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More Stuff I Think, I Think

the_mad_poster (640772) writes | more than 8 years ago

User Journal 18

I want to live here, but everything is "contact us for a price".

"If you have to ask, you can't afford it" is just a euphemism for "we're targetting really stupid people with a lot of money". See, there are three types of rich people:

1) the ones who are rich, know it, and make sound decisions in order to remain rich.

I want to live here, but everything is "contact us for a price".

"If you have to ask, you can't afford it" is just a euphemism for "we're targetting really stupid people with a lot of money". See, there are three types of rich people:

1) the ones who are rich, know it, and make sound decisions in order to remain rich.

2) the ones who are rich, know it, and flaunt it because they're brainless idiots trying to become poor through bad decision-making

3) the ones who are so offensively rich that it doesn't matter which path they take, nothing short of the collapse of society is going to change their wealth status.

There aren't many of any of these three, but #3 is by far the least common of the lot. I'm none of these three, so I will forgo this particular set of apartments - regardless of whether I can afford them or not - in favor of something a little more frugal.

------------

Over the last five years, I've regularly gone to a little pizza parlor around the corner for lunch. I can't afford it so much anymore now that I've become part of the disappearing middle class, but when I did go regularly I took joy in evaluating the people around me.

A number of folks who came in over the years were all quite obviously "leaders" of one caliber or another at their place of business. It has confounded me, however, to note the common qualities in many of these leaders over the years:

+ They tend to be less intelligent in some respects than you might expect. I regularly see prim and proper business people confounded by the simplest of technology, unable to make a decision between pushing a big red NO button and a big green YES button on a pinpad.

+ They have a tendency to be less suggestive/coercive than they are just plain bossy. Don't get me wrong, this usually works, but I'm always somewhat taken aback by their demanding nature and, even more so, by other people's willingness to jump when they demand it.

+ They are bad drivers. Many times it's not the frazzled mom with six kids in the car that blows the stop sign while she's westling with them. It's the suited silk-tie-wearing businessman who's just plain not paying attention or just apparently doesn't care.

I have no idea if this extends to other quarters such as the military or government, or if it even extends beyond my geographic boundaries, but it's interesting none-the-less.

------------

Nobody who ever had to make something from nothing says you can make something from nothing, but a lot of people who had something to start with and just don't recognize it do.

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The only difference between lying and making a mistake due to willful ignorance is that it makes it easier for your friends to make excuses for you after the fact if you do the latter.

------------

The people who are most willing to disrespect other people's beliefs are the ones who complain the most that other people disrespect their's.

------------

I think Wal-Mart is a perfect example of how easy it is to manipulate the gullible American public into doing things that are bad for it.

Everytime you buy something at Wal-Mart, odds are pretty good you're sending money to two places:

      1) Wal-Mart management
      2) China

The biggest price cuts for Wal-Mart don't come from innovative supply chains, they come from strong-arming suppliers so that demand is cut and churning out high volumes of low quality, low price product to compete. That means that every purchase at Wal-Mart either serves to solidify the damaged supply chain process (thus permanently undercutting the profits of American companies) or pump money away from America into the Chinese economy.

Since the U.S. is already desperately short on cash and stretching its credit with the world painfully thin - credit that is currently being used to support crucial government expenditures like the war in Iraq - the only thing you're doing by buying at Wal-Mart is bringing the looming credit crunch ever closer and making it that much more severe in the process.

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I think the media is at least partly to blame for the problems we have today with kids, but I also think that it's the parent's fault the media had that much power over their children in the first place.

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I think holocaust deniers have the same basic defect as anti-evolutionists, the holocaust deniers just apply their defect in a more socially destructive way.

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I think that the metric system is superior.

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There's a certain sick irony in venerating yourself as a democratic republic while you mock the will of the majority of the world.

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The metric system (1)

sielwolf (246764) | more than 8 years ago | (#13873216)

I like the Metric system scientifically. I like the Imperial system practically. If I want to do an analysis of... anything and need to do translation between units of measure, metric makes it easy. The units of measure are easy to apply. Like calories. A calorie does something and makes sense in terms of degrees and liters and all of that. If I was designing anything, I'd probably use metric.

But day to day I prefer Imperial. Take your average person: kilograms are a bit coarse in defining his weight (especially in relation to others), however centimeters aren't coarse enough. Six feet is a good demarcation between "tall" and "average". Inches are the good between feet. You have an idea what a 6'1", 193 pound man looks like. Most folks probably couldn't conceive the difference between someone 185 cm tall and one 170.

