds, is a thrill.""

Spinoffs from Spyland: How Some NSA Technology Is Making Its Way Into Industry

Anonymous Coward writes | about 4 months ago

0

An anonymous reader writes "MIT Technology Review reports, "Like other federal agencies, the NSA is compelled by law to try to commercialize its R&D. It employs patent attorneys and has a marketing department that is now trying to license inventions ... The agency claims more than 170 patents ... But the NSA has faced severe challenges trying to keep up with rapidly changing technology. ... Most recently, the NSA’s revamp included a sweeping effort to dismantle ... “stovepipes,” and switch to flexible cloud computing ... in 2008, NSA brass ordered the agency’s computer and information sciences research organization to create a version of the system Google uses to store its index of the Web and the raw images of Google Earth. That team was led by Adam Fuchs, now Sqrrl’s chief technology officer. Its twist on big data was to add “cell-level security,” a way of requiring a passcode for each data point ... that’s how software (like the infamous PRISM application) knows what can be shown only to people with top-secret clearance. Similar features could control access to data about U.S. citizens. “A lot of the technology we put [in] is to protect rights,” says Fuchs. Like other big-data projects, the NSA team’s system, called Accumulo, was built on top of open-source code because “you don’t want to have to replicate everything yourself,” ... In 2011, the NSA released 200,000 lines of code to the Apache Foundation. When Atlas Venture’s Lynch read about that, he jumped—here was a technology already developed, proven to work on tens of terabytes of data, and with security features sorely needed by heavily regulated health-care and banking customers. ... Eventually, Fuchs and several others left the NSA, and now their company is part of a land grab in big data ...""
Link to Original Source

Earth Barely Dodged Solar Blast in 2012

Rambo Tribble (1273454) writes | about 4 months ago

0

Rambo Tribble (1273454) writes "Coronal mass ejections, with severity comparable to the 1859 Carrington event, missed Earth by only 9 days, in 2012, according to researchers. The Carrington event caused widespread damage to the telegraph system in the U. S., and a similar occurrence would be devastating to modern electronics, it is thought. NASA's STEREO A spacecraft is responsible for detecting the event. From the Reuters article, 'Had it hit Earth, it probably would have been like the big one in 1859, but the effect today, with our modern technologies, would have been tremendous.' The potential global cost for such damage is pegged at $2.6 trillion."

Russian civil law changed by Wikimedia

Anonymous Coward writes | about 4 months ago

0

An anonymous reader writes "Changes to the russian civil code, which include the recognition of open licenses, or the right for libraries to generate digital copies of certain works, were now signed by the russian president and come into force on October 1st. According to Wikimedia-RU member Linar Khalitov, 'these changes are a result of a lot of hard work on behalf of Wikimedia-RU [...] – proposing, discussing and defending amendments to the Code.'"
Link to Original Source

Pine Tree is Largest Genome Ever Sequenced

sciencehabit (1205606) writes | about 4 months ago

0

sciencehabit (1205606) writes "Using a single pollinated pine seed, researchers have sequenced the entire genome of the loblolly pine tree--and it's a doozy. The tree's genome is largest ver sequenced: 22.18 billion base pairs, more than seven times longer than the human genome. The team found that 82% of the genome was made up of duplicated segments, compared with just 25% in humans. The researchers also identified genes responsible for important traits such as disease resistance, wood formation, and stress response."
Link to Original Source

Could Earth's Infrared Emissions be a New Renewable Energy Source?

Zothecula (1870348) writes | about 4 months ago

0

Zothecula (1870348) writes "Could it one day be possible to generate electricity from the loss of heat from Earth to outer space? A group of Harvard engineers believe so and have theorized something of a reverse photovoltaic cell to do just this. The key is using the flow of energy away from our planet to generate voltage, rather than using incoming energy as in existing solar technologies."
Link to Original Source

Fruit Flies are Better Than You at Calculus

DudeTheMath (522264) writes | about 4 months ago

0

DudeTheMath (522264) writes "Cornell University scientists studied how fruit flies respond to flight disturbances (instead of wind gusts, they used carefully controlled magnetic pulses) and found that the flies recover in as little as three wing beats (at 250 per second) by doing some kind of calculus in a little "integrated circuit" of neurons that control the wings directly. The pitch and yaw results are already published, and the roll study is forthcoming. (NYT, partial paywall, autoplay of fly that starts with a car ad.)"

