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HOWTO, Cook an Egg With Your Cell Phone

Hemos posted more than 8 years ago | from the the-joy-of-technology dept.

337

xPosiMattx writes "Suzzanna Decantworthy published an article in her Wymsey Weekend column that described how to cook an egg with two cell phones. From the article: "Many students, and other young people, have little in the way of cooking skills but can usually get their hands on a couple of mobile phones. So, this week, we show you how to use two mobile phones to cook an egg which will make a change from phoning out for a pizza.""

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A cheaper way (3, Funny)

SIGALRM (784769) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655604)

1. Preheat oven to 350deg.
2. Oil and flour a 8" pan (or use nonstick).
3. Dial your ex.
4. Place phone in pan.
5. Crack an egg on the phone.
6. Season to taste.
7. Bake at 350 for 20 minutes.

OK, obviously #3 is a problem...

Re:A cheaper way (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14655700)

Why is #3 a problem? Don't you know her number? You've been stalking her all these years, you should have her number memorized by now!

Re:A cheaper way (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14655749)

Why is #3 is a problem?? Maybe you noticed this guy just got the first post on this article. With that in mind, what do think the chances of him ever having a girlfriend are?

Re:A cheaper way (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14655766)

Because it's Slashdot. There are no ex's to stalk.

#3 is a problem because (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14655878)

...because if my X has caller ID and finds my #, this will *not* be a cheaper way (as the subject suggested)

Re:A cheaper way (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14655787)

i'm still using my xbox charger. it's more versatile, i can cook pizza too

Re:A cheaper way (5, Funny)

Tackhead (54550) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655802)

> 4. Place phone in pan.
5. Crack an egg on the phone.

#5 might be closer to a solution than you guess.

I, like others, RTFA, and along with everyone else who'd like their 30 seconds of "WTF" back, here's a way that might actually work.

1) Remove batteries from phones.
2) You've got between 1 and 2 amp-hours of 12 volts to work with.
3) You need to get the yolk to around 63C for soft-boiling, and from 20C room temperature, that'll take you around 15-20kJ of energy. Yeah, I've skipped a bit [ex.ac.uk] .
4) ...but it's within the right order of magnitude [mpoweruk.com] to cook an egg, particularly because the low internal resistance of such batteries allows for very high current.

Crack one egg onto one phone - you'll cook something as you short the entire battery out through a pile of egg. If you used the battery as a swizzle stick, constantly stirring the egg mess, and constantly scraping the battery terminals free of solidified gunk, you'll generate a decent amount of heat in the gunk. (You'll also probably electrolyze some of the stuff in the egg, so I wouldn't recommend trying this at home - FSM-only-knows what kind of stuff will show up at the battery terminals beyond hydrogen and oxygen.)

At worst, you'll end up with a partially-toxic, soupy, warmed-over mess with a few chunks of scrambled egg in it.

6) If you've got enough surplus energy (like, say, 100kJ to work with), break up the battery packs, use them to power a small hot plate or peltier unit, (preferably with 12V, but if you've got even more surplus energy in the battery packs to waste on conversions, you could use a converter to turn 12VDC into 120VAC), and power your heater with that.

Crack the egg onto the hot plate, and you'll end up with a light fluffy omelette.

Either way, you're way ahead of the author of the original link.

Re:A cheaper way (2, Funny)

Raynach (713366) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655835)

Really gives a new meaning to deviled eggs, eh?

*ducks*

It May Just Be Me... (4, Funny)

American AC in Paris (230456) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655606)

...but the little foot icon looks astonishingly like an old rotary telephone today.

Not so fast there. (5, Insightful)

Mrs. Grundy (680212) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655610)

FTFA:

6. Phone A will now be talking to Phone B whilst Phone B will be talking to Phone A.

I love urban legend as much as the next guy, but this isn't exactly true. These are cell phones not two-way radios. Phone A will be talking to a cell phone tower, whilst phone B is talking to a cell phone tower, whilst each cell phone tower is talking to the two phones respectively. There is no reason to think that you are forming some sort of ultra powerful death beam between the two phones by placing them in close proximity to one another. Having said that, if I was being attacked by a giant stay puff marshmallow man, I might give this a shot as a last resort.

Peak power (2, Insightful)

PIPBoy3000 (619296) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655651)

Plus, the phones try really hard to minimize the amount of energy they use. 2 Watts is peak power consumption. I wouldn't recommend trying this experiment unless you want egg on your face.

Easyish to achieve (3, Interesting)

grahamsz (150076) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655710)

Placing large metal objects round the phones until their signal strength meters read 1 bar would be an easy way to max out the power consumption.

