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Typo: Slashdot: WebTV 911 Hacker... Cyber Terrorist?

Chacham (981) writes | more than 10 years ago

User Journal 5

WebTV 911 Hacker... Cyber Terrorist? has a redefinition of the word "several". I've also felt that "a " is one, "a couple" is two, "a few" is three, "several" is four to seven, "handful" or "many" start after that. Either that, or he is defining "victim" differently.

WebTV 911 Hacker... Cyber Terrorist? has a redefinition of the word "several". I've also felt that "a " is one, "a couple" is two, "a few" is three, "several" is four to seven, "handful" or "many" start after that. Either that, or he is defining "victim" differently.

5 comments

hm. (1)

SolemnDragon (593956) | more than 10 years ago | (#8428363)

i think several is three to seven. That solves my number issues. On the other hand, Yesterday, three days ago, a week ago, and the associated days in between all become, "the other day."

The other day i tried this new recipe...

"Which other day?"

I think it was saturday...

"So, two days ago?"

no, last saturday week.

"So you mean last saturday week?"

Yes, like i said- the other day i tried this new recipe...

Re:hm. (1)

Chacham (981) | more than 10 years ago | (#8428703)

On the other hand, Yesterday, three days ago, a week ago, and the associated days in between all become, "the other day."

Interesting.

The rest is hilarious. Thanx. :)

Re:hm. (1)

turg (19864) | more than 10 years ago | (#8429104)

The original meaning for "several" was "separate" (the adjective), and it came to mean "more than one" -- as in "on several occasions this week" to emphasise that these are seperate occurances rather than one continuous occurance. Now the dictionary definitions [reference.com] seem to define it as "more than two but not many" -- none of them specify a definite upper limit. As a kid, I heard (from other kids) more specific definitions of how many constituted "several" but I haven't heard such rules in other contexts.

Doh! A typo of my own (1)

turg (19864) | more than 10 years ago | (#8429141)

here [reference.com] is the correct link to the definitions of several.

Re:Doh! A typo of my own (1)

Chacham (981) | more than 10 years ago | (#8429287)

...and "occurences" is the correct spelling of "occurances". :-P

Sorry, couldn't resist.
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