Algorithm Composes Music By Text Analysing The World's Best Novels

KentuckyFC (1144503) writes | about 4 months ago

0

KentuckyFC (1144503) writes "The recent development of vast databases that link words to the emotions they conjure up is changing the way researchers study text. Sentiment analysis, for example, is increasingly used to gauge the mood of society on topics ranging from politics to movies. Now researchers have used the same technique to measure the "emotional temperature" throughout a novel and then to automatically compose music that reflects the content. The key advance in this work is the development of rules that map the emotional changes into musical qualities such as tempo, key pitch and so on. The team has fed a number of well known books through the algorithm, which they call TransProse. These include lighter texts such as Peter Pan and much darker novels such as The Road and Heart of Darkness. And the music isn't bad (to my untrained ear). The teams say the new algorithm could lead to audio-visual e-books that generate music that reflects the mood on open pages. And it may even be possible to use the algorithm in reverse to recommend known songs that reflect the mood in a book."
Link to Original Source

Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370: Black Box Data 'Should be Uploaded to the Cloud'

concertina226 (2447056) writes | about 4 months ago

0

concertina226 (2447056) writes "The continued hunt for missing Malaysian Airlines flight MH370 has prompted calls for black box data to be streamed in-flight and uploaded to the cloud to speed up the rescue and accident investigation process.

Air France Flight 447 crashed into the Atlantic Ocean in 2009, killing all 228 people onboard. Although some major wreckage was removed from the sea within five days of the crash, it took another two years and €32m for the black boxes to be recovered from the ocean floor.

"There's a tombstone mentality at times. You actually have to have a very tragic event to get things done. I predict that this is one of those events," said Bob Benzon, a former US Air Force pilot and NTSB investigator. He said it would cost billions of dollars to fit out every single plane in the world with flight data real-time streaming capabilities."

Link to Original Source

Engine Braking Causes Remarkable Nanoparticle Pollution

jones_supa (887896) writes | about 4 months ago

0

jones_supa (887896) writes "Researchers at Tampere University of Technology, Finland have been surprised of their finding about engine braking creating significant amounts of toxic nanoparticles (Google translation). 'Traffic exhaust fumes carrying nanoparticles are distributed all around where people go. Whether we are indoors or outdoors, there is an exposure to them. According to current knowledge, nanoparticles are the biggest health concern in our environment', tells associate professor Topi Rönkkö from the aerosol physics laboratory. The metal-based particles are released when gasoline injection is stopped during driving when performing engine braking. When they analyzed a heavy diesel engine vehicle rolling downhill with the foot lifted from the gas pedal, the amount of generated toxic particles shot through the roof, even though previous research claims otherwise. This was a surprise also to car manufacturers and oil companies. After the finding, Rönkkö himself cringes driving especially behind large trucks and recommends keeping a good safe distance."

Ex-Microsoft Employee Arrested for Leaking Windows 8

SmartAboutThings (1951032) writes | about 4 months ago

0

SmartAboutThings (1951032) writes "Alex Kibkalo, a former Microsoft employee has been arrested yesterday for stealing and leaking company secrets. The former software architecture engineer is accused of leaking early Windows 8 builds to a French tech blogger with whom he was communicating inside a forum. The ex-Microsoft employee also stands accused of leaking some Windows 7 program files and also an internal system meant to protect against software piracy. Kibkalo is said to have leaked the Windows 8 code in the middle of 2012 because he was angry over a poor performance review."

musl libc hits 1.0 milestone

dalias (1978986) writes | about 4 months ago

3

dalias (1978986) writes "The musl libc project has released version 1.0, the result of three years of development and testing. Musl is a lightweight, fast, simple, MIT-licensed, correctness-oriented alternative to the GNU C library (glibc), uClibc, or Android's Bionic. At this point musl provides all mandatory C99 and POSIX interfaces (plus a lot of widely-used extensions), and well over 5000 packages are known to build successfully against musl.

Several options are available for trying musl. Compiler toolchains are available from the musl-cross project, and several new musl-based Linux distributions are already available (Sabotage and Snowflake, among others). Some well-established distributions including OpenWRT and Gentoo are in the process of adding musl-based variants, and others (Aboriginal, Alpine, Bedrock, Dragora) are adopting musl as their default libc."

Microsoftie arrested for leaking secrets ..

Anonymous Coward writes | about 4 months ago

0

An anonymous reader writes "an ex-Microsoft employee .. allegedly leaked info to a French tech blogger for something akin to revenge — he was apparently angry over receiving a poor performance review when he was still with Microsoft ..

If you're wondering how exactly the accused got caught, it's because .. investigators looked through the blogger's Hotmail account and instant messenger, where they found incriminating emails and chat logs ..."

Link to Original Source

France bans GM maize ..

Anonymous Coward writes | about 4 months ago

0

An anonymous reader writes "France's agriculture ministry on Saturday banned the sale, use and cultivation of Monsanto's MON 810 genetically modified maize, the only variety currently authorised in the European Union .."
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