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Crash Course in Linux & OSS for a Win32 QA guy

robi2106 (464558) writes | more than 4 years ago

Linux Business 5

I need to help someone get a crash course in QA work on an OSS stack, as opposed to their previous few years of QA work on a Win32 stack. We will be installing Ubuntu tomorrow for a quick and easy workstation. Then we need to find or write a series of tasks to learn the skills to help said person get a crash course in working in / with the LAMP OSS environment.

I need to help someone get a crash course in QA work on an OSS stack, as opposed to their previous few years of QA work on a Win32 stack. We will be installing Ubuntu tomorrow for a quick and easy workstation. Then we need to find or write a series of tasks to learn the skills to help said person get a crash course in working in / with the LAMP OSS environment.

Again, not a SW dev, or admin, just a QA guy, so tasks, reference material, etc need not be super low level. I have the perl trifecta (learning Perl, Perl Cookbook, and Reg Ex with Perl), but everything else I have relating to Linux is +5yrs old.

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Your first mistake (1)

tomhudson (43916) | more than 4 years ago | (#29243327)

We will be installing Ubuntu tomorrow for a quick and easy workstation.

If you want a fully-functional web server out of the box, Ubuntu is NOT the way to go. Try anything else - slackware, opensuse, fedora core ...

opensuse works well enough that I dumped redhat, but I still have a soft spot for slack. Ubuntu, on the other hand, will make you want to switch to Windows if you're a dev. And their "server version" isn't any better. I don't want things so "target marketed" and "dumbed down" that everything else that I'm accustomed to is missing. I don't want a "Windows-type experience". I give ubuntu to ID-10-Ts. You know, the "proud not to be able to learn" crowd.

Re:Your first mistake (1)

robi2106 (464558) | more than 4 years ago | (#29245545)

that makes sense. I might have been mistaken in my need for the system. I just need a Linux system so that he can get a crash course in the Linux OS, command line, reg expressions, piping, etc. If the system can also function as a server, would be a bonus, because the apps to be tested are all server side php.

so what would be a better dist? Keep in mind that I am NOT a linux admin, so something that is hard to install / configure (ie, does not have a pretty GUI for the install) is out of the question for me. :-)

Re:Your first mistake (1)

tomhudson (43916) | more than 4 years ago | (#29252007)

I think pretty much ALL the major distros default to a gui install.

For ordinary usage, you won't have to go beyond the gui. It's just when you're doing something funky (that probably wouldn't pass the "smell test", but you want to satisfy your curiosity) that you'll need to go beyond the tools in the gui.

I've been using opensuse since 9.0, and I like it. It supports dual monitors on both my box (ati) and laptop (nvidia), so I'm a happy homemaker. The "slab menu" in kde took some getting used to, but I actually prefer it now.

The easiest thing to do is give them a live cd. Harder would be to install multiple distros (just point swap, /home and (if you're going to have a server partition) /srv to common partitions,

For example (assuming a 320 gig hd):
/dev/sda1 swap (2x physical ram)
/dev/sda2 /home (100 gigs)
/dev/sda3 /srv (40 gigs)
/dev/sda4 extended partition
/dev/sda5 / for distro 1 (35 gigs)
/dev/sda6 / for distro 2 (35 gigs)
/dev/sda7 / for distro 3 (35 gigs)
/dev/sda8 / for distro 4 (35 gigs)

Keep in mind that /var will vary between distros, so you can't use a common one.

The reason to put only the actual distros on an extended partition is that, if you ever decide to opt for just one of the distros in the future, you can delete the extended partition, create a new /dev/sda4 primary partition, and install there (while keeping swap, /home, and /srv intact).

Of course, if you have more than one drive, knock yourself out :-) Good luck.

Re:Your first mistake (1)

robi2106 (464558) | more than 4 years ago | (#29263467)

see, even that small amount of information was enough that my eyes started glazing over at the mention of /sda4 etc. Yeah. Linux guru I am not. A lUser I am.

Re:Your first mistake (1)

tomhudson (43916) | more than 4 years ago | (#29269525)

In that case, just partition the disk into 4 parts, and insall a different distro on each. You can use a swap file instead of a swap partition, so play on!
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