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Pakistan Plans Mobile WiMax Network Rollout

Zonk posted more than 8 years ago | from the getting-the-country-online dept.

165

OneInEveryCrowd writes "Pakistan is apparently ready to move ahead of the USA in the deployment of a mobile wireless network." From the article: "The deployment is a milestone in the spread of WiMax, a superfast wireless technology that has a range of up to 30 miles and can deliver broadband at a theoretical maximum of 75 megabits per second. The 802.16-2004 standard, which is used in fixed WiMax networks, is being skipped in favor of a large-scale introduction of 802.16e, which was only recently agreed upon by the WiMax Forum. 'We made the decision 18 months ago to jump over (802.16-2004) and go straight to 802.16e,' Paul Sergeant, Motorola's marketing director for Motowi4, told ZDNet UK on Tuesday. 'We've been working on it for a while, which is how we're able to ship so soon after agreement.'"

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i hear competition (1)

jpling (976523) | more than 8 years ago | (#15421055)

I don't know how USA is reacting to this but i'm sure they want to be bigger and badder. Good job pakistan :P

Re:i hear competition (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15421138)

will bush go there and bomb them to get the money for the oil ^H^H^H^H wimax business ?

and ofcourse officially mark it as freeing pakistan.

Re:i hear competition (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15421165)

Score: -1 Troll

I find it amusing how the world hates on the US because of some notion that big == evil... all while they're wearing their Nike shoes and eating at Mc Donald's.

Re:i hear competition (0, Offtopic)

ShyGuy91284 (701108) | more than 8 years ago | (#15421184)

I predict as the world develops more, the US will shrink rapidly in technological power. As an American, I hate seeing this happen (although I'm not an obsessive brainwashed patriot that thinks the US is #1, I do have pride because it is my country). In the past, we have been a large driving force in bringing some truely great inventions into the mainstream, but It has been a while since we have done anything like that.... We aren't getting any smarter (we might actually be getting dumber some studies have indicated), and developing nations are educating very quickly. I'm glad to see Pakistan has some initiative. Much like another distasteful comment said, I never thought very highly of Pakistan (I know little about the area other then it neighbors Afghanistan). But I may think differently now since I know they are adapting technology beyond what the US is doing at the moment. In some ways i think the American lifestyle is the epiphany of how a country can live, but due to this, many here are becoming fat, lazy, and unambitious......

Re:i hear competition (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15422194)

"In the past, we have been a large driving force in bringing some truely great inventions into the mainstream..."

Interesting way of putting it! In fact the US has been very poor in inventing new technology, but quite good at marketing it. A mixture of a safe, stable currency and a large home market made it ideal for commerce. The US has had a 50 year economic lead prompted by WW2, which closed down all major competitors (though they are now beginning to come back). This is what is happening rather than the US declining rapidly.

For some reason, though, the US seems to think that it leads the world in innovation as well, and this is certainly not true. Mobile phones are a case in point - the US has been trailing behind in every mobile phone development since they started. Why should it be any diferent with 802.16e?

Re:i hear competition (1)

ELProphet (909179) | more than 8 years ago | (#15421393)

Oh, we're long ahead where it "counts." How much money are Pakistani ISPs making off this? Less than (the) US! Seriously, without a way for the ISPs to make money, their lobbyists will never let these networks get beyond a city/community level.

Does the USA care? (1)

MMaestro (585010) | more than 8 years ago | (#15422496)

Considering the size difference between the two countries alone, the fact that these countries are leaving the U.S. in the dust in terms of wireless internet service is no surprise.

And if you want to nitpick, Pakistan has a much more hostile terrain, a lack of already existing infrastructure and by doing this they kill two (or three) birds with one stone. (A cheap easy voice-over-IP telephone infrastructure, cheap easy wireless national internet service and arguably a relatively cheap investment in the long term future.) Whereas the U.S. has a (relatively) friendly terrain, a pre-existing infrastructure of both phone lines and cable lines and would cost far, far more than what Pakistan is paying because of the political attention it would recieve (read : political mess).

How is this possible? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15421061)

I mean, pakis are some sort of niggers, right? How could they pull off something technological like this, aren't their brains a bit too small? I'm honestly curious, wtf? I mean, there's a reason Pakistan and the rest of India is roughly 60 years behind all Aryan nations!

With all this increased bandwith in Pakistab (5, Funny)

nihilistcanada (698105) | more than 8 years ago | (#15421062)

Osama Bin Laden can finally now upgrade to higher quality video for his latest release.

Re:With all this increased bandwith in Pakistab (1)

Timesprout (579035) | more than 8 years ago | (#15421094)

No, I can exclusively reveal that from now on using the increased bandwith Bin Ladens rantings and ravings will be broadcast Bollywood style. Marketing advisors close to Bin Laden feel his message is too much doom and gloom and would achieve broader appeal if it was presented with some more singing and dancing.

Re:With all this increased bandwith in Pakistab (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15421180)

I'm sure bin Laden will use his own Internet broadcasting servers from now on.

