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EU Ministers backing GMO Food. Allowing Nation States Approve or Deny.

think_nix (1467471) writes | about a month and a half ago

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think_nix (1467471) writes "As reported from EU Parliament with a controversial follow up at rt . The EU Parliament is paving way for EU Nation States to decide on banning or allowing GMO grown foods within their respective territories. A further article at der Spiegel (German) (google translate) quotes the German Health Minister if countries cannot specifically scientifically argument the ban, this would allow GMO companies to initiate legal actions against the banning ruling states. Furthermore it was noted, given EU Parliaments current stance on not reintroducing border and customs controls between member states, this will make checks and controls of GMO foods between member states even more difficult. Also noting that the recently passed EU consumer food label law has no mention of GMO foods."

Transforming the web into a transparent 'HTTPA' database

Anonymous Coward writes | about a month and a half ago

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An anonymous reader writes "MIT researchers believe the solution to misuse and leakage of private data is more transparency and auditability, not adding new layers of security. Traditional approaches make it hard, if not impossible, to share data for useful purposes, such as in healthcare. Enter HTTPA, HTTP with accountability."
Link to Original Source

Expedia to Accept Bitcoin

Anonymous Coward writes | about a month and a half ago

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An anonymous reader writes "With the debacle of Mt. GoX, Bitcoin's future was looking a little murky. But in a significant mainline acceptance, Expedia has said they will begin accepting Bitcoins as a form of payment. At first, they will accept it for hotel bookings only, will accept it only in USA, and also will not be holding Bitcoins for any length of time — converting it to dollars as soon as they can. But, quoting Emily Spaven, managing editor of Bitcoin news site CoinDesk, as told to the BBC, the move was "brilliant news" and it "brings digital currency further into the consciousness of the mainstream"."
Link to Original Source

Deforestation Depletes Fish Stocks

Rambo Tribble (1273454) writes | about a month and a half ago

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Rambo Tribble (1273454) writes "Adding to the well-known fish-killing effects deforestation has in increasing turbidity and temperature in streams, a study published in Nature Communications, (abstract, PDF access), demonstrates deforestation causes a depletion of nutrients in associated lake aquatic ecosystems and, as a consequence, impacted fish stocks. Lead author Andrew Tanentzap is quoted as saying, 'We found fish that had almost 70% of their biomass made from carbon that came from trees and leaves instead of aquatic food chain sources.' This has troubling implications as, 'It's estimated that freshwater fishes make up more than 6% of the world's annual animal protein supplies for humans ...' Additionally, this may have significance in regard to anadromous species, such as salmon, which help power ocean ecosystems. The BBC offers more approachable coverage."

Amazon AWS continues to use TrueCrypt despite project's demise

Anonymous Coward writes | about a month and a half ago

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An anonymous reader writes ""Importing and exporting data from Amazon Simple Storage Service still requires TrueCrypt, two weeks after the encryption software was discontinued"

"Amazon.com did not immediately respond to an inquiry seeking information on whether it plans to support other data encryption technologies for the AWS import/export feature aside from TrueCrypt in the future"

http://www.infoworld.com/d/clo...

http://docs.aws.amazon.com/AWS...

http://aws.amazon.com/importex..."

Arts and technology clashing

Anonymous Coward writes | about a month and a half ago

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An anonymous reader writes "This article in The New Yorks Times (http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/12/arts/music/a-digital-orchestra-for-opera-purists-take-and-play-offense.html) shows the clash of purists and people who desire to experiment with "new technology" available to them. The geek in me is really curious about this concept of a digital orchestra (with the ability to change tempos, placement of speakers in an orchestra pit, possibly delaying some to line them, ...). I understand that instrumentalists feel threatened, but why not let free enterprise decide the fate of this endeavor instead of trying to kill it by using blackmail and misrepresentation. Isn't there a place for this, even if maybe it is not called Opera ... maybe iOpera?"
Link to Original Source

Need to move to IPv6 highlighted as Microsoft runs out of US address space

alphadogg (971356) writes | about a month and a half ago

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alphadogg (971356) writes "Microsoft has been forced to start using its global stock of IPv4 addresses to keep its Azure cloud service afloat in the U.S., highlighting the growing importance of making the shift to IP version 6. The newer version of the Internet Protocol adds an almost inexhaustible number of addresses thanks to a 128-bit long address field, compared to the 32 bits used by version 4. The IPv4 address space has been fully assigned in the U.S., meaning there are no additional addresses available, Microsoft said in a blog post earlier this week. http://blog.azure.com/2014/06/... This requires the company to use the IPv4 address space available to it globally for new services, it said."
Link to Original Source

OpenXcom 1.0 released

Anonymous Coward writes | about a month and a half ago

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An anonymous reader writes "OpenXcom 1.0 is finally released after:
5224 commits.
1843 days.
606 resolved issues since v0.9.
20 years of X-COM.

XCOM oldschool lovers enjoy!"

Link to Original Source

Planes disappearing from radar in Europe !?

thygate (1590197) writes | about a month and a half ago

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thygate (1590197) writes "Early this month, on several occasions, several planes disappeared from radar for several seconds to 25 minutes. Incidents have been reported in Czech Republic, Slovakia, Switzerland and Germany. Authorities report that at no time were there any problems with the planes and radio communication was available at all times during these radar blackouts.
Eurocontrol and the EASA have started an investigation, there is a global concern about safety since the MH370 disappearance.
There are speculations about NATO military exercises involving radio equipment tests, but the alliance has refused to comment. The Hungarian ministry of defense refuses this explanation, stating the technology used is not powerful enough to cause these blackouts.
According to an Australian newspaper it could of even been hackers, but it is unclear if this is even possible."