However this is obviously BS. Especially as phones all talk to the tower, so using two of them serves no other purpose than halfing the cook time.

This is your brain on CDMA

Re:Not so fast there. (2, Funny)

FireAtWill (559444) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655682)

Oh, c'mon! I really want this to work! This could be one of the coolest bar tricks ever. "Waiter? A shot glass and an egg, please...." ...."Okay, hold on guys, could just be another couple o' minutes.... maybe I need to turn the Nokia ten degrees...."

Re:Not so fast there. (1, Informative)

six (1673) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655709)

I love urban legend as much as the next guy, but this isn't exactly true. These are cell phones not two-way radios. Phone A will be talking to a cell phone tower, whilst phone B is talking to a cell phone tower, whilst each cell phone tower is talking to the two phones respectively.

Right the phones never connect directly on a GSM network, but either way their antennas are omnidirectional, so a phone talking to a tower on the opposite direction would still irradiate the egg with the same amount of energy ...

A funny thing I noted is the "if you're giving a strong (audio) input the phone will emit with more power" ... come on, this would be true with pure analog phones, but GSM is not and that make this claim plain wrong

Anyway, I don't see what this is doing on /.

Re:Not so fast there. (1)

bugnuts (94678) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655871)

A funny thing I noted is the "if you're giving a strong (audio) input the phone will emit with more power" ... come on, this would be true with pure analog phones, but GSM is not and that make this claim plain wrong

Most likely, it sends a low-bandwidth "no transmission" during times of no talking, and is probably somewhere around the output power of "standby" mode. No reason to saturate the digital airwaves with 00000000 when there's no sound.

The radio in the background simply makes sure both phones are actually transmitting.

Re:Not so fast there. (2, Informative)

sjf (3790) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655911)

A funny thing I noted is the "if you're giving a strong (audio) input the phone will emit with more power" ... come on, this would be true with pure analog phones, but GSM is not and that make this claim plain wrong

Erm, not true. Analog phone are Frequency Modulated, power output is, for all intents and purposes, constant during transmit. The purpose of the radio is to ensure that both phones are transmitting continuously: a digital phone transmitting "silence" will have a much lower signal to noise ratio, and therefore less power output.

Re:Not so fast there. (1, Informative)

Valdrax (32670) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655729)

I love urban legend as much as the next guy, but this isn't exactly true. These are cell phones not two-way radios. Phone A will be talking to a cell phone tower, whilst phone B is talking to a cell phone tower, whilst each cell phone tower is talking to the two phones respectively. There is no reason to think that you are forming some sort of ultra powerful death beam between the two phones by placing them in close proximity to one another.

Not so fast, yourself!

This might be an urban legend, but I sure hope that you don't think that cell phones talk to their towers with some sort of directional beam. Cell phones and cell towers radiate their energy in all directions with roughly the same power and would point just as much energy towards the egg as towards the tower (or any other direction).

The point of having two phones is so that you have control over the conversation and can run it at an arbitrary length without the other end hanging up. It also doubles the amount of power being broadcast at close proximity. The radio is there to keep the phone broadcasting.

I'd try this myself when I get home tonight, but I only have the one phone.

Re:Not so fast there. (1)

erikaaboe (89681) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655915)

So when you get home tonight you can try it by calling your cooker mobile from your land line. And, depending on your calling plan, cooking from home may be included!
Erik

Re:Not so fast there. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14655772)

But cellphone antennae are not directional. So it doesn't really matter if phone A is not really talking to phone B directly. That said, I think Brainiac:Science abuse had a show where they tried to cook an egg using 100 cellphones and of course, it didn't work. Hmm maybe I should actually try this tonight.

Re:Not so fast there. (2, Informative)

McFadden (809368) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655826)

I think you've perhaps missed the point. This isn't about producing a deathray - it's about having the extra radiating power of two phones to make the trick more effective. Calling one phone from another just makes it easier and cheaper than calling two separate third-parties (or should that be a third and fourth party!?)

Re:Not so fast there. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14655885)

Thanks for splitting THAT hair!

Re:Not so fast there. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14655924)

It's a feedback loop sending an audio signal to boost power output. The audio characteristics are what matter.