The NSA is happy (3, Funny)

Harmonious Botch (921977) | more than 8 years ago | (#15421075)

30 miles? Now they don't even need a presence on the ground, unless the antennas are very directional.

Re:The NSA is happy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15421458)

They are very directional [wikipedia.org] . That doesn't stop the NSA.

Ahead of the US? (4, Informative)

damian cosmas (853143) | more than 8 years ago | (#15421083)

Hopefully this new wireless technology will help them crack the 50% literacy [odci.gov] milestone. I'm sure the 4% of the population with internet access [odci.gov] will really appreaciate it, though.

Re:Ahead of the US? (2, Insightful)

flobberchops (971724) | more than 8 years ago | (#15421110)

Its only for the rich, like most technology that Bill Gates always spounts hot air about technology revolutionising people's lives like them. No, its for the rich mostly. They even have to share mobile phones between communities in some areas, granted its at least better than nothing but its not enough.

Re:Ahead of the US? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15421112)

The summary clearly mentions "ahead of the USA in the deployment of a mobile wireless network."

How is mentioning the literacy relevant? Be objective.
Or is that something your prejudiced mind can't achieve?

Anyway, what good is literacy if you're going to vote for Bush?

Re:Ahead of the US? (1)

Glonoinha (587375) | more than 8 years ago | (#15421314)

How is mentioning the literacy relevant? Be objective.

Perhaps because without the ability to read, the Internet is nothing more than pretty pictures. Not that there's anything wrong with that.

Re:Ahead of the US? (1)

irc.goatse.cx troll (593289) | more than 8 years ago | (#15421422)

Thats why theres 4chan.

Re:Ahead of the US? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15421128)

true - but also consider that the availability of high speed internet access can facilitate education and increase literacy. While it is questionalble how the government of Pakistan will handle almost certain opposition from the mullahs et.al., in itself, such networks can be used to help in education, marketing etc. Many pilot projects in India, Africa have shown that this is possible.

Re:Ahead of the US? (4, Insightful)

wenchmagnet (745079) | more than 8 years ago | (#15421153)

There are many challenges Pakistan faces, but this is progress... cheap wireless broadband access for the masses is GREAT! Whatever your preconcieved notions about Pakistan, the literacy rate in the urban areas is quite high and a LOT of people will benefit from this.

It also helps in getting the literacy rate up as more people take an interest in becoming literate. You might not believe it but many rural communities can limp along quite well without any need for widespread literacy - this will change that by showing them a bigger wider world that is out there for them to explore once they start to read!

Broadband internet access means access to a multitude of different views which means its a counter against fundamentalism and brainwashing.

As a Pakistani, I am very excited about this!

Who said 'cheap'? (2, Insightful)

Harmonious Botch (921977) | more than 8 years ago | (#15421573)

Parent says: "..cheap wireless broadband access for the masses is GREAT!"

True, but I rtfa and I don't recall anything about pricing. I suspect that the masses will not benefit anytime soon.

Re:Ahead of the US? (1)

mapkinase (958129) | more than 8 years ago | (#15422626)

I am glad for your country. Way to go!

Re:Ahead of the US? (1)

TheKidWho (705796) | more than 8 years ago | (#15421512)

I work in Pakistan for a US company.

So I am really getting a kick out of most of these replies.

Some of you guys are very good at making it sound like you know what you are talking about.

But trust me.... You don't.

I think you just want to make yourself sound smart, when in reality you dont know what you are talking about.

This is how bad info gets passed around.

If you dont know about the topic....Dont make yourself sound like you do.

Cuz some /.'ers believe anything they hear.

Re:Ahead of the US? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15421642)

"...you dont know what you are talking about..."

So, enlighten us. Give us facts.

Re:Ahead of the US? (1)

enrevanche (953125) | more than 8 years ago | (#15421693)

I hope you do realize you've actually said nothing here.

Maybe you should consider correcting the errors instead being smug.

Re:Ahead of the US? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15422270)

maybe you should consider learning what a cliche is

wooooooosh

Re:Ahead of the US? (1)

TorAvalon (971986) | more than 8 years ago | (#15422547)

I hope you do realize you've actually said nothing here.

See I am 9 years old and can act just like you.

Re:Ahead of the US? (1)

hyfe (641811) | more than 8 years ago | (#15422006)

Hopefully this new wireless technology will help them crack the 50% literacy milestone.

Well, I'm functionally illiterate and I'm perfectly capable of using the internet (atleast, I think I'm functionally illitereate. Yesterday f.x. I visited this cool site [myspace.com] and couldn't understand a word of what people wrote in their user profiles.. even so, I could still enjoy the pictures and vidoes of fat chicks showing body parts I really didn't want to see! yay me!).

I'm sure the 4% of the population with internet access will really appreaciate it, though.

Well, the whole point of improving the infrastructure is to, well, get a better infrastructure.

Re:Ahead of the US? (1)

GIL_Dude (850471) | more than 8 years ago | (#15422174)

Right, once they get power to the many area in Pakistan that have no electricity they may have wireless access.

