Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Ars Technica and Cisco Provide Another Example of Bad Security Reporting

wjcofkc (964165) writes | about 7 months ago

0

wjcofkc (964165) writes "It was recently reported by Cisco, Ars Technica, and reported on Slashdot that Linux based web servers running the 2.6 series were being attacked and infected with Javascript intended to allow attackers to serve up a variety of malicious content to the visitor. White Fir Design begs to differ, pointing out that the websites are not even all running Linux, much less the Linux 2.6 Kernel."

Getting misogyny, racism and homophobia out of gaming

Anonymous Coward writes | about 7 months ago

0

An anonymous reader writes "One theme central to several talks at this week's Game Developers Conference has been how to deal with the abuse generated by a small segment of gamers. BioWare's Manveer Heir says he wants the industry to stop being scared of challenging the most outspoken and vituperative members of the gaming community. His GDC talk focused on 'misogyny, sexism, racism, ethnocentrism, nationalism, ageism, ableism, homophobia, transphobia, queerphobia and other types of social injustice.' He said, 'We should use the ability of our medium to show players the issues first-hand, or give them a unique understanding of the issues and complexities by crafting game mechanics along with narrative components that result in dynamics of play that create meaning for the player in ways that other media isn't capable of.' Meanwhile, Adam Orth, who became the center of of an internet hatestorm last year after an offhand comment about the Xbox One's always-online DRM, said game developers should make an effort to encourage their playerbase to behave in a more civilized manner."
Link to Original Source

Oppo's New Phone Is the Most Technology-Packed Smartphone Ever

itwbennett (1594911) writes | about 7 months ago

0

itwbennett (1594911) writes "Oppo Electronics has taken off the wraps on its first LTE phone, and it packs more technology than most if not all laptops. The Find 7 is a 5.5" phone and is the first to support 2560 x 1440 resolution (by comparison, the Samsung Galaxy S5 has 441 PPI). 'Another striking and unique feature of the phone is its 2.5GHz quad-core Qualcomm Snapdragon 801 processor,' writes blogger Andy Patrizio. 'This is Qualcomm's first chip to feature its Gobi True 4G LTE World Mode, supporting LTE FDD, LTE TDD, WCDMA, CDMA1x, EV-DO, TD-SCDMA and GSM4. Translation: this phone will work on LTE all over the world.'"
Link to Original Source

New Information Narrows Missing Airliner's Flight Path

mdsolar (1045926) writes | about 7 months ago

1

mdsolar (1045926) writes ""In a case that is swirling with uncertainties, a few pieces of evidence have stood apart for seeming reliability. Among them was the revelation last Saturday by Malaysia Prime Minister Najib Razak that his country’s investigators, in collaboration with U.S. authorities, had analyzed an electronic ping that MH370 had broadcast to the Inmarsat satellite at 8:11 a.m. on the morning of the disappearance. Based on this data, the investigators had determined that at that moment MH370 must have been somewhere along one of two broad arcs: one which passed through Central Asia, and the other of which covered a swath of largely empty Indian Ocean, far to the south.

The revelation left a burning question unresolved: what about the six earlier pings, which had been exchanged between the aircraft and the satellite about once per hour? Could any position data be deduced from them?

Today, Inmarsat revealed some crucial information. “The ping timings got longer,” Inmarsat spokesman Chris McLaughlin stated via email. That is to say, at each stage of its journey, the aircraft got progressively farther away from the geostationary satellite’s position, located over a spot on the equator south of Pakistan, and never changed its heading in a direction that took it closer—at least for very long.""

Link to Original Source

More on the Disposable Tech Worker

Jim_Austin (1073454) writes | about 7 months ago

1

Jim_Austin (1073454) writes "At a press conference this week, in response to a question by a Science Careers reporter, Scott Corley, the Executive Director of immigration-reform group Compete America, argued that retraining workers doesn't make sense for IT companies. For the company, he argued, H-1B guest workers are a much better choice. "It's not easy to retrain people," Corley said. "The further you get away from your education the less knowledge you have of the new technologies, and technology is always moving forward.""
Link to Original Source

Spacecraft Returns Seven Particles From Birth of the Solar System

sciencehabit (1205606) writes | about 7 months ago

0

sciencehabit (1205606) writes "After a massive, years-long search, researchers have recovered seven interstellar dust particles returned to Earth by the Stardust spacecraft. The whole sample weighs just a few trillionths of a gram, but it’s the first time scientists have laid their hands on primordial material unaltered by the violent birth of the solar system.

