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Spam from Taiwan

ScuttleMonkey posted more than 8 years ago | from the spam-who-loved-me dept.

229

TristanGrimaux writes "According to a recent study done by CipherTrust, two thirds of the world's spam is sent by Taiwan servers. The US follows with 24% and in a distant third is China with only 3% of the servers who actually sends the spam." The article cites easy access to broadband and lack of crackdown on offenders as the main contributing factors.

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Survey Says? (5, Interesting)

conner_bw (120497) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522025)

By capturing these messages, CipherTrust is able to determine the location of the spam servers. Spammers themselves, of course, may be located somewhere completely different.

Any wagers on USA being said location? Russia? Africa? Are there any statistics on where this crap is actually sent from? Follow the money instead of the mail headers? Question marks?

Re:Survey Says? (1)

NeuroManson (214835) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522041)

More like follow the offshore bank accounts, Grand Cayman Islands, etc.

[OT: Your sig] (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15522122)

"Shoes for industry! Shoes for the dead!"

"Hi. I'm Joe Beets. Say, what chance does a returning deceased war veteran have for good paying job, more sugar, and that free mule you always dreamed of? Well, think it over. Then take off your shoes. Now you can see how increased spending opportunities mean harder work for everyone, and more of it, too! So do your part today, Joe. Join with millions of your neighbors and turn in your shoes!"

"For INDUSTRY!"

(Happy motoring on the freeway which is all ready in progress.)

Re:Survey Says? (5, Informative)

Technician (215283) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522133)

More like follow the offshore bank accounts, Grand Cayman Islands, etc.

I lived there. Internet access is expensive as it was a government protected monopoly. Check the rates. Cable and Wireless is the company. To visit, see www.candw.ky.

When they first put in internet, they got 2 satelite T1 links for the whole island. Little Cayman and Cayman Brac still did not have internet. They charged $0.25/minute for access on dial up.

Needless to say I didn't get internet until I returned to the states.

They have since gotten a Fiber Optic cable to Jamaca and they now offer DSL. They are running a promotion for $25/month for the first year. That is CI $ not USD. The price is close to US $30/month. Restrictions such as can't compete with the phone company by using VOIP is the norm.
The plan appears to be capped at 256K unless you upgrade to a faster plan. For example the 1024 plan is CI $74. The 512 plan is $59.

Cayman Islands is a nice place to go for diving and sun, but not for internet based business.

Re:Survey Says? (3, Insightful)

Firehed (942385) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522142)

You don't do the business itself from the Caymans, just your under-the-radar finances.

Re:Survey Says? (2, Insightful)

Mr Z (6791) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522164)

Ok, I know you're trying to be clever with your "Content Restriction, Annulment and Protection" acronym, but it doesn't make any sense. Why not just "Consumer Rights Annulment Provision"? Much less ambiguous, and much more direct.

That said... Yes. The Cayman Islands and a couple other small nations serve as fiduciary havens, not infrastructure.

--Joe

Re:Survey Says? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15522469)

Just do the world a favour and pull out the ass-plug from time to time, hm?

Re:Survey Says? (1)

melonman (608440) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522242)

Cayman Islands is a nice place to go for diving and sun, but not for internet based business.

Surely it depends rather a lot on what sort of Internet-based business we are talking about. Running a spam empire only means sending one relatively short bit of text once - the machines doing the spamming could be anywhere in the world, and, indeed, if I was planning a semi-legal or illegal business, I'd be keen to keep the servers as far away from me (both physically and in terms of hops and audit trails) as possible.

Re:Survey Says? (3, Interesting)

Short Circuit (52384) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522060)

As for following the money...I let the SEC do that. About once a week, I get a spam message pushing one stock or another. I forward them to enforcement (at) sec.gov. The message gets looked over by a lawyer.

I don't know that it does anything about the spam, but hopefully whoever paid for the message gets paid back.

Re:Survey Says? (3, Interesting)

ciscoguy01 (635963) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522174)

Let the SEC do it.

The SEC. Ha. A worthless three letter agency, if you ask me.
The SEC's lawyers wanted my help on stock tout junk faxes. I told them I had the information they wanted and I could get the rest and testify- but only if they were going to put the junk faxers out of business. They had no intention of doing anything. They are just going through the motions, drawing government salaries. I declined to help them.

Like the FCC, another worthless three letter agency.
They fined Fax.com $5.4 million for sending out junk faxes. The FCC's lawyers wanted my help too, if I had bothered with them the fine would have been $240 million. I have files full of those junk faxes.
The FCC did nothing whatsoever to collect. NOTHING
If you or I owed the government money I can assure you they would be collecting from us.

