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Found on (0, Troll)

poutine514 (776744) | more than 8 years ago | (#15466244)

www.digg.com a long ass time ago

Re:Found on (3, Insightful)

deesine (722173) | more than 8 years ago | (#15466367)

Great, now you can get some decent comments about it.

" The material seems pretty decent.... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15466245)

The material seems pretty decent, and is intended for an advanced audience."

So why bother posting it on Slahdot?

Study cryptography! (3, Insightful)

Radicode (898701) | more than 8 years ago | (#15466253)

I think most online software developpers should learn the basics of cryptography. Not only would it improve security but it would also lead to better design in general. No more "base 64 encoded password in a text file" stuff please!

Radicode

Re:Study cryptography! (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15466359)

Bx, cbvag gnxra.

Re:Study cryptography! (3, Funny)

Metabolife (961249) | more than 8 years ago | (#15466361)

No, just the password to root written on a post-it near their monitor.

Re:Study cryptography! (1)

timeOday (582209) | more than 8 years ago | (#15466646)

No, just the password to root written on a post-it near their monitor.
I'll grant that's a bad idea, but I think 95%+ of threats come over the network these days.

Re:Study cryptography! (1)

PatrickThomson (712694) | more than 8 years ago | (#15467117)

Exactly. Re vista's security model, people said "what's to stop the malware from confirming the 'install this?' prompt, but malware can't read a password postitted out of view of the webcam. If someone has physical access to the machine you're stuffed anyway.

Re:Study cryptography! (1)

Toveling (834894) | more than 8 years ago | (#15466678)

That's actually relatively secure. If a user has a strong password, but with it written, it's much more secure than if it's weak but memorized. If a malicious user has physical access to the machine, then he's going to get what he wants, one way or another password or no.

Re:Study cryptography! (1)

dhasenan (758719) | more than 8 years ago | (#15466735)

Not so. In a home environment, yes; but if you're talking about a server in a corporation, you'd need to open it up and modify the contents. A business will likely be using LDAP or something similar, or at least you'll need to provide another password in order to modify anything beyond the workstation you're on. And that password is on a machine that you won't have physical access to.

Re:Study cryptography! (3, Interesting)

Lord Ender (156273) | more than 8 years ago | (#15466491)

Actually, any company that cared about its own reputation and customers would have a security specialist write ALL code that does authentication or cryptography. It is actually pretty tricky to get right, despite how easy some APIs make it look.

If you are too small to afford a security specialist who can code, look outside the organization. Letting regular developers do security is an incredibly risky business decision.

Re:Study cryptography! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15466499)

/me raises hand. "guilty"

Re:Study cryptography! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15466827)

I think most online software developpers should learn the basics of cryptography.

You're hardly alone, a couple of years ago O'Reilly started publishing books like Secure Coding: Principles and Practices [amazon.com] that touch on cryptography as something all devs should know about. However, I think that this is probably one of the lesser-selling series in all that they publish, which is sad.

Re:Study cryptography! (1)

cras (91254) | more than 8 years ago | (#15467227)

No more "base 64 encoded password in a text file" stuff please!

So how should it be done, assuming the user wants passwords to be remembered? No matter how you store it, it's no more secure than base64 encoding since you'll have to be able to open it anyway. Unless you're talking about something completely different.

Re:Study cryptography! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15467308)

No. Its more important to do product which fulfills its specifications than try to do the perfect product.

I have studied and implemented most of the public and private key encryption/hashing methods. I have also been in software projects where requirements of the product didn't justify implementation/use of secure encryption so I coded simple scrambling well knowing that it can be broken with very little effort.

Better Design (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15467420)

I think most online software developpers should learn the basics of cryptography. Not only would it improve security but it would also lead to better design in general.

Ah-ha, now I get it, so that's where RMS learnt UI design when he was developing Emacs. Explains it all. Why, it really is better!

Found where? (-1, Flamebait)

Distinguished Hero (618385) | more than 8 years ago | (#15466262)

Found on digg here [digg.com] . Same writeup too. For shame, Slashdot, for shame. :)

Thanks (3, Informative)

backslashdot (95548) | more than 8 years ago | (#15466326)

Yeah and it was on college's website before that too.

Why don't i just visit all the websites on the internet every day? Then i wouldnt have to bother with the inconvenience of browsing slashdot.

As for having the same writeup? The bottom of the text credits linkfilter .. duh.