Once the sample panel was back on Earth, the problem quickly became finding any collected particles embedded in the aerogel. Out of desperation, Stardust team members called on 30,714 members of the general public. The “dusters” of the Stardust@home project volunteered to examine microscopic images taken down through the aerogel. They used the world’s best pattern-recognition system—the human eye and brain—to pick out the telltale tracks left by speeding particles."

Link to Original Source

The Net routes around censorship in Turkey

lpress (707742) writes | about 7 months ago

1

lpress (707742) writes "Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan, who has been embarrassed by social media showing corruption, vowed yesterday to "eradicate Twitter." He followed through by cutting off access, but users soon found work-arounds like posting by email and using VPNs. The hashtag #TwitterOlmadanYaayamam (I can't live without Twitter) quickly rose to the top of Twitter's worldwide trending topics."
Link to Original Source

The Newest Organized Labor Group: Start-up Employees

Anonymous Coward writes | about 7 months ago

0

An anonymous reader writes "Last Friday may turn out to have marked the beginning of Silicon Valley's organized labor movement--startup employees met in Palo Alto "to share war stories and to start developing what organizers called a 'Startup Employee Equity Bill of Rights'"."
Link to Original Source

The Surprising Origin Of The Big Bang Theory

Anonymous Coward writes | about 7 months ago

1

An anonymous reader writes "Public radio's WGBH News reports, "Between the announcement this week that scientists have detected primordial gravitation waves and FOX's reboot of Carl Sagan's groundbreaking series, "Cosmos", the Big Bang theory is enjoying its biggest moment since it banged the observable universe into existence 13.8 billion years ago. While the Big Bang is as old as the universe itself, our concept of it is still strikingly new — less than 100 years old. And if you dig into its origins, you come across a curious fact. ... The Big Bang theory was first proposed by a Roman Catholic priest. It wasn't just any priest. It was Monseigneur George Lemaître, a brilliant Belgian who entered the priesthood following his service as an artillery officer in the Belgian army during World War I. He was also an accomplished astronomer and a talented mathematician and physician. After earning his graduate degree in astronomy from the University of Cambridge in England, he came to Boston and spent a year at the Harvard College Observatory before earning his doctorate at MIT. ... At a conference in the 1930s, where Lemaître presented his theory, Einstein reportedly remarked, "This is the most beautiful and satisfactory explanation of creation to which I have ever listened."""
Link to Original Source

Docker Turns 1: What is the Future for Open Source Container Tech?

darthcamaro (735685) writes | about 7 months ago

0

darthcamaro (735685) writes "Docker has become one of the most hyped open-source projects in recent years, making it hard to believe the project only started one year ago. In that one year, Docker has now gained the support of Red Hat and other major Linux vendors. What does the future hold for Docker? Will it overtake other forms of virtualization or will it just be a curiosity?"
Link to Original Source

Fluke Donates Real Multimeters to SparkFun as goodwill gesture

Actually, I do RTFA (1058596) writes | about 7 months ago

0

Actually, I do RTFA (1058596) writes "We recently heard about the confiscation of a delivery of multimeters to SparkFun for infringing on Fluke's trademark. One common thread in the discussions was the theme that Fluke should have let that shipment through ("lawyers" argued about the legal ramifications of it) as a goodwill gesture to SparkFun and the Maker community. Well, Fluke did one better. They announced they were sending more than $30k worth of official multimeters to SparkFun for them to do whatever they want with.

SparkFun is most likely going to give them away.

A great example of win-win-win?"

Link to Original Source

Linux may succeed Windows XP as OS of choice for ATMs

Dega704 (1454673) writes | about 7 months ago

0

Dega704 (1454673) writes "Some financial services companies are looking to migrate their ATM fleets from Windows to Linux in a bid to have better control over hardware and software upgrade cycles.