Re:Survey Says? (1)

Korin43 (881732) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522190)

But if there was less spam, there wouldn't be anything for them to do!

Re:Survey Says? (3, Insightful)

nettdata (88196) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522434)

Except it's hardly ever the company itself that is doing the promotions... it's third-party people that target them and convince others, via spam, to invest in the company, which drives the prices up, which allows them to unload their own stock at a profit.

All while being 100% unrelated to the company.

Re:Survey Says? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15522335)

Almost all the spam comes back to good old USA in one way or another.

Thats alway why I have South America, Africa and all of Asia, all blocks with iptables.

Re:Survey Says? (1)

HaydnH (877214) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522416)

"Any wagers on USA being said location?"

From the article...

"Spammers themselves, of course, may be located somewhere completely different, such as Boca Raton, USA (for example)."

Any wagers on not RTFA as the cause of this comment??

Uh, Taiwan IS CHINA !! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15522439)

Welcome to 1999 !! Taiwan is SPECIAL, but it's still CHINA !!

Whats specific about Taiwan? (2, Interesting)

WinEveryGame (978424) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522033)

So, what is so specific about Taiwan that causes this?

Availability of relatively cheaper computing power with good bandwidth?

Some legal stuff?

Availability of some skill set?

Re:Whats specific about Taiwan? (1)

kcbanner (929309) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522083)

More people = more computes = more spam. Its a vicious cycle...

Re:Whats specific about Taiwan? (5, Informative)

Heir Of The Mess (939658) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522090)

Having been to Taiwan a fair bit I can think of some possibilities:-

Most people I know there earn about US$15k/yr, and upgrading the RAM in your Pentium3 machine and then the Hard Drive, and then the video card is sort of common practice. Forking out big $$ for Windows XP isn't real easy so a lot of people are running some SP1 version of Windows XP they bought for $1 off the street, and this version gets owned pretty fast, and can't be patched from windows update. So there are lots of bots.

Now 24Mbit internet access is like $5-$10 per month, so you can see there is quite a big engine there for generating spam.

The culture there is such that they love the latest thing, so I could imagine that there would also be a tendency for people to install software off the net that has malware in it as well.

Another thing I noticed is that your average grandmother there seems quite good at using a computer. So I could imagine that there might be more pensioner types sitting there doing some amount of spamming for a little bit of money.

Re:Whats specific about Taiwan? (1)

Spikeman56 (543509) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522166)

"The culture there is such that they love the latest thing, so I could imagine that there would also be a tendency for people to install software off the net that has malware in it as well."

I second that. The personal computers I have looked at are so loaded with "download managers" and "toolbars" it makes me sick. Piracy is big here too, so everyone has the standard ISO mounting software, strange p2p network applications, compression tools. Piracy can get you on some sketchy sites and convince you to install some sketchy software. Botnets anyone?

Re:Whats specific about Taiwan? (0, Flamebait)

clokwise (844691) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522279)

Taiwanese receive a lot of spam and many of them appreciate it. There is a growing backlash against spam recently, but it's still the norm. Taiwan has something like 97% IE usage, which would also account for so many bots. Most users here have no interest in switching to FF or other browsers because so many websites here only work in IE. It's a vicious circle.

Re:Whats specific about Taiwan? (1)

CrazyGuy (18581) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522454)

I live in Taiwan.
Here's some info for you.

An average person earns like US$150~200k a year.
The 8M/640k ADSL line from Hinet, taiwan's largest ISP, is US$33/month, with 1 fixed IP+ 7 floating IP addresses.

People here are used to DIY PCs. But not so used to pay for software.
Part of the problem is that lot's of people just scared to do Windows Update, because they're using pirated copy.
Another part of the problem is that infomation about computing here are very easy to get. So lot's of people are using Linux or some shareware/software running their own servers. But these people really don't have the skills to secure that server.

Re:Whats specific about Taiwan? -- Outsourcing! (2, Insightful)

ahodgkinson (662233) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522136)

So, what is so specific about Taiwan that causes this?
Availability of relatively cheaper computing power with good bandwidth?
Some legal stuff?
Availability of some skill set?


All of the above, and more. Taiwan is a great place to outsource technology intensive operations. Perhaps spammers have discovered this. In a nutshell, spamming is just another technology driven business.

Maybe it's so great that even China outsources their spam generation there too. Hence their low spam generation figures.

