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Edmund Burke PC (12 January 1729 - 9 July 1797)

Jeremiah Cornelius (137) writes | more than 3 years ago

Government 7

Edmund Burke PC (12 January [NS] 1729[1] - 9 July 1797) was an Irish statesman, author, orator, political theorist, and philosopher who, after relocating to England, served for many years in the House of Commons of Great Britain as a member of the Whig party. He is mainly remembered for his support of the cause of the American Revolutionaries, and for his later opposition to the French Revolution. The latter led to his becoming the leading figure within the conservative faction of the Whig pa

Edmund Burke PC (12 January [NS] 1729[1] - 9 July 1797) was an Irish statesman, author, orator, political theorist, and philosopher who, after relocating to England, served for many years in the House of Commons of Great Britain as a member of the Whig party. He is mainly remembered for his support of the cause of the American Revolutionaries, and for his later opposition to the French Revolution. The latter led to his becoming the leading figure within the conservative faction of the Whig party, which he dubbed the "Old Whigs", in opposition to the pro-French-Revolution "New Whigs," led by Charles James Fox.[2] Burke was praised by both conservatives and liberals in the nineteenth century. Since the twentieth century, he has generally been viewed as the philosophical founder of modern conservatism,[3][4] as well as a representative of classical liberalism.[5] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edmund_Burke

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Is it possible (1)

PopeRatzo (965947) | more than 3 years ago | (#34215054)

If you think about it, the rise in popularity for Edmund Burke's ideas in Britain also coincided with the beginning of the decline of England as the premiere world power.

Conservatives have a way of doing that to countries for some reason.

Re:Is it possible (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34218716)

You might not know this, but England still runs everything outside Russia, and maybe France, Belgium, and China...

Re:Is it possible (1)

Jeremiah Cornelius (137) | more than 3 years ago | (#34219260)

BanKING.

Re:Is it possible (1)

PopeRatzo (965947) | more than 3 years ago | (#34221702)

Sure, sure, they run everything but Belfast.

And from the looks of the riots in the UK over the cost of university, they're not doing a great job at home.

Re:Is it possible (1)

countertrolling (1585477) | more than 3 years ago | (#34224326)

And from the looks of the riots in the UK over the cost of university, they're not doing a great job at home.

Waddya talkin' about? This isn't politics, it's artwork. And a beautiful piece it is. You use the riots to scare people into granting you more authority. In fact, it might be in your interest to provoke more riots, and maybe plant a few bimbs on the side.

We've had a few setbacks.
That's to be expected in any business.
But I am still in charge, and I am still strong.

Re:Is it possible (1)

PopeRatzo (965947) | more than 3 years ago | (#34226920)

Well, when you put it like that.

Re:Is it possible (1)

JesseL (107722) | more than 3 years ago | (#34245560)

Is imperialism supposed to be a good thing now?

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