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Slashdot Poll

How much of your media do you store locally?

187
  • 0% to 20%

    965 votes / 6%
  • 20% to 40%

    487 votes / 3%
  • 40% to 60%

    519 votes / 3%
  • 60% to 80%

    1140 votes / 7%
  • 80% to 100%

    11901 votes / 74%
  • I don't store any media

    481 votes / 3%
  • Depends which cloud providers shut down this week

    475 votes / 2%
15968 Votes.
cancel ×

187 comments

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All of it (5, Insightful)

techno-vampire (666512) | about 10 months ago | (#45720715)

Why should I store any of my media (or other data, for that matter) anyplace else? Storing it in the cloud only works for as long as your cloud provider stays in business, and what I store is my business and nobody else's.

Re:All of it (5, Insightful)

ThorGod (456163) | about 10 months ago | (#45721085)

Or, how ever long they want to have that service free. They can just boot you anytime or close up that application, GOOGLE.

Re:All of it (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45722471)

Or, how ever long they want to have that service free. They can just boot you anytime or close up that application, GOOGLE.

This. Most of the stuff I've watched on YouTube I also store locally.

That just paid dividends last month when they forced everyone to switch to DASH instead of HTTP for 1080p streams (resultsing in choppy buffering all the time), and again last week when they downgraded all 256k audio to 128k.

Re:All of it (2)

Chrisq (894406) | about 10 months ago | (#45724915)

This. Most of the stuff I've watched on YouTube I also store locally.

You must have a fine porn collection

LOL (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45727937)

LOL

Re:All of it (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45752593)

that is one part of the media that I consume and that I never store. There is enough good streaming services around and if your needs are special enough not to be served by free service or you want to see whole movie then there are paid ones. There is also another aspect of this - there are predator lawyers around who send automatic requests to pay ransom for watching stuff they themselves put into internet. I consider this my duty to watch streaming pr0n now - I think if one gets a latter from Urmann+Collegen one should cut the balls off of these assholes - one can even argue that this was a service for the society. Common good so to say. Action based on principle. Marry xmas everyone!

Re:All of it (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45730949)

Youtube Center is great.

Re: Don't reply to ACs (2)

Adam Colley (3026155) | about 10 months ago | (#45722863)

Pah

What is this discrimination?!

Re: Don't reply to ACs (1)

ThorGod (456163) | about 10 months ago | (#45722943)

You're the exception.

Re:All of it (1)

JamieKitson (757690) | about 10 months ago | (#45725179)

Or, how ever long they want to have that service free. They can just boot you anytime or close up that application, GOOGLE.

Or they could *stop* charging and give you a terabyte of data, FLICKR

Re:All of it (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45735917)

Yeah and you can still get free internet from NetZero.

Re:All of it (1)

ILongForDarkness (1134931) | about 10 months ago | (#45725421)

Or just say now downloading that stuff will cost you $1 per MB, or hand the keys to NSA/those that would like to sue. Or the flip side your ISP might start charging you onurous rates for both the initial download, the upload to the cloud provider then a download again when you really want to consume the content. Of course things are easier for people that own/produce the content but ... they are rare. For every nerd shooting uncompressed HD video there are a thousand nerds downloading HD porn/TV/games etc.

All of it locally. None of it "in cloud". (1)

AliasMarlowe (1042386) | about 10 months ago | (#45752285)

The only media that leaves our home (the media server has local backup), does so on our portable media players.

Some of our mp3/video players are dumb enough (only a USB link) to trust. If the telephones which also serve some of that purpose are uploading them - or the media's metadata - to outside agencies, there's no trace of it in the logs. This doesn't mean that it's not happening, but there is no trace that I can find.

Exactly (3, Insightful)

Overzeetop (214511) | about 10 months ago | (#45721527)

I don't "store" anything in the cloud. I backup to the cloud, and I use it for synchronization, but I have everything locally. Most things at least twice.

Re:Exactly (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45721655)

Unless you own and operate your own internet connected server, backing up to the cloud is a really stupid idea. First, because if anything goes wrong with the connection, like the remote end has problems, the backup never happens and you are at the mercy of the cloud provider to fix it. Second, because a company running a cloud service could suddenly disappear or decide to start charging/raise your rates. Third, it's a huge privacy hole, what with the NSA stealing peoples' data and all.

I do everything locally. I have two TrueCrypted 8TB drives, one for daily use and the other is a mirror of that. My absolute most important data also goes on to a 512GB flash drive. Both the backup hard drive and the flash drive stay locked in a fireproof and waterproof safe.

Re:Exactly (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45727127)

if anything goes wrong with the connection, like the remote end has problems, the backup never happens and you are at the mercy of the cloud provider to fix it.

So either they fix it, or you fire them.

Second, because a company running a cloud service could suddenly disappear or decide to start charging/raise your rates.

Irrelevant or covered by above case. If you don't like what you're getting from that provider, use a different one.

Third, it's a huge privacy hole, what with the NSA stealing peoples' data and all.

"Let them eat static." -- Khan. Linux's RNG is not compromised. Anybody who has enough computing power to brute-force the backup's key, probably already has nano-spies in all my computers anyway. The level of adversarial power that you're talking about, are hypothetical space aliens, not the NSA.

I'm not really saying your concerns are warrantless, but none of them are really serious problems that rule out "back up to other people's computers" as a strategy.

The reason I don't like the strategy, is that my upload speed is so damn slow.

Re:Exactly (1)

barista (587936) | about 10 months ago | (#45739649)

if anything goes wrong with the connection, like the remote end has problems, the backup never happens and you are at the mercy of the cloud provider to fix it.

So either they fix it, or you fire them.

Suppose a clueless construction worker digs severs the network cables a block away from your house/business. A lot of things can go wrong with a network connection that aren't the fault of the cloud provider. Unless you live next door to a datacenter, bandwidth and network reliability are things to consider.

Re:Exactly (2)

maxwell demon (590494) | about 10 months ago | (#45732109)

First, because if anything goes wrong with the connection, like the remote end has problems, the backup never happens and you are at the mercy of the cloud provider to fix it.

This is only a problem if your cloud backup is the only backup you do.

Second, because a company running a cloud service could suddenly disappear or decide to start charging/raise your rates.

See above.

Third, it's a huge privacy hole, what with the NSA stealing peoples' data and all.

Bingo. Except that's not the third, but the first reason not to do cloud backups.

Re:Exactly (1)

msauve (701917) | about 10 months ago | (#45742769)

Third, it's a huge privacy hole, what with the NSA stealing peoples' data and all.

Bingo. Except that's not the third, but the first reason not to do cloud backups.

That's why I only back up really big files, like /dev/random, to the cloud.

Re:Exactly (1)

MrL0G1C (867445) | about 10 months ago | (#45752687)

Or you could encrypt and then backup to the cloud.

Re: Exactly (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45745559)

I hope no one steals your safe.

We have to type in new subjects now? Is this a bug (1)

CauseBy (3029989) | about 10 months ago | (#45745729)

Your scheme is vulnerable to a nuclear attack. A well-distributed cloud backup is not.

Why do I keep hearing perfectly well-educated nerds on Slashdot make the ridiculous argument "Oh, but the entire internet could suddenly go away, and if it did then my backup wouldn't exist anymore." Yeah, let me share a secret with you: the internet isn't going away. The thing you should actually worry about is that you aren't as good at providing 100% uptime as a professional server admin is.

Re:Exactly (2)

mlts (1038732) | about 10 months ago | (#45722113)

Nail, head hit. To me, the cloud is another piece of media, like a tape, hard disk, SSD, USB flash drive, or punchcard. Said media has its uses, but it also has shortcomings.

Right now, my cloud stuff also syncs to a HDD volume (it gets its own separate ReFS volume so that bit rot can be detected), and gets backed up to another volume every so often.

Files I want to archive offline, I just reach for Blu-Ray blanks and burn archives split to the media size, with a couple disks used in case one of the BD-R disks is bad. This type of setup has worked well, and storing a bunch of CD/DVD/Blu-Ray media in a folder costs me $0 per month unlike most cloud based solutions that cost about a C-note/terabyte/month.

Re:Exactly (1)

wooferhound (546132) | about 10 months ago | (#45736649)

Nail, head hit. To me, the cloud is another piece of media, like a tape, hard disk, SSD, USB flash drive, or punchcard. Said media has its uses, but it also has shortcomings.

How could you store Media on the cloud anyway. Wouldn't it be expensive to mail all the CDs, USB drives, Tapes and hard drives to the cloud where ever they are. It would be much more sensible to store Data on the cloud.