Hinet Lax Policies (4, Interesting)

Spikeman56 (543509) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522150)

I believe the main issue is that broadband here is pretty much monopolized by Hinet. If you have a phone (landline), chances are you have a Hinet e-mail address. For some reason Hinet never, ever, authenticates their e-mail servers allowing them to be used from anywhere for any purpose. As a result a lot of companies (like AOL possibly) have just banned the whole entire Hinet domain, which often results in e-mails going outside of Taiwan never getting to their intended recipient. Hinet is a mess, I don't why they're so bloody awful at maintaining their servers responsibly, but its providing to be a huge problem both worldwide and for Taiwanese people themselves.

Re:Hinet Lax Policies (1)

jiawen (693693) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522305)

I had Hinet as my ISP my entire time in Taiwan. Terrible, really terrible. There are other ISPs around, but they're even dodgier, and hey, Hinet is the government, so it's gotta be trustworthy, right?

Re:Hinet Lax Policies (1)

Myen (734499) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522323)


Hinet is so bloody awful because there's no meaningful competition. IIRC, they own the out-of-country lines anyway (since they are the ISP arm of the national telecommunications company), and everyone else have to rent their lines.

... Doesn't help that, when I was there, the APOL (one of the cable companies) had a sucky line. Plug in the NAT box ("router"), nothing on the other end, and watch the lights blink from the various worms looking for a host.

Taiwan China ... (0, Redundant)

layer3switch (783864) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522034)

So Taiwan isn't part of China now? OK, I'm confused.

Re:Taiwan China ... (2, Informative)

kclittle (625128) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522072)

Have you been under a rock since 1949? :)

They're part of China sort of (but not exactly) the way the South was part of the U.S. between 1861 and 1865, except the war to resolve the issue hasn't happened yet. Pray that it doesn't...

Re:Taiwan China ... (1)

layer3switch (783864) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522105)

So it's part of China or not? "Maybe" doesn't really make much sense to me. US and UN says Taiwan is part of China, EU is saying Taiwan is not part of China, Taiwan is saying it's its own country, China is saying it's part of China. Google says it's part of China. WTF.

Re:Taiwan China ... (4, Informative)

kclittle (625128) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522138)

Well, we have shades of red and red here. :)

Does the People's Republic of China collect taxes in Taiwan? No, the Republic of China does.

Does the PRC actually try to enforce its criminal laws in Taiwan? No, but the ROC enforces its laws.

Does the PRC define the commerce regulations, health regulations, education standards, voting laws, aviation regulations, etc. within the borders of Taiwan? No -- but the ROC does.

Does the PRC have military bases on Taiwan? No ... but the ROC does!

What the U.N., U.S. and Europe say in polite diplo-speak is one thing. The working reality (and the *money* reality) is that Taiwan is a separate country, perhaps not in name, but in operational fact.

Re:Taiwan China ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15522180)

Taiwan goes to great lengths to avoid saying it is its own country!

Re:Taiwan China ... (1)

Zeebs (577100) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522203)

Funny how people will avoid doing things that will cause them to be invaded.

Re:Taiwan China ... (1)

kclittle (625128) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522241)

In other words, this is a case where even the proverbial elephant in the room doesn't want to acknowledge its own presense! :)

Re:Taiwan China ... (1)

dafoomie (521507) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522212)

Its a very politicized situation.

Taiwan is effectively its own country. China says its not. China will not trade with any country that recognizes Taiwan's statehood, therefore most countries don't, but also don't recognize China's (PRC) rule over Taiwan (ROC).

In 1949, the communists (PRC) fought a civil war with the then Chinese government (ROC), the communists won, and the ROC fled to Taiwan. China (PRC) claims Taiwan, and Taiwan (ROC) until recently claimed all of China.

It gets a little complicated with the Taiwan Relations Act and the Six Assurances, but we're pretty much hoping the communists go away before a war breaks out over it. Taiwan has been assured that we (USA) will intervene in the event of a Chinese invasion. We've also been selling them a great deal of arms for the last 30 years, you always take care of your best customers. We've created a situation similar to the one in Korea, where our forces there are a deterrent, a tripwire for American intervention in case of an invasion. The 7th Fleet is very conveniently positioned for that reason.

I don't see anything changing until China is no longer ruled by an oppressive communist regime, the people of Taiwan should decide what to do after that. The US doesn't want Taiwan to fall into China's hands, Japan considers the prospect a grave threat as well. Taiwan certainly doesn't want to be under oppressive communist rule, either.

Re:Taiwan China ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15522113)

Hi, yes, apparently you haven't been awake for the last half century... In the context of a discussion about Taiwan and China, "China" refers to "Mainland China" (this is the big land mass that is directly connected to the rest of Asia), and "Taiwan" refers to this little island off the coast of the Mainland where all the non-communists escaped to after losing the civil war.