Pushing them in that direction apparently is Microsoft's decision to end support for Windows XP on April 8, said David Tente, executive director, USA, of the ATM Industry Association (ATMIA).

"There is some heartburn in the industry" over Microsoft's end-of-support decision, Tente said.

ATM operators would like to be able to synchronize their hardware and software upgrade cycles. But that's hard to do with Microsoft dictating the software upgrade timetable. As a result, "some are looking at the possibility of using a non-Microsoft operating system to synch up their hardware and software upgrades," Tente said."

Link to Original Source

Wireless carriers in huge Washington lobby fight over spectrum auction

techpolicy (3586897) writes | about 7 months ago

0

techpolicy (3586897) writes "The big four wireless carriers are spending millions of dollars to hire professors, fund Washington think tanks and to meet with the Federal Communications Commission to try to convince the agency to write rules for an upcoming auction of spectrum that favor them, according to an article posted by the Center for Public Integrity in Washington. The frequencies are needed to bolster or build out their nationwide networks — and this kind of low-band spectrum won't be up for sale for a very long time. The biggest fight is over a rule that would limit how much AT&T and Verizon can get of these valuable frequencies. How it plays out will determine who has control over your smartphone."
Link to Original Source

Goodyear's New State-of-the-Art Airship Makes its First Flight

Zothecula (1870348) writes | about 7 months ago

0

Zothecula (1870348) writes "The Goodyear blimp may have been flying around for almost 90 years, but it still manages to turn heads. On Friday, there was another reason to look beyond nostalgia for the days of the great airships of old as Goodyear unveiled its new state-of-the-art blimp to the media, Goodyear associates and dealers at its Wingfoot Lake hangar in Suffield, Ohio. Built in partnership with the Zeppelin company, the new craft that replaces the 45-year old GZ-20 blimp fleet is not only larger and faster, it isn’t even a blimp, but a semi-rigid airship."
Link to Original Source

Navy database tracks civilians' parking tickets, fender-benders

schwit1 (797399) writes | about 7 months ago

1

schwit1 (797399) writes "A parking ticket, traffic citation or involvement in a minor fender-bender are enough to get a person's name and other personal information logged into a massive, obscure federal database run by the U.S. military.

The Law Enforcement Information Exchange, or LinX, has already amassed 506.3 million law enforcement records ranging from criminal histories and arrest reports to field information cards filled out by cops on the beat even when no crime has occurred."

Link to Original Source

MtGox finds 200,000 BTC in old wallet.

thesandbender (911391) writes | about 7 months ago

0

thesandbender (911391) writes "Today has news that BTC "found" 200,000 BTC coin a "forgotten" wallet that they thought they was empty. The value of the coins is estimated to be $116 million USD, which happens to cover their $64 million USD in outstanding debts nicely and might offer them the chance to emerge from bankruptcy. There is no explanation, yet, of why the sneaky thieves that "stole" the bit coins used a MtGox wallet to hide them."

Google's Project Tango Headed To International Space Station

itwbennett (1594911) writes | about 7 months ago

0

itwbennett (1594911) writes "A pair of Google's Project Tango phones, the prototype smartphone packed with sensors so it can learn and sense the world around it, is heading to the International Space Station on the upcoming Orbital 2 mission where they will be used to help develop autonomous flying robots. Work on the robots is already going on at NASA's Ames Research Center in Silicon Valley, and this week the space agency let a small group of reporters visit its lab and see some of the research (video here)."
Link to Original Source

Speedy attack targets Web servers with outdated Linux kernels

alphadogg (971356) writes | about 7 months ago

0

alphadogg (971356) writes "Web servers running a long-outdated version of the Linux kernel were attacked with dramatic speed over two days last week, according to Cisco Systems. All the affected servers were running the 2.6 version, first released in December 2003. "When attackers discover a vulnerability in the system, they can exploit it at their whim without fear of it being remedied," Cisco said. After the Web server has been compromised, the attackers slip in a line of JavaScript to other JavaScript files within the website. That code bounces the website's visitors to a second compromised host. "The two-stage process allows attackers to serve up a variety of malicious content to the visitor," according to Cisco. http://blogs.cisco.com/securit..."
Link to Original Source

Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?