×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Sale of Goods Act beats AppleCare

TheRaven64 (641858) writes | more than 3 years ago

United Kingdom 2

A little while ago, someone on Slashdot pointed me at the Sale of Goods Act in relation to purchased electronics. The act, for those unfamiliar with it, requires that goods be 'suitable for the purpose for which sold.' This is a fairly broad term, but it basically means that they must be able to do anything that the seller claims that they can do. Under this law, y

A little while ago, someone on Slashdot pointed me at the Sale of Goods Act in relation to purchased electronics. The act, for those unfamiliar with it, requires that goods be 'suitable for the purpose for which sold.' This is a fairly broad term, but it basically means that they must be able to do anything that the seller claims that they can do. Under this law, you have 6 years from the date of purchase to file a lawsuit if the item does not match the claims.

This was relevant to me because my MacBook Pro is now out of warranty and the battery is dying. Looking in the System Profiler, its full charge capacity was showing up as 1476mAh after 56 charges. When new, it was 5500mAh. These numbers don't mean anything by themselves, but Apple claims that their batteries retain 80% of their full charge capacity after 300 charge cycles. Claiming this means that a battery that does not retain 4400mAh after 300 charge cycles is not suitable for the purpose for which sold, and they are legally required to refund or replace it (irrespective of the time that has elapsed, although I can only sue them if they don't within 6 years of the time of sale).

I called their support line and was put through to an Indian woman, who explained that the warranty had expired. I quoted the relevant parts of law to her, and (after being kept on hold for a bit), was transferred to someone senior. He very quickly agreed to send out a replacement battery.

Interestingly, he did not ask that the original battery be sent out, nor that I provide a credit card number where I would be billed if the battery turned out not to be defective. I've had two batteries replaced in warranty, and this was standard procedure then, so apparently I get better service out of warranty. I don't have a great deal of use for a battery that only lasts about 35 minutes on a full charge, but I'll probably keep it as a spare.

As always, it pays to know the law. It's a shame that Apple, which claims to be a customer-focussed company, doesn't educate its support team about this though. Possibly the Indian call centre deals with people from everywhere English speaking, while the Irish one only deals with people in the UK and Ireland, so the people there are more familiar with British law, but if I had not quoted the relevant act then I would have been charged £99 for a battery, on top of the £1.50 it cost to call their support line for half an hour.

2 comments

Very nice (1)

nacturation (646836) | more than 3 years ago | (#33885488)

The UK has some pretty cool pro-consumer laws. Reminds me of some of Rev's posts at http://me.uk/ [me.uk]

Re:Very nice (1)

TheRaven64 (641858) | more than 3 years ago | (#33892502)

The battery arrived this morning - very prompt, considering that I only called them yesterday afternoon. Normal warranty service from Apple takes 2-3 days for stuff to arrive. It's a big improvement. 5446mAh on a full charge, instead of 1476. Hopefully this one will last for a while, although if the event this month introduces shiny new ones I might be tempted to upgrade.

I've been pretty satisfied with this machine overall. It's almost four years old, and I bought it expecting to replace it after three. It was a huge step up from the (roughly three-year-old) PowerBook that it replaced. Going from a 1.5GHz G4 to a 2.16GHz Core 2 Duo was a big leap. The big limitations is that the memory controller can only access 3.25GB of RAM. If I could bump it up to 6GB, it would probably last quite a bit longer.

After three years, the replacement models looked uninspiring. About 20% faster, but that's about it - hardly worth upgrading. Most of my work these days is done in a FreeBSD VM, so a nice SSD and a bit more RAM would be nice.

Google gave me an account on a machine that makes this one seem very slow. It has 12 cores and a ludicrous amount of RAM. I can do a complete LLVM build in about 3 minutes on it (takes 45 minutes to an hour on this machine) - having the entire tree on a RAM drive makes things really speedy.

Check for New Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Sign up for Slashdot Newsletters
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...