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FCC Looking Into Paid Peering Deals

Anonymous Coward writes | about 6 months ago

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An anonymous reader writes "The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) announced on Friday that it has successfully obtained the details regarding paid peering deals between Netflix and Comcast as well as Verizon and is working to obtain similar information for other video streamers and their respective ISP peers. The FCC's goal is, as they pointed out themselves, not to regulate as yet but to examine these deals with the goal of providing some transparency to the American public regarding the internet services they pay for. Verizon and Comcast issued statements expressing their willingness to be open about their peering activities and stressed that no regulation is required. The peering market 'has functioned effectively and efficiently for over two decades without government intervention,' Comcast claimed at a congressional hearing. The Free Press policy director nevertheless points out that 'when the FCC required reporting from AT&T after the company blocked Skype in 2009 and Google Voice in 2012, the disclosures revealed that AT&T was indeed misleading its customers.'"

MIT Researchers want to replace Wearables with Wireless

Anonymous Coward writes | about 6 months ago

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An anonymous reader writes "MIT researchers develop technology that can can monitor people's breathing and heart rate through walls. "Their latest report demonstrates that they can now detect gestures as subtle as the rise and fall of a person’s chest. From that, they can determine a person's heart rate with 99 percent accuracy. The research could be used for health-tracking apps, baby monitors, and for the military and law enforcement." The report describes how they extended their through-wall technology to up to five users and how they track vital signs."
Link to Original Source

Appeals Court finds scanning to be fair use in Authors Guild v Hathitrust

NewYorkCountryLawyer (912032) writes | about 6 months ago

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NewYorkCountryLawyer (912032) writes "In Authors Guild v Hathitrust, the US Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit has found that scanning whole books and making them searchable for research use is a fair use. In reaching its conclusion, the 3-judge panel reasoned, in its 34-page opinion (PDF), that the creation of a searchable, full text database is a "quintessentially transformative use", that it was "reasonably necessary" to make use of the entire works, that maintaining maintain 4 copies of the database was reasonably necessary as well, and that the research library did not impair the market for the originals. Needless to say, this ruling augurs well for Google in Authors Guild v. Google, which likewise involves full text scanning of whole books for research."

Transforming the web into a transparent 'HTTPA' database

Anonymous Coward writes | about 6 months ago

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An anonymous reader writes "MIT researchers believe the solution to misuse and leakage of private data is more transparency and auditability, not adding new layers of security. Traditional approaches make it hard, if not impossible, to share data for useful purposes, such as in healthcare. Enter HTTPA, HTTP with accountability."
Link to Original Source

Expedia to Accept Bitcoin

Anonymous Coward writes | about 6 months ago

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An anonymous reader writes "With the debacle of Mt. GoX, Bitcoin's future was looking a little murky. But in a significant mainline acceptance, Expedia has said they will begin accepting Bitcoins as a form of payment. At first, they will accept it for hotel bookings only, will accept it only in USA, and also will not be holding Bitcoins for any length of time — converting it to dollars as soon as they can. But, quoting Emily Spaven, managing editor of Bitcoin news site CoinDesk, as told to the BBC, the move was "brilliant news" and it "brings digital currency further into the consciousness of the mainstream"."
Link to Original Source

Google Fit to curate steps, calories, heart rate, other biometric data

mpicpp (3454017) writes | about 6 months ago

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mpicpp (3454017) writes "Google is planning to release a new product called Google Fit that will aggregate health data from various devices and apps, according to a report Thursday from Forbes. Fit will use available APIs to pull biometric information together into one place, but it's unclear whether it will be a standalone app or part of the Android OS.

Reports of Fit come on the heels of Apple's announcement of HealthKit in iOS 8, a system that also interacts with apps and APIs to curate and present health data like steps walked, calories consumed, and heart rates logged. Fit also follows the announcement of Sami, Samsung's health platform for culling health-related info."