Re:Ahead of the US? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15422577)

I don't think Pakistan is in danger of getting ahead of the US anytime soon. They ought to concentrate on returning democracy to the people of Pakistan (instead of their usual military dictatorship), stop proliferating nuclear weapons, control those madrassas where foreign born Pakistanis get training (London bombing July 7th 2005), stop allowing the Taliban and Al-Qaeda elements refuge in Western Pakistan, stop interferring with the internal affairs of Afghanistan as they have done in the past and stop being such a damn failed state.

Pakistan 'is a top failed state [bbc.co.uk] . Yeah, they have a long way to go. WiMax is not going to be their salvation.

Re:Ahead of the US? (1)

mapkinase (958129) | more than 8 years ago | (#15422633)

What a bunch of nonsense...

Why are you repeating like a parrot what you read in Western media?

Re:Ahead of the US? (2, Insightful)

mapkinase (958129) | more than 8 years ago | (#15422617)


Let me rephrase beyond "Informative" tag in two words what the parent said: "Pakistan is a developing country". Duh!

Scenario: /.er reads the only positive article in the history of Slashdot about subject country, digs out two negative facts about subject country, gets 5 mod points Informative from a moderator who counts number of references and % signs iin the post to base the moderation upon.

The big mistake of the original poster was to compare to US. God forbids to do it ever!

It is funny how citizens (residents, sympathizers) of the most powerful nation in history of the humanity get upset when instead of 100.0% domination they got only 99.999%.

What did you want to tell us, Damian? That Pakistan is a developed country? That is "Informative"?

Way to go, Pakistan!

Just so I understand: (5, Funny)

DysenteryInTheRanks (902824) | more than 8 years ago | (#15421088)

I want to make sure I understand this correctly: Osama bin Laden is about to get faster broadband Internet on his laptop in some mud hut in Pakistan than I could possibly buy at home in the U.S.?

p0wn3d, man. Fucking p0wn3d.

Re:Just so I understand: (1)

the_masked_mallard (792207) | more than 8 years ago | (#15421239)

why has the parent been modded troll ?

perhaps this might shed some light on it : http://blogs.abcnews.com/theblotter/2006/05/bin_la den_on_th.html [abcnews.com]

Re:Just so I understand: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15421424)

Hereby I am asking you to promptly cancel your internet connection, because there is some criminal hiding in your country.

If you say pakistanis are less a human than you are, then let me congratulate you to your nazi thinking. Maybe you'll get born as pakistani in your next life, who knows, reincarnation isn't proven nor unproven.

In dense areas.. (1)

pthor1231 (885423) | more than 8 years ago | (#15421090)

I don't know how well it's going to work. For a coverage range of 30 miles, at theortical maximum of 75 Mbps, that's not much per user. Sometimes my cable connection could get slow in my house, with my other roomates using it, and thats an 8 Mbps connection, wired. Also, does a 30 mile range maximum mean in each direction, so a sphere of radius 30 miles? God I would hate to be on that.

Re:In dense areas.. (1)

alfs boner (963844) | more than 8 years ago | (#15421122)

There is no reason to think that a government body, or quasi-government body like most public utiltiies couldn't set up a good network.

A lot of it is in hiring the right people. Right now there are large nubmers of very skilled people that are unemployed or underemployed. These people could be snapped up at a good price.

Also, as many developing countries have learned, it's cheaper to invest in modern technology than to maintain and upgrade older networks. A wireless network that uses off-the-shelf modern parts should be much cheaper than a custom network built over a much longer time. Look at all the articles about growth in South Korea and similar places.

Re:In dense areas.. (1)

Teun (17872) | more than 8 years ago | (#15421463)

30 mi. is the maximum radius, nothing prevents the use of smaller cells in build up areas.

Re:In dense areas.. (2, Informative)

petecarlson (457202) | more than 8 years ago | (#15421962)


For a coverage range of 30 miles (You)

has a range of up to 30 miles (TFA)

Reality: There are PTP applications that can hit 30 miles. Users will never be on a point to point link as it would take one AP per subscriber. For mobile applications, you are looking at a range of about two miles with six access points creating a 360 degree cluster. Assuming we get half of the theoretical 75 megabits per second, we have ~35 Mb/s per AP and 225 Mb/s per cluster.

Sometimes my cable connection could get slow in my house, with my other roomates using it, and thats an 8 Mbps connection, wired.

First, I would like to remind you that it is highly unlikely that you have an 8Mbps connection. It is more likely that your connection maxes out at 8Mbps and is best effort. It is also likely that you are maxing out your upload queue which is making your connection appear slow. Lets compare your connection to our theoretical connection above.

Comcast or other cable provider.
Up to 1000 subscribers per node with 100 Mbps per node.
(This is limited by Comcasts backhaul. Bandwidth on the coax is shared)

Theoretical WiMax deployment:
Up to 1536 (6X256) Subscribers per node with 225 Mbps per node
(Most likely limited to less by the backhaul. Bandwidth per AP is shared)
(It is unlikely that they will pull this many subs in a 15 sq mile node.

