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Canadian Scientists Regrow Teeth

samzenpus posted more than 8 years ago | from the throw-out-your-toothbrush dept.

220

54mc writes "APL reports that Canadian Scientists have created the first device able to regrow teeth and bones. The researchers at the University of Alberta in Edmonton filed patents earlier this month in the United States for the tool based on low-intensity pulsed ultrasound technology after testing it on a dozen dental patients in Canada."

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FIRST POST! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15626776)

FIRST POST!

Just in time... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15626777)

For the Blade TV series!

Amazing (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15626780)

I didn't believe in the tooth fairy until I saw my dentist in loafers.

So if you are out there, Mr. Dentist man, you can now officially BITE ME!

Re:Amazing (0, Offtopic)

tomhudson (43916) | more than 8 years ago | (#15627163)

didn't believe in the tooth fairy until I saw my dentist in loafers.

So if you are out there, Mr. Dentist man, you can now officially BITE ME!

Don't be so quick - remember, this is from Canada ... you could end up looking like this guy [ecsd.net] or this one [spicetreegraphics.biz] ...

though I'm sure more than a few of you wouldn't mind spending some time with this one [jimgunn.com]

Inevitable Discovery (4, Funny)

supafly613 (413120) | more than 8 years ago | (#15626785)

This was a 2 phase discovery:

Phase 1 - Invent a sport where a piece of equipment that, at times, travels towards your face at 160 km/hour and weighs only 170 grams.

Phase 2 - Invent a way to grow teeth back due to resulting injury from Phase 1

It's a Canadian make-work program :)

Re:Inevitable Discovery (2, Interesting)

lowrydr310 (830514) | more than 8 years ago | (#15626824)

I don't understand why people always associate Hockey with missing teeth. For the past 30 years or so goalies have been wearing face shields, nearly eliminating their chances of getting teeth knocked out.

Players who aren't goalies still don't wear face shields in 2006, however most facial injuries from hockey involve someone getting hit with the end of a stick or getting crushed into the boards by a bad hit, NOT getting hit with a puck (though it does happen sometimes).

Re:Inevitable Discovery (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15626864)

So how exactly does stating that facial inuries incurred while playing hockey are not puck related eliminate all missing teeth from hockey?

Re:Inevitable Discovery (1)

logpoacher (662865) | more than 8 years ago | (#15626889)

Please refer back to the original post. I quote: "Phase 1 - Invent a sport where a piece of equipment that, at times, travels towards your face at 160 km/hour and weighs only 170 grams."

This is plainly a reference to the puck. Other types of facial injury will be discussed in a separate thread. Do keep up!

Of course, if you'd asked why everyone has assumed that we're talking about hockey, *then* you'd have a point. I thought they were talking about tiddleywinks.

Re:Inevitable Discovery (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15626939)

Please refer back to the article. I quote: "Right now, we plan to use it to fix fractured or diseased teeth, as well as asymmetric jawbones, but it may also help hockey players or children who had their tooth knocked out." Do keep up!

Re:Inevitable Discovery (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15627385)

I thought he was talking about baseball, except the Canadian thing doesn't apply there.

Re:Inevitable Discovery (2, Informative)

twistedsymphony (956982) | more than 8 years ago | (#15626898)

I'm not a hockey fan so I don't remember the guys name but There was a famous player way-back-when that lost a few teeth. He became sort of the face of hockey at the time with his toothless grin and thus the stereotype.

Re:Inevitable Discovery (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15626999)

I think you are talking about Bobby Clarke, the current GM of the Flyers. He had one of those great hockey smiles, where you could slide a puck between the gap in his smile. The photo you are thinking of I believe was when the Flyers won the cup in the 70's (he played there before becoming the GM).

Oh, and it isn't a sterotype. There are very few pro players who haven't lost a few chicklets along the way. Between sticks, pucks, hard hits, solid boards, and fights, about the only players who aren't missing a couple are the goalies. Hard to imagine the goalies only started wearing ANY facial protection in the late fifties, early sixties.

So how exactly does it work? (3, Interesting)

nietsch (112711) | more than 8 years ago | (#15626786)

"with low frequency ultrasound pulses" is pretty uninformative for me. If they can regrow theeth, do they first have to implant a 'seed' that will focus the growth? Every theeth has a quite specific form, how will this device influence that?