Re:Exactly (1)

CastrTroy (595695) | about 10 months ago | (#45727307)

I wouldn't even say I use "the cloud". I have 50 GB backup storage included (on top of what they give me for actual web content use) with my hosting plan, and I back stuff up there. I trust this more because I'm paying for it, so (I presume) it's less likely to just disappear one day. I keep everything locally, on at least 2 different machines.

Re:Exactly (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45728297)

Most things at least twice

 
Exactly!

c:\records

c:\records_backup

c:\records_backup2

[smug] I don't know about you chumps, but I'm covered for backups [/smug]

Re:Exactly (0)

kermidge (2221646) | about 10 months ago | (#45734481)

Not when they're all on the same drive.

Unless that was some of the more subtle sarcasm to show up here in quite a while.

Re:Exactly (4, Funny)

sosume (680416) | about 10 months ago | (#45734755)

He uses NTFS junction points you insensitive clod!

Re:Exactly (1)

QuesarVII (904243) | about 10 months ago | (#45735249)

[smug] I don't know about you chumps, but I'm covered for backups [/smug]

Not when they're all on the same drive.

Unless that was some of the more subtle sarcasm to show up here in quite a while.

Subtle? Really? Whooooooosh.

Re:Exactly (1)

stealth_finger (1809752) | about 10 months ago | (#45744049)

Some people need joke tags. smug tags just don't cut it.

Re:Exactly (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45744495)

Hey be nice, maybe he's just German.

They can't help it.

Re:Exactly (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45745187)

Some people need joke tags. smug tags just don't cut it.

He thought it said "Smaug".

Re:Exactly (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45751721)

I've got one better: C:\Stuff

It's in the spirit of xkcd [xkcd.com] .

Re:Exactly (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45728465)

I would use the same solution. Except for 2 small issues. My 'local' data is now in the 50TB range (massive DVD on demand collection, what can I say I liked the format, and xbmc is seriously awesome!). To backup that amount of data in the cloud would be slightly expensive as most charge a per month fee. My second problem is bandwidth. I can upload at 1mb per sec. That comes out to about 90-100KB per second. That would take 15 years to backup to the cloud. I could send a tape in (another cost for an expensive drive I dont own yet). Or ship them the drives (another cost). For now I have to live with local backup of original DVDs.

I do have a small amount of data I sync thru other peoples servers. But that is tiny in the 50 watt range.

Re:Exactly (1)

MrL0G1C (867445) | about 10 months ago | (#45752683)

Backup is stored, duh.

Re:All of it (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45722227)

what I store is my business and nobody else's

Terrorist.

Re:All of it (3, Insightful)

niftydude (1745144) | about 10 months ago | (#45723865)

Not to mention that

sudo apt-get install openssh-server sshfs

gives me my own cloud. Why would I use "the" cloud?

So I can get spam emails every time an artist on my list of music visits town? So I can lose all my media when the cloud provider goes broke, or has their assets frozen by the feds because some content elsewhere on their network is allegedly infringing copyright (ala kim dotcom)?

I don't know why I don't fall over myself to take advantage of such an opportunity.

Re:All of it (1)

ConceptJunkie (24823) | about 10 months ago | (#45726289)

Oh, I do that too, but I haven't figured out a good, _simple_ way to access this with my Android phone media players. I do not want to have to install a special server, that's what sshd is! I do not want to have to root my phone (e.g., in order to use sshfs). Maybe it's out there, but I haven't found it yet.

My dream would be to see AOL open-source Winamp now that they've abandoned it and the community could add ssh/scp support. The Winamp Android player is a nice piece of kit and I always use it for playing local media.

Re:All of it (1)

ichthus (72442) | about 10 months ago | (#45727325)

AndFTP [google.com] , which handles sftp/scp file browsing and transfers. You're welcome.

Re:All of it (1)

ConceptJunkie (24823) | about 10 months ago | (#45740011)

Thanks, but I've already got that. I'm not interested in tediously downloading something before I can listen to it. That's not my definition of "simple". The SFTP/SCP part needs to be transparent. I should be able to see all my stuff on my server as if it were on the phone... just like I can with Amazon's MP3 player.

Re:All of it (1)

punkrockguy318 (808639) | about 10 months ago | (#45749271)

Thanks, but I've already got that. I'm not interested in tediously downloading something before I can listen to it. That's not my definition of "simple". The SFTP/SCP part needs to be transparent. I should be able to see all my stuff on my server as if it were on the phone... just like I can with Amazon's MP3 player.

Check out Ampache and the android apps for it https://github.com/ampache/ampache/ [github.com] If you don't want to bother with setting up ampache you can always try subsonic which is more plug and play: http://www.subsonic.org/pages/index.jsp [subsonic.org] You can also use MPD to stream your local library to your portable device with an mpd client (MPDroid is available for Android)

Re:All of it (2)

niftydude (1745144) | about 10 months ago | (#45733999)

Oh, I do that too, but I haven't figured out a good, _simple_ way to access this with my Android phone media players. I do not want to have to install a special server, that's what sshd is! I do not want to have to root my phone (e.g., in order to use sshfs). Maybe it's out there, but I haven't found it yet.

I agree - it kinda sux that the sshfs implementation on android needs root. However, if you want to stream to an android media player from your home server, and you don't want to root your device, a combination of an openvpn [google.com] vpn, and samba filesharing will do the job. A lot of routers support openvpn out of the box now - but failing that any linux server can be configured to provide vpn addresses.

Re:All of it (1)

ConceptJunkie (24823) | about 10 months ago | (#45740023)

Thanks. That's probably the only viable solution, and I hadn't considered using VPN.

Re:All of it (1)

Daniel_Staal (609844) | about 10 months ago | (#45752081)

Just to add to the choices others are giving, you could take a look at OwnCloud [owncloud.org] . If you are running a php-based website already you won't have to install any new server. (It does need an HTTP server, and has it's own interface.)

It exports things via WebDAV, and it has an Android client. (Or you can use other WebDAV Android clients.) So you can mount the server on you computer as a directory, and you can easily get stuff to your phone as well. The one thing is that you need to upload into it - not into whatever file system you have already. (Though you can mirror into it easily.)

Worth looking at, though it might be a bit more complexity and overhead than what you are looking for.

Re:All of it (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45741669)

own cloud

The term 'cloud' originates, from my knowledge, in networking diagrams where an unknown portion was drawn as a cloud, because it could be anything, and all you knew about it was what you pushed in, and possibly what you got out. So if you know the composition of a "cloud", it ceases to become a cloud.

Re:All of it (1)

crdotson (224356) | about 10 months ago | (#45748661)

Wow, you're right! "sudo apt-get install openssh-server sshfs", configuring it, and then figuring out how to access that from every device you have is certainly easier than installing the DropBox app.

You and I (and probably a lot of people on Slashdot) know how to set up such things. Most people don't. And even those of us who do don't always enjoy reinventing the wheel. I completely get that you don't want or need to use such services, but the attitude of "why would ANYONE want such a thing" really baffles me.

And besides, I use yum, you insensitive clod!

Re:All of it (1)

punkrockguy318 (808639) | about 10 months ago | (#45749283)

Wow, you're right! "sudo apt-get install openssh-server sshfs", configuring it, and then figuring out how to access that from every device you have is certainly easier than installing the DropBox app.

You and I (and probably a lot of people on Slashdot) know how to set up such things. Most people don't. And even those of us who do don't always enjoy reinventing the wheel. I completely get that you don't want or need to use such services, but the attitude of "why would ANYONE want such a thing" really baffles me.

And besides, I use yum, you insensitive clod!

That's why there are applications like Subsonic that allow you to easily setup your media library so you can stream it to and from anywhere: http://www.subsonic.org/pages/index.jsp [subsonic.org]

Re:All of it (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45724105)

This obviously is the only sensible strategy. Of course one can store copies of their media "on the cloud" (=on the computer of a random guy who you met on the webz).

And while one can encrypt whatever is to be uploaded "onto the cloud", remember that in the NSA spying scandal, the meat of the case was the metadata.

"The cloud" is yet another bait for suckers. But I can't blame the investors, after all as we know, there's one born every minute.

All of it - So you can loose all of it (1)

nomaddamon (1783058) | about 10 months ago | (#45725231)

Why should I store any of my media (or other data, for that matter) anyplace else? Storing it in the cloud only works for as long as your cloud provider stays in business, and what I store is my business and nobody else's.

Storing it locally works as long as you don't get robbed...
and your house don't burn down...
and you don't get hit by major disaster (i.e. flood)...
and your storage medium doesn't fail...