-1 redundant... (4, Insightful)

Duncan3 (10537) | more than 8 years ago | (#15421093)

"ready to move ahead of the USA"

We get it already, 30% of high school kids drop out, our President has an IQ of 60, and smart kids are beaten in the streets, what the hell do you expect?

OT: Jr and IQ (was:-1 redundant...) (1)

Lead Butthead (321013) | more than 8 years ago | (#15421212)

... our President has an IQ of 60 ...
The article linked http://urbanlegends.about.com/library/bliq-bush.ht m [about.com] claims Lovenstein Institute research (which is not to say that said research or the reference isn't biased) estimates Jr's IQ to be 91. For comparison O'Reagan's IQ was estimated to be 105 and FDR was 147.

Re:OT: Jr and IQ (was:-1 redundant...) (1)

Lead Butthead (321013) | more than 8 years ago | (#15421221)

Well, that turns out to be an e-mail joke that has been in circulation for the past five years. Do I feel stupid now (DUH.)

Re:OT: Jr and IQ (was:-1 redundant...) (1)

DigiShaman (671371) | more than 8 years ago | (#15421267)

That link is bogus. Your an idiot too for spreading that FUD.

FYI, Bush's four year grade average was the same as Kerry's at Yale. You can read about it here [boston.com] .

From the linked article... "Bush went to Yale from 1964 to 1968; his highest grades were 88s in anthropology, history, and philosophy, according to The New Yorker article. He received one D in his four years, a 69 in astronomy. Bush has said he was a C student."

History and philosophy are subjects all presidents should be proficient in.

Re:OT: Jr and IQ (was:-1 redundant...) (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15421367)

History and philosophy are subjects all presidents should be proficient in.

Despite doing decent in History class, Bush still seems doomed to repeat it. Perhaps he didn't pay as good attention as one might hope?

presidents have little power or control (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15421417)

Presidents get told what to do. His next set of marching orders will be coming after the next bilderberg conference, which is soon in some city in canada I think. That meeting and a few more with the planetary bankers and controllers is where the real power on the planet is. Presidents and prime ministers, etc are chosen there, they get their orders from those sorts of people through their personal handlers. This election stuff is for show biz purposes.

MOD PARENT UP!!!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15421592)

get the word out!

Re:OT: Jr and IQ (was:-1 redundant...) (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15421368)

FYI, Bush's four year grade average was the same as Kerry's at Yale.

And this is supposed to make me feel better about having a C student lead the "free world"?

Re:OT: Jr and IQ (was:-1 redundant...) (1)

rlp (11898) | more than 8 years ago | (#15421288)

It's a hoax. See Snopes [snopes.com]

Re:-1 redundant... (4, Insightful)

suv4x4 (956391) | more than 8 years ago | (#15421218)

We get it already, 30% of high school kids drop out, our President has an IQ of 60, and smart kids are beaten in the streets, what the hell do you expect?

War with Iran by the end of the year. Was this the right answer?

(what do I win btw?)

Re:-1 redundant... (1)

david.given (6740) | more than 8 years ago | (#15422090)

(what do I win btw?)

The undying enmity of half the population of the planet?

Re:-1 redundant... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15422103)

Mahmoud Ahmadinejad approves of your answer... and you win a big, wet, slurpy kiss from him!

A question of infrastructure (1)

dj245 (732906) | more than 8 years ago | (#15421260)

I think this has much more to do with the fact that 2nd and 3rd world countries never had telephone infrastructure to begin with, so it would make sense that they just skip it and go right to wireless technologies. And as long as you're going to a wireless technology, might as well make it the cutting edge one.

Re:A question of infrastructure (1)

Peyna (14792) | more than 8 years ago | (#15421375)

I think this has much more to do with the fact that 2nd and 3rd world countries never had telephone infrastructure to begin with

"Second World" countries would be those allied with the USSR during the Cold War.

"Third World" countries historically was everyone that wasn't allied with either the US or the USSR during the Cold War, but has, in the media, come to mean "undeveloped country."

Re:A question of infrastructure (1)

RotateLeftByte (797477) | more than 8 years ago | (#15421622)

You are spot on with your observation.
I do and have done a lot of biz in 2nd & 3rd world countries. With the fall of the Soviet Union the newly independant countries went for the latest tect in a big way. Those were the days. I had to get a Supercomputer export license to hand carry an Alpha to Kazakhstan.
Their lack of POTS for the majority of the population enables the take rapid up of Mobile phones. After all, who would ewait months to get a land line installed when you could get a mobile in minutes.

For the accountants/bean counters amongst us, a wireless infrastructure is far (by orders of magnitude) to install and maintain than a wired network.

I remember some prominent 1st world IT companies being shown the door when the proposed "not leading edge" tachnology whereas the company I was working for proposed 64bit Risc CPU's (this was in 1995) Guess who got the biz?

Unfortunately, the average Americans view of the world ends at 48 states. the 2nd & 3rd World are just savages with an IQ approaching zero. (this is a simplistic view but I hope you get the point)

Just my 0.02tenge ( tenge is the currency of Kazakhstan)

Re:A question of infrastructure (1)

Detritus (11846) | more than 8 years ago | (#15422551)

A friend who worked in Pakistan said that they had numerous problems with telephone and data line outages. Some of the more enterprising local residents would steal the cable right off the poles.