I also like its 12-base: easily divisible by two, three (very important and often overlooked), four, and six. This is also what makes the 60 second minute and the 60 minute hour so utilitarian. It's good reasonable 5+/-2 sized chunks. I for one am not too hype for digital time.

Re:The metric system (1)

tomhudson (43916) | more than 8 years ago | (#13873296)

There is 1 measurement that will never go metric:

36-24-36

By comparison, 91-60-91 just sounds grossly fat!

Re:The metric system (1)

Philip K Dickhead (906971) | more than 8 years ago | (#13875739)

"Only if she's five foot three"

Re:The metric system (1)

Mantorp (142371) | more than 8 years ago | (#13873314)

Metric makes sense day to day if it's what you grow up with. I can easily tell the difference between your height example just like I can guesstimate a liter of fluid or a 60kg person. How many ounces make a foot divided by the freezing point in fahrenheit gets me all confused however.

Re:The metric system (1)

NeMon'ess (160583) | more than 8 years ago | (#13873694)

Japanese skin mags use centimeters and I'm sure the readers know what those numbers look like on a figure.

Re:The metric system (1)

sielwolf (246764) | more than 8 years ago | (#13873818)

They also promote "Triple-G Bust Extravaganza!" which is a gross example of false advertising.

Re:The metric system (1)

NeMon'ess (160583) | more than 8 years ago | (#13874446)

Very true. Though I believe their cup sizes don't match those in the USA. A "B" cup in America is a "C" or "D" in their bra sizes. Yes, it's still false advertising.

BTW, Shoko Goto [tripod.com] has an impressive body.

"If you have to ask, you can't afford it" (1)

HokieSeas (560745) | more than 8 years ago | (#13873360)

About 5 weeks ago I was out with Bodak and we were with his parents and some other friends of theirs we hang out with quite a bit, and one of them was waiting on a phone call from their daughter to see if their offer was accepted on a condo she and her husband were trying to buy. Now I will admit I do not completely understand the entire condo mindset since I was desperately ready to get out of an apartment and into a house. Their offer was just shy of $300k for about a 1400 sf condo. It was a high rise (well, about as high as you can get around here with Navy jets flying around) near the ocean front. I think I may have choked slightly when I heard the number since I had bought my place, 1300 sf, for less than a third of that a couple of years ago. It makes me wonder what they think they are getting for all that money that justifies it.

Re:"If you have to ask, you can't afford it" (1)

mekkab (133181) | more than 8 years ago | (#13873589)

I had bought my place, 1300 sf, for less than a third of that a couple of years ago

Dinosaur. The housing market of a couple of years ago is nothing like the housing market of last spring (things are slow now, becuase they're always slow in the winter).
Three years difference can mean $100k. Or more.

Seriously. If you aren't down with the housing market even casually, you aren't going to understand.

It makes me wonder what they think they are getting for all that money that justifies it.

To cut from your own post: It was a high rise (well, about as high as you can get around here with Navy jets flying around) near the ocean front.

Uhm, is it me, or did you just answer your own question?

Re:"If you have to ask, you can't afford it" (1)

HokieSeas (560745) | more than 8 years ago | (#13873778)

Uhm, is it me, or did you just answer your own question?

Well, yeah I guess I did then. But still, I sure don't see that as being worth the money.

If you aren't down with the housing market even casually, you aren't going to understand.

I pay attention to what is being sold around me, but I haven't seen any jumps in my neighborhood more than $60k or $70k. My assessed value, of course being on the low end of things, has gone up $30k in three years. But, I do alot of engineering work for residential developers, and I still don't understand it the prices people will pay for items. Just last year, or maybe end of the year before it, we had a single lot (just under 1 acre) on one of our projects sell for over a million dollars. An empty lot on that. A triangular shaped piece on an culdesac, that backed up to a pond, that backed up to a golf couse, that overlooked the Chesapeake Bay. We all knew it was going to be a high dollar lot, but we never expected that amount.

I think I think about things you think you think. (1)

dave-tx (684169) | more than 8 years ago | (#13873427)

+ They are bad drivers. Many times it's not the frazzled mom with six kids in the car that blows the stop sign while she's westling with them. It's the suited silk-tie-wearing businessman who's just plain not paying attention or just apparently doesn't care.

Bet you 2:1 they were talking on a cellphone, too.

The people who are most willing to disrespect other people's beliefs are the ones who complain the most that other people disrespect their's.

I think that's almost a definition, though - in order to have a certain set of beliefs (I'm assuming you're talking religious), you have to, by definition, disbelieve others'. In the case of religion, that almost always shows up as disrespect. I have to admit some guilt on this one - I don't have a particular set of beliefs, but I do in fact disrespect the way others express their own. And I feel bad about it sometimes.