Or can it be that somebody patented a possible way to stimulate bone & tooth growth and some reporter let his fantasy run wild on it?

This article has more details (4, Informative)

nietsch (112711) | more than 8 years ago | (#15626808)

here [biologynews.net]

Re:So how exactly does it work? (3, Insightful)

goonies (227194) | more than 8 years ago | (#15626902)

"with low frequency ultrasound pulses" is pretty uninformative for me.

..and pretty much wrong ;-) The article said "low-intensity pulsed ultrasound"
low frequency ultrasound is like saying: "Thank God, I'm atheist!"
I think they call it "Contradictio in adjecto" (see also: oxymoron [wikipedia.org] )

...and sorry for the nitpicking!

Re:So how exactly does it work? (2, Funny)

Red Flayer (890720) | more than 8 years ago | (#15626932)

Every theeth has a quite specific form, how will this device influence that?
(emphasis mine)

Obviously you have a pressing interest in this cutting-edge technology.

Re:So how exactly does it work? (1)

Bombula (670389) | more than 8 years ago | (#15627111)

The article doesn't explain how this works at all. Maybe that don't know? Perhaps ultrasound stimulates hormone production or adult stem cells or something like that?

Re:So how exactly does it work? (1)

airlynx (957866) | more than 8 years ago | (#15627379)

The article mentions a previous publication in the American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics which you can access for $30 as a pay-per-view sort of thing, but the abstract gives more than enough information if you want to know more about how it actually works. I copied the URL here, but bear with me, I don't do much slashdot posting of URL's. http://www2.us.elsevierhealth.com/inst/serve?actio n=searchDB&searchDBfor=art&artType=abs&id=as088954 0604002872&nav=abs&special=hilite&query=%5Bcontrib s%5D(el-bialy%2C) [elsevierhealth.com]

Re:So how exactly does it work? (0)

1u3hr (530656) | more than 8 years ago | (#15627542)

"with low frequency ultrasound pulses" is pretty uninformative for me. If they can regrow theeth, do they first have to implant a 'seed' that will focus the growth? Every theeth has a quite specific form, how will this device influence that?

TFA says "stimulates tooth growth from the root once inserted into a person's mouth".

This notice is to inform you... (4, Funny)

PixelPirate (984935) | more than 8 years ago | (#15626790)

This notice hereby notifies you, Tooth Fairy that you are hereby no longer needed as your job has been outsourced to Canada. We hope you will find our severance package of 6 months teeth as well as full dental to be more than generous. Also note that you are hereby banned from acting in the capacity of ortho-collector for a period of 8 years, and any attmpt to circumvent this will lead to a termination of the aforementioned benefits.

-The Management

Re:This notice is to inform you... (3, Funny)

Joebert (946227) | more than 8 years ago | (#15626806)

This notice hereby notifies you, Tooth Fairy that you are hereby no longer needed as your job has been outsourced to Canada.

*pssst*
Think of all the money you could make knocking your own teech out & selling them to the tooth fairy. ;)

Re:This notice is to inform you... (1)

Joebert (946227) | more than 8 years ago | (#15626809)

teech

Geez, I couldn't get any use out of the thing.
*smacks forehead*

Re:This notice is to inform you... (1)

andrewman327 (635952) | more than 8 years ago | (#15627065)

I disagree. Now we can grow more and more teeth in labs then sell them to the tooth fairy! I think I have now solved the missing link of the age old equation:


Step 1: Grow Teeth
Step 2: ???
Step 3: PROFIT!

Re:This notice is to inform you... (1)

myth24601 (893486) | more than 8 years ago | (#15627214)

The real PROFIT will be when somone figures out a way to grow back missing hair.

Re:This notice is to inform you... (1)

camperdave (969942) | more than 8 years ago | (#15627271)

What? That would ruin my "We're all born with the same amount of testosterone. If you want to use yours to grow hair, that's your business." tee shirt empire.

Great Test Bed (2, Funny)

general scruff (938598) | more than 8 years ago | (#15626792)

Lord know Canada is a great place to research tooth replacement, considering that Maine is so close by! We could really use some of that stuff down here!