I keep mine locally (2 redundant systems) and in cloud

Re:All of it - So you can loose all of it (1)

Digital Vomit (891734) | about 10 months ago | (#45726169)

Why should I store any of my media (or other data, for that matter) anyplace else? Storing it in the cloud only works for as long as your cloud provider stays in business, and what I store is my business and nobody else's.

Storing it locally works as long as you don't get robbed...
and your house don't burn down...
and you don't get hit by major disaster (i.e. flood)...
and your storage medium doesn't fail...

I keep mine locally (2 redundant systems) and in cloud

It's not a real cloud, you know. All those things can happen to stuff stored "in the cloud" as well.

Re:All of it - So you can loose all of it (1)

Daniel_Staal (609844) | about 10 months ago | (#45752089)

Sure, but the chances it will happen both locally and in the cloud, at the same time, is very small. If one fails, you recreate from the other.

Re:All of it - So you can loose all of it (1)

ConceptJunkie (24823) | about 10 months ago | (#45726321)

That's why a few months ago when visiting my parents I gave them a spindle of optical media to stick in their closet. Two copies of everything at home, two copies offsite, new full backups of everything about once a year or so, multiple backups to hard drives continuously, periodic incremental backups to optical every couple months or so. Yes, it's a hassle, but it's saved my bacon a few times, and one time even saved my employer's bacon (not my current employer).

Re:All of it - So you can loose all of it (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45727617)

Get yourself a waterproof fire safe that has a USB passthrough. Bolt it to the floor and just mount an external laptop type HDD in there. What is it that you absolutely have to backup? Family photos, personal documents (e.g. tax records, medical, family heirloom things). Movies and music can be replaced if need be... yea, there is a cost, time and effort. But it's copies that are lost - not the originals.

Every other year replace the HDD and store the 'old' one in a safe place - e.g. safe deposit box.

The files in the firebox are copies of what you maintain on the server - the firebox should not be your only copy.

I'm more of a Windows person - so I use XXCOPY to manage the backup. The only tool I've found that will make a new copy if one already exists at the destination that is changed from the source. Keeps me from overwriting the 'good' copy on the backup with the 'bad' copy from the source if I booger it up due to an errant save from PhotoShop.

Fred In IT

Re:All of it (1)

ConceptJunkie (24823) | about 10 months ago | (#45726233)

Oh, I store plenty of stuff on the cloud, but it's not my only storage. I sprung for Amazon's cloud music storage. $25/y/250000 songs and have uploaded my music collection there (about 2000 CDs' worth and about half as much in electronic purchases), however, that's for convenience. And given that the Amazon MP3 player has been doing nothing but crashing on my Android phone for the last couple weeks, it's not even a convenience right now.

I'm sure they'll sort out the software eventually, but a 64GB SDXC Micro in the phone is another convenience I rely on... that and a Sansa Fuze (definitely not Fuze+, that's a horrible device) that I keep in my work bag. Everything is also backed up in multiple locations on ready-accessible magnetic media and periodically backed up to optical media. I couldn't imagine relying on any cloud service for anything except convenience.

Re:All of it (1)

Tsingi (870990) | about 10 months ago | (#45726727)

Why should I store any of my media (or other data, for that matter) anyplace else?

There's no good reason to do that. Storage is dirt cheap. If you don't own a real computer you might find it useful. If you aren't storing it on your own system though, you should reconsider calling it 'your' media, because you don't actually possess it.

Re:All of it (1)

Sloppy (14984) | about 10 months ago | (#45726991)

Why should I store any of my media (or other data, for that matter) anyplace else?

My interpretation of the question, was that if you're taking backup tapes home from the office (or if you have a hard drive stashed at a friend's or relative's house) then some of your media isn't local. And the reason you might want to do that, would be to have data survive "serious" problems, such as fire, flood, etc.

I didn't see the question as implying anything about storing things on other people's computers ("cloud"), though yeah, that would count as nonlocal too.

what I store is my business and nobody else's

It is your business and nobody else's, but it doesn't have to be that way. Perhaps a simple trade (e.g "I'll store your backup disk in my closet, if you store my backup in your closet") could be advantageous.

Re:All of it (1)

Em Adespoton (792954) | about 10 months ago | (#45729231)

Yeah; talk about interpretation... when I read the question, I was thinking "Hmm... I keep one of my backup sets offsite, does that count as 1 medium or 2 media?" Then I looked at the options and got confused, until I realized they're likely talking about multimedia files, not physical media.

But for multimedia files, if you store them offsite, they're not really your files --- especially if stored in the cloud.

So what exactly is this poll polling? I long for the days with answers that were limited, but obvious, with a good CowboyNeal option for "I protest the provided options."

Re:All of it (1)

Geek Hillbilly (2975053) | about 10 months ago | (#45727273)

Amen,Bro

Agreed (1)

ambidextroustech (2597091) | about 10 months ago | (#45727983)

Storage and backup is sometimes good on the cloud, when it's unimportant or irrelevant. I sincerely doubt that our security overseeing and certifying board would allow us to store any backups in the cloud--it's a security risk.

Re:Agreed (1)

Daniel_Staal (609844) | about 10 months ago | (#45752103)

Tarsnap [tarsnap.com] or something similar - locally encrypted before it's uploaded, and the key never leaves your system.

Of course, then you have to back up the key, but that's a much smaller problem.

Re:All of it (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45728575)

Exactly my thoughts: why the hell would I ever give anyone the opportunity to look at MY personal data?

Re:All of it (1)

GIL_Dude (850471) | about 10 months ago | (#45729813)

I guess the question does come down to "your media". However some of it is in a grey area. For example, I have a bunch of (legal) MP3 files that I personally ripped from CDs (which I still have). So I have these MP3 files and CDs here locally. But, I also have them on Google Music. How does that count? 1/3 cloud? Or, since they are the same files is that "local" and ignore the cloud "copy". We have a ton of DVDs in several racks. Those, of course, are local. As far as movies in the cloud, I never purchased any, but I got a free one here and there - so there are a few. But we watch a TON of Netflix. Those aren't MY media. But I have access. How does that count? I am going to have to say - because of all of that, that I have only those few movies I got free that are cloud only and are supposedly "mine". Compared to the number of DVDs and CDs (and MP3 files) that I have local those few free ones are rounding error making it 100% local. But since I use a lot of Netflix I think of myself as a heavy cloud consumer. Strange, huh?

Re:All of it (1)

techno-vampire (666512) | about 10 months ago | (#45732177)

No, not strange. Just because I watch the occasional youtube video doesn't mean that I'm storing any of my stuff in the cloud. If I want to keep a copy, I use a Firefox extension to make a local copy, which is then "mine."

What media? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45730337)

Media I own or consume?
I own a few DVDs - those are local. So "owned" media - 100%. Minus the documents in the Google Drive, so I guess 80%!

The actual media I consume? 10%. Google Music for endless streaming music, Amazon/Netflix/RedBox for movie rentals, Steam/GOG/HumbleBundle for games. No point in hoarding.

Re:All of it (1)

Barlo_Mung_42 (411228) | about 10 months ago | (#45733229)

Depends on the device. I have all of it in the cloud so I can also access it from my Surface and phone (so not local at the moment) but it is still all backed up. The question then becomes why not *also* have it in the cloud?

Re:All of it (1)

SGT CAPSLOCK (2895395) | about 10 months ago | (#45733519)

My cloud provider is the NSA!

Anyway, I don't really store anything online. I'd sooner not use a computer at all than trust a "cloud" storage system on the internet to archive my data even half as well as my own physical drives do.

I've got convenience -- my drives are insanely fast, instantly available, and I can connect them with USB 3.0, eSATA, or drop them into a SAS backplane at my leisure. I own the drives, I own the data, and I own all the options.

When I want my data to be reliably backed up, I make reliable backups.

When I want to share it, I can do that.

But most important -- when I want to delete my data, I make it truly vanish.

Re:All of it (1)

Ogive17 (691899) | about 10 months ago | (#45735075)

I would be worried the RIAA would go after those that store music in the cloud.

Re:All of it (1)

bogjobber (880402) | about 10 months ago | (#45735279)

It can be extremely convenient to store application data in the cloud. I use budgeting software that syncs to dropbox, making it possible to switch seamlessly between using the software on my phone and desktop.

That being said, I think the total amount I store on dropbox is about 50MB so it's a very small percentage of my total data.

Re:All of it (1)

crdotson (224356) | about 10 months ago | (#45748619)

And really, why should you buy power from the power company? It only works as long as the power company is in business. Get a generator, truck in some fuel I say!

They're not exactly equivalent, but I assume you actually know some valid answers to "why would I ever store stuff on a cloud service" and you're just being obstinate. (I admire obstinacy! ) And, of course, it's entirely possible to encrypt the data on a cloud service so that it remains "your business".