I think the media is at least partly to blame for the problems we have today with kids, but I also think that it's the parent's fault the media had that much power over their children in the first place.

It's the dumbing down of our society. Television is a great barometer for the direction the country is heading - when shit like "The Simple Life" is getting good television ratings, it's a good indication that the average person doesn't want to think at all when they're at home. And yeah, it gets passed on to the kids.

There's a certain sick irony in venerating yourself as a democratic republic while you mock the will of the majority of the world.

It's sad that the average American would have no understanding of your statement. And it's really sad that some would try to argue a contrary point.

Re:I think I think about things you think you thin (1)

elmegil (12001) | more than 8 years ago | (#13876255)

I'm assuming you're talking religious

Not necessarily a good assumption, I've seen very crunchy granola liberal hippy types that you could apply this to.

Re:I think I think about things you think you thin (1)

dave-tx (684169) | more than 8 years ago | (#13879363)

Not necessarily a good assumption, I've seen very crunchy granola liberal hippy types that you could apply this to.

I'm sure that there are many ways to interpret the original statement, but I'll stick by my assumption in this context.

You're doing it again (1)

Red_Foreman (877991) | more than 8 years ago | (#13875714)

There's a certain sick irony in venerating yourself as a democratic republic while you mock the will of the majority of the world.

If the majority of the world were other democracies, and not dictatorships and monarchies, you'd have an argument. But it's not, and it's flawed such that it would be easy for a conservative to point this out while jinning up a bunch of flag waving patriotism.

Stop being a dumbass. You do more harm than good to the progressive movement. Think before you post, dumbass.

I Am Jack's Anthropomorphised Vulva (1)

the_mad_poster (640772) | more than 8 years ago | (#13876071)

Which would be an invalid (and therefore typically conservative) argument since we don't discriminate between who can and can't vote based on their beliefs. After all, dumbass, fascists, communists, and all manner of anti-freedom dickheads can not only vote, but can and do run for office.

Try being less of an intellectual wet noodle.

Although you did trick me with the logout sig. If that particular incarnation of the trick is your idea, congrats and godspeed in your quest. If not, quit stealing other people's shit.

Re:You're doing it again (1)

jawtheshark (198669) | more than 8 years ago | (#13879345)

and monarchies

I hope that you know that many monarchies are pretty much democracies these days. At least this is the case in Europe, where (I think all) monarchies just serve as an (expensive) symbol of state. The monarch just signs what the (democratically elected) parliament has decided.

I live in the only remaining Grand Duchy in the world. I get to vote, and I know that the most important laws are called "Réglement Grand Ducal", because the Grand Duke signed them. (Above that there is the constitution, but that's a whole different thing)

In recent history, I only remember one instance where a King refused to sign a law. It was the (now deceased) Belgian King and the law was about abortion. I remember it being over the headlines everywhere (at least at my side of the pond, in our tiny country) See this biography [monarchie.be] , search for "abortion" and you'll see how it was worked around.

america could do something to change the economy (1)

kesuki (321456) | more than 8 years ago | (#13876101)

(note: you've seen me agrue stuff similar to this before, but this is a different angle)

We have the technology, we have the sceintists and we have the people to make it happen, we could turn the seas inta a 'cash crop' of renewable algea for 'fuel' we could find the best waters, get there first, have the most aquaculture mass farms, and produce enough renewable energy to comepletely replace oil and eventually coal.. look at how much the world spends on buying 'cheap' arabian oil... america isn't the only importer of energy... on the one hand we could completely stop importing energy, and on the second hand we could start exporting energy to anyone who needed it, and was willing to pay us for it. without america 'proping up' cheap oil prices oil prices would soar and biofuels would quickly becom the energy source of choice for the world economies. of course, i'm sure many countries would also want to have their own algea fields rather than let us control it all, but the costs associated with making it cheaply means that only china and a collective eu effort could manage to finance any serious competitor to the prices we could offer the world.. especially if we were harvesting trillions of barrels of algae products a year... :)

yes, it costs money, yeah, there might be hiccups making sure said technology was 'earth' friendly... but it sure as hell beats chasing the 'dream' of acheiving fusion.. because frankly a larger, more powerful fusion reactor that will run maintenece free for the next 2-5 billion years than any humanity could dream of allready exists, it's just a matter of making efficient use of the energy that great fusion reactor in the sky is outputting more efficiently than 'nature' does now.

One more to add (1)

cyranoVR (518628) | more than 8 years ago | (#13877981)

It occurs to me that "Common Sense" is merely simple-mindedness flavored by arrogance.
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