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1958 Integrated Circuit Prototypes from Jack Kilby's TI Lab Up For Sale

Dharma's Dad (668471) writes | about 4 months ago

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Dharma's Dad (668471) writes "Christie's New York is auctioning them off this Thursday. They were gifted to one of the lab employees by Jack Kilby (who won the Nobel prize in 2000 for his part in the work). The family has finally decided to sell them — they are expected to go for over one million dollars. How cool would it be to have these in your man (or lady) cave =)"
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Shadow Network 100 Times Faster than Google Fiber Already Exists

Anonymous Coward writes | about 4 months ago

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An anonymous reader writes "When the Department of Defense's ARPAnet evolved into the present-day internet, the scientific community didn't actually stop experimenting with networks. Even as the commercial internet grew, scientists were building other nets connected first via land lines, then satellite links, and now via fiber optic cables. Various shadow networks in the U.S. were eventually combined into ESnet (Energy Science Network) that was able in November 2013 to transfer data in 'real world' settings at 91 gigabits per second. ('Real world' settings refer to non-direct connections.) Google Fiber is currently aiming to provide data transfer speeds of 10 gigabits per second to American consumers, much higher than all other U.S. internet providers. ESnet utilizes 'the excess network capacity built-up by commercial internet providers during the late 1990s internet bubble' — i.e., 'dark fiber'. Its data transfer capabilities foreshadow the future for average consumers, but some today may see the disparity between this shadow net and the commercial one and wonder just why exactly such a large disparity exists."

Unisys phasing out decades-old mainframe processor for x86

angry tapir (1463043) writes | about 4 months ago

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angry tapir (1463043) writes "Unisys is phasing out its decades-old mainframe processor. The chip is used in some of Unisys' ClearPath flagship mainframes, but the company is moving to Intel's x86 chips in Libra and Dorado servers in the ClearPath line. The aging CMOS chip will be "sunsetted" in Libra servers by the end of August and in the Dorado line by the end of 2015. Dorado 880E and 890E mainframes will use the CMOS chip until the servers are phased out, which is set to happen by the end of 2015."
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Samsung funded startup announces new launcher to compete with Google

d2ncal (1250446) writes | about 4 months ago

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d2ncal (1250446) writes "Engadget, Slashgear and others are writing about a new launcher called Terrain, funded by Samsung. Its created to directly take-on google by having its own search that replaces Google search, and a new sidebar with cards similar to Google now. They don't have smart contextual features like google now, but claim to be more focused letting users decide what shows up.

http://www.slashgear.com/terra...
http://www.engadget.com/2014/0..."

How Nest Is Using Data From Its Army of 'Smart' Smoke Alarms

Advocatus Diaboli (1627651) writes | about 4 months ago

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Advocatus Diaboli (1627651) writes "Consider that each Protect is packed full of sensors, some of which are capable of much more than they're doing right now: What could go wrong?

"From heat and light sensors to motion sensors and ultrasonic wave sensors.This simple little device could scrape an incredible amount of data about your life if Nest asked it to: From when you get home, to when you go to bed, to your daily routine, to when you cook dinner. Now imagine how a device like that would interlock with another that you keep on your wrist, like the forthcoming Android Wear. Together, they would create a seamless mesh of connectivity where every detail of what you do and where you go is recorded into a living, breathing algorithm based on your life.""

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4K Monitors: Not Now, But Soon

Anonymous Coward writes | about 4 months ago

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An anonymous reader writes "4K monitor prices have fallen down into the range where mainstream consumers are starting to consider them for work and for play. There are enough models that we can compare and contrast, and figure out which are the best of the ones available. But this report at The Wirecutter makes the case that absent a pressing need for 8.29 million pixels, you should wait before buying one. They say, "he current version of the HDMI specification (1.4a) can only output a 4096×2160 resolution at a refresh rate of 24 Hz or 3840×2160 at 30 Hz—the latter, half that of what we’re used to on TVs and monitors. Connect up a 4K monitor at 30 Hz via HDMI and you’ll see choppier animations and transitions in your OS. You might also encounter some visible motion stuttering during normal use, and you’ll be locked to a maximum of 30 frames per second for your games—it’s playable, but not that smooth. ... Most people don’t own a system that’s good enough for gaming on a 4K display—at least, not at highest-quality settings. You’ll be better off if you just plan to surf the Web in 4K: Nvidia cards starting in the 600 series and AMD Radeon HD 6000 and 7000-series GPUs can handle 4K, as can systems built with integrated Intel HD 4000 graphics or AMD Trinity APUs. ... There’s a light on the horizon. OS support will strengthen, connection types will be able to handle 4K displays sans digital tricks, and prices will drop as more 4K displays hit the market. By then, there will even be more digital content to play on a 4K display (if gaming or multitasking isn’t your thing), and 4K monitors will even start to pull in fancier display technology like Nvidia’s G-Sync for even smoother digital shootouts.""
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Elon Musk's Solar City makes manufacturing capacity play with Silevo acquisition