Red Face (1)

Profane MuthaFucka (574406) | more than 8 years ago | (#15421096)

It was bad enough when South Korea got DSL lines ten times faster than our cable modems, but now this is just embarassing.

Re:Red Face (1)

flobberchops (971724) | more than 8 years ago | (#15421121)

Its even more embarassing that New York, the center of the worlds finance has alot of very poor people without. I say SHAME ON YOU. The distrubition of wealth there is pathetic.

Re:Red Face (1)

Dan Ost (415913) | more than 8 years ago | (#15421182)

As long as there is scarcity, there will always be uneven distribution
of wealth. There is no other way.

Re:Red Face (0, Flamebait)

TheKidWho (705796) | more than 8 years ago | (#15421205)

No not embarassing at all, those poor people are lazy bastards. Pretty simple eh?

Re:Red Face (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15421170)

It was bad enough when South Korea got DSL lines ten times faster than our cable modems

Yes, but at least those were only for old people.

Might finally get Bush's attention... (1)

EmbeddedJanitor (597831) | more than 8 years ago | (#15421203)

Wireless rollout has been pretty bad in USA and even basic services like cellular phone are not available in many ruralareas. A comparison like this could finally get some attention from the "leadership".

Of course the opposite could also happen: the Administration could equally spin this up that wireless networking == antiChrist == terrorism.

Consumer adoption (1)

alfs boner (963844) | more than 8 years ago | (#15421103)

Though I do honestly hope WiMax succeeds, there's absolutely no gaurantee that they will be able to get the consumers to buy these things like hotcakes. Quite franky 802.11b at 11MBit/s is good enough to carry (US anyways) consumer broadband which averages around 1.5Mbit down 384kbit up. Until broadband reaches the speeds where a consumers WiFi link is what's slowing them down, that's when we'll get the upgrades. But in the meantime, unless people suddenly have a real use for the increased speed/distance, I can't see think taking off so quickly.

Re:Consumer adoption (1)

Ant P. (974313) | more than 8 years ago | (#15421173)

There's no such thing as "too much bandwidth".

Re:Consumer adoption (1)

LordVader717 (888547) | more than 8 years ago | (#15421371)

There may be no urge for an increase in speed for now, but distance is a big gain for most people. I don't know what it's like elsewhere, I don't get around too much, but at these ranges you can have access practically anywhere.

Re:Consumer adoption (2, Insightful)

zogger (617870) | more than 8 years ago | (#15421448)

It's the distance, man. WAY too many places in the US have no broadband at all with cable/wires/fiber and wifi is too short a range and trees and hills just muck it up.. WiMax is about the only way I'll get broadband, even then it will be iffy, and there are millions and millions more people in the same boat. the US is not just the top major urban areas afrter all and even a lot of suburban areas have little to no choice in broadband. If some companies get wimax out there, they WILL sell it. All these people still on dialup will go to it if it works and it is at least a reasonable cost. As it is now I pop for a phone line just to get net access, I don't *need* the land line phone, my cell works fine for phone calls, so wimax would maybe be cheaper than dialup!

Wireless upgrades (1)

Deliveranc3 (629997) | more than 8 years ago | (#15421125)

Really the technology for this was available to do this in cities with the 802.11b spec if the last mile net connections were actually neutral (which they are supposed to be in most cities).

G seemed like a good spec, obviously it wasn't fast enough to run a corperate or even a power users connection off but if they could have hit the theoretical maximum it would have been fine, these new specs won't allow small deployments which can service many users so they aren't a huge improvement over local wireless points (Also increased security concerns as it's not just neighborhood traffic but potentially whole city traffic which will be available for packet sniffing) it just centralizes a system which is only important if you're commited to an upgrade cycle (Which would actually be nice after we got borked by the western isps).

At some point the range will be there and I really hope they have backwards compatability worked out by then, users don't know anything about the interoperability of the wireless standards and they shouldn't have to.

Also the security standards are pretty stupid as well, routers support wireless security features that don't work AT ALL... why bother!

Hey cool (1)

rivetgeek (977479) | more than 8 years ago | (#15421187)

Now they can oppress women and demand total religious cultism without those pesky wires!

Re:Hey cool (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15421434)

Some would argue you're talking about the Christian Right in America...

Re:Hey cool (1)

rivetgeek (977479) | more than 8 years ago | (#15421833)

Last I checked the American Bible thumpers don't stone to death women that talk to men other than their husbands. They also don't prescribe raping a young girl as effective justice for an unpaid debt.

Re:Hey cool (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15421916)

It takes a certain kind of personality to only see the negative. Some how Pakistan elected a woman as the leader of the country, somehow that slipped your mind? Do women never get raped in America? Does America not have little cults (people who don't believe in medicine, people who mess around with snakes in their church, etc.)