Gramps is getting sick of eating through a straw.

As a Canadian, I'd like to.. (3, Funny)

ABeowulfCluster (854634) | more than 8 years ago | (#15626800)

.. test this on other body parts. Just sayin.

Re:As a Canadian, I'd like to.. (1)

Joebert (946227) | more than 8 years ago | (#15626830)

Well, they did say bones.

Re:As a Canadian, I'd like to.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15626850)

At least! A real p3n1s enlargement coming true. What a fl00d of cheap enlargement devices will hit our emails in future.

Do you really want teeth on your penis? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15626973)

Oh, wait...

Re:As a Canadian, I'd like to.. (1)

tetabiate (55848) | more than 8 years ago | (#15627089)

If all the money men have spent on miracle p3n1s enlargement devices/treatements was used to make serious research on the subject, by now we would have already seen real possibilities. By the way, do you know that the bigger you p3n1s gets the more blood you need to fill it and the less blood is left for the brain to function properly? Most women would not like to sleep with mentally retarded ba5tards. Just joking, of course.

Re:As a Canadian, I'd like to.. (2, Funny)

jamesh (87723) | more than 8 years ago | (#15626895)

I'm sure it's possible. Which particular bone did you have in mind?

Re:As a Canadian, I'd like to.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15626972)

funny bone? :)

Re:As a Canadian, I'd like to.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15627031)

What? Your dick fell off?

Bob Dole endorsement (1)

kaufmanmoore (930593) | more than 8 years ago | (#15627117)

Bob Dole uses this product, Bob Dole, Bob Dole.

Re:As a Canadian, I'd like to.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15627131)

dude...it was to grow 'teeth and bones'...not 'teeth and boner'...please READ ! ! !

Re:As a Canadian, I'd like to.. (1)

mrchaotica (681592) | more than 8 years ago | (#15627159)

Just our luck: humans are one of the few (or maybe only) species that don't actually have a penis bone. This actually would work on, say, dogs or something.

[cue educational cartoon "the more you know" banner]

Re:As a Canadian, I'd like to.. (1)

mario_grgic (515333) | more than 8 years ago | (#15627277)

They said teeth and bones, not boner!

Dog... (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15626803)

I suggest Dog the Bounty Hunter sign up ASAP.

Canada has really young scientists (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15626814)

"Canadian Scientists Regrow Teeth"
A group of Canadian scientists in the age from 4 to 10 has successfully regrown their teeth after they mysteriously lost them.

Re:Canada has really young scientists (1)

operagost (62405) | more than 8 years ago | (#15627357)

They've also mysteriously come into a lot of money, most of it in quarters and dimes.

For Suckers (3, Funny)

Joebert (946227) | more than 8 years ago | (#15626818)

Thee ma ?
I thold you bruthing your theeth wath fo thuckerth !

Wow! (1)

pjt48108 (321212) | more than 8 years ago | (#15626822)

That's a story with bite!

Root canal? (4, Interesting)

paulhar (652995) | more than 8 years ago | (#15626833)

> Chen helped create the tiny ultrasound machine that gently massages gums and stimulates tooth growth from the root once inserted into a person's mouth, mounted on braces or a removable plastic crown.

As several of my teeth have gone the way of the fairy, I wonder how this "treatment" copes with teeth that have been root canal filled.

And what colour does the new tooth grow back at? It it's pure white - fantastic as it'll put lots of whiting products out of business, but bad as it'll have the pringles effect; once you start you'll have to have all your front/visible teeth done, even if they are just discoloured.

Re:Root canal? (2, Funny)

ObsessiveMathsFreak (773371) | more than 8 years ago | (#15626847)

once you start you'll have to have all your front/visible teeth done, even if they are just discoloured.

Or you could just, you know, brush them..... Oh wait.

Re:Root canal? (1)

rasjani (97395) | more than 8 years ago | (#15626892)

Im sure we have done the waiting part allready =)

Re:Root canal? (1)

Anonymous Brave Guy (457657) | more than 8 years ago | (#15626960)

Speaking as someone whose teeth were basically wrecked by an incompetent orthodontist years ago, I can promise you that not everyone with dental problems brought them upon themselves. My dentist often comments on how good my oral hygiene is, yet I have some sort of filling in nearly every tooth in my mouth.

