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Puzzle: Adverbs that do not end in "ly"

Chacham (981) writes | about 11 years ago

User Journal 12

This may be an easy one, I haven't thought about it too much. It would seem as mentioned in "Mad Libs" that most adverbs end in "ly". Well, do you know any adverbs that don't end in "ly"?

This may be an easy one, I haven't thought about it too much. It would seem as mentioned in "Mad Libs" that most adverbs end in "ly". Well, do you know any adverbs that don't end in "ly"?

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12 comments

Google is your friend (1)

superyooser (100462) | about 11 years ago | (#6188250)

I thought of a few on my own like "now" and "soon." See here [reference.com] and here [uvcs.uvic.ca] .

Re:Google is your friend (1)

Chacham (981) | about 11 years ago | (#6203913)

I guess I meant subtype manner. I was unaware of the other types. I still need to absorb that information.

very (1)

AntiFreeze (31247) | about 11 years ago | (#6188434)

"very," and I've got a ton more, but some of my work is in the linguistics business, so I won't ruin it for others by posting a large list.

Re:very (1)

Chacham (981) | about 11 years ago | (#6203895)

Whereas an adverb is a modifier for a verb, wouldn't "very" become an ad-adverb? (Or an adjecverb? :)

Re:very (1)

AntiFreeze (31247) | about 11 years ago | (#6204407)

very [reference.com] :

very: adv.

For the same reason "always" is an adverb.

I was always running.
I was very tired.

They're clearly adverbs in context, even though they certainly don't end in ly.

I believe that approximately 90% of words which end in -ly are adverbs. Right now, I can't think of any words ending in ly which aren't, but I just woke up and am pretty tired. Anyone want to help me out?

Re:very (1)

Chacham (981) | about 11 years ago | (#6205165)

For the same reason "always" is an adverb.

I was always running.
I was very tired.

They're clearly adverbs in context, even though they certainly don't end in ly.


I don't understand. And adverb describes a verb. "Always" is not a description of "tired", nor is "very". "Always" merely mentions *when* the verb happened. and, "very" is intensity. So, they should be similar to adverbs, yet not quite actual adverbs.

Right now, I can't think of any words ending in ly which aren't

Really? A wordly person such as you? How silly. Anyway, count me as an ally. I'd love to find a frilly answer.

Re:very (1)

AntiFreeze (31247) | about 11 years ago | (#6208271)

No, adverbs don't describe verbs. They modify the behavior of verbs.

I was swimming quickly.
I was very tired.
I will always need more sleep than I can get.

etc.

And ally's a great example of a word ending in ly which isn't an adverb.

Re:very (1)

Chacham (981) | about 11 years ago | (#6208645)

No, adverbs don't describe verbs. They modify the behavior of verbs.

So that's my mistake. Oh well. English is stoopid. :-)

More... (1)

Tickenest (544722) | about 11 years ago | (#6190022)

quite too And "daily" is a word that ends in "ly" that isn't always an adverb.

Fast (1)

salimma (115327) | about 11 years ago | (#6198423)

... as in 'he goes fast' ?

Re:Fast (1)

Chacham (981) | about 11 years ago | (#6202404)

I always correct people who say that, by telling them "fast" is not an adverb. :) Therefore, it is "He goes quickly".

Re:Fast (1)

salimma (115327) | about 11 years ago | (#6203710)

I always correct people who say that, by telling them "fast" is not an adverb. :)

It is, actually. Just not in that context.

From Dictionary.com [reference.com] :

adv.
faster, fastest
1. In a secure manner; tightly: hold fast.
2. To a sound degree; deeply: fast asleep.
3. In a rapid manner; quickly.
4. In quick succession: New ideas followed fast.
5. Ahead of the correct or expected time: a watch that runs fast.
6. In a dissipated, immoderate way: living fast.
7. Archaic. Close by; near.

I did not remember it correctly - one of those anecdotes I picked up when I first learned English, that fast is one of those irregular adverbs that does not gain a -ly ending.
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