Link to Original Source

Man arrested for parodying mayor on Twitter files civil rights lawsuit

mpicpp (3454017) writes | about 6 months ago

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mpicpp (3454017) writes "The Illinois man who made headlines when he was detained for parodying the town's mayor on Twitter sued the Peoria politician and local police, claiming on Thursday that his civil rights were violated.

As part of the April raid, the authorities seized the mobile phone and laptop of the 29-year-old prankster, Jonathan Daniel, and reviewed their contents, which he says was in violation of his First Amendment rights.

Daniel, the operator of the @peoriamayor handle shut down by Twitter after the city threatened a lawsuit, was initially accused of impersonating a public official in violation of Illinois law. The authorities never lodged charges, however."

Link to Original Source

3D Bioprinters Could Make Enhanced, Electricity-Generating 'Superorgans'

meghan elizabeth (3689911) writes | about 6 months ago

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meghan elizabeth (3689911) writes "Why stop at just mimicking biology when you can biomanufacture technologically improved humans? 3D-printed enhanced "superorgans"—or artificial ones that don’t exist in nature—could be engineered to perform specific functions beyond what exists in nature, like treating disease. Already, a bioprinted artificial pancreas that can regulate glucose levels in diabetes patients is being developed. Bioprinting could also be used to create an enhanced organ that can generate electricity to power electronic implants, like pacemakers."

Need to move to IPv6 highlighted as Microsoft runs out of US address space

alphadogg (971356) writes | about 6 months ago

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alphadogg (971356) writes "Microsoft has been forced to start using its global stock of IPv4 addresses to keep its Azure cloud service afloat in the U.S., highlighting the growing importance of making the shift to IP version 6. The newer version of the Internet Protocol adds an almost inexhaustible number of addresses thanks to a 128-bit long address field, compared to the 32 bits used by version 4. The IPv4 address space has been fully assigned in the U.S., meaning there are no additional addresses available, Microsoft said in a blog post earlier this week. http://blog.azure.com/2014/06/... This requires the company to use the IPv4 address space available to it globally for new services, it said."
Link to Original Source

Amaya Gaming Buys PokerStars and Full Tilt Poker for $4.9 Billion

Dave Knott (2917251) writes | about 6 months ago

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Dave Knott (2917251) writes "Montreal-based gaming company Amaya Gaming Group Inc. has agreed to purchase privately held Oldford Group, the owner of online poker websites PokerStars and Full Tilt Poker, for $4.9 billion. The deal marks the end of a remarkable story that began when Isai Scheinberg, an Israeli-Canadian former IBM computer programmer, founded PYR Software in Toronto and started building PokerStars, which eventually became the largest online poker site in the world. But in 2011, federal prosecutors in Manhattan launched a massive crackdown against online poker in the U.S., indicting Scheinbeg, suing PokerStars and shutting down the U.S. operations of the company for operating an illegal gambling business. In 2012, PokerStars struck a $731 million settlement with federal prosecutors that also saw the company acquire the assets of Full Tilt Poker. However, reentering the vital U.S. market has proved difficult, and in the end, it started to make sense for the Scheinbergs to sell. The Scheinbergs will not remain with PokerStars in any capacity after the current deal closes. In a statement announcing the deal, Amaya said it believes the “transaction will expedite the entry of PokerStars and Full Tilt Poker into regulated markets in which Amaya already holds a footprint, particularly the U.S.A.”"

Canadian Supreme Court Delivers Huge Win For Internet Privacy

Anonymous Coward writes | about 6 months ago

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An anonymous reader writes "For the past several months, many Canadians have been debating privacy reform, with the government moving forward on two bills involving Internet surveillance and expanded voluntary, warrantless disclosure of personal information. Today, the Supreme Court of Canada entered the debate and completely changed the discussion, issuing its long-awaited R. v. Spencer decision, which examined the legality of voluntary warrantless disclosure of basic subscriber information to law enforcement. Michael Geist summarizes the findings, noting that the unanimous decision included a strong endorsement of Internet privacy, emphasizing the privacy importance of subscriber information, the right to anonymity, and the need for police to obtain a warrant for subscriber information except in exigent circumstances or under a reasonable law."
Link to Original Source