Re:Root canal? (1)

CaptainNerdCave (982411) | more than 8 years ago | (#15627503)

i can't wait to see how this turns out, i have a broken incisor. it is really miserable, just the root is left (no nerve) and there's a piece of some kind of porcelain glued to it. can i eat sandwiches and pizza like the rest of the world? no :( i would really like to see this become realistic soon.

Re:Root canal? (1)

BioCS.Nerd (847372) | more than 8 years ago | (#15626901)

"the pringles effect" -- brilliant usage of the phrase! A tip of the hat to you.

I was waiting for this (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15627118)

I got my first root canal recently and finding out that they had to take out the nerve inside was truly shocking. It felt as an amputation of my body, immediately I wondered why on earth noone has invented to regrow the damn thing. One option was to take it out, the second one was to have the empty molar filled, and topped it off with a cumbersome crown.

Anyways, I am glad to hear about this discovery because now I can get rid of all my artificial fillings and regrow my natural teeth :-)))

Just hope they freaking hurry up to make this a standard practice at the dental clinic.

It makes sense that this comes from Canada... (4, Funny)

i_want_you_to_throw_ (559379) | more than 8 years ago | (#15626841)

What with all those hockey players losing teeth. It was either there or Kentucky where people also don't have teeth. Interestingly that's where the toothbrush was invented. Otherwise it would have been called the teethbrush.

Thanks, I'll be here all week, enjoy the veal.

(Disclaimer: I am a Kentuckian)

Re:It makes sense that this comes from Canada... (1)

kaufmanmoore (930593) | more than 8 years ago | (#15627063)

Dont forget the need though for american football players who dont wear helmets while riding their motorcycle.

In another part of the world... (1)

CrimsonScythe (876496) | more than 8 years ago | (#15627158)

...Shane MacGowan [wikipedia.org] let out a unmistakingly happy [shanemacgowan.com] "*blargh* bloody motherfuckers" upon hearing this news.

Medical research is too slow (2, Interesting)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 8 years ago | (#15626848)

From TFA:

With the help of Chen and Ying Tsui, another engineering professor, the initial massive handheld device was shrunk to fit inside a person's mouth.

But they had something like this working in the late 1990s so for part of the last seven years they have been mucking around making a minature version of their machine. A proper engineering job would have taken six months, max, and they could have kept working on the science.

Sorry to bitch about this but I see too much improvisation going on and not enough forethought.

Re:Medical research is too slow (2, Insightful)

Vellmont (569020) | more than 8 years ago | (#15626914)


A proper engineering job would have taken six months, max, and they could have kept working on the science.

You can figure out how long it would take to engineer a device you've just heard of all of 20 minutes ago from a short, non-technical article posted on slashdot?

Re:Medical research is too slow (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15626917)

the initial massive handheld device was shrunk to fit inside a person's mouth.
Mick Jagger is due for an upgrade.

I won't believe it... (5, Funny)

jkrise (535370) | more than 8 years ago | (#15626857)

until they prove it on these (currently) toothless specimens:
1. The Justice dept. (SCO vs IBM)
2. The anti-trust dept. (MS vs US)
3. Other suggestions welcome...

Re:I won't believe it... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15626919)

seems in the first case, the teeth grew yesterday (SCO vs IBM)
Citation: [groklaw.net]

Re:I won't believe it... (1)

ekgringo (693136) | more than 8 years ago | (#15627285)

How about the UN?

Re:I won't believe it... (1)

LeonardsLiver (885268) | more than 8 years ago | (#15627476)

4. Congress

Re:I won't believe it... (0, Troll)

corbettw (214229) | more than 8 years ago | (#15627524)

I'll second the Justice Dept. (vs. the New York Times). Since when did treason become legal?

What about bones illness? (5, Interesting)

KarMax (720996) | more than 8 years ago | (#15626862)

This is amazing... i never imagine that this could be possible.

It can also stimulate jawbone growth to fix a person's crooked smile and may eventually allow people to grow taller by stimulating bone growth, Chen said.
I'm far away to know something about odontology, so i ask to the slashdot doctors:
This stimulation process could be used to cure bone illness, like Osteoporosis [wikipedia.org] or Osteosarcoma [wikipedia.org] ??