MarkWhittington (1084047) writes | about 4 months ago

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MarkWhittington (1084047) writes "Elon Musk is well known as a private space flight entrepreneur, thanks to his space launch company SpaceX. He is also a purveyor of high end electric cars manufactured by his other company, Tesla Motors. But many people do not know that Musk has a third business, Solar City, which is a manufacturer of solar panels. Tuesday that company announced a major play to increase the output of solar panels suitable for home solar units.

Solar City has acquired a company called Silevo, which is said to have a line of solar panels that have demonstrated high electricity output and low cost. Silevo claims that its panels have achieved a 22 percent efficiency and are well on their way to achieving 24 percent efficiency. It suggests that 10 cents per watt is saved for every point of efficiency gained.

Solar City, using the technology it has acquired from Silevo, intends to build a manufacturing plant in upstate New York with a one gigawatt per year capacity. This will only be the beginning as it intends to build future manufacturing plants with orders of magnitude capacity. The goal appears to be for the company to become the biggest manufacturer of solar panels in the world."

Link to Original Source

The History of Android

benfrog (883020) writes | about 4 months ago

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benfrog (883020) writes "Ars Technica has pieced together an extensive History of Android, an attempt to preserve older versions of the OS before they die from "cloud rot". The article includes nearly every old and new version, starting from a rather curious Blackberry-like prototype and ending with today's KitKat."

Nokia paid millions of euros for stolen signing keys

jppiiroinen (2664019) writes | about 4 months ago

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jppiiroinen (2664019) writes "I find it very odd that back in the days 2007-2008 when Nokia had a huge market share with Symbian devices, that they did not disclose the information that somebody had stolen their encryption keys. Being a listed company after all. They did even ended up paying millions of euros and the local Finnish police manage to fail to investigate who was behind it.

The blackmailer had gotten hold of the Symbian encryption key used for signing. The code is a few kilobytes in size. Had the key been leaked Nokia would not have been able to ensure that the phones accept only applications approved by the company.

"

U.S. Democrats Propose Legislation To Ban Internet Fast Lanes

Anonymous Coward writes | about 4 months ago

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An anonymous reader writes "A proposal from Democrats in the U.S. House and Senate would require the FCC to stop ISPs from creating "internet fast lanes." Senator Patrick Leahy (D-VT) said, "Americans are speaking loud and clear. They want an Internet that is a platform for free expression and innovation, where the best ideas and services can reach consumers based on merit rather than based on a financial relationship with a broadband provider." Representative Doris Matsui (D-CA) added, "A free and open Internet is essential for consumers. Our country cannot afford ‘pay-for-play’ schemes that divide our Internet into tiers based on who has the deepest pockets." Unfortunately, this is only half a solution — the bill doesn't actually add to the FCC's authority. It only requires them to use the authority they currently have, which is questionable."
Link to Original Source

Facebook Is Making Us All Live Inside Emotional 'Filter Bubbles'

Daniel_Stuckey (2647775) writes | about 4 months ago

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Daniel_Stuckey (2647775) writes "It hopefully doesn't come as a surprise that your friends shape who you are. But we tend to think of that on a micro level: If your close circle of friends tends to have tattoos, wear polo shirts, or say "chill" a lot, it's quite possible that you'll emulate them over time—and they'll emulate you too.

But what happens on a macro scale, when your friend circle doesn't just include the dozen people you actually hang out with regularly, but also the hundreds or thousands of acquaintances you have online? All of those feeds may seem filled with frivolities from random people (and they are!) but that steady stream of life updates—photos, rants, slang—are probably shaping you more than you think.

A massive Facebook study recently published in PNAS found solid evidence of so-called emotional contagion—emotional states spreading socially, like a virus made of emoji—on the social network."

