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3d galactic map with time calculations?

JWSmythe (446288) writes | more than 2 years ago

Space 8

Ok, here's an odd request. Maybe someone out there has an answer for me.

I know we've been making huge advances in mapping distant celestial bodies, their speed either across our field of view or relative direction (to or from us) with red/blue shift, etc. I was curious to if there has been any publicly available project which creates a 3 dimensional representation of that data, and allows for adjustment of time.

Ok, here's an odd request. Maybe someone out there has an answer for me.

I know we've been making huge advances in mapping distant celestial bodies, their speed either across our field of view or relative direction (to or from us) with red/blue shift, etc. I was curious to if there has been any publicly available project which creates a 3 dimensional representation of that data, and allows for adjustment of time.

The way I understand it, in theory with enough data, the known universe could be collapsed (virtually) to the time of the big bang.

I've had an idea for a (fictional) story, which I'd like to be able to back up with at least something resembling factual information. For example, the Earth takes roughly 250 million years to make an orbit all the way around our galaxy (one "Galactic year"). If you were looking at Galaxy X and Galaxy Y, and for particular intervals. Imagine a line drawn from a fixed point in each Galaxy. Would it be possible to determine if the Earth (or at least a close part of our galaxy) would intersect that line, or look back to when that did happen? ... and save the supercomputer comments for some other time. :)

8 comments

Time Travel (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36702880)

I think if you find the answer you will be on the verge of discovering how to travel time. Time is a product of us moving through space which is actually Time itself... If you can predict or map out where our planet is heading or where it has been, physically in space, it opens up an enormous amount of questions. This about the prediction that the LHC might possibly be able to relay message through time with quantum particles, you have to know where the LHC is going to be at the specific time in space, would you not?

Re:Time Travel (1)

JWSmythe (446288) | more than 2 years ago | (#36702968)

    I think you're a little confused on what I was asking.

    We already understand the movement of our planets and their moons, around the sun. We extrapolate our position in the galaxy from that. You can get programs to show the movement of objects in our galaxy, as well as stars tor astrological signs (among other things)

    Instead of a simulator with a few dozen objects, I'm looking for something that can simulate the entire known universe.

    Most of what I see mapped is done in a very obvious 2-dimension space. I'm looking to be able to visualize the 3-dimensional space and all the objects we know about. No time travel required.

Celestia? (1)

tqft (619476) | more than 2 years ago | (#36703600)

While Celestia may not be able to do exactly what you want as is, it is apparently extendable (I have - at least had - Star Trek mods ) and so on for it

Re:Celestia? (1)

JWSmythe (446288) | more than 2 years ago | (#36707846)

    Perfect! Well, I had a look at their page. 100k stars, not limited to the surface of the earth. That sounds perfect. Thank you!

Re:Celestia? (1)

tqft (619476) | more than 2 years ago | (#36707896)

I knew you can get a view of our galaxy from the outside - been there done that - so I thought it might fit

Re:Celestia? (1)

JWSmythe (446288) | more than 2 years ago | (#36708710)

Been there, done that? :) I'm assuming I read that a bit wrong the first time. Otherwise, let me know when the next flight out of here is. I've been waiting a long time for a ride off this rock. :)

Re:Celestia? (1)

tqft (619476) | more than 2 years ago | (#36708808)

Next time you are over I will lend you my Electronic Thumb, yours seems to be broken.

Took me a few minutes to work out how to go out that far.

Re:Celestia? (1)

JWSmythe (446288) | more than 2 years ago | (#36709420)

Next time you are over I will lend you my Electronic Thumb, yours seems to be broken.

    Ya, that's why I have to resort to asking people for a ride. I tried to fix it, but it's not like you can pop down to the store and pick up the parts. It's hard to duplicate hundreds of thousands of years of technological advancements made by other planets.

    The way these primitives work, they'll never reach the same level. All of their focus has been on better ways to kill each other. Sharp sticks, to sharp rocks, to sharp metal sticks, to flinging rocks, to propelling small metal chunks with a chemical reaction, to flying metal sticks with chemical or nuclear reactions on the top. They always want the better way to kill each other, and fail to realize the potential of cooperation, and what the brighter of the species could produce.

    I'd be surprised if they ever get far enough to invent a transharmonic resonance flux generator. If they had, I could at least build a site to site wormhole, and just walk home. This rock is covered with the raw components, but forbid the thought of making even a high output power generator. They'd probably call it a bomb, shoot us as terrorists, and destroy the answers to so many of their socioeconomic problems.

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