Thanks in advance.

Re:What about bones illness? (2, Interesting)

Zzootnik (179922) | more than 8 years ago | (#15626940)

Actually, I was more thinking of Using this on Space Travelers to stave off the Bone Density Loss that inevitably (??) occurrs... Sounds like One of the big problems solved...MMmmmmmm... Full Body Ultrasound....

Or- yeah...I suppose you could also use it to treat/cure degenerative bone loss symptoms. No reason it can't have multiple applications...Except maybe Patent law.

Re:What about bones illness? (2, Informative)

Red Flayer (890720) | more than 8 years ago | (#15626971)

IANAD (but I do have a Pharmacy degree). But most likely this could not be used to cure osteosarcoma, as stimulating growth of a cancer is probably not the best idea.

As for osteoporosis, I would suspect stimulating growth is not the right way to go either -- the bones are there, it's the structure of the bone that is weakened. Exercise, calcium intake, Vitamin D intake, and sometimes Fosamax (slows down resorption of calcium) or hormone regimens (still experimental) are the treatments du jour.

Re:What about bones illness? (1)

sjwaste (780063) | more than 8 years ago | (#15627325)

Can it cure crippling bone-itis?

Tyranny Of Patents (0)

ObsessiveMathsFreak (773371) | more than 8 years ago | (#15626875)

The USPTO will strike again. Innovation will once again be stifled. This technology will remain overpriced and underdeveloped because all R&D is in effect frozen. Toothaches for all!

What's that you say?! With the encouragement of patents this technology would never have been developed?! But wait! These are "University" researchers. They are, in all likelihood, paid to do their research out of the public purse. Canadians have already paid for this research, and the scientists in question were already motivated to perform it.

Patents are less than useless to society. A competator is copying your ingenius invention? Welcome to the real world. This is what other businesses have to put up with all the time. Competition. Crying to the government for preferential treatment just because you were the first to stitch together some preexisting pieces of technology won't earn you too many brownie points with the people you subsequently gouge.

Patents aren't required. People and business will innovate without them. Don't believe me? Look at the wheel.

Re:Tyranny Of Patents (4, Insightful)

heinousjay (683506) | more than 8 years ago | (#15626890)

Fantastic rant. It's logically inconsistent, substitutes opinions for facts, uses examples that don't illustrate your point, and sets up strawmen as its main thrust. Absolutely Slashdottian.

Re:Tyranny Of Patents (1)

dwandy (907337) | more than 8 years ago | (#15626905)

Maybe we can use this to grow new back-bones for the legislators.

Re:Tyranny Of Patents (1)

Manchot (847225) | more than 8 years ago | (#15626977)

They are, in all likelihood, paid to do their research out of the public purse. Canadians have already paid for this research, and the scientists in question were already motivated to perform it.

Most engineering professors get the money for their research by directly appealing to outside organizations. Though the university/public pays their salary, this is for teaching and for the prestige that they bring to the university, not for their research.

Patents are less than useless to society. A competator is copying your ingenius invention? Welcome to the real world. This is what other businesses have to put up with all the time.

Many times, it wouldn't even get that far. Say that you invent something truly remarkable, and a large company gets wind of it. They'll have a version of your invention out before you can even get a business up and running. No competition can occur because of the relative sizes of the two organizations. Of course, you'll never see a dime. Does that seem fair to you?

Re:Tyranny Of Patents (1)

ObsessiveMathsFreak (773371) | more than 8 years ago | (#15627032)

Say that you invent something truly remarkable, and a large company gets wind of it. They'll have a version of your invention out before you can even get a business up and running. No competition can occur because of the relative sizes of the two organizations.

Let's say I do invent something, patent it, and a large company uses my invention without the patent being licenced. What am I supposed to do? Start a civil action? No legal action is possible on my part because of the relative sizes of the two organisations. I should never have let them get wind of it in the first place, by holding onto my trade secrets.

The myth that patents protect the little genius inventor is one of the great lies dragged out in any patent discussion. They do no such thing. They actively conspire against him. The small inventor stands a better chance with no patent system, as at least his business won't be torpedoed his larger competators' submarine patents.