Re:Thanks (-1, Troll)

MarkByers (770551) | more than 8 years ago | (#15466400)

Why don't i just visit all the websites on the internet every day?

You don't need to, Digg has everything you need.

Slashdot is good too. Apart from the crazy moderators that mod you down if you don't agree with the hive...

Re:Thanks (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15466490)

And Digg doesn't have abusive moderation? Get real. The whole hive moderates you on Digg.

Re:Thanks (4, Funny)

MarkByers (770551) | more than 8 years ago | (#15466556)

If you say something unpopular on Slashdot you lose the right to moderate. At least on Digg everyone is equal.

Re:Thanks (1)

WilliamSChips (793741) | more than 8 years ago | (#15467005)

Including the GNAA.

Re:Thanks (1)

WilliamSChips (793741) | more than 8 years ago | (#15467012)

And all their clone accounts.

Re:Thanks (1)

Distinguished Hero (618385) | more than 8 years ago | (#15466489)

My apology. I assumed there was some sort of friendly rivalry going on between digg and slashdot, although with all that bile and vitriol I've just experienced, I guess not. I also found it interesting the the Slashdot post claimed "Found on linkfilter." which is a pretty obscure site that I've never heard of (and I don't think many others have as well; it doesn't even have a wikipedia entry). Furthermore, if you compare and contrast the date stamps on both the linkfilter and digg, you'll notice that the digg post predates the linkfilter post.

Why don't i just visit all the websites on the internet every day? Then i wouldnt have to bother with the inconvenience of browsing slashdot.
With one of those newfangled "RSS/Atom" readers, it's quite easy to keep yourself appraised of quite a few websites. If you still find yourself strapped for time, perhaps you could reschedule some of the time that is currently allocated to flaming innocent people on slashdot, to reading more websites instead.

Re:Thanks (2, Insightful)

MarkByers (770551) | more than 8 years ago | (#15466528)

I totally know what you mean. If you mention Digg on this site you get modded Troll or Flamebait. Weird, huh? Personally I think both sites are good and both have positive and negative points. I see no reason why anyone wouldn't want to read both.

I guess I'm just too radical...

Re:Thanks (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15466712)

Ever tried mentioning Slashdot on Digg?

A passing reference got me -40. Yet, copying comments verbatim from Slashdot (when I'm certain they weren't the same people) usually resulted in being modded up.

I can't say I've seen many intelligent conversations there. I sometimes look at Digg, but I no longer look at the comments.

And by the way, since you seem to be very vocal about how Digg is good because of 'equality', you might try Googling for that incident with Kevin Rose a while back, where the same 10-20 people instantly Dugg certain stories, while stories with 3 times as many Diggs in half the time never made it to the front page.

It's not a democracy there either.

Re:Thanks (1)

EvilIdler (21087) | more than 8 years ago | (#15466620)

Sure, RSS makes it easy, if you can cut down the stream to just the subjects you are
interested in. Then you need to KNOW ABOUT the sites in question - I wouldn't have
heard of Digg if people weren't constantly bitching about it here ;)

Re:Thanks (1)

Jane_Dozey (759010) | more than 8 years ago | (#15466916)

Unfortunatly there are far too many digg and slashdot trolls running around both sites to ever have a friendly rivalry :/ There are also too many people visiting them that don't understand banter and take everything as a serious personal attack if they think you're critising something they like (ie slachdot or digg).

Next time just make sure you stick in a disclaimer making it blindlingly clear that you're having some fun rather than trolling! :)

Re:Found where? (1, Funny)

Aurisor (932566) | more than 8 years ago | (#15466622)

Except digg has a typo:

"for advance audience"

And slashdot does not.

It's a cold day in hell.

Also worth visiting... (5, Informative)

Sheetrock (152993) | more than 8 years ago | (#15466278)

The MIT OpenCourseWare [mit.edu] site has a sizeable amount of free learning materials. I had it bookmarked a while back when they weren't offering that much but they've since put a lot online.

Re:Also worth visiting... (1)

vinay.ys (976057) | more than 8 years ago | (#15466350)

There is nothing on the courseware that can't be found in text books available all over the world. So it isn't all that great a news. Also, most univ. profs put up notes and presentations online.