Re:All of it (1)

techno-vampire (666512) | about 10 months ago | (#45748771)

I assume you actually know some valid answers to "why would I ever store stuff on a cloud service" and you're just being obstinate.

You assume wrong. I'm retired, I'm only concerned about my personal data/media and see no possible valid reason to store it where I don't have control of it. Not even to have access to it from away from home, because I have safe, secure ways to do that already. Now, if I were currently working in IT, and management was too penny-pinching to provide for a proper backup system, including storage off-site, that would be different. But for the home user, IMAO, using the cloud for storage is never the best solution.

Re:All of it (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45750787)

I buy it, then rip it to more convenient formats. DVD and BR ARE NOT convenient. DRM is the least convenient aspect here.

If it is streamed it, then it gets saved for later viewing ... you know "time-shifting."

If it is broadcast (OTA TV), it gets stored, commercials nearly automatically removed, and watched in an inefficient storage container. Only if it is an interesting series does it get transcoded and saved for "time-shifed" watching later.

HDDs are relatively cheap. I used to do this with CDROMs, then DVD5s, then DVD9s, now it is $100 (2TB-4TB) HDDs. One spinning and the other on a shelf as a backup.

After all, when the internet is out, I still want to watch Vampire Diaries and Pretty Little Liars. ;)

RE: All of it (1)

FPhlyer (14433) | about 10 months ago | (#45752581)

By "Media" I'm assuming music/movies/tv shows.
If you use Netflix - that's movies and TV stored in the cloud. Same for Hulu and Amazon Prime.
If you listen to Pandora, Google or Apples streaming music services that's also in the cloud.
The real question is not how much data you store locally or in the cloud... it really should be a question of what YOU consider to be YOUR media. Thanks to DRM most of what I think of as being "mine" isn't really mine at all... it's licensed. I bought a compilation album from Amazon and used their "Cloud Player" to listen to it. One day I realized that it had been a long time since I heard one of the songs that was in the mix. Turns out the actual owner of the song decided that it shouldn't be a part of that compilation album anymore so... "my" song was taken from me.
Remember: It it's in the cloud... you own nothing!

Re:All of it (1)

pla (258480) | about 9 months ago | (#45753513)

Why should I store any of my media (or other data, for that matter) anyplace else? Storing it in the cloud only works for as long as your cloud provider stays in business, and what I store is my business and nobody else's.

In fairness, I keep a low-quality (256k MP3) copy of my current active rotation playlist in the cloud. Kinda nice having it accessible from anywhere I have connectivity without needing to store it on every portable player I own (phone, tablet, laptop, car, etc).

Key word there, though: "copy". Before it goes anywhere else - Before I even listen to a new CD, it gets ripped to FLAC and sent to my home file server.

Missing Option (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45720767)

I use BitTorrent Sync you insensitive clod!

Re:Missing Option (1)

SeanBlader (1354199) | about 10 months ago | (#45726785)

+1 for BitTorrent Sync, I just need to sync offsite for that extra security.

Depends on what "Media" Means... (1)

Adam Claassen (3006455) | about 10 months ago | (#45720795)

If by "media" you mean any thing that I consume (TV, YouTube, music) then I store about .5% of my media locally, mostly the pictures on my phone that I haven't bothered to put in the cloud. If by media you mean pictures, videos, and music that I own (don't pay a subscription to access), then about 95% of my media is local

Re:Depends on what "Media" Means... (1)

Adam Claassen (3006455) | about 10 months ago | (#45720883)

And anything I don't store locally, I put in the cloud to share with people

Re:Depends on what "Media" Means... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45721243)

Also depends on what "my" means. For the purpose of this question, are all the movies I have access to on Amazon Prime "mine"? Etc.

Re:Depends on what "Media" Means... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45721913)

Way to totally miss the point. If your films are on Amazon, then obviously you store your media in the cloud.

Re:Depends on what "Media" Means... (1)

M1FCJ (586251) | about 10 months ago | (#45723747)

Way to totally miss the point. If you bought any movies from Amazon, you didn't actually buy the media, you only bought the licence to watch them. See the recent case of Disney preventing movies already bought from being watched just because they don't feel like it.

Hence, you don't store any real media in the cloud.

Re:Depends on what "Media" Means... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45733689)

Way to totally miss the point that it doesn't matter if you buy physical media or buy from Amazon cloud services, you only ever purchase a license. Hence, the original statement is true.

Not really adapted to cloud storage (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45720867)

While I do find Google Drive to be a useful tool, it seems I store almost everything on my hard drive save for robotics stuff. I don't like giving Google or other cloud services free rein to all of my files, it just sorta scares me a bit.

Which media? (1)

kwerle (39371) | about 10 months ago | (#45721147)

Uh... Software? Does gmail count?
Music? Yeah, almost all of it. Oh, but pandora - I don't own it - is it mine?
Pictures... Both. So, how do I count that?
Video - same as pandora. It's not mine, but I have access to all of Netflix. Does that count?

Re:Which media? (1)

locopuyo (1433631) | about 10 months ago | (#45721399)

The poller was referring to traditional cloud services, not streaming services where you don't own the content. That would be like counting every TV show and movie you watch on cable TV.
I can see how that is hard to understand because many people don't buy any media anymore, they stream it. I haven't bought any music or movies for years now.

Re:Which media? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45723195)

The poller was referring to traditional cloud services, not streaming services where you don't own the content.

Citation please.

Re:Which media? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45743969)

The asker is suffereing from deep confusion about what data are, and what it might mean to 'own them'. Basically that person is a victim of propaganda from media cartels.

They would like us to believe that there is some essential difference between 'streaming' something and 'owning' a digital copy of it. The idea is that if you pay money to 'buy' a movie, it's a little bit like owning a DVD (therefore piracy is the same as 'stealing' a DVD from a shop). However if you use a streaming service, it's the equivalent of 'watching TV'.

However, smart people understand that there isn't any technical difference between the two processes, whereas watching a DVD and watching TV ARE different. In both cases, you access a number which is stored on a server somewhere. You authenticate in order to be able to 'download' this number. The number is cached locally on your machine while you're watching it. You don't have the 'right' to make or distribute copies of the number. There is some form of DRM which means that you can't decrypt or interpret the number without getting a key or token from an external server.

The DVD/TV metaphor breaks down in a number of ways. You don't physically own anything in either case. The numbers involved could be copied many times to different physical places (your disk, your RAM, your GPU RAM, your backup of whatever type, myriad disks on servers in various places). Your ability to make a copy which you control is roughly the same in either case. The data in the 'DVD' equivalent can be turned off or disabled remotely any time the provider wants to. Its persistence might depend on your continued subscription or membership of a service, or on your not changing devices. There is no standard format of the 'DVD' data which allows other people to build devices that work with the data you own. You can't lend, give or resell the 'DVD'. (This all applies to music, software and books as well as video content).

Basically, everything is streamed. But there is a fake 'ownership' model which has been invented for the sole purpose of getting people who enjoy re-purchasing the same stuff in different formats to continue doing this. Everyone else has understood that you either store and share a unencumbered (ie pirated) copy or you stream.

Alt answer: (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45721489)

All of it is on CloudboyNeal

90% maybe? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45721537)

Now while I HATE the "cloud", there is a good reason for it to exist - Porn. All the stuff I dont want lying around on my own machines and spinny disk get sent to the "cloud" and stored there until I ...ummm.... yeah your grown people, you work it out! If you take a second to think about covering your tracks too, your SO or family wont know and never find it. Sure the NSA will be able to access it, but they just see I like boobs. Maybe they will be grateful I have a really nice porn collection.

Re:90% maybe? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45721991)

You really need a better looking SO with bigger boobs.

Re:90% maybe? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45723903)

Mate - this is Slashdot. What are the chances his SO has a name that ends in .jpg?

Re:90% maybe? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45724399)

What are the chances his SO has a name that ends in .jpg?

I'd rather bet on .stl nowadays

Re:90% maybe? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45725283)

.so ?

Re:90% maybe? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45743869)

My SO is also a grown person. I don't need to hide from her the fact that I masturbate or look at porn.

The only real answer is 100% (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45722451)

To say "I store some of 'my' media in the cloud" means it is not really yours. It is your rental. Look to Disney's recent removal of licenses from both iTunes and Amazon instant. If it is not DRM free on you machine then it is not really yours.

Re:The only real answer is 100% (1)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about 10 months ago | (#45727095)

Well, you could include what people have in their Dropbox accounts.

