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Verbiage: TV never leaves you.

Chacham (981) writes | more than 10 years ago

User Journal 6

Just the other day i was talking to someone and told me not to worry. He said "We can rebuild him. We have the technology...." and he continued. I stopped him and asked him where that was from. Something told me that i recognized it, yet i didn't know what it was. He then repeated it and started singing the theme song, which i did not remember.

Just the other day i was talking to someone and told me not to worry. He said "We can rebuild him. We have the technology...." and he continued. I stopped him and asked him where that was from. Something told me that i recognized it, yet i didn't know what it was. He then repeated it and started singing the theme song, which i did not remember.

I asked him when was the last time he saw Max Payne's predecessor (though, he probably knows not of Max Payne) and he responded probably about twenty years. I then repeated what i've been saying a lot, i heard from my younger brother, and has been echoed for quite some time now, "TV never leaves you". Never. Ever.

We then talked about why. He said that he heard a good explanation, that with tv one gives himself totally over to it. As if he removes his conciousness and asks the TV to run it for a while. And, such devotion always leaves its mark. Perhaps.

I am wondering if it's because we don't necesarily want to leave. Even if we recognize it as being "bad", we aren't disgusted at it. So, remembering an old show is a slight attachment. Hmm...

Bah! I remember such stupid things from the seventies and eighties. When playing Trivial Pursuit is someone mentions that they got a piece of the pie, i start thinking "Cus we're a movin' on up (movin' on up)". (I can't even stop it right now!) Or, if someone says "Hmmm" i many times think of Don Herbert. And the word "deal" reminds me of the "Most Annoying Commercial Ever" which was for a local car dealership. And who can forget Meow Mix's meow song? Clap-on, Clap-off, and the Sure card. It goes on and on.

TV never leaves you.

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steve austin (1)

MJRo (763418) | more than 10 years ago | (#8671108)

the six million dollar man.

Re:steve austin (1)

Chacham (981) | more than 10 years ago | (#8679735)

Congratulations on your first comment.

The Sun Always Shines On TV (1)

bettiwettiwoo (239665) | more than 10 years ago | (#8701203)

I think you're right (or possibly: I think your brother's right): TV never leaves you.

Especially the programmes you see/saw for the first time as a child. I think it's partly its repetitive aspect. For some obscure and inexplicable reason, it appears that with enough repetition almost anything can be found to contain gems of interest, be they quirky quotations, funny gestures, memorable moments to refer to. A sort of social adhesive? A cultural identikit/identity?

Maybe it's the way that one often doesn't give TV one's absolute and undivided attention, so that it is left to (insiduously) worm its way into one's mind without one really noticing?! Since TV-shows are shown repeatedly, albeit not the same episode of course, it can do its worming at least once a week, for an extended period of time. And before you know it, you have developed an interest (however luke-warm) in the whatever show.

Re:The Sun Always Shines On TV (1)

Chacham (981) | more than 10 years ago | (#8701928)

I think it's partly its repetitive aspect.

People seem to remember movies they have only seen once as well. Most notably, the effect it had on them. As people who saw "The Blob" when it came out reportedly still get scared in the same way.

I'll have to think about the repetitive aspect. I'll have to think about the repetitive aspect. But my gut feeling is that it doesn't play as important a role. More that the devotion does the main damage, repetition perhaps, cleans up some of the fine details.

Re:The Sun Always Shines On TV (1)

bettiwettiwoo (239665) | more than 10 years ago | (#8710419)

People seem to remember movies they have only seen once as well. Most notably, the effect it had on them. As people who saw "The Blob" when it came out reportedly still get scared in the same way.
Admittedly, I remember seeing Alien and being scared witless: years afterwards I could still remember almost every scene of the entire film and I could definitely remember how it made me feel. So obviously I agree with that. However, I didn't see it on TV, but at the cinema. And in my post I wasn't referring to film at all. Not even film you see on TV, but TV shows pure and unadulterated, so I didn't even consider films.

Compared to films I think TV shows has less of an impact per show and per viewing: the TV show is usually shorter, the picture is usually worse (or at least it used to be worse before HD-TV), the sound quality is probably lesser. I would say that the situation in which you normally watch a film, viz. at the cinema, is more conducive to totally imersement (if there is such a word) and therefore a bigger impact upon 'first' viewing.

My argument is that a TV show will probably/normally have a lesser impact at 'first' viewing (of say 'episode 1') than a film (a film considered here as a finished entity; i.e., I will totally disregard sequels), but that with repetitive viewing (of 'episode 2', and then 'episode 3', and then 'episode 4', etc.) the TV show can have just as much, or more, impact as a film can. In other words, it grows on you, over time, with repetitive viewing. Without that repetitiveness, however, I doubt that the TV show would stay with you for as long, and I also doubt that in the normal case a TV show impacts as deeply as films do.

Re:The Sun Always Shines On TV (1)

Chacham (981) | more than 10 years ago | (#8711067)

OK, you seem to have a point. :)
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