Re:Also worth visiting... (1)

Sheetrock (152993) | more than 8 years ago | (#15466464)

It really depends on which course you're looking at. I was interested in a review of calculus, and was able to obtain a free book, accompanying teacher's guide (answers to all problems in the text), presentations/notes, and assignments. Other courses are more sparse, but if you can point to a larger resource in one spot on the Internet I'd like to know about it.

Re:Also worth visiting... (5, Interesting)

Chalex (71702) | more than 8 years ago | (#15466481)

MIT has the full text of the book Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs [mit.edu] online. They also have the videos of all the lectures. [mit.edu] I've been going through them slowly; they really make you think.

Re:Also worth visiting... (1)

Aerion (705544) | more than 8 years ago | (#15466686)

They also have the videos of all the lectures. I've been going through them slowly; they really make you think.

Those lectures are from 1986! The course content has changed a fair amount since then, although mostly it's a matter of the order in which they are taught.

Anyway, in recent terms, we've opted for the lower-bandwidth option (not that we usually worry about bandwidth here) of lecture slides with accompanying audio clips. This also means that lecture attendance has dropped severely.

Re:Also worth visiting... (1)

Sheetrock (152993) | more than 8 years ago | (#15466820)

I'm probably going to run through this series anyway. One bonus over slides of recent lectures is that if they start to lose me on a topic, at least I can be amused by what we used to look like in the 80s.

Re:Also worth visiting... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15467033)

SICP has been online for ages. I remember referring to the online version even when I was taking the introductory CS course many years ago.

Re:Also worth visiting... (1)

hlimethe3rd (879459) | more than 8 years ago | (#15466638)

MIT's courseware ranges quite a bit from the very complete to the just-an-outline, but the variety of subjects online, and number of levels within each, is pretty impressive. I've found it a good resource just for a quick reference, or for a self-taught subject. Definitely a good thing for the school to do.

Re:Also worth visiting... (1)

RackinFrackin (152232) | more than 8 years ago | (#15466645)

Another great online crypto resource is the Handbook of Applied Cryptography [uwaterloo.ca] . The full text is available for download.

Re:Also worth visiting... (1)

RackinFrackin (152232) | more than 8 years ago | (#15466667)

Doh!

Next time I'll read the article.

The Zatanna School of Cryptography: Thanks, Taco! (3, Interesting)

RobotRunAmok (595286) | more than 8 years ago | (#15466284)

I so, so TOTALLY love the fact the little sub-title/blurb for this story is in a backwards-writing code, and that there is a misspelling.

Sometimes, it's all just so perfect.

Thanks again.

Re:The Zatanna School of Cryptography: Thanks, Tac (1)

Gothmolly (148874) | more than 8 years ago | (#15466734)

It's not a misspelling, the first thing you do when encrypting is compress, to remove all the redundant data. So that was Taco's little joke, he 'compressed' out the 2nd "L" character.

Encrypted (1)

MrSteveSD (801820) | more than 8 years ago | (#15466288)

And once you've cracked the encryption, the course is free!

What about certifications? (0)

Zweideutig (900045) | more than 8 years ago | (#15466306)

Isn't the whole point of taking post secondary courses to have the credentials necessary to get a job in your chosen field?

Re:What about certifications? (2, Informative)

kfg (145172) | more than 8 years ago | (#15466368)

No.

KFG

Re:What about certifications? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15466414)

Believe it or not, some people are still into learning for learning's sake: you know, the whole increase your knowledge thing.

It's visible in Europe too! (4, Funny)

MarkByers (770551) | more than 8 years ago | (#15466309)

The US Government has allowed us in Europe read it too! They finally realised that learning about cryptography doesn't mean you are a terrorist.

Or perhaps they are using the website to collect IP addresses of potential terrorists?

Re:It's visible in Europe too! (1)

Radicode (898701) | more than 8 years ago | (#15466331)

No, all "approved" methods on the website are tainted with a reversable key known by the US gov. Now they can read your e-mail too :-P

Re:It's visible in Europe too! (1)

v1 (525388) | more than 8 years ago | (#15466501)

I would be willing to bet that there is a "classified rule" in that educational system, "thou shalt not teach of crypto that we are as yet unable to break".

Better to sell locks to which you already posess the key.

Re:It's visible in Europe too! (1)

gkhan1 (886823) | more than 8 years ago | (#15466782)

What, are you crazy??? Ofcourse they teach ciphers the US is unable to make! Hell, I never took crypto-courses at the university, and I can teach you a few that is practically unbreakable simply because I'm curious about this stuff.

