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ah, the voice of reason

elmegil (12001) writes | more than 8 years ago

Media (Apple) 3

Too bad more slashbots can't be forced to read this, Clockwork Orange style. Seems the last time the issue came up on the front page, hordes were claiming that iTunes and iPod were a complete lock in, despite the true facts.Too bad more slashbots can't be forced to read this, Clockwork Orange style. Seems the last time the issue came up on the front page, hordes were claiming that iTunes and iPod were a complete lock in, despite the true facts.

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3 comments

Yeah, I don't get it either (1)

jawtheshark (198669) | more than 8 years ago | (#15064354)

It is perhaps because iTunes defaults to AAC for ripping CDs. This means that Joe Sixpack is going to rip to AAC and thus only have AAC files. I'm not saying no other player can play AAC, they certainly can (think PSP), but comprehending different formats is beyond the capabilities of the average Joe Sixpack. Take my brother in law for example: I think he's quite intelligent, but he is only 14 years old. When he got his first MP3 player it was a "real MP3" player in the sense that it could only handle that format. Being the uneducated Windows user by definition and I was just entering his life at the time (as the boyfriend of his sister), he ripped his CDs with Windows Media Player to "MP3s". Yet, they wouldn't play on his MP3-player. That was so surprising for him that he declared the MP3 player "crap" and wanted to return it.
What did really happend: he went with the default settings of Windows Media Player and thus ending up with .WMA files. Windows hides extentions and he didn't know about the existence of extentions in the first place. For him, the files on which he clicked and that produced music were for all purposes MP3s.

The above story illustrates what iTunes does for the normal user: it creates files by default that are not MP3s but still are music files. They will play on iPods, but not on most other devices. AAC certainly has qualities (having much smaller footprint for equal quality), but that's one problem I predict with people using iPods and ripping their own CDs.

The thing is: we geeks do not think the same way normal people do. When we get a new program, the first thing we do is go out and find what options can be set, evaluate its capabilities, etc.... So, when I install iTunes, I do many things: including (but not limited to)

  • Set ripping format to MP3
  • Disable the Update notification: I decide when to update
  • Enable music sharing

A normal user will probably not even bother to go through the different possible settings, because (frankly) he doesn't understand them! You see a dropdownbox with "AAC" in it, what newbie would suspect that "MP3" is in the same dropdownbox... Unless one knows about file formats and most people evidently do not....

Not defending the "Whiny Guy", just pointing out how many of those misunderstandings have come into this world. (Okay, summary is: "IGNORANCE")

Re:Yeah, I don't get it either (1)

Allen Zadr (767458) | more than 8 years ago | (#15072296)

Frankly, I think that was a great synopsis.

Re:Yeah, I don't get it either (1)

jawtheshark (198669) | more than 8 years ago | (#15073744)

Thank you.
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