Re:Not so fast there. (2, Funny)

ifitzgerald (680941) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655934)

Yeah, a lot of people think that two cell phones form a link together. But I can top that one:

My girlfriend's (believe it or not) mom has been going on a "kill the long-distance bill" rampage, and has been yelling at everyone for using her land line to make anything but local phone calls. One day, I asked her why she doesn't use her cell phone to call her mom who lives in New Mexico (my girlfriend's mom lives in Wisconsin). She replied "Oh, well there aren't that many cell phone towers in New Mexico." After that, I had to spend ten minutes explaining to her how cell phones actually work. She still yelled at everyone else, and used the land line herself.

What's the radio for?? (2)

8282now (583198) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655613)

I feel foolish for asking but...
What's the radio for??

fp

Re:What's the radio for?? (1)

Malor (3658) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655645)

Well, assuming that this is real and works (I have no idea), it might be to create interference, so the phones go into high-power mode?

Re:What's the radio for?? (2, Informative)

Toveling (834894) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655647)

To create loud noise for the phones to pick up and transmit. Or you could yell into them...

Re:What's the radio for?? (1)

SIGALRM (784769) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655655)

I would assume, to generate feedback noise for the transmission/reception...

Re:What's the radio for?? (2, Informative)

NitroWolf (72977) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655664)

I feel foolish for asking but...
What's the radio for??


To generate traffic. On modern digital cell phones, if the line is silent, they don't transmit or recieve, or at least not enough to speak of. Saves on power.

The radio will generate traffic and cause the power output of the phone to max out.

Re:What's the radio for?? (3, Funny)

idonthack (883680) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655760)

So you don't get bored waiting, because you'll be waiting a very long time. Especially considering the fact that this method does not work.

That SO wouldn't work... (5, Funny)

gardyloo (512791) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655614)

Ha! Like they expect us to believe th -- OOOH! Shiny!

Thanks Hemos (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14655629)

For posting an obvious Hoax.

can't cook an egg with two cell phones. (2, Funny)

icecow (764255) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655630)

can't cook an egg with two cell phones. Each phone communicates with a tower, not each other. I even knew that before I read it on boingboing. amazing.

Re:can't cook an egg with two cell phones. (3, Funny)

ePhil_One (634771) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655691)

Now now, give it a chance. The author quotes a power output of 2watts, which means you need to track down one of those ancient brick phones, I don't think any modern phones still have that power level. And if you compare that 4 watts of unidirectional power to the focused power of a dorm room 600 watt microwave, you an quickly see how with the 200x microwave application aucustic concentration effect of modern radios, you can see how this might work to cook an egg as fast as a microwave.

Re:can't cook an egg with two cell phones. (1)

Eightyford (893696) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655726)

can't cook an egg with two cell phones. Each phone communicates with a tower, not each other. I even knew that before I read it on boingboing. amazing.

That doesn't mean that radio signals aren't generated that could pass through and possibly cook the egg. Radio signals don't work like laser beams.

Re:can't cook an egg with two cell phones. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14655774)

Putting it that way seems some how wrong. Laser beams and radiowaves are both EM radiation. There's no a priori reason why you couldn't come up with a laser-like transmitter for radio waves, and making omnidirectional lasers is possible too.

Re:can't cook an egg with two cell phones. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14655862)

They have omni direction lasers, they're called light bulbs (I know not a consentrated wavelength like a laser, but maybe a led then)

Re:can't cook an egg with two cell phones. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14655869)

Thats not the point. A cellular phone has a simple antenna that radiates outward in all directions with respect to the long dimension of the antenna. Lasers are focused in one direction.

Masers (1)

xenn (148389) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655879)

yup, here clipped from Wikipedia, under "Laser"

It should be understood that the word light in the acronym LASER is meant in the expansive sense, as photons of any energy; and is not limited to photons in the visible spectrum. Hence there are X-ray lasers, infrared lasers, ultraviolet lasers, etc. Because the microwave equivalent of the laser, the maser, was developed first, devices that emit microwave and radio frequencies are usually called masers. In early literature, particularly from researchers at Bell Telephone Laboratories, the laser was often called the optical maser. This usage has since become uncommon, and as of 1998 even Bell Labs uses the term laser[1].

----

but I dont think you can have an omnidirectional light, I'm fairly sure that by definition a laser concentrates light to go in phase, and in generally the same direction.

-=>

Re:can't cook an egg with two cell phones. (1)

iggymanz (596061) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655739)

the low power level is why you can't cook an egg with two phones, but the cell phones don't "direct" or "point" an energy beam at the tower while communicating with it, a dipole antenna isn't directional.

Note to self... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14655634)

...don't talk on two cell phones simultaneously.