Link to Original Source

Google's Going To Take On Apple's CarPlay

cartechboy (2660665) writes | about 4 months ago

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cartechboy (2660665) writes "Come on, you didn't think Google was going to let Apple take over your car without a fight, did you? Of course not. Now that automakers are taking Apple's CarPlay system seriously, and starting to put it into production, Google's set to unveil its own automotive operating system known internally as Google Auto Link. The search giant plans to unveil its system at a software developer conference this month. Interestingly, Auto Link is the first production developed in conjunction with the Open Automotive Alliance, a group of companies including Audi, General Motors, Honda, Hyundai, NVIDIA, and Google itself. Like CarPlay, Auto Link won't be an "embedded" system, rather, a "projected" one--an operating system that uses a driver's own smartphone operating system. We'll obviously learn details soon enough, but for now, we are left to wonder whether it'll be Apple or Google that ends up owning the automotive market."

Chinese-Built Cars Are Coming To The U.S. Next Year

cartechboy (2660665) writes | about 4 months ago

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cartechboy (2660665) writes ""Made In China." It's a sticker we all know too well here in the U.S., and yet, it seems not everything we buy is made in China. To date, there haven't been Chinese-built cars in the U.S., but we keep hearing they are coming. Now it seems it's about to become a reality, as Chinese-built Volvos will be arriving in the U.S. as early as 2015. The first model to arrive will be the S60L. The payoff for Volvo if it manages to convince buyers that its cars built in China are just as good as those currently built in Europe is vast. Not only will it save on production costs, but it will help buffer against exchange rate fluctuations. Volvo's planning to make China a manufacturing hub, and that makes sense since it's now owned by Chinese parent company Geely. But will Chinese-built cars be just as good as European-built cars, and will consumers be able to tell the difference?"

Google and Facebook can be legally intercepted, says UK spy boss

mpicpp (3454017) writes | about 4 months ago

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mpicpp (3454017) writes "The UK government has revealed that intelligence service GCHQ can snoop on British citizens' use of Facebook, Twitter and Google without a warrant because the firms are based overseas.

UK spy boss Charles Farr said that such platforms are classified as external communications.

The policy was revealed as part of an ongoing legal battle with campaign group Privacy International (PI).

PI said the interpretation of the law "patronises the British people".

It is the first time that the UK has commented on how the UK's legal framework allows the mass interception of communications as outlined by US whistleblower Edward Snowden in his leaks about global government surveillance.

The policy was revealed by Charles Farr, director general of the Office of Security and Counter-Terrorism.

According to Mr Farr, Facebook, Twitter, Facebook, YouTube and web searches on Google, as well as webmail services such as Hotmail and Yahoo are classified as "external communications", which means that they can be intercepted without the need for additional legal clearance."

Link to Original Source

Wikipedia creates new rules, forcing editors to disclose if they're paid

mpicpp (3454017) writes | about 4 months ago

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mpicpp (3454017) writes "The Wikimedia Foundation, a nonprofit which operates Wikipedia and related projects, explained yesterday that it will establish new rules covering paid editing.

The heart of the change is that anyone who is paid to edit the site must "add your affiliation to your edit summary, user page, or talk page, to fairly disclose your perspective," according to Wikimedia's explanation of the change. The organization has also published an FAQ on paid editing.

The changes come after some high-profile commotions over paid editing. In October, Wikipedia deleted more than 250 accounts believed to be connected to a PR firm that was writing articles on the site. In January, the Wikimedia Foundation fired an employee who was accused of taking paid editing gigs."

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Google confirms indie musicians must join streaming service or be removed

Sockatume (732728) writes | about 4 months ago

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Sockatume (732728) writes "In a statement to the Financial Times and reported by the BBC, Google has confirmed that it will remove the music videos of independent artists unless they sign up to its upcoming subscription music service. Many independent musicians and labels have refused to do so, claiming that the contracts offer significantly worse deals than the likes of Spotify and Pandora, and that Google is unwilling to negotiate on the rates it offers artists. A Google spokesperson indicated that the company could start removing videos within days."