Not just for the Internet (3, Informative)

cam762 (948285) | more than 8 years ago | (#15421226)

WiMAX 802.16e isn't used just for Internet connectivity, but also competes against cellular technologies (GSM/UMTS and CDMA2000) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wimax#Similar_technol ogies [wikipedia.org]

While 802.16e is mainly a mobile technology, it also supports "Fixed" access and mesh networking, which means that signals can be relayed from one access point to another instead of needing to hardwire every connection.

This should help implementation and penetration of the region by reducing the overall amount of infrastructure required.

Re:Not just for the Internet (1)

LordVader717 (888547) | more than 8 years ago | (#15421404)

It might bring in more competition to the mobile service provider market aswell. If you consider that the german government managed to make 50 billion Euros selling the spectrum for UMTS, you can imagine what kind of fair competition and pricing there is.

"Old" Wi-Fi is in a sense competition for cellular technologies when those new "hybrid-phones" come out, that switch to WiFi access points when they find them.

Mobile telephony (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15421282)

Wow, a country that is ahead of the United States in implementing wireless technology. That's something extraordinary. I'm glad that didn't happen with mobile telephony.

+1 Sarcastic (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15421416)

And the article didn't even mention pricing, which will have to be pretty low if they expect the average Pakastani to be able to pay for it.

Elsewhere in the sub-continent ... (2, Insightful)

moanads (613115) | more than 8 years ago | (#15421306)

Alcatel is teaming up with the Government of India to set up a WiMax development center [techworld.com] in the South Indian city of Chennai and the products developed there will be marketed worldwide. It appears that parts of Asia prefer to rollout wireless data networks as opposed to wireline ones, probably due to the fact that it is easier to deploy wireless networks. With Europe going ahead with the adoption of UMTS and HSDPA, it looks like wireless data networks are going to become pretty ubiquitous in many parts of the world. I wonder what new applications we will see once the pipe to the phone/wireless device gets much bigger than what it is today.

Sure - better for all the Jihadis ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15421322)

This is great to see that instead of trying to educate people about vices of their Mulla-infested education which in turn creates bunch of people who believes non-muslims have no right to live they are creating spending on some gizmo.

No, I am not talking about the wimax, I am taking about F16, missile program, nukes ... great country!

Re:Sure - better for all the Jihadis ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15421460)

Way to stereotype. I'm sure the millions of Christians and Hindus, Sikhs, and even Parsis in Pakistan would love to hear you try to explain how Pakistanis allegedly don't want them to live. They get along ok, for the most part, so quit making stuff up.

Re:Sure - better for all the Jihadis ... (1)

XchristX (839963) | more than 8 years ago | (#15421586)

He's not stereotyping. Pakistani Hindus live in mortal fear of their lives. They are publicly stoned to death, forced to wear armbands (like the Jewish people during the Nazi Ausrotten in Poland), and Hindu women often get gang-raped and molten metal poured into their eyes and ears and buried alive for wearing makeup in public or for not following the Islamic 'hijab'. These are state sanctioned atrocities advertised as "blasphemy laws".

  The wikipedia article is just the tip of the iceberg:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hinduism_in_Pakistan# The_future_for_Pakistani_Hindus [wikipedia.org]

Re:Sure - better for all the Jihadis ... (1)

Statman (208736) | more than 8 years ago | (#15421829)

XchristX --- Doesnt get any better for those Muslims living in Kashmir that are being masscared by Indian forces everyday. Two wrongs dont make a right.

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-551772270 2246333713 [google.com]

Re:Sure - better for all the Jihadis ... (1)

XchristX (839963) | more than 8 years ago | (#15421899)

In retaliation for muslim ethnic cleansing of Hindus in Kashmir:

http://www.panunkashmir.org/fundamentalism.html [panunkashmir.org]

http://64.233.179.104/search?q=cache:vkcaOQjIS9MJ: www.kashmir-information.com/fundamentalism.html+Is lamic+Fundamentalism+in+Kashmir&hl=en&gl=us&ct=cln k&cd=1&lr=lang_en&client=firefox-a [64.233.179.104]

  Two wrongs don't make a right ideally. However, the only feasable way to deal with terrorism and islamic mob savagery is to retaliate tenfold. America's success in Afghanistan against the Taliban, and Israel's successes in defeating the PLO, and Fatah, and Hamas are proof of that.

  Best I recall, Indians don't do these:
http://www.rawa.us/f-hang.htm [www.rawa.us]
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/f9 /WTC_attack_9-11.jpg [wikimedia.org]
http://news.bbc.co.uk/onthisday/hi/dates/stories/d ecember/13/newsid_3695000/3695057.stm [bbc.co.uk]
http://www.rediff.com/news/2003/oct/21franc.htm [rediff.com]

  or ram planes full of people into buildings full of people. Nor do they blow up parliaments, or teach hate ahead of maths in schools, madrassas and qutbas. Indians don't behead journalists or anyone. We don't have state sponsored rape gangs.

    India has history, art, science, technology, the world's largest democracy and third largest army.

    If anything, Indians are doing a poor job of taking care of the terrorists. The incompetent and corrupt UPA government seems to learn nothing. If it were the Israelis in Kashmir, the Jihadis would all be urinating in their pants by now, gibbering for mercy like retarded people.