Thank you. Next week I will explain the difference between "United States" and "Puerto Rico" for you.

Re:Taiwan China ... (2, Informative)

Zeebs (577100) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522118)

Taiwan and China are actually both China. Taiwan is the Republic of China. While what most people(unless you happen to be from Taiwan) call China is of course the Democratic Peoples Republic of China. The DPRC does consider Taiwan a rouge province, while Taiwan doesn't consider that to be the case. As the other reply said, lets hope the war to resolve this doesn't happen any time soon.

Re:Taiwan China ... (2, Funny)

Beryllium Sphere(tm) (193358) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522218)

>does consider Taiwan a rouge province

So Taiwan is actually Red China?

(I apologize. I transpose keys too. But that one was just irresistible.)

Re:Taiwan China ... (1)

Zeebs (577100) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522247)

*headdesk*... but a golf clap for you indeed, well played sir :P

Re:Taiwan China ... (2, Interesting)

LostInTaiwan (837924) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522253)

Saying Taiwan and China are both China is like saying both England and Australia are Great Britan. Taiwan was a part of China till China forked it over to Japan 100 years ago. Go back a few more hundred years, Taiwan belonged to the Dutch, whom I think is the first county to officially plant their flag and call it their own. . . . Most Taiwanese are ethnic Han Chinese, but so are most Chinese Americans. . . and most Australians can trace their roots back to GB but that does not mean they are British.

Taiwan is Taiwan. Taiwan is is a completely separate policital entity, way different from China. . . . I think they're trying to impeach their president right now. . .lol. . . I like to see that in China. . . .

regarding spammer from Taiwan. . . . base on what I saw the geeks to nerds ratio is too low to product a sizable indigenous hacker population. . .

John

Re:Taiwan China ... (1)

Zeebs (577100) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522265)

Ask a person from Taiwan where they are from and they will say China. I know that because I've worked booking appointments for visas to the U.S. One of the things to get straight when someone said they were from China was that the Democratic Peoples Republic of or Republic of. They both refer to them selves as from China.

Re:Taiwan China ... (1)

jiawen (693693) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522320)

Ask a person from Taiwan where they are from and they will say China.
Unless, that is, they're pro-Taiwanese independence, in which case they'll probably say they're from Taiwan. Yes, it's complicated.

Re:Taiwan China ... (1)

jo3c (923581) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522359)

pro-taiwanese independence? haha
saying us taiwanese from china is like lowering our social class

funny all the people i know gets angry when people say they are from china

and no we don't ever say we from china..
we from taiwan

Re:Taiwan China ... (1)

lxt518052 (720422) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522387)

No point starting a flame war on this issue on Slashdot.

Let's hope this issue will be resolved by ourselves. I, for one, welcome political parties in Taiwan back to mainland to takeover the regime. But it seems they're currently only interested in fighting one another on this Taiwan Independence issue.

Re:Taiwan China ... (1)

Dracil (732975) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522464)

That's because it's the official name on our passports (surprise surprise when you're doing visas!) Ask any regular Taiwanese where they're from in any othe context, and they'll say Taiwan.

Re:Taiwan China ... (1)

l-ascorbic (200822) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522267)

Surely communist china is the rouge china...

Thank you, thank you, I'll be here all week.

Re:Taiwan China ... (1)

KiloByte (825081) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522285)

The DPRC does consider Taiwan a rouge province, while Taiwan doesn't consider that to be the case.

In fact, it's the DPRC who's a rogue province there :p

We have a revolution where a government gets ousted by rebels once per like 1-2 years in the world, and in quite a bit of cases the rebels fail to grab control of the whole country. However, it's not every year when this happen in a billion+ country with nuclear weapons.

Re:Taiwan China ... (1)

jiawen (693693) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522316)

Two porbelms with your post: One, as others have already noted, you mean "rogue", not "rouge"; two, there's no such thing as the Democratic People's Republic of China. Perhaps you're thinking of the full name of North Korea (DPRK)? With mainland China, the correct/full name is People's Republic of China -- no "Democratic". Thus, the two sides of the Taiwan Strait are officially the PRC and the ROC.

And yes, I know there's a typo in the second word of my post. :)

Re:Taiwan China ... (1)

Zeebs (577100) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522329)

Ok it's early and you are right I am adding Democratic cause I'm some form of monkey. Damn you communists and your tricky name tricks. Anyway :P while I ment rogue as EVERYONE has pointed out, what I said was no less true, the PRC does consider them 'red' :P Ok yea I'm grabbing at straws there.