Of course, if they're anything like me, they use Dropbox purely as a sync-and-share service, and thus still keep local copies of everything.

Re:The only real answer is 100% (1)

Lazere (2809091) | about 10 months ago | (#45727199)

So, if I use iCloud/Google Drive/Skydrive/Dropbox it's not really mine? That's news to me...

Re:The only real answer is 100% (1)

wooferhound (546132) | about 10 months ago | (#45736735)

Why would anyone store files in/on the cloud anyway. I thought Hard Drives were cheap?

50% (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45722479)

About half of my stuff is stored locally. The rest is stored on a pile of optical discs way over on the other side of the room.

A is A (4, Insightful)

mcmonkey (96054) | about 10 months ago | (#45722499)

The question is tautological.

How much of my media do I store locally? If it's not local, it's not mine.

So 100%.

Re:A is A (1)

Neil Boekend (1854906) | about 10 months ago | (#45723683)

That is a question of definitions. I say the stuff people have on a cloud service is still theirs. The EULA may grant some rights to the provider but that data is still owned by the user.
If I lend a tool to a friend it doesn't suddenly become theirs. It's still mine, while I grant the friend the right to use it. Ergo the data on the cloud server still belongs to the user.

I assume of course that the EULA doesn't state the data is owned by the provider. I also assume that the EULA states that the data will be given to any government spy agency that sends some "legal" request for it (for large values of legal).

Re:A is A (1)

rmdingler (1955220) | about 10 months ago | (#45731897)

If I lend a tool to a friend it doesn't suddenly become theirs. It's still mine, while I grant the friend the right to use it. Ergo the data on the cloud server still belongs to the user.

When I loan a tool to a friend, the likelihood of recovery is in direct inverse proportion to how close a friend he/she is. If it's family, hell, she is gone baby gone.

Re:A is A (1)

ihtoit (3393327) | about 10 months ago | (#45752803)

possession is 9/10 of the Law.

Ergo, content stored on a cloud is 9/10 the property of the provider, the 1/10 that is the original owner's is defined as "access".

Ask then answer: how much content from MegaUpload was returned to its users after the service was canned by court order?

Next to none. I think there are cases still ongoing to retrieve some of that content. It's not even a case of fiscal restitution at this point, can you put a money value on your wedding photos?

And I'll bet that most of that content was legitimate.

Re:A is A (1)

Neil Boekend (1854906) | about 10 months ago | (#45764953)

I couldn't put a money value on my wedding photo's. I'd love to see them and I'd be curious if I know the girl I apparently married.
On a more serious note: in practice you are right, if not in theory. Who would place wedding pictures on a single storage medium anyways?

Re:A is A (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45748655)

Indeed. A more interesting question might have been, how much media does one store locally versus rent access to? I've got access to some non-local media, but it certainly isn't my media since it isn't under my control.

Store all media (1)

flogger (524072) | about 10 months ago | (#45722551)

I store some of my media on the hard drive.., ripped DVDs, CDs, and yes, records...
I store some of my media in the TV cabinet... DVDs, and VHS
I store some of my media near the stereo ... CD and Cassettes and Records
I store some of my media in the closet ... 8 track tapes, floppy discs
I store some of my media on the wall ... Digital Art I've created.
I store some of my media on a linux box for streaming music at my workplace.... no pandora ads.
I store exactly one "album" in the cloud. which is about .09% of my media.

Re:Store all media (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45727207)

I'm a mixed media artist, but I store most of my media in the Matrix, It gives the perfect illusion that it's local, but I'm sure it's really more like a cloud or something more distributed. And then there's this [youtube.com]

I didn't put it there (1)

rossdee (243626) | about 10 months ago | (#45722647)

The media that I buy is only "stored in the cloud" because thats where they put it after I buy it. Then I download it to my computer(s) and back it up to external drives (both spining and solid state)

I don't ever upload anything to the cloud

99.99999% at home (1)

yayoubetcha (893774) | about 10 months ago | (#45722653)

All my movies, music, software, etc. are all on local media. I have some Gmail, and a limited number of Google Docs. in the "cloud".

Re:99.99999% at home (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45729279)

Lots of 9 => made up number.

Define "locally" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45722991)

Depends on what you mean by "locally". I have two flats in different parts of the city, and a router with a big USB disk in one of them. 100% of my media is stored on that disk. The other flat's router has a VPN established with the first router, so music and videos are accessible from here, too. Definitely not local storage from that viewpoint, but not third-party cloud storage, too.

Re:Define "locally" (1)

Valdrax (32670) | about 10 months ago | (#45728959)

Depends on what you mean by "locally".

Same here. Most of my files are on the machines used to access them. However, very large files, like video is stored on my roommate's SAN. He has music that he can stream via his phone to his car. Is that local or not?

Archiving files is a boring hobby. I've moved on. (1)

neiras (723124) | about 10 months ago | (#45723093)

The only media I store is photos and video of my family. Beyond that, nothing. I used to have big drives full of music and movies, but Netflix and Grooveshark and Rdio and those guys are just easier to deal with. Occasionally I'll torrent a TV show that isn't on Netflix, but I don't bother with high-quality rips and I delete the download when I'm done.

Honestly, I'm surprised that people like me aren't a bigger share of the poll results. Interesting.

"Ownership" of ephemeral things like music and movies means exactly squat to me. The right to watch or listen on demand is enough. If I couldn't listen tomorrow, oh well, no great loss.

Re:Archiving files is a boring hobby. I've moved o (1)

torsmo (1301691) | about 10 months ago | (#45723389)

Filthy casual!

Re:Archiving files is a boring hobby. I've moved o (1)

neiras (723124) | about 10 months ago | (#45723433)

Filthy casual!

Yeah, yeah. I have a library of decade-old CDs formatted with BFS (the BeOS filesystem), which contain the "massive" media library of my 20-something self all tagged and organized perfectly. I've earned the right to not care anymore.

Hmm. I wonder if Linux has a BFS driver.

Re:Archiving files is a boring hobby. I've moved o (1)

thatkid_2002 (1529917) | about 10 months ago | (#45724835)

Haiku in a VM and rsync the CDs across. Though, if the tagging is done in BFS metadata then that may be an interesting problem (though not particularly difficult) to solve.

Why Wouldnt I (2)

bobjr94 (1120555) | about 10 months ago | (#45723325)

Instant access, no logging on, no updates required to play this content, no wasted bandwidth with the same media over and over, no moving / loosing your files when your cloud provider closes up.

Simple (1)

Indigo (2453) | about 10 months ago | (#45723407)

If it ain't on my disk, it ain't really mine.

Local to what? (1)

Zocalo (252965) | about 10 months ago | (#45723527)

Local to me, or backed up on storage media I control? The latter might not be (and usually isn't) local, often to the tune of several hundred or even thousand miles.

I have digital copies of all my media, and physical ones for that matter, stored at home, but I don't carry the whole lot around with me. I voted 100%, since I think that was the intent, but I have less than 10% of it available to me when I'm away from home on my phone/laptop, although that is going up as more and more is also available via the cloud.

Define Locally (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45723767)

If by locally you mean "in hardware I own and operate", then ~90%

If by locally you mean "in the building you reside in", then ~50%

If by locally you mean "In the machine you are currently using", then ~1%

Don't you mean 'data' in that question ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45724421)

The way that question is phrased, the first thing I thought of were classic off-site backups. Storing MEDIA should mean storing CDs, Tapes, harddisks, paper or whatever whereever. But every answer I've seen here is about putting DATA in the cloud ...

Re:Don't you mean 'data' in that question ? (1)

wooferhound (546132) | about 10 months ago | (#45736849)

It's hard to store CDs and Tapes in the cloud . . .

Put Your Data In The Clown! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45725035)

Put your data in the clown! Clown storage! Clown backup! Tape your spreadsheets to the windows facing out - now they're in the clown! Clown docs! Clown plus! Clown docs plus! Clown clown clown!

"Okay... but will it save me money?"

YES! You save money because all the IT guys in charge of your data aren't your employees! You're not paying them a dime! They work for me! Hahahaha!

"Hmm.. I think our shareholders will like this. Is it safe?

SAFE??! Hahahahahahaaaaa... Of course it's safe! Trust me! I'm a company! Sign the lease! Sign right there! Come on! SIGN IT! Honkhonkhonkhonkhonkhonk!

Re:Put Your Data In The Clown! (1)

zaft (597194) | about 10 months ago | (#45729859)

If I had mod points I'd totally mod this up. BWAHAHAHA! The last point reminds me of the issue with the sign language interpreter at Mandela's funeral who apparently was totally bonkers and gee, the company he worked for "disappeared".