  Great to see some more anti-Hindu sock puppets of Pakistan on slashdot though.

Re:Sure - better for all the Jihadis ... (1)

ceoyoyo (59147) | more than 8 years ago | (#15422379)

Interesting examples of victorious nations. Israel is known for being a bit of a paranoid society and deals with frequent bombings. I met an Australian who was working in Israel. His contract prohibited him from going to large public gathering places like clubs and restaurants because he was too valuable to lose in a bombing.

The paranoia is growing by leaps and bounds in the US.

Maybe there isn't a better approach, but the "two wrongs" one isn't working so well.

Re:Sure - better for all the Jihadis ... (1)

XchristX (839963) | more than 8 years ago | (#15422562)

>Interesting examples of victorious nations. Israel is known for being >a bit of a paranoid society and deals with frequent bombings.


Can you blame them? They're a small but prosperous country surrounded by countries that hate them and want to destroy them.

Pew global statistics reports that anti-semitism in neighboring Jordan is 100% today...

I'd be paranoid too if I were in their shoes.

>The paranoia is growing by leaps and bounds in the US.


I think you're exaggerating a bit. Don't believe everything the liberal media in the US spits out of it's propaganda factories. Nor should you believe every bit of Saudi-Lobby backed US-bashing spewed out by terrorist-sympathetic cabals like C.A.I.R or F.O.S.A or whoever about 'rising hate crimes against muslims' or 'racial profiling'. It's mostly hogwash...

I mean, look at me. I'm a brown dude and been in the US for 4 years now. I've gone through the airports and the screenings. No problems...


Ths US is more guarded now after 9/11 than before, true. But a little healthy paranoia is a good thing. Keeps the society vital. It's better than the miserable apathy that has engulfed Indian society since the 80s and leads the mulish electorate to vote away our rights and our safety to the bloody spineless crypto-communists of the UPA government, who bend over and take it up the arse while islamists and christian missionary-thugs try to overrun our country.

More info (1)

ashvagan (885082) | more than 8 years ago | (#15421374)

A US based company in Pakistan is using WiMax for its call center. Sales Rep will be sitting at home working with WiMax and will be monitored by a webcam (I know it sounds lousy and 1984ish, hope it works). This will introduce a whole new way for outsourced companies to work here.

Priorities (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15421389)

Good to see Pakistan has it's priorities in order.

Competing with India. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15421527)

Perhaps the whole WiMax thing was pushed to ensure decent connectivity and pipelines for luring Outsourcing business to Pakistan. Considering the perpetual inferiority complex Pakistan suffers because of India, this is a last ditch attepmt to rev up the infrastructure so that they grab a pie of the dollars pouring into India, China and Phillipines.

I wonder how they plan to use it. Most likely Al-Qaeda employees will now have faster access to Google Earth.

Expect to see more webcasts from Bin Laden when the Pakistanis finally roll out the service.

Repeat? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15421566)

So is this just and Ad for another country with WiMax, because i'm pretty sure its been rolled out elsewhere before.
Not to mention the places planning on rolling it out with trials already in place.

At least it'll prove to certain trolls that its not vaporware and always has been a long way from it.

The advantages I see in this are of mainly areas where conventional phone lines cannot carry a signal well; Eg. Rural Areas or Certain Buildings.

wonderful! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15421661)

A Great milestone. seems like mobility is becoming very popular in south-asian countries where it's very hard to develop and maintain cable infrastructure.

There's a HUGE market for highspeed connectivity and other telecom + economic sectors in Pakistan. After a big boost in cellular/telecom industry, Pakistan is soon going to see a broadband revolution. Here in Pakistan, Prices are very very high for a good high-speed connection.. it costs more than 50$ to get a 128kbits shared connection with no bandwidth caps. But looks like things are changing rapidly.. big players are coming into the broadband market and soon we'll see a price PLUS quality competition, which will obviously benefit the end-user. Same happened with mobiles/cellular industry, and now we have one of the most low-cost tariffs with quality of service being high.

WiMAX hype and hope (1)

bananaendian (928499) | more than 8 years ago | (#15421816)

AT&T did its bit to puncture the WiMAX hype today, while providing an update on three of its trial WiMAX deployments. Behzed Nadji, AT&T's Chief Architect, debunked stories about 70 Mbit/s throughput over distances of 70 miles for WiMAX. "There's little reality to that," he said. A range of 3 to 5 miles and 2 Mbit/s was closer to reality. In fact, one of AT&T's three deployments rarely saw throughput rise above 500 kbit/s, he said. Source [theregister.co.uk]

I can already provide point-to-multipoint 360 coverage with megabit connections simultaniously to over a hundred customers with 802.11g using three channel sector antennas. The range depends on how big a receiving antenna they have. WiMAX isn't about revolutionizing speed and coverage. It's about [wikipedia.org] intellegent contention, load control and QoS, which the existing 802s are lacking. Better for real mesh networking and reliable VoIP.