Re:Taiwan China ... (1)

jiawen (693693) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522361)

Like I said, two problems: that's it, no more. Everything else you said was quite correct.

misinformation (4, Informative)

lxt518052 (720422) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522366)

There isn't a country in this world called Democratic Peoples Republic of China. The 1.3 billion population live in a country called PRC(People's Republic of China).

ROC used to rule the whole China, mainland and Taiwan combined. They lost the civil war in 1949 and retreated to Taiwan. Neither PRC nor ROC see each other as a ligitimate government of China. At least both constitutions claim largely overlapping territories. It's a stalemale over half a century.

How people are so casual about the facts is beyond me.

Re:misinformation (1)

Zeebs (577100) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522378)

How people are so casual about the facts is beyond me.
You should try it sometime it can be loads of fun.

Other then adding democratic to the name because as I mentioned above I am some form of monkey, I really didn't go into anything you said. Thanks for adding to the discussion, but I didn't cover any of the facts you're claiming I'm casual about.

Re:Taiwan China ... (1)

Heir Of The Mess (939658) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522228)

Taiwan has a different government to China. Somewhere around 1945, Taiwan was taken from the Japanese, and given back to China which was ruled by Chang Kai Shek (sp?). I think it was around 1949 that the Communist Party (run by Chairman Mao) overthrew the CKS government and drove the Nationalist forces back until they retreated to Taiwan. So ever since then Taiwan has been run by the KMT party (Chinese Nationalists), until a few years ago when they were voted out in favour of the DPP (Democratic Progressive Party).

Now CKS had planned to take back China as he built Taipei (the capital was Tainan) to be a city of big streets that could be used as runways for bombers, but that never happened.

For about the last 20 years China has been making noises about bringing Taiwan into the communist fold. The DPP party in Taiwan has been making noises about declaring Taiwan independent from China, and so China has responded with bigger noises. I would say that nothing will happen until the Olympics are over..

Time for a history lesson? (3, Informative)

l-ascorbic (200822) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522256)

After WW2 and the end of the Japanese occupation, a civil war was fought between the Communists under Mao and the KMT under Chiang Kai-shek. The KMT were effectively defeated by 1949, and Chiang evacuated to Taiwan. For much of the Cold War, "Free China" (ROC) was the only government of China recognised by most states and international organisations. However, as part of the 'detente' in the 1970s, most countries switched their recognition to Communist China (PRC). The ROC is obviously a state in all but name, but the situation is maintained to avoid nuclear war. The PRC has said that if the ROC declares independence then they will invade, while the US has stated that it will defend Taiwan, and has meanwhile provided large amounts of military aid. So, basically, it's a mess.

China has cheap broadband access (1)

JohnGrahamCumming (684871) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522036)

One thing that surprised me in TFA was the claim that China has cheap broadband access. Perhaps I suffer from some cliched view of China, but it surprises me to hear that China has cheap broadband. Any knowledgeable person like to fill in the details? Here in France we have very cheap broadband, but doesn't seem like France is producing much zombie spam.
John.
Visit SpamOrHam [spamorham.org] and help in the fight

Re:China has cheap broadband access (2, Interesting)

Telvin_3d (855514) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522063)

Heh, these days, everywhere except North America has cheap broadband. All the other governments see it as an important investment.

Re:China has cheap broadband access (1)

layer3switch (783864) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522123)

Is that why rest of the world pay so much for traditional voice line? Curious.

Re:China has cheap broadband access (2, Informative)

_merlin (160982) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522132)

Australia doesn't have cheap broadband. It's a rip-off here, just like in the US of A.

Re:China has cheap broadband access (1)

Technician (215283) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522075)

Here in France we have very cheap broadband, but doesn't seem like France is producing much zombie spam.


Read past the headline.. Look to the part where they mention ISP's are slow to disconnect. I imagine in France, most ISP's are quick to disconnect a bot spewing stuff.

Re:China has cheap broadband access (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15522406)

I don't think so. A large provider in France is called "wanadoo", and I get a lot of zombied spam via them.
They operate locally here as well, and are well known to do *nothing* about complaints.

Re:China has cheap broadband access (4, Interesting)

layer3switch (783864) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522082)

France
*Total Population: 60,876,136
*Internet Users: 26,214,174

China
*Total Population: 1,313,973,713
*Internet Users: 111,000,000

I think, that number speaks for itself.

*ref. from CIA World Fact Book [cia.gov]

Re:China has cheap broadband access (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15522098)


I think, that number speaks for itself.

*ref. from CIA World Fact Book

It's a slam dunk. Oh wait...

Re:China has cheap broadband access (1)

upside (574799) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522148)

Taiwan is one of the Asian Tigers, like South Korea. They are a multiparty democracy and have a standard of on par with Western Europe. Why are you surprised?

