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CEOs assume no incentive to become more efficient if there is no bw price

keneng (1211114) writes | more than 3 years ago

Media 0

http://www.canadianbusiness.com/managing/ceo-poll/article.jsp?content=20110218_165223_3532
Telecom: The CEO Poll: Communication breakdown. Canadian CEOs vent about the CRTC.

http://www.canadianbusiness.com/managing/ceo-poll/article.jsp?content=20110218_165223_3532
Telecom: The CEO Poll: Communication breakdown. Canadian CEOs vent about the CRTC.

Extracted from the article:
Only 31% agreed that usage-based billing is fair and maintains network efficiency. âoeThis controversy is rooted in the false assumption that bandwidth is free,â wrote one respondent. âoeThere is no incentive to become more efficient if there is no price for consumption â" whether it is water or bandwidth.â

IMHO that's bull-manure. Network hardware providers sell cables, routers, switches, transponders, etc..
Selling this kind of hardware is more similar to either tire pumping machines or water pumping machines.
All the internet consumers continually provide incentive to improve internet bandwidth efficiency when they continually purchase the upgrade network equipment at their discretion as a one-shot deal purchase. Then the internet consumers may pump out/pump in as much as their network hardware is capable of like a tire pumping machine or a water pumping machine. As everyone knows there are different pumping machines available at a variety of prices just like networking hardware.

Everybody understands if neighbourhoods hook themselves in a grassroots style without intervention from Bell/Rogers/CRTC, they would be better served. There are enough networking aficionados out there to make this happen given enough hunger for bandwidth. There will be no revolution if the Canadian Internet Users' appetites for bandwidth are fed well enough. As the Canadian government and the CRTC is observing, Canadian Internet Users are hungry at the moment. How much time will it be before the grassroots NO-BELL/NO-ROGERS/NO-CRTC Canadian Internet materializes itself? I would bet sooner rather than later. Usage Based Billing(UBB) is a less obvious restriction of internet rights, but it does in some ways resemble the restriction of creating content and timely relaying the content in large bandwidth rates to everywhere on the planet as found in other countries reducing/disallowing internet access/tor/vpn's. Everybody understands the synergy to the global village when there are no political/economic borders on the internet.

Don't trust the media articles saying UBB is good because the legacy media providers are protecting their interests by restricting bandwidth to the general consumer. By introducing UBB, BELL/ROGERS/CRTC/Legacy media providers aim to restrict the general internet users' ability to become a high-bandwidth content providers. There is some truth to use the excuse of piracy to justify it and push UBB through, but that's insignificant when compared to stripping away everyone's inherent ability to become a high-bandwidth content provider. As an example of articles not to trust, here's one and do please read it comments blasting the article's credibility away because the article is posted on Macleans and is owned by ROGER(an internet provider) and the article's opinion biases to defend UBB to protect ROGER's business interests:
http://www2.macleans.ca/2011/02/18/the-internet-should-be-fair-not-free-to-everyone/#idc-cover

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