Even in digital photography age, high schoolers still flock to the darkroom

v3rgEz (125380) writes | about 4 months ago

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v3rgEz (125380) writes "In the age of camera-equipped smart phones and inexpensive digital cameras, many high schoolers have never seen a roll of film or used an analog camera — much less developed film and paper prints in a darkroom. Among those that have, however,
old school development has developed a serious cult following, with a number of high schools still finding a dedicated audience for the dark(room) arts."

Link to Original Source

Century-old drug reverses signs of autism in mice

sciencehabit (1205606) writes | about 4 months ago

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sciencehabit (1205606) writes "A single dose of a century-old drug has eliminated autism symptoms in adult mice with an experimental form of the disorder. Originally developed to treat African sleeping sickness, the compound, called suramin, quells a heightened stress response in neurons that researchers believe may underlie some traits of autism. The finding raises the hope that some hallmarks of the disorder may not be permanent, but could be correctable even in adulthood."
Link to Original Source

The FBI Built the Most Comprehensive List Internet Acronyms Ever

Jason Koebler (3528235) writes | about 4 months ago

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Jason Koebler (3528235) writes "Internet slang: Do you use it? If so, do it AYOR (at your own risk), because the FBI knows exactly what you're saying thanks to the agency's insane list of "Twitter shorthand." Rather than just rely on Urban Dictionary or a Google search, the agency has compiled an 83 page list of more than 2,800 acronyms.
The FBI responded to a FOIA request with one of the most illegible scans of a document you'll ever see, embedded on a CD—so maybe the agency isn't all that up on its technology, or maybe it's just doing its best to KTAS (keep this a secret)."

Minibuilders, Tiny Robots Capable of 3D Printing Large Building

Anonymous Coward writes | about 4 months ago

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An anonymous reader writes "The Minibuilder lineup consists of three different robotic devices, which are also 3D printers, They each have dimensions no larger than 42cm. Despite their small size, they are capable of printing buildings of almost any proportion. All three robots, all responsible for different functions, are required during any large 3D printing project. The 'Minibuilders' are the work of a research team at the Institute for Advanced Architecture of Catalonia .
Further details: http://3dprint.com/6340/minibu..."

Link to Original Source

Why Amazon Might Want a Big Piece of the Smartphone Market

Nerval's Lobster (2598977) writes | about 4 months ago

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Nerval's Lobster (2598977) writes "If rumors prove correct, Amazon will unveil a smartphone at a high-profile June 18 event in Seattle. According to a new article in The New York Times, Amazon’s willing to take such enormous risks because a smartphone will help it sell more products via its gargantuan online store. In theory, a mobile device would allow customers in the midst of their daily routines to order products with a few finger-taps, allowing Amazon to push back against Google and other tech companies exploring similar instant-gratification territory. But a smartphone also plays into Amazon’s plans for the digital world. Over the past several years, the company has become a popular vendor of cloud services and used that base to expand into everything from tablets to a growing mobile-app ecosystem. A smartphone could prove a crucial portal for all those services. If an Amazon smartphone proves a hit, however, it could become a game-changer for mobile developers, opening up a whole new market for apps and services. Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos has succeeded in the digital space largely by opening up various platforms—whether Kindle self-publishing or the Amazon app store—to third-party wares. It’ll be interesting to see whether he does something similar with the smartphone."
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LTE and GSM wireless getting hitched thanks to new technology

alphadogg (971356) writes | about 4 months ago

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alphadogg (971356) writes "In the hunt for more spectrum to speed up mobile networks, Vodafone and Huawei Technologies have successfully tested a technology that lets LTE and GSM share the same frequencies. The speed of future mobile networks will depend on the amount of spectrum mobile operators can get their hands on. The more they get, the wider the roads they can build. One thing they can do to get more space is to reuse frequencies that are currently used for older technologies such as GSM and 3G. But that isn’t as easy as sounds, as operators still have a lot of voice and messaging traffic in those older networks. However, using a technology called GL DSS (GSM-LTE Dynamic Spectrum Sharing) Vodafone and Huawei have shown a way to allow GSM and LTE to coexist."
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Relationship Amongst Spam Actors Researched

Anonymous Coward writes | about 4 months ago

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An anonymous reader writes "A team of researchers at the UC Santa Barbara and RWTH Aachen presented new findings on the relationship of spam actors at the ACM Symposium on Information, Computer and Communications Security. This presents the first end-to-end analysis of the spam delivery ecosystem including: harvesters crawl the web and compile email lists, botmasters infect and operate botnets, and spammers rent botnets and buy email lists to run spam campaigns. Their results suggest that spammers develop a type of "customer loyalty"; spammers likely purchase preferred resources from actors that have "proven" themselves in the past. Previous work examined the market economy of the email address market in preparatory work: 1 million email addresses were offered on the examined forum for anywhere ranging between 20 and 40 Euros."
Link to Original Source