Hell I'll teach you the Vernam cipher right now! For each message create a totally random string of letters as long as the message to serve as a key. Convert the letters in the key and the message to binary numbers, XOR them together, and convert them back to letters. Make sure the key was mindblowingly random (no PRNGs!) and that you never, ever, EVER! use the key again. To decrypt, just XOR the cipher with the key again.

There, that's unbreakable. Completetly, 100%, mathematically proven, not-even-when-the-aliens-come-with-their-supercomp uters unbreakable.

So no, I'm fairly certain that they teach whatever they want.

Re:It's visible in Europe too! (1)

v1 (525388) | more than 8 years ago | (#15466935)

btw, that's more commonly referred to as a "one time pad". I rather doubt most people have heard of it referred to as "Vernam cipher ".

For unbreakability, if used properly, yes, a one time pad is effective. In reality though, this relies on the repeated exchange of a codebook, and in that case the frequent need for physical exchange between the parties produces more risk and opportunity for exploit/discovery than it's worth.

Any attempt to generate the pads without physical exchange via a formula etc just reduces the security of the system by introducing analyzable patterns that can be used to break the formula and thus break the pad.

Re:It's visible in Europe too! (1)

gkhan1 (886823) | more than 8 years ago | (#15467294)

Well, technically, the Vernam cipher and the one time pad is slightly different, the Vernam cipher uses XOR where the one-time pad uses good ole' Vigenère style addition.

The cipher was invented by Gilbert Vernam, and I like using the term because it describes the general cipher instead of the one-time pad, which really is a much more restricted application of it. Also, I beliece that's the term David Kahn used most often in The Codebreakers, and who am I to argue with David Kahn :P. As a plus, it sounds way cooler.

And yes, obviously you are right. My point was that, used correctly (and it has been, several times, russian spies used this alot), the cipher is unbreakable. The cipher isn't useless, it just has limited application. As I said, russian spies used it alot back in the day, and even though we have had their encrypted communications for ~40 years, we still havent been able to break them. And we never will.

Re:It's visible in Europe too! (1)

meringuoid (568297) | more than 8 years ago | (#15466980)

I would be willing to bet that there is a "classified rule" in that educational system, "thou shalt not teach of crypto that we are as yet unable to break".

I doubt it. That requires too many people to know the secret. If you've broken Popularly Used Cipher X but not Popularly Used Cipher Y, you keep the fact deadly secret. You want people to keep using the broken code, rather than switch to the unbroken code.

Now, if you try to ban people teaching Y because you can't break it, then you have to let every crypto researcher know about it so that they can know what not to teach.

But that kind of negates the secrecy, doesn't it? Suddenly the fact that Cipher X has been broken is public knowledge; you've just told hundreds of civilian professors about it, and someone's going to leak. The world switches to Cipher Y, and your great advantage in cryptanalysis is gone.

It's possible, of course, that you might try a double-bluff: ban discussion of the _broken_ cipher, and try to trick people into switching _away_ from the stronger version. But in general, it's probably better practice to keep silence as far as practical. Let 'em keep guessing. Every move you make, every public word you say, will be analysed by your adversaries, and whether you're lying or telling the truth it's all information that might be useful to them in ways you can't predict...

Uh. so what? (1)

Tuffnut (618438) | more than 8 years ago | (#15466312)

Lots of universities have their course information online. I fail to see why this case is of any significance?

American tax payers money wasted big time! (0, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15466314)

Damn! This is tax payers money that gets wasted big time! Now all the foreign people can study this course for free. It has costed some big dollars to get that course material. Tax payers money! We pay - others benefit. Do you have ANY idea how much this costs?

More outsourcing! (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15466363)

People in India and China will use this course material to study crypto and eventually more American jobs will be transfered to India. This is like a jackpot to Indian educational institutes. And all of this is funded by American citizens. Like Kennedy said - ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country. This is just wrong! College students pay huge amounts of money to get access to this kind of material. They pay - the rest of the world benefits.

Re:More outsourcing! (2, Insightful)

dhasenan (758719) | more than 8 years ago | (#15466794)

Okay. The alternative is that an intelligent Indian person comes to the US and studies cryptography, then goes back to India and starts teaching it.

What's the net benefit to the US? Maybe $100K. So how do we keep the money in the US? Force everyone with a graduate degree from a US university to stay in the country? Then you get a pair of intelligent Indian people; one gets a doctorate in applied cryptography and teaches everything he learns to the other.