Re:China has cheap broadband access (1)

linj (891019) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522178)

Broadband is cheap in concentrated city areas of China. Think about it. If you have most of your subscribers in one very small location, typically in business districts and high-rise condominiums (we're talking about the large cities such as Shanghai, Beijing, and if you want to include Hong Kong SAR), it's not hard to provide cheap broadband access.

Of course, the broadband here isn't that speedy for individual users. I'm typing this on (stolen) wifi access from an apartment in Shanghai and I can barely hit 100kBps, tops. Typically, accessing US sites is slow, with around 10kBps transfer rates. But e-mail isn't time-critical, so I'd assume that an always-on connection of any speed encourages spam as in this case.

Re:China has cheap broadband access (1)

Korin43 (881732) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522199)

Seems like if you're sending billions of spam emails, slow internet connections start to matter.

Re:China has cheap broadband access (1)

nihaopaul (782885) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522331)

i currently live in china, computer repairs can be done for a fraction of the cost and piracy is so rampant that virus software exsists for us$0.50 same with the latest windows version.

not only that, on the servers on the chinese backbone, they are tested once a week by chinatelecom for openrelays and if found they are portblocked untill the owner does something, this can be a pain if you run a smtp node in a cluster who accepts mail for the domain and then sends out an failed email if the address doesn't exsist. i'm not sure if this is good or bad, all we need now is for them to take out the site harvesters.

Paul

Re:China has cheap broadband access (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15522345)

No spam from France? HAHHAHAHAAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAH

Right.

Since implementing a IP block on France, my spam has gone down. I dont need anything from France, ever, let alone spam from your yellow spined country. Quick, surrender, someone has a board with a nail it in.

I've done tests with HoneyBOT (2, Interesting)

Spy der Mann (805235) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522039)

http://www.atomicsoftwaresolutions.com/honeybot.ph p [atomicsoft...utions.com]

With this software emulating an open SOCKS proxy, I've been able to detect several scans of port 1080, and then attempts to send e-mail to different servers around the world (i.e. Israel).

I don't remember if I got requests from Taiwan, but I did get them from South Korean IPs.

Re:I've done tests with HoneyBOT (5, Interesting)

BrynM (217883) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522099)

That's a cool project for a Windows honeypot. Thanks for the link. Outside of honeypots, I've been blanket filtering addresses from APNIC on my mail server for about a year now using some ideas I learned from this [tsg.ne.jp] project (I filter at the mail request level rather than iptables). It's sad to filter an entire geographic region like that, but my users never talk to people from the Pacific Rim that I know of. My server (running XMail [xmailserver.org] ) is small, but my logs for the filtered emails constantly show the spam blocked exceeds the number of legit mails by a factor of four.

Since I started filtering, I've turned a couple of other admins onto the idea. I wonder if TW/KR will find themselves in some odd form of network segregation in the future as more people adopt the practice of filtering their IPs. That might push the authorities into a little more action.

Re:I've done tests with HoneyBOT (1)

TorKlingberg (599697) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522249)

You mean you block one legit mail for every for spam mails?

Re:I've done tests with HoneyBOT (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15522384)

A factor of four means 10 000 to 1 (or one to ten thousands). A factor of three would be a thousand to one (or one to a thousand)

Re:I've done tests with HoneyBOT (1)

BrynM (217883) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522408)

You mean you block one legit mail for every for spam mails?

After reading the AC who replied to you, it would be a factor of THREE that I meant then. Roughly anwhere from 500-1000 blocked APNIC SMTP connections per legit email on my bi-weekly log checks. A couple of my users used their accounts for sites like collegehumor.com, so they are basically spam honeypots without filtering. In fact, I use one of them that was abandoned by the user to feed spamassassin learning (it only has the APNIC filter and no other protection on that account)

Got my factors all fandangled - sorry!

Re:I've done tests with HoneyBOT (1)

jrumney (197329) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522422)

It's sad to filter an entire geographic region like that, but my users never talk to people from the Pacific Rim that I know of.

You've made damn sure of that, haven't you. Personally, I have never encountered a company that did not need to communicate with someone on APNIC from time to time, but maybe you're a sysadmin for a small company that only deals with people in your own hick town.

Hmm... (3, Funny)

blank89 (727548) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522051)

Instead of figuring out where most of the spam comes from, they should figure out which geographic location churns out the most humorous spam. It could be a world wide competition.

Re:Hmm... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15522414)

I do not think that humorous spam exists. It's maybe just your pathetic attitude.