Re:Note to self... (2, Funny)

slashdotmsiriv (922939) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655929)

haha good one dude. Hope you get mod up :)

I'm suspicious of this (1)

LunaticTippy (872397) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655642)

I'm pretty sure you're talking from phone->tower->phone (unless using walkie-talkie mode), so the geometry is a little more complicated than TFA states. Also, depending on your signal strength you may not be using full transmitter power. If you could cook an egg in 3 mins your battery wouldn't last for 6 talk hours.

Boring logic aside, it will be very amusing to think of a boiling egg next time I see someone with 2 cellphones - one on each ear

Re:I'm suspicious of this (1)

MactechBri (637128) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655784)

Nlot quite sure what the tower has to do with it? Since they are talking to each other, they are transmitting. Meaning they are producing power out put. Either phone could be talking to anyone, as long as they were transmitting.

Re:I'm suspicious of this (1)

toddbu (748790) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655887)

unless using walkie-talkie mode

I hate to tell you, but walkie-talkie mode still uses the tower. It just makes your cell phone behave like a walkie-talkie.

Re:I'm suspicious of this (1)

green1 (322787) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655910)

>> I'm pretty sure you're talking from phone->tower->phone (unless using walkie-talkie mode),

well... you're half right... they will talk phone -> tower -> phone (or more likely add some more steps in there) but it doesn't matter what "mode" you are in, even the "walkie-talkie" phones still go through the tower, it's kind of like a speed-dial/conference call combination when you push the button, they never behave like true "walkie-talkies" they are always behaving like cell phones.

of course that's only one of many many holes in the whole theory anyway, so relatively minor...

would we be able to (1)

Evilhomer2300 (900004) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655652)

I wonder if we would be able to cook larger things with more cell phones? Like if we had 12 phones could we cook a pizza? Or with 20, a plate of cookies? As well, this shows the amout of power that goes out form these phones, and most of the time, they are next to our heads! Hey, can they make enough heat to keep us warm, like if were stuck in a snowbank?

Re:would we be able to (1)

man_of_mr_e (217855) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655702)

Sure beats the insides of a tauntaun any day....

But... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14655662)

...does this work with Poodles [snopes.com] ?

Wow... (0)

Punboy (737239) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655663)

Thats funky. I wonder how many eggs I cook every day while im chatting with my GF...

Hahaha, I feel sorry for cell-phone using Eggheads. Hahaha.

Ya, that was bad. Shoot me.

Re:Wow... (5, Funny)

winkydink (650484) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655844)

Thats funky. I wonder how many eggs I cook every day while im chatting with my GF...

Two, if you keep your phone in your front pants pocket.

More like a way to drain cell batteries (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14655673)

Next, an article about how to troubleshoot your phone by putting it in a bucket of water.

If two cell phones generate enough energy to cook one egg, imagine how scrambled your brains would be from holding a phone next to your head.

Then again, that just might explain the 405 in LA...

Brainiac (5, Informative)

interiot (50685) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655680)

Bzzt. Brainiac (an alternative to Mythbusters) tried this with 100 phones, and the phones were literally covering the egg, and they left the egg under there for a while. It definitely didn't cook, and they reported it didn't even get remotely warm either.

Brainiac is the worst program ever (5, Funny)

caitsith01 (606117) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655801)

EVER.

It has none of the charm or actual science of Mythbusters and yet the people who make it think they're the coolest, funniest, sexiest people in the world. What they don't realise is that they're actually English.

Re:Brainiac is the worst program ever (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14655876)

Mythbusters is also somtimes full of shit, when they don't get the result they hoped for..brainiac just add more explosives to the pyro mix if it looks disappointing in rehearsal. And they're not Transpondians...wanker.

Power levels and direction (1)

sterno (16320) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655865)

Yeah, this is kind of a ridiculous concept. The power level on a most modern cellphones will never go above 2 watts. In addition, the peak output is typically only used when the phone first connects to the network. So we're talking well under 2 watts most of the time.

On top of that it's an omnidirectional signal. As some others pointed out, you're talking to the tower, not directly to the other phone, but even that suggests that it's somehow directional. So in the end, the amount of power were talking about hitting the egg is miniscule.

If two phones were putting out enough wattage to cook an egg in 3 minutes. I should think after a 10 minute phone call with one phone, you're head would start to feel warm.

Soilent Green derivitave quote: (1)

SlashdotTroll (581611) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655683)

Next thing you know, they'll be caging the women and scrambling their eggs with free cell-phone service. oh, wait.

KAAAAAAHHHHHNNNNNgress!

stolen from engadget's comments (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14655686)

This is your brain.
This is your brain on CDMA.

questions??