Now we require that everyone who talks with anyone with a graduate degree from a US university has to stay in the country. Hell, why not just close the borders entirely? Nobody gets in, nobody gets out.

There's still the problem of correspondence. So why not close all borders permanently to all traffic? No goods enter or leave the country; no communications outside the country. And set up a 50-mile wide belt of land mines around all our borders so people can't use semaphore, and outlaw radio communications, and....

Hell, why not just outlaw learning. That'd show 'em.

Re:American tax payers money wasted big time! (3, Insightful)

kfg (145172) | more than 8 years ago | (#15466390)

Now all the foreign people can study this course for free.

And without it they couldn't just go to a library.

KFG

Re:American tax payers money wasted big time! (5, Insightful)

orthogonal (588627) | more than 8 years ago | (#15466483)

Now all the foreign people can study this course for free. It has costed some big dollars to get that course material. Tax payers money! We pay - others benefit. Do you have ANY idea how much this costs?

How much are you paying the Sumerian guy (yes, and others) who invented writing? The Babylonian who invented the calendar? Hell, most of the early American industrial revolution depended on violating English patents on water-wheels and drive-shafts and various cogs and pulleys. That God there was no Berne Convention then, huh?

When you enjoy Bach's Musical Offering, do you send a buck to the descendants of Bach's patron, Frederick II of Prussia?

The truth is, every one of us -- even the most prolific and creative inventors -- benefit far more from our shared cultural patrimony than we contribute to it.

Most of Newton's genius would have been wasted if he'd had to spend his life chasing down gazelles to get his lunch. Little of that genius would have been transmitted to anyone without the efforts of the anonymous inventor of writing and thousands of others who refined that tool and so many other tools down through the ages.

Information, knowledge -- they are not, contrary to the more glib claims of the Open Source movement, free. Knowledge must be wrested from nature at great cost by discovers, and each of us to understand that knowledge must pay our own cost to learn it.

But the Open Source advocates aren't wrong either: knowledge can be transmitted at little marginal cost: developing the course did cost the tax- and tuition-payers of Washington State, but the additional cost to make it available to all is the negligible amount required to host it on a web server. Nor is it "free" to anyone -- anyone who wants to possess it must take the time and effort to learn it, to re-make his own mind by incorporating that new (to him) knowledge. There is no "royal road" to knowledge; commoner or king must wrestle it into his own head.

Don't be a Philistine: millions, alive and dead, your teachers and people entirely unknown to you have for fifty thousand years given you knowledge and indeed a rich material culture based on that knowledge. Don't begrudge passing it on.

Re:American tax payers money wasted big time! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15466612)

Best post.ever.

encore!

MOD UP! #1 POST ON SLASHDOT - EVER! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15466621)

Subject says it all.

Re:American tax payers money wasted big time! (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15466700)

Bendover and let me teach you something passed down from the ancient Romans.

Re:American tax payers money wasted big time! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15466750)

So well written post that it's damn hard to find any arguments.

So? (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15466366)

How is this special? Princeton's entire CS curriculum [princeton.edu] has been there for all to see for the last 9 years, and I haven't seen any /. articles about it in that time.

Re:So? (1)

Xshare (762241) | more than 8 years ago | (#15466749)

video?

Dead URLs, all of 'em (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15467009)

The URL you gave is valid, but the links from that page are dead.So much for open education at Princeton.

Let's take it together (4, Interesting)

orthogonal (588627) | more than 8 years ago | (#15466381)

Looks like good stuff, and even the textbook is freely available. I've also enjoyed podcasted courses from several sources. One thing I do miss, when auditing by podcast, is a chance to discuss the course material with others (and the tests that would allow me to know how much of the material I'm getting).

Anyone want to join me in taking the course as a group? We could "meet" in IRC or via a listserv. and we'd probably get more out of the course by having others to bounce ideas off of, to challenge our assumptions, and to correct our errors.

If you're interested in joining me in this, reply to this post, and I'll see about organizing things in my Slashdot Journal.

Moi! (1)

The Cydonian (603441) | more than 8 years ago | (#15466649)

Strike me interested. Will be tuning in to your JE's now.

Not crypto. (1)

SanityInAnarchy (655584) | more than 8 years ago | (#15466809)

I know most of what I need to know about crypto -- just feed it through gpg or openssl, done. I'd want to take some other course -- right now, I'm wanting to learn C# on Mono (Windows, Mac, Linux, and I do have them all) and do some more advanced algorithms and data structures.