Dr. Ben Oguejiofor of the Nigerian Army

China sending spam (2, Interesting)

VincenzoRomano (881055) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522089)

China with only 3% of the servers who actually sends the spam.
I was pretty sure that there was no way for China spammers to send email outside their borders!
And they don't need to. With their billion+ population, one fifth of the world can be reached without passing the invisible borders!

Overachievers (4, Funny)

Doc Ruby (173196) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522101)

Taiwan makes more than 66% of the notebooks on which we read that spam, so they're actually overperforming on the content:reader ratio. I wish they'd get more into eBooks.

Must not lose! (4, Funny)

Umbral Blot (737704) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522104)

Impossible! Go USA! Go USA! We can win the spam race!

Re:Must not lose! (1)

dwater (72834) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522201)

Don't you mean, "Must not loose!"? You are from the USA, right?

Re:Must not lose! (1)

Umbral Blot (737704) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522221)

I was educated by foreigners. (just kidding)

Re:Must not lose! (1)

Tim C (15259) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522263)

Well, if it's any consolation, pretty much all the spam I get (~1000/day) is for products or services from American companies, so you're at least causing it to be generated, even if it's not actually originating from machines on US soil.

Re:Must not lose! (1)

IHC Navistar (967161) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522293)

"Mr. President, we cannot allow a Spam gap!"

Ya know, just about any line from Dr. Strangelove makes a great one-liner in IT.

-----

Sig Sauer

I don't really believe... (0)

Snipergrunge (978927) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522151)

So, what about Russian, Ukranian, India spammers. I bet that each county sent at least 10% of spam letters.

CipherTrust? nothx. (2, Informative)

deepb (981634) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522155)

CipherTrust operates a service called "Trusted Source" - it allows anybody to input an IP address, searching CipherTrust's DB to see if any spam has come from that IP recently. Aside from being generally useless, here are some of the funnier results:

http://www.trustedsource.org/query.php?q=255.0.0.0 [trustedsource.org] 255.0.0.0 - "Spam"
http://www.trustedsource.org/query.php?q=0.0.0.0 [trustedsource.org] 0.0.0.0 - "Spam"
http://www.trustedsource.org/query.php?q=224.0.0.1 [trustedsource.org] 224.0.0.1 - "Unverified"

Since they have most of my favorite subnet masks listed as a "Spam" source, I'm not sure that I trust any "research" that comes from these guys.. YMMV.

Re:CipherTrust? nothx. (2, Informative)

someone1234 (830754) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522170)

If a mailer manages to supply those crippled IP's then the mail is definitely fake, and most likely spam (or virus). Don't confuse a legitimate subnet mask with a fake IP.

Re:CipherTrust? nothx. (0, Flamebait)

deepb (981634) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522390)

"If a mailer manages to supply those crippled IPs" ... well that's the trick - a mailer can't supply those IPs because they're simply not valid public IPs. If one of CipherTrust's collection points is reporting traffic from any of those IPs I listed, they have a very obvious network configuration problem (or they're getting spoofed, which is 100% avoidable).

Regardless of what the actual cause is, this is the reason why I don't trust any network-realated research they publish.

You can easily fight with spammers. (5, Interesting)

Snipergrunge (978927) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522167)

By the way... Most spammers who sent you letters to visit their web pages want's you to click their Google adSense ads. So, help them! Keep clicking Google banner untill your arm get tired and guess what happened. Google will close their account in one second because Google systems will decide that advertiser trying to cheat. It is impossible to open account again! SPAMMER DEAD!

well lets hope... (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15522168)

that china will try to take taiwan and that all the spam servers will be destroyed in the war that follows. //is it a bad sign that the confirmation image says battler?

Where's Nigeria? (4, Funny)

RetroRichie (259581) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522185)

Prince Desmond Okotiebor Etete himself MUST account for at least 10% of all spam...

Tie One On (2, Funny)

tiktok (147569) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522208)

Somedays I almost wish that some of this Taiwanese spam showed up in a character set I could read so at least I could have a good laugh at it, or at least learn how they are trying to extract money from illicit private bank accounts!

"Dear Sir or Madam,

This email may to you as a surprise, but I am Mr. Chen Liao, son of former Taiwanese president Lin Liao, who was murdered by ninjas, and I need your help recovering $25 million Taiwanese Dollars..."

It Makes Sense!!! (1)

Mysteerie (972719) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522224)

That is why my spam has typos and leet speak in the subjects and email message, for example: buy cheap c1alis, /i@gra and other best pharmaceuticals =-= gghgtmn

Re:It Makes Sense!!! (1)

HaydnH (877214) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522435)

Are you talking about the 24% from the US? =P

SPAM origins (4, Interesting)

kingmundi (54911) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522236)

I run my own mail server for my private email that I only use with friends.
Lately, I have been getting spam about stock investments, and I notice that
it was pretty consistent so I started investigating what was going on with
my server. I started marking down ip addresses of the offending servers
and blocking them if I felt they were not legitimate mail servers or if it
was from a country that I know I will not get email from on my personal email
account.