Slashdotted... here's the content! (-1, Redundant)

NitroWolf (72977) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655687)

23 : Wymsey Weekend

Weekend Eating:
Mobile Cooking

with Suzzanna Decantworthy
additional research: Sean McCleanaugh

Many students, and other young people, have little in the way of cooking skills but can usually get their hands on a couple of mobile phones. So, this week, we show you how to use two mobile phones to cook an egg which will make a change from phoning out for a pizza. Please note that this will not work with cordless phones.
To do this you will need two mobile phones -they do not have to be on the same network but you will need to know the number of one of them. The only other items you will need are:

An egg cup, (make sure that the egg cup is made of an insulating material such as China, wood or glass - plastic will do. DO NOT use stainless steel or other metal).
A radio, AM or FM - you can also use your hifi.

A table or other flat surface on which to place the phones and egg cup. You can place the radio anywhere in the room but you might as well put it on the table.

How To Do It:

Take an egg from the fridge and place it in the egg cup in the centre of the table.
Switch on the radio or hifi and turn it up to a comfortable volume.
Switch on phone A and place it on the table such that the antenna (the pokey thing at the top) is about half an inch from the egg (you may need to experiment to get the relative heights correct - paperbacks are good if you have any - if not you may be able to get some wood off cuts from your local hardware shop).
Switch on phone B and ring phone A then place phone B on the table in a similar but complementary position to Phone A.
Answer phone A - you should be able to do this without removing it from the table. If not, don't panic, just return the phone to where you originally placed on the table.
Phone A will now be talking to Phone B whilst Phone B will be talking to Phone A.
Cooking time: This very much depends on the power output of your mobile phone. For instance, a pair of mobiles each with 2 Watts of transmitter output will take three minutes to boil a large free range egg. Check your user manual and remember that cooking time will be proportional to the inverse square of the output power for a given distance from egg to phone.
Cut out these instructions for future reference.
Note: We cooked our egg during the evening using free local calls, if you were to cook an egg for lunch it would cost £3.00 - not cheap but you do have the convenience.

Phone A > > > > > > Egg Phone B

Re:Slashdotted... here's the content! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14655718)

No it isn't, you karma-whoring liar.

Important lesson (1)

nizo (81281) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655697)

And this is why you should never, ever, talk on two cellphones at once.


Next up we learn how to get a heated pizza with two cellphones. Simply call pizza places until you find one willing to trade a pizza for one of your cellphones and baddbingbaddaboom, you get your hot pizza.

Re:Important lesson (1)

chengmi (725888) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655771)

Or, at the very least, not talk to yourself on two cell phones at once.

Hemos... (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14655705)

so niggerish...

Oh dear lord (1)

FhnuZoag (875558) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655714)

Come on! It's not like it's hard to realise that this is a hoax. It's already appeared on Boingboing, where people noted that it was a load of crap. Will Slashdot editors please do a little research?

At least, I dunno, learn about the laws of physics? Specifically, THE CONSERVATION OF ENERGY.

That is all.

I don't believe a word of it (1)

benjj (302095) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655724)

Is it April Fool's Day already?

A few problems (5, Informative)

jmorris42 (1458) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655727)

Problem #1. Handheld cellphones do not emit 2W. The old analog handhelds were capped at 700mW and I suspect the digitals emit much less based on the power available to them and the talktime.

Problem #2. Even if you scrounged up some old bagphones with their 3W output power, they still only gives you six watts of power. I don't think that is going to cook an egg in the time claimed.

Re:A few problems (1)

MerlinTheWizard (824941) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655849)

And hopefully not. If that were true, imagine what it would do to your inner ear (and possibly brain) while you phone. Plus, the emitting power largely depends on how far the phones actually are from the relays, so unless you are in an ill-covered area, it's not even likely that the emitting power will be at its maximum...

Article is ancient and probably spurious. (1)

fondue (244902) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655728)

http://web.archive.org/web/20010429231038/http://w ww.wymsey.co.uk/wymchron/cooking.htm [archive.org]

The experiment might have worked with some kind of Ni-Cad powered analogue bricks in 2000-2001. Maybe.

And pardon my lack of physics knowledge... but wouldn't the radiation have to be ionising for this to work?

Makes you wonder (1)

I_am_Rambi (536614) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655731)

what it does to our brain when we talk on the cell phone.

Fried brain coming right up!

Remember, kids... (5, Funny)

creimer (824291) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655735)

Don't ever put two cell phones in your front pant pockets. You might cook your eggs but no one will ever know. And if you have two cell phones in your back pant pockets, your ass will catch on fire and everyone will laugh at you. Life is a cruel master.