The FCC Can't Help Cities Trapped By Predatory Internet Deals With Big Telecom

Jason Koebler (3528235) writes | about 6 months ago

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Jason Koebler (3528235) writes "At least 20 states have laws that make it illegal for communities to offer local government-owned high speed internet access. Wednesday, Federal Communications Commission Chairman Tom Wheeler threw consumers a bone by suggesting that the agency could make it easier for cities to skirt those laws. That's a great first step—but many cities have locked themselves into telecom company-caused messes the FCC probably can't fix.
The FCC's power becomes much less certain once you drill into the other major reason—besides state laws—why cities can't offer broadband to their constituents: local, long-term agreements with internet service providers."

Dell Exec Calls HP's New 'Machine' Architecture 'Laughable'

jfruh (300774) writes | about 6 months ago

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jfruh (300774) writes "HP's revelation that it's working on a radical new computing architecture that it's dubbed 'The Machine' was met with excitement among tech observers this week, but one of HP's biggest competitors remains extremely unimpressed. John Swanson, the head of Dell's software business, said that 'The notion that you can reach some magical state by rearchitecting an OS is laughable on the face of it.' And Jai Memnon, Dell's research head, said that phase-change memory is the memory type in the pipeline mostly like to change the computing scene soon, not the memristors that HP is working on."
Link to Original Source

European iPhone Chargers Prone to Overheating

jones_supa (887896) writes | about 6 months ago

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jones_supa (887896) writes "Apple has announced a "replacement program" for European iPhone AC/DC adapters sold between October 2009 and September 2012 after discovering they may overheat and thus pose a safety risk. The affected adapter, model A1300, was bundled with European sales of the iPhone 3GS, iPhone 4, and iPhone 4S, and was also sold separately. By a quick estimate, there must be millions of A1300s in the wild. The specific technical reason causing the overheating has not been detailed (a YouTube video shows a teardown of the device). The A1300 was replaced by an almost-identical adapter, A1400, in 2012, which is not affected by the safety issue. For more details on how to identify the affected adapter, and to arrange a replacement, visit Apple's dedicated portal for the issue."

Cockpit Revealed for Bloodhound Supersonic Car

Zothecula (1870348) writes | about 6 months ago

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Zothecula (1870348) writes "Unveiled at a special event in Bristol, UK, the Bloodhound land speed team showed off the cockpit that will be driver Andy Green’s "office" for his record attempt run in 2015 and 2016. Although Green holds the current world land speed record of 763 mph (1,227 km/h), the challenges in attempting to break the 1,000 mph (1,600 km/h) barrier will be significant for both pilot and the design team."
Link to Original Source

Lie Like a Lady: The Profoundly Weird, Gender-Specific Roots of the Turing Test

malachiorion (1205130) writes | about 6 months ago

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malachiorion (1205130) writes "Alan Turing never wrote about the Turing Test, that legendary measure of machine intelligence that was supposedly passed last weekend. He proposed something much stranger—a contest between men and machines, to see who was better at pretending to be a woman. The details of the Imitation Game aren't secret, or even hard to find, and yet no one seems to reference it. Here's my analysis for Popular Science about why they should, in part because it's so odd, but also because it might be a better test for "machines that think" than the chatbot-infested, seemingly useless Turing Test."
Link to Original Source

Clueless About Card Data Hack, PF Chang's Reverts to Imprinting Devices

wiredmikey (1824622) writes | about 6 months ago

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wiredmikey (1824622) writes "After saying earlier this week that it was investigating reports of a data breach related to payment cards used at its locations, P.F. Chang's China Bistro confirmed on Thursday that credit and debit card data has been stolen from some of its restaurants. What's interesting, and somewhat humorous, is that the company said that it has switched over to manual credit card imprinting systems for all of its restaurants located in the continental United States.