I have been blocking a new server every day for 2 months.

Here is the scarey part. I still get the same email spam every day, but
only once.

My hunch is telling me that the purveyor of this message is using some
sophisticated means of harnassing zombie machines to send messages, and is
only sending a few messages at a time so that automated blackhole lists
never catch on fast enough. (such as spamhaus)

I have noticed that these machines are almost always located in Asia,
Latin America, or Eastern Europe...

It got so bad, I just started block entire class A's from countries I know
I am not going to email to or from.

59
61
80
81
83
84
85
87
88
201
211
218
221
222

Re:SPAM origins (1)

pe1chl (90186) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522397)

Welcome to the world of the spam victims. There is nothing, I repeat nothing, particular in the events that you report.

Spammers operate via hacked Windows PCs (zombies) distributed all over the world. So many that blocking them is not going to help you.
Spammers repeatedly send the same or similar thing, over time.

That is just the way they work.
Try SpamAssassin, it does quite a good job without having to do so much useless and manual work.

Re:SPAM origins (3, Insightful)

the packrat (721656) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522463)

My hunch is telling me that the purveyor of this message is using some sophisticated means of harnassing zombie machines to send messages, and is only sending a few messages at a time so that automated blackhole lists never catch on fast enough. (such as spamhaus)

It's not a 'hunch'. I try to stop spam coming from a large devolved university network with a great number of varyingly maintained windows boxes and many different mail servers. A little over a year ago, spam zombie machines stopped flooding tens of thousands of messages an hour and started leaking out a handful every now and then. A few months later, the email-borne virus folks caught up.

It makes them a lot harder to spot.

For what it's worth, blacklists are effectively useless. Almost all spam now comes from poorly secured workstations and personal machines attached to ISPs and other organisations. All you're going to do with a blacklist is irritate organisations who have users with poorly configured machines. This includes practically everyone. The spammers are just going to move on to another part of their massive botnet, only legitimate email will be blocked.

Likewise, your blocking of entire class A-sized-blocks, particularly as with tight IP space, a lot of blocks are being broken up and moved round, is pretty pointless. Reminds me of a post some years ago by someone who claimed you could stop lots of spam for no loss by blocking mail from all TLDs other than .edu, .gov, .edu, and .net. Ho ho ho. B>

Those numbers sound about right... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15522257)

I would have expected the spam numbers from China to be larger, but then I remembered; the Chi-Com's are spending all their time trying to hack my server, not send Spam to it.

Spam solutions (2, Interesting)

Antony-Kyre (807195) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522288)

I'm not really sure how to deal with that, but let us focus as one method of spam. The method would be sending to a variety of e-mail addresses. Those kind of dictionary attacks or whatever they are killed. If e-mail providers were to make some dummy addresses which if hit, could block the e-mail server and/or IP address(es) for a given period of time, wouldn't that work?

(Fine, mod me down if you think this is off topic.)

Re:Spam solutions (2, Informative)

pe1chl (90186) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522386)

Although there are some dictionary-like attacks, for example appending some characters to an existing address or subsitituting one or more characters by others, I think the vast majority of spammers just use existing addresses they get from spidering the web.
When an address appears somewhere on the web, especially in discussion forums, guestbooks, and foremost: IANA listings, it is guaranteed to receive spam.

I think the "dictionary attack" story is mostly folklore. When someone receives spam on a never-used never-published address they often cry "dictionary attack" without further research.

Of course, using spamtraps is a known technique. It may work a little, but there is not much you can block as there are so many addresses in use that blocking one is bringing you almost nothing.

Cool so (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15522355)

we could cut 90% of the spam just by blocking Taiwan and the US from the internet.


Oh, crap.

I've seen this recently. (1)

Ivan Matveitch (748164) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522382)

They have taken to serving spam alongside the scorpions, rats and cats.

Made in Taiwan (2, Funny)

Joebert (946227) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522405)

Spam, Made In Taiwan ?
Why doesn't that supprise me ?

China + China (1)

renrutal (872592) | more than 8 years ago | (#15522430)

According to the Chinese gov, the correct news would state that they make 69% of the world's spam, USA 24%, and less than 7%, the other 200+ countries that import from them.

Well, even is one country is at 0.001%, I'd still bet they deliver billions of emails a day.
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