Depends which is "backup" and which is "media". (1)

JamieKitson (757690) | about 10 months ago | (#45725171)

I keep all the photos I take locally and upload the better ones to Flickr. I call the local store a backup and the Flickr uploads the media and answered 0-20%, but some might view the local store as the media and the Flickr uploads as a backup.

As others have said I stopped collecting music/video locally once I knew I could stream/torrent anything I wanted whenever I wanted.

I'm really surprised at the results of this poll, I hope you all have off site backups!

For all of those of you saying that giving you data to 3rd parties allows them to start charging later Flickr recently went in the opposite direction.

Huh? (1)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | about 10 months ago | (#45725697)

I store all of my media locally. I imagine most people do.

Did the person who wrote the question actually mean something completely different? e.g. "How much of the movies, TV shows, and music that you watch or listen to originates from your own personal collection?

Re:Huh? (1)

j2.718ff (2441884) | about 10 months ago | (#45726141)

I store all of my media locally. I imagine most people do.

Did the person who wrote the question actually mean something completely different? e.g. "How much of the movies, TV shows, and music that you watch or listen to originates from your own personal collection?

I suppose a person could post a video to youtube, and then misplace/delete the original.

Multicast streaming (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45726451)

I haven't had to download anything to watch in years.

The cloud is for backups and small stuff (1)

KeithH (15061) | about 10 months ago | (#45726985)

The greatest portion of my data is photos, music, and videos. These are all large files consumed almost exclusively locally.

I back my stuff up to the cloud as well as off-site.

100% (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45727017)

Because my upload speed sux and I don't like NSA.

100% "Cloud" = My own server (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45727179)

I built my own file server (12TB with mirrored backup) for a fraction of the cost to pay some company for the same amount of space. It's accessible over the Internet thanks to DDNS. The only shortcoming with my current setup is I don't have a 3rd backup. There's nothing stored that is critical to my business or life so I don't have any concern if everything were lost. Whenever I have something that I want to save long term I burn it to a CD/DVD and email myself a copy so it gets stored in webmail. Even then there's not really anything I couldn't live without. Life is more important than digital bits.

Define: 'My Media' (1)

Mr. Sketch (111112) | about 10 months ago | (#45727773)

If I have Netflix streaming, I can watch thousands of movies and TV shows that are not stored locally, so are those 'mine'?

If so, then I have about 0.0000000000001% of my media stored locally since the vast majority of it is accessed on the cloud.

In terms of media that I watch, I stream about 1000 shows or movies for every 1 that might watch from a local collection (if ever).

Missing option: 200% (1)

lxs (131946) | about 10 months ago | (#45727809)

Local backups should count towards the total.

"Media" includes text based content... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45727815)

How much in what sense? Filesize or percentage? How many percentage of "media" is an article on slashdot compared to a youtube video of a cat farting while hiccuping?

Define "locally" (1)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | about 10 months ago | (#45728049)

I thought this meant the proper networking definition of "locally" as in "on localhost."

Most of mine is on my home server, and that's usually not the machine I'm using (although it doubles as an HTPC). But I don't use any streaming services like Netflix or Hulu. It's all stored on hard drives in my house.

don't know, where are you? (1)

schlachter (862210) | about 10 months ago | (#45728113)

I keep all my data at my house. Where are you writing the question from? Doubt I'm local to you.

Dropbox? (4, Insightful)

businessnerd (1009815) | about 10 months ago | (#45728583)

Not sure how to answer this one since I use Dropbox. Everything uploaded to Dropbox exists locally on my HDD as well as having a second copy on one of the other computers in my household with enough disk space. At one point I had 3 computers all synchronized with Dropbox. So 100% is stored locally AND in the cloud. I know Slashdot loves to hate on the cloud, but most of the arguments against it don't apply to Dropbox. If Dropbox were to disappear tomorrow, I would still have my data (and still backed up in multiple locations). There is no migrating away, since all I do is just upload to the new service without having to retrieve anything from Dropbox (I already have it). From a disaster recovery standpoint, the only scenario where I am exposed is if Dropbox disappears followed by my house burning down destroying every hard drive I own beyond recovery. The chances of this are very slim and if I was really that worried about it, I could set up another computer outside of my house (say at a trusted friends house on the other side of the country) and have Dropbox synchronize there as well. The only valid argument is the privacy one, since Dropbox theoretically could access any data I have uploaded to their service. They claim it is encrypted and they don't look at it, but that doesn't mean they couldn't. The solution here is to not upload anything I wouldn't want them to see. Some also have had success with uploading a TrueCrypt volume into Dropbox.

Re:Dropbox? (1)

kaladorn (514293) | about 10 months ago | (#45730149)

You can't trust that they can't see your stuff, as you point out.

Moving a TrueCrypt is more viable (assuming TC is clean), but it is bandwidth heavy since you have to move the whole crypt.

I would like to see the following product become available:

A 'private cloud' not hosted by folks like Amazon, but rather software available to be hosted by any group. This private cloud software would provide email, SMS/MMS hooks, video and audio chat, and a storage repository system all setup to be encrypted in situ and in transit. The crypto and authentication modules would be pluggable to allow people to mix, match, chain, and choose how many layers they want to have in the picture. Tools would exist to handle cloud functions (like data integrity in case one node drops out and ways to integrate new storage nodes as they are added).

The concept would be that everyone in your group (mine would include a cluster of nodes in the US, another three clusters in Canada potentially) would have an always (or almost always) up node that they hosted several TBs of storage on. There would be distribution and mirroring of data to allow some % of nodes to be offline or to fail completely (I'd say at least 1 in 4 to be paranoid and all data should be replicated to at least 3 other locations in the cloud).

Internally, you could share, store, chat, email, and so on without anyone at your provider, at any corporation, or at any intrusive C third S party E being C involved.

This has nothing to do with having anything to hide. I buy my PDFs, I buy my movies and TV and books and music. I just happen not to think any corporation of government should be looking over my shoulder for purposes that even they don't fully understand. And the potential for data to be stolen from corporate or government databases from external hacks or internal threats is too great to be ignored; If the NSA can't keep its secrets, do you expect the rest of the government IT infrastructure or corporations to be any better? I think not.
And I don't like the idea of corporations constantly using more and more refined models of me to pitch new products at me. I'm contributing to that by using existing online services.

So, this private cloud solution would address that.

Re:Dropbox? (1)

sandytaru (1158959) | about 10 months ago | (#45730235)

I said 80-100% based on DropBox. I have 4 GB storage for free there (was an early adopter and got some some referrals to sign up) and I used up every GB, primarily with photos but also with backups of configuration files, text documents, very old installers for obsoleted programs, and pretty much anything original that I can't replace by downloading it again from someplace else. I have about 400 GB of total in-use storage - 128 GB SSD and a 1TB spinning drive that has around 300 GB of music files on it that I would not be heartbroken to lose (old podcasts I can probably find someplace online if I really felt the need to replace it.)

So, a small percentage of my files are backed up to the cloud (probably more since I'm on 8.1 and who knows what SkyDrive is uploading to Microsoft) but that's all.

Where is the 100% option? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45729117)

Really. I refuse to tickmark "80 to 100" on this, because my policy is very simple: If it's mine, it's stored locally. Hell, I even store all my e-mail locally, running my own server..

20 TB of video (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45729253)

4 x 4TB for porn and 1 x 4 TB for series.

Safe and trusted location. (1)

CFBMoo1 (157453) | about 10 months ago | (#45729343)

External storage mediums that aren't connected to the network all the time. The cloud is unsafe, unsecure, and privacy is certainly not guarenteed.

1 rsync, 2 Countries, 3 Locations, 4 Devices (1)

trydk (930014) | about 10 months ago | (#45729469)

All my important files (including media) are hosted on the machines they primarily "belong" to, then they are backed up locally to a file server and then to two overseas destinations several hundred miles apart. rsync and creative scripting are indispensable tools for this.

When I take pictures, my attitude is that nothing is secure until the pictures have been downloaded to the local fileserver and replicated to at least one of the overseas destinations. (Isn't that what friends and family are for????)

What, me paranoid? What made you think that????

Re:1 rsync, 2 Countries, 3 Locations, 4 Devices (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45730759)

What makes your selfies at Walmart irreplaceable ?

As of right now, 100% (1)

gman003 (1693318) | about 10 months ago | (#45730125)

As of right now, every picture, video, song or game I own has a copy stored locally, sometimes with a "cloud" backup.