I'd also be interested in hanging out around a class on crypto, or on introductory programming. I haven't finished college (and probably won't), but it's been a hit-and-miss whether I'm a better teacher than my professors.

Re:Let's take it together (1)

wied81 (858164) | more than 8 years ago | (#15466843)

i'm game...wied81@hotmail.com

Re:Let's take it together (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15467265)

I am in...soaponarope@gmail.com

Re:Let's take it together (1)

thesolo (131008) | more than 8 years ago | (#15467334)

That's an excellent idea, I'd be very into it.

What Crypto Course? (2, Informative)

jackb_guppy (204733) | more than 8 years ago | (#15466391)

Did they reaad the material before posting this article??

Some math questions involving a MOD and the final homework... How much bandwidth is VeiSign using.

Where is the questions about breaking the code?

Re:What Crypto Course? (1)

mtenhagen (450608) | more than 8 years ago | (#15466458)

A course on cryptography is a course how encrypt and decrypt stuff. Not how to break it.

Re:What Crypto Course? (1)

jackb_guppy (204733) | more than 8 years ago | (#15466508)

The course matrial do not talk about that either. Just bandwidth and preformance issues with choosing different encyrption method available. IPSEC, SSL, ...

Re:What Crypto Course? (1)

RackinFrackin (152232) | more than 8 years ago | (#15466774)

Look through the assignments. They include exercises involving number-theoretic foundations of cryptography, breaking classical cryptosystems (Vigenere ciphers), differential cryptanalysis, and other stuff.

Re:What Crypto Course? (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15467269)

I think he's talking about the Stanford link which is a 'certificate' course and, after a cursory glance, does not appear to have any mathematical foundation.

In contrast, the U.Wash. course does seem to be for a degree program, actually studying the mathematics of cryptography.

Why these two were compared is a mystery.

103885710475-109865-946598 (1)

sidfaiwu (901221) | more than 8 years ago | (#15466403)

4987520-23495863459802-349876927450-09827-10960349 56-875-19608917294857019. 2398798-897326-10691326! 234987340-189763865-19287638946?

MOD PARENT UP (2, Funny)

patio11 (857072) | more than 8 years ago | (#15466565)

1560464-40437870136830!

Free as in what? (2, Funny)

ABoerma (941672) | more than 8 years ago | (#15466422)

I mean, this is Slashdot after all.

Re:Free as in what? (1)

Stormwatch (703920) | more than 8 years ago | (#15466682)

Serr nf va orre.

Re:Free as in what? (1)

gEvil (beta) (945888) | more than 8 years ago | (#15466803)

Serr nf va orre.

Hey now. I realize that the Pirate Bay is down, but that doesn't mean you need to post your Swede-talk here...

Re:Free as in what? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15466706)

sorry ...

Free as in Buttsecks.

Winter '02 course is also available on-line (5, Informative)

bal (112317) | more than 8 years ago | (#15466485)

Winter '06 was actually our second crypto class for UW PMP; lectures and materials from when Josh Benaloh and I taught crypto in Winter '02 are also available on-line [washington.edu] . The material covered in the two courses is similar (we added material on cryptanalysis in '06 and updated the existing material). If you're working through the course at home you might find it helpful to work through the '02 assignments as well.

Re:Winter '02 course is also available on-line (1)

kfg (145172) | more than 8 years ago | (#15466552)

Very nice, really; and thank you, but. . .

would it be possible to have the HTML material presented in HTML?

KFG

Not again! (1)

Patrick_Mac (973235) | more than 8 years ago | (#15466570)

First there were the Walter Levin physics lecture videos (http://phischkneghtx.blogspot.com/2006/02/wikiped ia-doesnt-know-what-roof-is.html [blogspot.com] ), consuming 7 GB space, now this. Stop posting highly interesing educational videos cramming my PowerBook hard drive! Make it stop!

Re:Not again! (1)

Aerion (705544) | more than 8 years ago | (#15466772)

Whoops! Then I guess I shouldn't post this link [mit.edu] ...

But yes, Walter Lewin's lectures were fantastic. It's a shame that he doesn't do freshman physics anymore, with the advent of the s/learning/technology/g [mit.edu] program (a.k.a. TEAL). I think the move to make his old 8.01 lectures available was in part to provide a good resource to those students who don't like TEAL and who don't learn well in that environment.

advanced? crypto? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15466586)

is the OP a moron? i can't believe this is a college class.