Link to Original Source

Nominet destroying UK WHOIS privacy, wants ID

ktetch-pirate (1850548) writes | about a month and a half ago

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ktetch-pirate (1850548) writes "Earlier this week, Nominet launched the .uk domain to great fanfare, but hidden in that activity has been Nominet's new policy of exposing personal domain owners home addresses. Justification is based on a site being judged 'commercial', which can mean anything from a few google ads, an Amazon widget, to an email subscription box or linking to too many commercial sites, according to Nominet reps. In the meantime though, they want your driving license or passport to ensure 'accuracy' because they 'want to make things safe'."

Netflix Continues to Shun Developers

esarjeant (100503) writes | about a month and a half ago

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esarjeant (100503) writes "I guess it shouldn't come as a total surprise, but Netflix has gone from not issuing new developer keys to announcing the entire program will be shut down. It's a real shame they are going to be taking this offline, it spurred quite a bit of innovation for the Netflix service. For major sites that have already gone live it sounds like Netflix will let them keep going, but if you're looking to build the next FeedFliks then you better look elsewhere."
Link to Original Source

Online shoppers across Europe now have new rights

mrspoonsi (2955715) writes | about a month and a half ago

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mrspoonsi (2955715) writes "Previously, anyone who bought a product online was allowed seven business days during which they were able to change their mind and return the product for a full refund. This ‘cooling-off period’, during which a refund can be requested without being required to give a reason for the cancellation, has now been extended to fourteen calendar days from the date on which the goods are received. Online retailers and providers are now also banned from 'pre-ticking' optional extras on order forms, such as those adding insurance to the cost of a purchase. For the first time, laws have also been introduced to offer a cooling-off period for digital content, including music, films and books, as BBC News reports. Consumers may now cancel an order for digital content within fourteen days, but only if they have not downloaded it."

HFS+ Bit Rot

jackjeff (955699) writes | about a month and a half ago

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jackjeff (955699) writes "HFS+ lost a total of 28 files over the course of 6 years.

Most of the corrupted files are completely unreadable. The JPEGs typically decode partially, up to the point of failure. The raw .CR2 files usually turn out to be totally unreadable: either completely black or having a large color overlay on significant portions of the photo. Most of these shots are not so important, but a handful of them are. One of the CR2 files in particular, is a very good picture of my son when he was a baby. I printed and framed that photo, so I am glad that I did not lose the original."

Link to Original Source

FCC Looking Into Paid Peering Deals

Anonymous Coward writes | about a month and a half ago

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An anonymous reader writes "The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) announced on Friday that it has successfully obtained the details regarding paid peering deals between Netflix and Comcast as well as Verizon and is working to obtain similar information for other video streamers and their respective ISP peers. The FCC's goal is, as they pointed out themselves, not to regulate as yet but to examine these deals with the goal of providing some transparency to the American public regarding the internet services they pay for. Verizon and Comcast issued statements expressing their willingness to be open about their peering activities and stressed that no regulation is required. The peering market 'has functioned effectively and efficiently for over two decades without government intervention,' Comcast claimed at a congressional hearing. The Free Press policy director nevertheless points out that 'when the FCC required reporting from AT&T after the company blocked Skype in 2009 and Google Voice in 2012, the disclosures revealed that AT&T was indeed misleading its customers.'"

Dell Exec Calls HP's New 'Machine' Architecture 'Laughable'

jfruh (300774) writes | about a month and a half ago

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jfruh (300774) writes "HP's revelation that it's working on a radical new computing architecture that it's dubbed 'The Machine' was met with excitement among tech observers this week, but one of HP's biggest competitors remains extremely unimpressed. John Swanson, the head of Dell's software business, said that 'The notion that you can reach some magical state by rearchitecting an OS is laughable on the face of it.' And Jai Memnon, Dell's research head, said that phase-change memory is the memory type in the pipeline mostly like to change the computing scene soon, not the memristors that HP is working on."
Link to Original Source

Google Fit to curate steps, calories, heart rate, other biometric data

mpicpp (3454017) writes | about a month and a half ago

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mpicpp (3454017) writes "Google is planning to release a new product called Google Fit that will aggregate health data from various devices and apps, according to a report Thursday from Forbes. Fit will use available APIs to pull biometric information together into one place, but it's unclear whether it will be a standalone app or part of the Android OS.

Reports of Fit come on the heels of Apple's announcement of HealthKit in iOS 8, a system that also interacts with apps and APIs to curate and present health data like steps walked, calories consumed, and heart rates logged. Fit also follows the announcement of Sami, Samsung's health platform for culling health-related info."

Link to Original Source

3D Bioprinters Could Make Enhanced, Electricity-Generating 'Superorgans'

meghan elizabeth (3689911) writes | about a month and a half ago

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meghan elizabeth (3689911) writes "Why stop at just mimicking biology when you can biomanufacture technologically improved humans? 3D-printed enhanced "superorgans"—or artificial ones that don’t exist in nature—could be engineered to perform specific functions beyond what exists in nature, like treating disease. Already, a bioprinted artificial pancreas that can regulate glucose levels in diabetes patients is being developed. Bioprinting could also be used to create an enhanced organ that can generate electricity to power electronic implants, like pacemakers."

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