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Normal CIO antics or immoral/illegal?

todrules (882424) writes | about 5 years ago

User Journal 1

I work for a large, publicly-traded company, and my CIO is friends with the CEO of a small/medium software development company. He seems to want to use this company for a lot of projects, even though they have never delivered a solid project. For example, they tried a chat project. That bombed. Didn't even make it past pilot stage. They tried a Flex app for our CSRs. Well, our real dev team had to go in and rewrite all the code, and when they were done, they were able to get rid of over half

I work for a large, publicly-traded company, and my CIO is friends with the CEO of a small/medium software development company. He seems to want to use this company for a lot of projects, even though they have never delivered a solid project. For example, they tried a chat project. That bombed. Didn't even make it past pilot stage. They tried a Flex app for our CSRs. Well, our real dev team had to go in and rewrite all the code, and when they were done, they were able to get rid of over half the code base. But, even that wasn't enough to save it. Less than a year later, we're redoing it from scratch. So, now, take 2 on the chat project. They way over promised and under delivered - blatant lies. We had to use 2 teams full time for 4 months to finally get the product even slightly usable and was able to deploy it (at times telling them what they were supposed to do and how to code). It's still one of the worst apps I've ever used. Next, they deliver another product, and it actually crashes an entire enterprise-class system on its first day! Hey, at least they got first at something. Now, they come in on even another project, and almost destroy this project by redoing the UI. (We were told by the CIO that we had to use them). Again, they deliver a crappy design and crappy code. It seems that our CIO is just intent on using this company, but it's costing my company millions of dollars, and, I think will be detrimental to the health of my company. Now, is this normal for a CIO to continue to use a company just because they have a friend in the other company, even though they can't deliver? Any suggestions on how to handle this? I really like my company and the people I work with, but I'm at my wit's end when it comes to this issue.

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Over his head (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29824429)

Lay this out to the CEO in terms of the damage in dollars it is doing to your company (lost productivity, lost clients if you can point to any, salary paid to X programmers to rewrite the CIO's mistake, etc). If that doesn't work, go to the board of directors.

If that doesn't work, buy a share of your company then go back to the board of directors and tell them you WILL show up at the next shareholder's meeting to present your report on the damage the CIO is doing to the company and how the board of directors is not doing anything to reign in the executive officers' money-losing antics.

This will almost certainly have an effect (if they just fire you and ignore the problem, it sounds like your company isn't going to be around much longer anyway. Bonus points if you keep the stock and show up at the meeting after being fired, handing out packets with records of your correspondence with the CIO, CEO, and board to the representatives of the Big Boys who show up until they throw you out. Then you file a whistleblower lawsuit with your documentation showing that you raised this issue long before you were fired to get your job back).

Now that I think of it, this is all a really bad idea. Just start reviewing your resume and touching base with friends and other contacts because you're pretty much screwed either way.

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