For a long time, that wasn't true. My Steam library in particular outstripped my hard drive capacity for several years, until I started buying storage specifically for it. My desktop now has every game* downloaded, although my laptop can only fit whatever games I feel like playing on the go. But if Steam ever shuts down, all I have to do is set it to offline mode (or download one of the already-existing auth server cracks, if I don't get advance warning of the shutdown), and I'm good.

Likewise, all my music is stored as unencrypted MP3s, and my movie collection is stored on optical disks. I even have a large stash of porn saved locally in case my ISP goes down again.

* I did skip a few things I have near-dupes of - I installed only the GOTY edition of Arkham Asylum, for instance. But the things I skipped are things I would have zero problem with never having access to again.

100%. By definition. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45730151)

If it's not stored locally, then it's not "my media."

There may be another copy or three of it floating around somewhere out there, but if I don't have my own copy to do with it as I choose when I choose, I don't see how it could possibly meet any definition of being mine. It would only be -- as the industry is managing to so effectively convince the public "should" be the case -- someone else's media for which I have purchased permission to experience for a limited time.

It depends . . . (1)

dmatos (232892) | about 10 months ago | (#45730445)

on what you consider to be "my" media.

If "my" media is the stuff that I legally own, then 100%. If it's stuff that I own both legally and illegally, then also 100%.

If, however, you're talking about media that I consume, then then answer is in the 0-20% bracket. Almost everything I watch comes from Netflix. Music I play comes from streaming radio. Even the log fireplace with xmas carols is a 3-hour-long Youtube video.

I would consider this media to be "stored" because it remains available to me, and I can go back and consume it again with less effort than putting one of my DVDs on to play. This is in comparison to cable or OTA transmissions, which are ephemeral and cannot be watched again, unless they are recorded somehow.

Of course, I could be ultra-pedantic (who doesn't like pedants?) and say 100%. Even the stuff that is not stored locally on non-volatile storage media is at least loaded into RAM before it's displayed/output. And technically, that's short-term local storage.

Including YouTube (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45731253)

Im including the fact that I dont watch TV apart from stuff on YouTube, otherwise it would be 100%

All local - PLUS some in the cloud. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45732955)

Well, all the media I actually *care* about anyway. I have gotten a lot of "free TV episodes" off iTunes that I didn't like, so deleted - and Apple continues to offer them to me via iTunes in the Cloud. But I'm not counting those.

Depending on what you mean by "media", I may *ALSO* have somewhere between 50% and 75% "in the cloud" as well. My home-videos-awaiting-editing aren't, and that's actually a majority of my local storage, simply because the raw video takes up a lot more space than the finalized video. Movies I have about 1/10th of in the cloud because I have about 1 TB of (legally) ripped DVDs and Blu-rays, that iTunes doesn't offer to cache for me, plus a few iTunes-purchased (or, more common, iTunes free Digital Copy with the purchase of the Blu-ray,) copies. Music is 100% in the cloud both in iTunes via iTunes Match and in Google Music. Pictures are semi-cloud - I use an EyeFi card that caches that last however-many pictures on their servers, and I use iCloud Photos that caches the last 1000 pictures from my phone.

Most of my recent documents are now stored both locally and in one or more cloud services. Google Docs for collaboration, iCloud+iWork for personal docs that are purely-for-me, Box.net for Microsoft Office docs that I want access to, but aren't something I can keep in iWork format.

I have no "sensitive" information in any of my cloud storages, though. Those are backed up the conventional way - to a local RAID-1 that I rotate disks out of every week into a fireproof safe.

Does youtube count? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45733405)

I listen to a lot of music on youtube... but it's not "my" media so... yeah.

cheap calls to india (0)

kinkatomara (3467849) | about 10 months ago | (#45733605)

Callings! Perhaps to be the best medium that has been always appreciated across the various societies, religions, and people in the world. Talking is the best medium which associates two different people in to a close bonding. Hence, when the speaker and listener belong to same family or group, the sentiments become more expressive and close. Calling cards companies coming up with the offers such as cheap calls to india [telcan.com] , made the close ones come together and stay together all the time.

A couple of documents are in the cloud (1)

Borgmeister (810840) | about 10 months ago | (#45734059)

Massive, multi-terabyte local storage. I store a copy of my CV (resume) and oddly a copy of my wristwatches user manual on Dropbox. Total on cloud about 10mb.

Re:A couple of documents are in the cloud (1)

xyzzymage (3415857) | about 10 months ago | (#45734441)

Largely the same here. I keep my files stored & redundantly backed-up on terabyte drives, plus I use the SpiderOak cloud service to keep ongoing live versioned backups of both my fiction as well as the autosave & backup files OpenOffice generates. I was a Dropbox user, but Idumped them when they ended live versioning on free accounts.

That approach has saved my files more than once... Because the .odf, .doc & .docx document formats (required to have changes tracked) are zip-compressed xml files, a single 'bad' save renders it unreadable with zero chance of recovery. With my setup, if the most recent manual save is fucked, I can grab the previous one, then patch in any changes from the .bak or autosave produced every 3 minutes.

Places where Net isn't ubiquitous (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45734293)

Sometimes it just isn't practical to rely on cloud storage (except to share sub-100 mb files with people) due to bandwitdths of 256-512 kbps or because we don't have Net access all the time.

Probably 20% (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45734419)

Not much. But rest of the media is stored on server which I own (as in, it's co-located). 350Mbps WAN link is enough for streaming all of it over NFS (or to be more exact, end client uses SMB, but the server exports over NFS and I have NFSSMB proxy. I know locks are problematic, but I don't really need them in my use case).

Depends on the definition of "Local" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45734831)

Across the 8 machines I own and operate, plus the 4 NAS arrays, all of my storage is "local" to properties I own. But at any given moment, about 80% of my total data storage capacity is offsite. Makes it handy for offsite backup management, and until recently I have felt fairly happy with that.
Since the NSA-gate crap started going on, I have started to encrypt all of the data before it leaves each client on the local networks, never mind the encryption before it leaves the network and goes over the interweb-net-thingy. No, I have nothing to hide, and I am not doing or planning anything that would threaten the security of the United States of America, but I do value my privacy and the integrity of the data my computers produce.

Captcha: "Wronged". Is /. trying to tell me something??

Poll? (1)

synapse7 (1075571) | about 10 months ago | (#45735077)

Is the poll suggesting that media not "local" is your media?

Division by zero (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45737229)

what media?

I consider "The Cloud" to be a gigantic troll (3, Insightful)

kheldan (1460303) | about 10 months ago | (#45737853)

As soon as "The Cloud" came into being, I saw immediately the problem: You want me to let someone else hold onto things I allegedly own? Really? Are you kidding me? and that's been my position all along, and I've been harangued more or less continuously by people claiming I'm a "tinfoil hat wearer", or that I go around yelling "get off my lawn!", etc. Of course as time goes by we all read more and more legitimate news stories of "cloud services providers" who go out of business, or lose people's data, or arbitrarily decide that content bought and paid for shouldn't be in the "posession" of the person who paid for it anymore. How do you like me now, doubters? You still enjoying your "cloud" storage? Uh huh, thought so. Maybe Santa will bring you a nice offline backup drive so you can keep track of your own stuff instead.

Re:I consider "The Cloud" to be a gigantic troll (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45745287)

It's like the lockers at a train station, or a valet to park your car -- sometimes it is convenient to have someone else hold onto your stuff. Sometimes not. Why does it have to be "YES" or "NO", why can't it be "well, sometimes"?

Re:I consider "The Cloud" to be a gigantic troll (1)

kheldan (1460303) | about 10 months ago | (#45750581)

In this reply, I'm replying to the following comment as well as this one: http://slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=4568663&cid=45745289 [slashdot.org] as well.

Train station lockers

But, do train stations just suddenly decide to go out of business, taking the lockers and all the contents with them?

Wouldn't the same logic apply to banks?

Banks are federally insured and regulated by the government, so your assets are protected. Also you can go to your bank at any time and empty your account in cash, can you do that with all your digital media, laden with access controls, encryption, and DRM?

Re:I consider "The Cloud" to be a gigantic troll (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45753023)

Banks are federally insured and regulated by the government, so your assets are protected.

Only up to a certain point.. if there is a run against the bank, the government does not have to bail it out. What you might find is that the government may only cover a certain amount in your account the case of a bank failure ($100000 per account seems like the going number by western governments). It is not guarenteed though.

Re:I consider "The Cloud" to be a gigantic troll (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45753113)

Train station lockers

But, do train stations just suddenly decide to go out of business, taking the lockers and all the contents with them?

The lockers are rarely run by the owners of the train stations themselves. And I would trust that they would give a day or so notice, but not a year notice before the owners change or it is shut down.