Osama to pay for entire venture (1, Troll)

BocaJuniors (924973) | more than 8 years ago | (#15421838)

Evidently, a pious Islamofascist can only go so long without broadband pr0n.

Re:Osama to pay for entire venture (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15422060)

We all need our pr0n, don't we!? That's what's driving this wireless technology like in the West. :)

Re:Osama to pay for entire venture (1)

alfs boner (963844) | more than 8 years ago | (#15422204)

Evidently, a pious Islamofascist can only go so long without broadband pr0n.

Evidently, you've outsourced your thinking to a cabal of virginal basement bloggers. Kudos for controlling yourself and not calling someone an "asshat," just because you were writing a sentence.

Re:Osama to pay for entire venture (1)

BocaJuniors (924973) | more than 8 years ago | (#15422403)

Evidently, my joke about pr0n, not Islamofascism, sucked. ;)

Re:Osama to pay for entire venture (1)

alfs boner (963844) | more than 8 years ago | (#15422466)

Correct; you're not funny.

All five Pakistani internet users are joyous (2, Funny)

melted (227442) | more than 8 years ago | (#15421921)

All five Pakistani internet users are joyous.

They've been hiring this last month (1)

anticypher (48312) | more than 8 years ago | (#15422005)

There are a bunch of low-cost no-name recruiting agencies searching around for engineers to go to Pakistan for a WiMax project the last month or two. It doesn't hold too well for the project that they are trying to pay Paki prices, but expect to find experienced first world engineers.

I had a twisted conversation with one of them two weeks ago. They want all the usual impossibilities, such as 5-10 years of WiMax experience, 15-30 years industry experience but only 18-25 years old, have to be able to program in PowerPoint, etc. I played along, and tried to convince the HR droid to at least pass my CV on, as people closer to the core of the project are probably more competent and my chances of scoring the contract much higher. I told her that they needed to contact me soon, as I was also being recruited by Motorola to do another WiMax rollout so they had only 5 days to get back to me. The deadline has passed, so I guess my holding out for minimum wage was too much for them.

the AC

The sky is falling... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15422127)

Who the f#ck cares about this piddly installation....except for Osama who is can finally go wireless in his cave.

Re: Sure Better for all the Jihadis (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15422583)

"He's not stereotyping. Pakistani Hindus live in mortal fear of their lives. They are publicly stoned to death, forced to wear armbands (like the Jewish people during the Nazi Ausrotten in Poland), and Hindu women often get gang-raped and molten metal poured into their eyes and ears and buried alive for wearing makeup in public or for not following the Islamic 'hijab'. These are state sanctioned atrocities advertised as "blasphemy laws".
"

This is a complete misrepresentation of the true situation.
I live in the capital of Pakistan. And Hindus live here respectable lives. In the current Governing Cabinet there is a Hindu minister! Hindus have been a major part in Pakistani Cricket.
In the street I live, their is a Hindu government officer, but here in pakistan we dont think in terms of religion!! I dont know hows its in hte rural areas. What armbands are you talking about???? There is no discrimination with respect to religion here, noone is asked to wear armbands for their religious believes.
Right here in the capital there is a Hindu Temple, just as their is a Masonic lodge and two Churches. In Karachi there's even a Synagogue!
There are more attacks on groups of other religions in India then their are in any other country, Kashmir, Gujarat etc..

And What Islamic Hijab?? Pakistan is not Afghanistan or Iran only a minority of women wear that thing! Just visit the Capital you'll see women going around the street in jeans!!

Thanks for pointing to that wikipedia article I'll update it with the true facts, it has to have been made by some one who has no knowledge of the ground realities!!

The only reason they would do this is because (2, Informative)

beoswulf (940729) | more than 8 years ago | (#15422628)

The government is expanding internet access in an attempt to maintain Pakistan's top rank amongst nations that search Google for "sex".

http://www.google.com/trends?q=sex&ctab=1&sa=N [google.com]

Pakistani Perspective (1)

alijsyed (957651) | more than 8 years ago | (#15422641)

I spent much time in Pakistan (over 3 years) and I have had first hand experience with the limited growth of the internet in rural Pakistan. Outside of the mega cities of Karachi, Lahore and Rawalpinidi(twin city Islamabad), rural areas had very limited access to the internet via 56k modem based internet.

During my last visit (last may) I witnessed a massive surge in cell phone use and purchases by the middle class and dare I say lower income brackets (very parallel to us in Canada and America). Access to information and technology should never be restricted to income or literacy.

Do you really think the people of rural USA or rural Canada are any better or worse than those in rural Pakistan. Hardly, I grew up in rural Ontario and I can not see a major difference (apart from religions though the rural south west of Punjab province in Pakistan is dominated by Christian populations). Regardless of country, income, class information and access to it should always be free.

Shame on use for thinking anything else.

The real boom behind this is the fact land lines require a position on a waiting list which means a heavy bribe. Cell phones and wireless technology have side stepped dated briery practices because there is so much competition in Pakistan for this to take root. While WiMax may not better the poor it gives the poor rural population a technology they would have had access to otherwise. This in turn leads to education (in various forms) and an increase in job potential.

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