Independant Cryptography Learning (2, Informative)

tetrisaddict (979118) | more than 8 years ago | (#15466588)

On a related note I've recently noticed this [plus.com] post about getting into the theory of cryptography. I don't know anything about the author nor the topic so I cannot verify is the advice is good, but it sounds reasonable.
T

Memo from U.Wash Dean to NSA (4, Funny)

Gothmolly (148874) | more than 8 years ago | (#15466608)

Dear NSA,

Our plan is working splendidly. Numerous people have given us their names, addresses, social security numbers, and personal information. This along with their expressed interest in encryption will keep the data miners happy. We will, as previously agreed, forward all correspondence from students of this class. Enclosed please find an Excel file of all information on the online course takers. I can't believe you were right, that potential enemies of the State would voluntarily sign up for something so obvious.

Yours truly
Tobias Fünke

Memo from Student to Osama (1)

SanityInAnarchy (655584) | more than 8 years ago | (#15466878)

You're not gonna believe this. The NSA uses Excel! Call up our friends at Microsoft and let us crush the infidels once and for all!

-----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE-----

(In case you didn't get it, the point of this satire is that if the NSA truly believes in preventing people from studying encryption, then most of the crypto experts will be terrorists.)

Re:Memo from Student to Osama (2, Insightful)

Gothmolly (148874) | more than 8 years ago | (#15467328)

Since the passage of the DMCA, most people who can break encryption are Teh Terrorists.

Related: Networks course at CMU (4, Informative)

angio (33504) | more than 8 years ago | (#15466640)

Since people seem to be interested in this, you might also take a peek at
the CMU computer networks course [cmu.edu] , which I put online almost entirely (lecture nodes, video, homeworks, and the programming projects). Click on "Syllabus" to get to the contentful-bits. Feedback is welcome: Srini and I hope that leaving it online will be useful for students and instructors everywhere.

Re:Related: Networks course at CMU (1)

Giometrix (932993) | more than 8 years ago | (#15466867)

Looks promising. I'll be checking it out when I have more free time. Thanks!

Crypto course online for free (2, Funny)

matt me (850665) | more than 8 years ago | (#15466708)

No it's not.. it's password protected!

Oh right, I get it.

sadly (1)

friedman101 (618627) | more than 8 years ago | (#15466748)

you may be able to turn someone's credit card number into an asymetric cipher hidden inside a jpeg of his last family reunion but you can't stop the idiot user from writing his password on a sticky note on the side of his monitor.

munitions status (3, Insightful)

babanada (977344) | more than 8 years ago | (#15466812)

In the past, as I'm sure most here know, encryption software was considered to be munitions. I actually purchased the Zimmerman book that was just PGP in source code format at the UW bookstore. The idea at the time was how can you control a book? Now, I know that laws have changed, and the US has relaxed its stance on this. Most distributions of GNU/Linux have SSH included.

This is fresh in my mind because I recently created a specialized GNU/Linux distribution and debated about whether or not to include SSL and SSH. Although I knew the status of this software had changed, I could not find any definitive regulations regarding crypto software. Certainly the last four years don't make me any less paranoid about getting burned by making a mistake here. There is a good presentation that specifically talks about these issues here [washington.edu] in TFA. Yes, it does talk about how the munitions stance has relaxed, but I'm still not entirely sure that I don't have to notify some government agency that I'm including encryption if I distribute the root filesystem in binary form.

Another such course in Operating Systems... (1)

nddomer (979133) | more than 8 years ago | (#15467137)

On a similar note, we made the contents (lecture slides, video etc.) from Operating Systems online. Would appreciate any comments on whether such efforts are useful to the larger community (http://www.cse.nd.edu/~surendar/teach/spr06/cse30 341/lecture.shtml [nd.edu] ).

Why pay? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15467237)

"Who wants to pay for Stanford's Crypto Course, when University of Washington has made the whole Cryptography Course available online for free."

I do. Personally, I'm willing to pay money to take a couse from a school like Stanford even if a free alternative is available from a school like the University of Washington.

do7l (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15467402)

only way to go: to you by penisbird of OpenBSD. How Code sharing of BSD/OS. A Keep unnecessary SLING you can there are
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