Canadian Court Orders Google To Remove Websites From its Global Index

Anonymous Coward writes | about 4 months ago

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An anonymous reader writes "In the aftermath of the European Court of Justice "right to be forgotten" decision, many asked whether a similar ruling could arise elsewhere. While a privacy-related ruling has yet to hit Canada, Michael Geist reports that last week a Canadian relied in part on the decision in issuing an unprecedented order requiring Google to remove websites from its global index. The ruling is unusual since its reach extends far beyond Canada. Rather than ordering the company to remove certain links from the search results available through Google.ca, the order intentionally targets the entire database, requiring the company to ensure that no one, anywhere in the world, can see the search results."
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Cable TV boxes are the 2nd biggest energy users in many homes

SpzToid (869795) writes | about 4 months ago

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SpzToid (869795) writes "224 million U.S. cable TV set-top boxes combined consume as much electricity as produced by four giant nuclear reactors, running around the clock. They have become the biggest single energy user in many homes, apart from air conditioning.

Cheryl Williamsen, a Los Alamitos architect, has three of the boxes leased from her cable provider in her home, but she had no idea how much power they consumed until recently, when she saw a rating on the back for as much as 500 watts — about the same as a washing machine.

A typical set-top cable box with a digital recorder can consume as much as 35 watts of power, costing about $8 a month for a typical Southern California consumer. And the devices use nearly as much power turned off as they do when they are turned on."

Link to Original Source

Kingston and PNY caught bait-and-switching cheaper components after good reviews

Anonymous Coward writes | about 4 months ago

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An anonymous reader writes "Over the past few months, we’ve seen a disturbing trend from first Kingston, and now PNY. Manufacturers are launching SSDs with one hardware specification, and then quietly changing the hardware configuration after reviews have gone out. The impacts have been somewhat different (more on that) but in both cases, unhappy customers are loudly complaining that they’ve been cheated, tricked into paying for a drive they otherwise wouldn’t have purchased."

Hackers ransom Domino's customer data (including favourite toppings) for €3

stephendavion (2872091) writes | about 4 months ago

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stephendavion (2872091) writes "Hackers who compromised the servers of Domino’s Pizza have demanded a ransom of €30,000 or they will publish the records of more than 600,000 customers – including their favourite toppings. "Earlier this week, we hacked our way into the servers of Domino's Pizza France and Belgium, who happen to share the same vulnerable database," wrote Rex Mundi. "And boy, did we find some juicy stuff in there!""

AT&T Repeats Past Promises to Get Approval for DirecTV

Anonymous Coward writes | about 4 months ago

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An anonymous reader writes "Karl Bode from dslreports.com has noted a trend in AT&T's dealings with the government in which AT&T repeatedly promises more coverage in order to gain government approval for its proposals but never really makes good on its promises. 2004: 'AT&T promised to deploy broadband to every home in their 22-state footprint in exchange for regulators locking the FiOS and U-Verse networks off from open access policies and competition.' 2007: 'AT&T promised to offer broadband to 100% of homes in their 22 state footprint if they were allowed to buy BellSouth.' Now, in 2014, AT&T is offering pretty much the same thing — i.e., coverage for the same area they should have already provided coverage for as per past promises — if they are granted permission to buy out DirecTV. 'If AT&T is already supposed to have 100% completed, how can 15 million locations — at least 20% of all AT&T areas, not already have high speed broadband?'"

SanDisk to buy Fusion-io to boost flash storage business

stephendavion (2872091) writes | about 4 months ago

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stephendavion (2872091) writes "SanDisk Corp said on Monday it will buy Fusion-io Inc for about $1.1 billion to bolster its fast-growing business of providing flash storage drives to companies. Fusion-io has struggled with losses since its initial public offering in 2011, but SanDisk sees its technology as a major component for its own lineup of storage products. SanDisk is using its NAND memory chips to build and sell its own solid-state drives. The flash drives offer higher margins than SanDisk's traditional business of selling memory chips for smartphones and cameras."
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