This is your brain (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14655750)

This is your brain on a cell phone.

Any questions?

This will never work (5, Informative)

Sycraft-fu (314770) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655758)

For so many reasons:

1) Cell phones are the wrong frequency. They are 800, 900, 1800, or 1900 MHz depending on the service. To make water heat up, you need to be at the frequency water resonates which is 2.4GHz.

2) Cell phones are too low power. A microwave that will cook an egg in a couple of minutes is going to have power expressed in at least the hundreds of watts, and probably will be 1000 watt. Cellphones have output power expressed in the miliwatts, that 1/1000th of a watt. We are literally talking over 5 orders of magnitude difference.

3) Microwaves function because they build standing waves. You find that if you take the frequency of a microwave (printed on the back usually), measure the size of the cavity and run the numbers, it works out that it's of a size such that standing waves build up. Taking a magnetron out of the case makes it work very poorly, despite the power output.

4) Cellphones operate in bursts. They do a burst when they have something to transmit, then fall silent. Saves on batteries. That's not going to cut it for heating, you need continous output.

I'm not sure if this is a joke or what, but you'll never get something like this to work. To even have a chance, you'd need to use a cordless 2.4GHz phone. It's at least in the right frequency ballpark, never mind all the other problems.

Does work for me... (1)

rduke15 (721841) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655846)

Cell phones are the wrong frequency. [...] you need to be at the frequency water resonates which is 2.4GHz.

Exactly. And this is why I always cook my eggs between my notebok and my wireless AP while transferring large files, instead of falling for this urban legend spread by mobile phone companies trying to boost their revenues.

If it were true , you'd friggin burn your face (1)

grantsucceeded (126212) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655763)

So how bout someone explaining why you wouldn't burn your face when making a cell call?

my fucking microwave takes 3 minutes to cook an egg . Why would a handset operating for days on a 3 volt battery cook something that fast, while not cooking the face of anyone using it?

Re:If it were true , you'd friggin burn your face (1)

Professor_UNIX (867045) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655922)

Hmmm, 1000 watt microwave vs. 700 milliwatt cell phone. In the month it'd take to "cook" the egg with your phone it'd more likely be devoured by bacteria.

cooking any thing? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14655764)

I hope no one believes this stupid pile of garbage. You get bombarded with much more radio waves just by being out side than any normal cell phone emmites while on a call.

All this is paranoya about cells phones is really anoying.

a quick calculation (2, Informative)

csimicah (592121) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655767)

Assuming an egg has the heat capacity of 60g of water, and a 1000mAh * 3.7V cell phone battery, it looks like a fully charged cell phone battery could actually raise the temperature of an egg by 55 degrees C. That is, if you could somehow expend your entire battery into heat, and have it all go into the egg, you could cook one.

The article is still a joke, of course - the egg won't even come close to warming by any measurable amount.

Mythbusters... (1)

Twitch@lwf (158601) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655773)

I am so sending this to them [discovery.com] to check out.

That won't work (1)

Reality Master 201 (578873) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655775)

That's probably the stupidest fucking thing I've read on Slashdot in a while. You can't nuke an egg with 2 cell phones and a hifi.

Jeezuz. Do you guys read and/or apply a 4 seconds of thought to these things before you post them?

Egg, brain, whatever... (3, Funny)

jpellino (202698) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655789)

this is nonceklse - ive;benen using my cebll phone for yearsnow and theresno obsevvable effecsts.

What is this, Digg? (1)

Smarty2120 (776415) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655790)

This is completely false. Yes, the phones radiate energy in a fixed pattern around them regardless of what they are communicating with (in this case the tower, which requires significant energy to reach). However, cell phone transmissions do not occur on the microwave band which can excite water molecules (and hence increase their motion, i.e. heat). If this were true, your head should get unbearably warm after a long phone conversation. Sounds like the "cell phones cause cancer" myth taken to a new level.

Re:What is this, Digg? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14655895)

No, it's not Digg. It's an evil plot to kill idiots by tricking them into eating raw eggs.

I Call Shennigans! (0, Redundant)

TechnoGrl (322690) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655791)

Don't believe it.
For one thing most cell phines put out less then 2 watts average power.

For another it takes over well over 60-80 watts of power at 2 meters to begin to, say cook a hotdog (don't ask)

And lastly, the frequency range is a gigahertz or more below what it takes (about 2 GHz) to achieve heat water through RF....

