Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Verbiage: phone lights before the ring, Advance knowledge.

Chacham (981) writes | more than 10 years ago

User Journal 4

My cell phone (which i plan to return tomorrow), has blue lights it. They light up when the phone is about to ring, but just slightly earlier. I keep thinking "kewl! Advance knowledge". Of course, i then realize that the ringer is just late. It's just odd. Kind of like being "pre-qualified".

My cell phone (which i plan to return tomorrow), has blue lights it. They light up when the phone is about to ring, but just slightly earlier. I keep thinking "kewl! Advance knowledge". Of course, i then realize that the ringer is just late. It's just odd. Kind of like being "pre-qualified".

cancel ×

4 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Similar thing (1)

GoRK (10018) | more than 10 years ago | (#8010974)

If I have my phone on the desk next to some cheap speakers or a phone with a speaerphone or something, the RF interference it creates when it transmits causes the speakers to buzz or hum really loudly. When the phone is about to ring, I know a second or two ahead of time because I can hear the speakers start to buzz, etc.

What happens is that the tower must start soem kind of direct 2-way communication with the telephone and the phone must acknowledge the tower before it begins to ring. CallerID information and whatnot is also transmitted at this point before the actual ringing begins. I believe your phone is doing something similar. The fact that the LED's light slightly before the callerid shows and the ring starts is kind of a non-issue.

I'm sure there is a document out there somewhere that details the protocol between network and phone during a ring... That'd be the best answer to your question.

Re:Similar thing (1)

Cyberdyne (104305) | more than 10 years ago | (#8012694)

What happens is that the tower must start soem kind of direct 2-way communication with the telephone and the phone must acknowledge the tower before it begins to ring.

That can't account for this much delay. More likely, it's power management: for obvious reasons, the phone keeps everything turned off it isn't actually using; the ringer and other circuitry back online could take a few seconds to power up.

I'm sure there is a document out there somewhere that details the protocol between network and phone during a ring... That'd be the best answer to your question.

The SS7 protocol used within the network is certainly publicly documented, but it's very simple - certainly not elaborate enough to account for this delay. Something like "202-555-1111, there's a call for you from 202-555-2222 on channel 27", "OK" (phone rings, user answers) "off-hook, connected". I'm pretty sure the delays will be within the phone, rather than on the network layer.

Re:Similar thing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8028427)

That can't account for this much delay. More likely, it's power management: for obvious reasons, the phone keeps everything turned off it isn't actually using; the ringer and other circuitry back online could take a few seconds to power up.

Or it could be that the phone is a more current model that has an internal list of numbers that it is told to treat differently...

Example: Some phones can be programmed to ring differently based on if the caller is in the phonebook of the phone or not. Some phones allow the user to give a different ringtone to different people on the phonebook list.

Some phones have a "do not disturb unless number is on my emergency list" option.

All the above could be reasons why the phone is taking a little time before ringing.

The is also a new proposed featureset [howstuffworks.com] {which there are some models that already have the code in them} for some bluetooth phones to automatically "optionally/volunterily" disable ringing when in "silence" zones like movie theatres and hospitals.

Some phones can be configured to act differently [cellphonehacks.com] depending on which SID [mountainwireless.com] the call is coming from.

Any of the above could account for the delay...

~GoAT~

Funny... (1)

MikeXpop (614167) | more than 10 years ago | (#8022672)

There was an episode of a Nickelodeon show (since cancelled) called Keenan and Kel that involved a phone like this. Kel could tell when the phone was going to ring and once who was calling, although that was just because that person had called before and was planning to call back. Because of this everyone thought Kel to be psychic. Hilarity ensued, or so I'm guessing. I didn't watch the end.

I'm suprised they actually made phones like that.
Check for New Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>