The popular restaurant chain said that on Tuesday, June 10, the United States Secret Services alerted the company about the incident. Admitting that it does not know the extent or current situation and impact of the attack, the company noted in a statement: “All P.F. Chang's China Bistro branded restaurants in the continental U.S. are using manual credit card imprinting devices to handle our credit and debit card transactions,” the company said. “This allows you to use your credit and debit cards safely.”

If it's not obvious, anyone who has visited a P.F. Chang’s and used a payment card in the last several months should monitor their accounts and report any suspected fraudulent activity to their card company."

Link to Original Source

Google In Talks To Take Virgin Galactic Stake

schwit1 (797399) writes | about 6 months ago

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schwit1 (797399) writes "Google is in talks with Virgin Galactic about a deal that will hand it crucial access to satellite-launch technology and an equity stake in Sir Richard Branson’s $2bn (£1.2bn) space tourism venture.

The discussions with Virgin Galactic are part of Google’s ambitious project to put hundreds of satellites in low-Earth orbit in an attempt to extend internet access to billions of people."

Link to Original Source

British Army turns to Oculus Rift to take the sting out of battlefield trauma

Dimetrodon (2714071) writes | about 6 months ago

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Dimetrodon (2714071) writes "British consultancy Plextek has just announced the world's first immersive medical training system for the military using the Oculus Rift. The virtual reality technology will be used to simulate pre-hospital care on the battlefield, requiring trainees to "negotiate and prioritise" clinical needs while under virtual fire."
Link to Original Source

EU Ministers backing GMO Food. Allowing Nation States Approve or Deny.

think_nix (1467471) writes | about 6 months ago

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think_nix (1467471) writes "As reported from EU Parliament with a controversial follow up at rt . The EU Parliament is paving way for EU Nation States to decide on banning or allowing GMO grown foods within their respective territories. A further article at der Spiegel (German) (google translate) quotes the German Health Minister if countries cannot specifically scientifically argument the ban, this would allow GMO companies to initiate legal actions against the banning ruling states. Furthermore it was noted, given EU Parliaments current stance on not reintroducing border and customs controls between member states, this will make checks and controls of GMO foods between member states even more difficult. Also noting that the recently passed EU consumer food label law has no mention of GMO foods."

Eskimo Diet Lacks Support for Better Cardiovascular Health

jones_supa (887896) writes | about 6 months ago

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jones_supa (887896) writes "Monthly Prescribing Reference reports that the "Eskimo diet" hypothesis, suggested as a factor in the alleged low incidence of coronary artery disease (CAD) in Greenland Eskimos, seems not to be supported in the literature, according to a metastudy published in the Canadian Journal of Cardiology. Researchers found that only one study directly assessed the prevalence of CAD or CAD risk factors, and that study showed that CAD morbidity was similar among Inuit and American and European populations. In most studies, the prevalence of CAD was similar for Greenland Eskimos and Canadian and Alaskan Inuit and for non-Eskimo populations. The original studies from the 1970s that formed the basis of the supposed cardioprotective effect of the Eskimo diet did not examine the prevalence of CAD. 'The totality of reviewed evidence leads us to the conclusion that Eskimos have a similar prevalence of CAD as non-Eskimo populations,' the authors write. 'To date, more than 5,000 papers have been published studying the alleged beneficial properties of omega-3 fatty acids not to mention the billion dollar industry producing and selling fish oil capsules based on a hypothesis that was questionable from the beginning.'"

Laser device for detecting alcohol in cars

biomass (13779) writes | about 6 months ago

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biomass (13779) writes "An external laser device can detect the present of alcohol vapors in passing vehicles.
The laser system is set up on the side of the road to monitor each car that passes by. If alcohol vapors are detected in the car, a message with a photo of the car including its license plate is sent to a police officer waiting down the road.
An overview including some of the problems is located
here
For more detail there is the original paper."

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