Fun... but silly...

cell phones and microwaves (1)

yadobaka (748946) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655804)

Interesting this should come up. One of my professors today went into depth about cell phones. From what he said, Microwave ovens heat up food by sending waves with a very specific frequency. This frequency which supposedly has to be right around 2.43GHz excites the hydrogen particles in a water molecule, creating heat, and warming up the food. He went on to say that modern day phones, and cell phones just so happen to use the same frequency of 2.4GHz to trasmit. So one would question the use of cell phones, since the frequency is the same. Cell phones, according to this professor use around 25 milli(?)-amps of current on average, so the effects are not really seen. However, this current can fluxuate. I was told atop a ski-lift , or near a cell phone tower the current can drastically increase, to around 700 mA. What I am getting at, is that from what I've been told, cell-phones can produce the same affect as microwaves, and really mess with the water in your brain, and supposedly cause cancer. People thus far have said, they don't buy the article and the sort, because the two cell phones aren't talking to eachother directly. It seems to me elevation is of more importance than whether or not the two cell phones are communicating directly. My guess is that the second cell phone is just to up the total amount of waves emitted per an area. Yeah, ramblings, quas-organized thought. Just ideas relayed from a teacher.

Power requirement (1)

Y0tsuya (659802) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655797)

Let's see, most cell phones come with 500mAh (or smaller) 3.6V batteries. That's 1.8W over 1 hour. Let's assume 1000W microwaves can cook their eggs for 10 seconds before they explode (It's been a long time since I've tried it and I have better things to do nowadays). Let's further assume we can peak the power of cell phone radio to 1000W without frying it. That comes out to about 6.5 seconds before the juice runs out. Not quite long enough to cook. Now the article says you need TWO cell phones, then you may have a case. May be something for the mythbusters to look into.

Really Works! Call Now! (5, Funny)

AeroIllini (726211) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655813)

This really works! I've done it!

And, for the first time since yesterday, I am offering for sale a revolutionary new product that will protect your precious head from the same egg-cooking x-rays that make you breakfast.

For three small payments of $19.95, you can block the radiation emitting from your cell phone by adding this small device to the back of your phone. The unique lattice-like orientation of the pantented gold-copper-lead electrical conduits create an electrical "net" around your phone, forcing the dangerous radiation to be emitted directly up into the sky instead of into your brain! Simply peel the backing off the product and affix it to the back of your phone, between the phone and the battery. Be sure to read the manual for proper placement, because if you are even a fraction of an inch off, you won't get the proper protection you deserve. If you are feeling nervous about doing it yourself, I also offer a service to install this device on your phone for you, for only two additional payments of $19.95 each, plus postage. Just send me your phone and rest easy!

But wait! Call now, and I will throw in, completely free of charge, a cell phone privacy guard. This handy device fits over the mouthpiece of the phone and prevents malicious hackers from listening in on your calls by scrambling your signal. Don't miss out on this opportunity!

First one hundred callers receive a deed to the Brooklyn Bridge as a FREE GIFT!

My Calendar is broken (1)

tehlinux (896034) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655817)

I'm assuming it should say 4/1/06, but it says today is 2/6/06.

his noodly brainfry (0, Offtopic)

flowerp (512865) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655822)


If you believe in creationism (or in the flying spaghetti monster for that sake), you might just as well believe in mobile cooking. But then, your brain is fried anyway.

Not plausible (1)

r_weaver (563014) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655840)

Obviously the article was meant to be tongue-in-cheek (though it would be nice if the editors had tagged it as such). Intuitively, if this were possible, you'd expect your hand and head to be uncomfortably hot after holding the phone during an extended conversation.

But, I figured I'd take a stab at doing the math to see if it's plausible. It's been quite a while since I've taken Physics, so someone else can (and I'm sure will) check my work:

An average egg weighs 58g, and is 90% edible [goldeneggs.com.au]

So let's figure 50g for the egg after I pick out the pieces of broken eggshell.

I'll start at room temperature 70 degF (21 degC), and I want to raise to 145 degF (62 degC), so let's say I want to raise the temp of the egg by 40 degC.

This is where I make a bit of a leap, these calculations will assume that the egg is 100% water, obviously that's not the case, but it's probably a reasonable approximation.

50 g of water raised 40 degC takes 50 * 40 = 2000 calories (scientific calories, not dietary).

A calorie is 4.19 Joules, so that's 8380 J.

The article says it takes 3 minutes to cook an egg. A Watt is one J/sec, so 8380 J / 180 seconds = 46 Watts.