Also you can go to your bank at any time and empty your account in cash, can you do that with all your digital media, laden with access controls, encryption, and DRM?

Really...? If I go to my bank, during business hours, and maybe one of the bigger branches, and not during some emergency, I can probably withdraw some cash... and certainly all that I normally need. I doubt that I could walk out with a suitcase with all of my money without some notice.

Re:I consider "The Cloud" to be a gigantic troll (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45753127)

Banks are federally insured and regulated by the government, so your assets are protected.

The contents of a safe deposit box are not insured. Also, if you forget to pay the rent for it, you could forfeit the contents.

Re:I consider "The Cloud" to be a gigantic troll (1)

Superdarion (1286310) | about 10 months ago | (#45745289)

Wouldn't the same logic apply to banks? You let a bank keep your money for you, and yet still consider it to be yours.

Re:I consider "The Cloud" to be a gigantic troll (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45748543)

Well US bank accounts are backed by the federal government up to $100,000, so in theory its perfectly safe (up to that amount after which you can always open a new account). Digital information has no such federal backing... well there is the NSA, but I don't believe they provide a restore service to the plebs.

and put the good stuff on a non-internet computer (2)

k6mfw (1182893) | about 10 months ago | (#45740341)

all my good stuff is on PC and Mac that is not connected to the internet. it's the only way to be sure.

Re:and put the good stuff on a non-internet comput (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45743715)

Not Paranoid Enough!(perhaps), be sure theres no embedded cellular devices including most newish Intel CPU's with 4G WiMAX Wireless Technology.

I mean, it exists, it's there, it 'beeps' to towers so imo there *could be backdoors/remote exploitable by someone. I know if I was running NSA or similar, I'd have a hand in making this technology useful in my goals. Even if it is just positioning/systemID info, could be very useful in establishing identity/relationships etc.

Re:and put the good stuff on a non-internet comput (1)

k6mfw (1182893) | about 10 months ago | (#45747239)

alright that's it, from now on all my data will be engraved on stone tablets! And I will entomb them into a large pyramid with various traps to thwart invading pirates.

Re:and put the good stuff on a non-internet comput (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45750543)

Jesus, man. What about the ninjas?

Re:and put the good stuff on a non-internet comput (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45748183)

WiMAX? On Intel CPUs?

And *what* WiMAX towers?? Were there ever raised any such, anywhere?

Re:and put the good stuff on a non-internet comput (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45753395)

WiMAX? On Intel CPUs?

And *what* WiMAX towers?? Were there ever raised any such, anywhere?

They're attached to the silent black helicopters. If you coat your computer in aluminum foil, though, you'll be safe.

Is it just me? (1)

multimediavt (965608) | about 10 months ago | (#45743105)

Or, does the graph look like a giant middle finger?

100% (1)

Tom (822) | about 10 months ago | (#45744043)

While I have copies of some of my stuff online, there is nothing that I consider "my own" that is not stored on a computer I own or rent (i.e. my desktop machines or my hosted servers).

If you store your media "in the cloud", you are - in my eyes - an idiot. If someone else can take it away from you at any time for any reason or no reason at all, then it is not yours, period.

Wake me when cloud providers have become dumb drives like ISPs have become dumb pipes and I can store my data transparently distributed over several of them - the cloud-equivalend of a RAID array.

mega lifted me into the clouds (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45744111)

kim dotcom created mega - a cloud that encrypts:decrypts seamlessly on the fly, so the host has no idea what you store there and can't use it for metadata mining. this was the kind of cloud i felt really had MY interests in mind, so i use it to store stuff i would not want to lose to a home data disaster, or stuff I'd be embarrassed for others to find on my home computer. considering mega's origins and mission statement, i'm pretty confident mega.co.nz will be around for decades to come.

99% (1)

will_die (586523) | about 10 months ago | (#45744611)

The only thing I store in the "cload" are my saved games for things like steam and origin and that more a backup.

I bought a 15 drive 4U SAN on kijiji (1)

basenode (3469545) | about 10 months ago | (#45745007)

I know this sounds crazy. But the SAN itself was only $300 and it came with 15 320GB HDD. It has full RAID 6 functionality. So I split the drives 8 and 7. One for important files and the other for Media and Movies. SO far it has served me great and I have has 0 issues. I do full backups to it as well as file backups. It also serves as a central place for media streaming in my home. I guess the downside is I can't access it outside of the home for now as I don't trust giving it internet access. But that is where I store my files. I guess the plan for the future is to replace the following drives with newer ones that might be a little more reliable. I would have never done this normally because I can only imagine the cost for all the hardware in that server. It has truely been a learning experience as I had to learn about RAID Storage, FREENAS and Effectively networking it. I think the knowledge more than anything will be helpful in the future. Hopefully the SAN lasts. Oh some more specs on it. It is a dual Xeon dual core unit with 8GB of ECC RAM with 3 Power Supplies(1 redundant) complete with the 15 320GB HDD's. I was surprised when I saw it and am very excited to see what it can do.

200%-250% (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45745347)

PC at home, the portable disk, laptops (just got my new one installed to replace my 5year old netbook), assorted USB keys (seriously, I'm addicted to 'em, fill 'em up and then don't dare to use them anymore. It's in(s)ane!), work PC has some stuff... oh, and all my work in the work SVN repository is most probably copied to all of my colleague's PCs as well (not all in the same building even).
Yay sneakernet cloud!

"Your" media (1)

gmuslera (3436) | about 10 months ago | (#45745453)

If can be withdrawn [theguardian.com] at a publisher request, is it your media?

It's not either / or (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45746103)

I store 100% of my media on the cloud, and 100% locally.

I like the availability of the cloud, but I prefer the control of local.

And, I have the original physical copies of everyrthing I own. I don't believe in licensed content or rental content.

Mine, MINE! (1)

Tesral (630142) | about 10 months ago | (#45746159)

Needs a 100% category. If you don't have it physically present, you don't own it.

media is plural of medium (1)

Strange Attractor (18957) | about 10 months ago | (#45746429)

It's the physical stuff on which one conveys or stores information. My physical stuff is mostly in my house.

A lot (1)

Cro Magnon (467622) | about 10 months ago | (#45747603)

I have a lot of stuff on a "cloud". I also have it locally, so if this "cloud" disappears in a puff of, er, cloud, I still have my stuff.

Locally ? What does that mean ? (1)

Pop69 (700500) | about 10 months ago | (#45748345)

On the PC in front of me, on a general purpose server, on a NAS somewhere else on my own network ?

If it's this marvellous cloudy thing I keep hearing is the saviour of all things IT then basically nothing, just steam sync save games.

Unlimited free, secure are reliable cloud storage (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45749327)

It's really quite easy to back all your files up reliably on the 'cloud'. Just bundle up all your family photos, movies, music collection, etc. into an archive, encrypt it and name it something like "snowden_insurance_k29ap8s.aes" and seed it as a torrent. Garanteed to be kicking around on the torrents for years!

Back it up on an external hard drive. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45751959)

Now that I have faster internet, I am uploading my music to Amazon's Cloud service, but I still don't trust "the cloud." Much preferable to me is the old-time backup method. There's an external hard drive in the back of my grandmother's closet, in my father's house and a third is with another relative. 90% of the contents of the drives are music, and most of it was purchased, including audio books, or ripped from my personal library of at least 1000 music CDs. Just the time I invested in ripping those CDs into MP3 files is irreplaceable - I'll never again have that much free time on my hands to repeat the process. Certain things are fun when you're 17 years old, but not so much fun when you're 30.

Local Host or Network? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45752867)

Local Host - none
Local Network - 100%

I've got way to many localhosts to store anything on them. All the stuff is on a big Linux RAID that's hardwired in the utility room next to the furnace and water heater.

World of e-commerce (1)

yadimas karyo rejo (3470441) | about 9 months ago | (#45753099)

World of e-commerce or often referred to as an online store in Indonesia continued to show significant improvement. Many types of businesses that start to touch this business. Because the system is spending like this, consumers can shop directly without having to meet with vendors or go to the store in question so as to save on the time. As a result, the bustle and the ease of the biggest reason for the growth of e-commerce in Indonesia. As one of the leading retailer in the country, Alfamart also do not want to miss to give another plus of a minimarket. For that Alfamart launched its e-commerce products that are labeled Alfaonline. This is one of our customer service facility Alfamart not have much time to shop for Alfamart. So far, Alfamart minimarket still be the first in Indonesia to launch an e-commerce, said Hans Butler, Managing Director of Alfamart. Alfaonline [slashdot.org] http://awalilah.blogspot.com/2013/11/alfaonlinecom-toko-belanja-online-murah.html [blogspot.com]
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