So, it would take 46 watts over 3 minutes to fully cook an egg to 145 degF. And that's assuming that the power is 100% absorbed by the egg. Since the article suggests placing the phones near (but not touching) the egg cup, most of the radiated energy will not be absorbed by the egg (if it were, the phones would drop the call and be unable to find a signal)

I think (but am not certain) that a typical handheld cell phone will put out around 600mW of power max, so if you immersed your 2 phones in the egg to get maximum RF absorption, you'd be ready to eat your egg after only 114 minutes. Better charge your battery first.

Wow. Who knew? Cook an egg with 12 Watt-minutes (5, Insightful)

crmartin (98227) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655847)

Uh. Huh. Let's see ... an egg is, oh, say 50 grams. So it takes 50 calories to raise the temp of the egg by 1C. and a hard-boiled egg is more or less at equilibrium with boiling water, so the minimum would be something like 70×50 calories, and 4.2 joules/calorie, so its going to take MINIMUM 14,700 joules.

60 joules to the watt-minute. 720 joules in 12 watt-minutes. 720 joules < 14,700 joules.

Check: it takes about 1 minute for my 700 watt microwave to cook 1 egg. 700 watt-minutes is 42,000 joules. 720 joules < 42,000 joules.

I call bullshit.

Inverse Square? (1)

Chysn (898420) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655858)

> that cooking time will be proportional to the inverse
> square of the output power for a given distance from
> egg to phone.

        Even if everything else about TFA were true, I wouldn't buy this part. It's sort of like saying that 30 minutes at 350 degrees is the same as 15 minutes at 700 degrees. Tell that to a chef.

Irresponsible (4, Funny)

Linker3000 (626634) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655874)

It is EXTREMELY irresponsible to post such stupid stuff here - don't you realise that soon this will be duped several times on Digg and then other Diggers will post it to their blogs, while others look for someone (or a cell phone company) to blame, and will start wrapping their phones or heads in tinfoil - heck, some Diggers will probably TRY and cook an egg and may get salmonella from the eggs on their fingers, which they will transfer to their mouths when they suck their thumbs and so will end up needing antibiotics.

For the sake of humanity (Diggmanity?) *** --No Digg ***.

I better go warn them before it's too late.....

2 watt output? (1)

kitzilla (266382) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655875)

> Cooking time: This very much depends on the power output of your mobile phone. For instance, a pair of mobiles each with 2 Watts of transmitter output will take three minutes to boil a large free range egg.

I'm thinking a cellphone with a two-watt output would sap a standard cell battery dry in just about that ... three minutes.

I thought most cell devices were on the order of 1/3 watt rf output.

Chickens (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14655897)

The moral of this story is: never let a pregnant chicken use a cell phone.

dear me... (1)

hplasm (576983) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655901)

What shit.

Also not a workable egg cooking method (1)

zappepcs (820751) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655903)

Some time ago, klorg.org had a piece about trying to cook an egg in the Arizona heat... apparently, cooking on sidewalks and car hoods won't work either... though the spot between speakers behind the back seat seems good enough to keep you from having to clean up runny eggs...

It's a HOAX! (5, Informative)

SiliconEntity (448450) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655905)

This has been widely [flutterby.com] discussed [brainwagon.org] online [livejournal.com] and it is a pure hoax. The wymsey site also has such highly factual articles as hunting the wily tofu [wymsey.co.uk] . Obligatory dig at slashdot editors elided for space.

Holy bejesus (2, Informative)

John Miles (108215) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655909)

How does anyone get out of high school without the ability to call bullshit on stuff like this?

It takes one calorie to raise the temperature of one gram of water by one degree C. To a first approximation, an egg weighs about 50 grams, and is full of stuff whose specific heat is probably not too different from that of water. Let's say cooking an egg at room temperature requires you to raise its temperature by 50 degrees C for one minute. You will need something on the order of 2500 calories to do this, or about 10,000 joules. This energy will have to be transferred to the egg over a one-minute interval, assuming 100% efficiency.

A joule is one watt-second, so this cooking process is going to require exposing the egg to about 166 watts for one minute. At 100% efficiency.

A cell phone puts out about one watt, and good luck funnelling all of its output into an egg. (For extra credit, calculate the impedance of a chicken egg in free space, and design a suitable matching network).

Now, if you'll excuse me, I need to get back to my public-safety campaign, warning gullible Americans about dangerous levels of radiation in voting booths.

Snopes! (2, Informative)

redelm (54142) | more than 8 years ago | (#14655920)

First place [snopes.com] I check for these urban legends.

If this were true, a naked magentron would be a great cellphone jammer. Even if not, it still might be!

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