Patents do not help the little guy. They only help the big guys screw the rest of us over. These scientists won't make a dime out of their patent, unless they sell it off that is.

Re:Tyranny Of Patents (1)

Oligonicella (659917) | more than 8 years ago | (#15627511)

"No legal action is possible on my part because of the relative sizes of the two organisations."

What a crock of shit. It happens all the time. Ever hear of pro bono or lawyers taking a percentage of the settlement?

What you espouse is no more than your opinion phrases as if it's truth. Perhaps you don't read enough.

"The small inventor stands a better chance with no patent system, as at least his business won't be torpedoed his larger competators' submarine patents."

No, dimwit, it would be torpedoed by out-competititon, as mentioned above you. Submarine patents are held by small firms too, you know.

Don't need 'em! (2, Funny)

PoprocksCk (756380) | more than 8 years ago | (#15626877)

I don't need no stinkin' "real" teeth. My false teeth are just fine, thank you very much! Hell, I can even eat corn on the cob, if someone cuts it off the cob and then mashes it up into a fine paste!

Presence of stump? (1)

mcai8rw2 (923718) | more than 8 years ago | (#15626879)

The article didn;t make it very clear...but do you have to have part of the tooth left to stimulate it to grow? or will the tooth grow from nothing.

This is quite a differnt approach to the "growing teeth from stem cells" that I read about recently. Both seem quite viable, but growing teeth from stem cells might be a little more complecated prehaps?

Re:Presence of stump? (2, Interesting)

Red Flayer (890720) | more than 8 years ago | (#15627054)

There needs to be a root. Interesting that you bring up the research into teeth grown from stem cells [bbc.co.uk] [1], possibly one could create the root from stem cells, implant, and then finish the growth with this device. I'm not sure if tissue rejection would be a problem, though.

There's also a good potential for this to be used for body modification. Easy enough to add things to the diet to impart a color into the tooth while it grows (one reason why kids aren't given tetracycline -- it makes their growing teeth permanaently orange). A mouthful of glow-in-the-dark teeth? No problem. How about teeth that glow orange or green under a blacklight, instead of violet?

Just freakin' great. (5, Funny)

Khaed (544779) | more than 8 years ago | (#15626881)

We can grow teeth now. Next step, growing teeth in places not the mouth.

Now all those nightmares I have about a woman with teeth in her vagina are going to come true.

Thanks a lot Canada!!

Re:Just freakin' great. (4, Funny)

prionic6 (858109) | more than 8 years ago | (#15626896)

So you have a problem with sticking your genitals into a female body part that has teeth in it?

Re:Just freakin' great. (1)

Khaed (544779) | more than 8 years ago | (#15626949)

If I plan on that body part clenching up tightly, rhythmically, after a few minutes? Hell yes.

If a girl had a jaw spasm halfway through oral sex, that would suck (bada-baaa).

Of course, this is /. so... (I have like four jokes, and none of them are funny.)

omg (-1, Offtopic)

Danzigism (881294) | more than 8 years ago | (#15626921)

if it works as they say it will, then it will truly be a remarkable device.. however, when i visited the article, I gasped when I saw an advertisement for "Conservative Tshirts".. a really hot chick, was wearing a tshirt with a portrait of Ronald Reagan on it.. it suddenly made her a lot less hot..

Horse Hockey! (5, Informative)

wdkeeper1 (541337) | more than 8 years ago | (#15626930)

Horse hockey on the "growing a new tooth" thing, but I can see repairing damaged teeth, depending on the cause of the damage. You need the presence of odontoblasts, etc in order for a new tooth to grow. That guy Chen is an engineer, not a dentist. I'm thinking he doesn't really understand how teeth form and grow, so he's got high hopes for his invention. The root structure of teeth is covered in cementum and dentin, which are repairable, so it makes sense that teeth with root resorption may be fixed by the ultrasonic thing. But to completely grow new teeth, you'd have to have "tooth stem cells" in the area, and those stem cells would have to know what size and shape of tooth to form for that area. I don't see that one happening. I also don't see damaged enamel being fixed by this thing; once enamel is gone, it's pretty much gone.

Re:Horse Hockey! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15626957)

This is a little more realistic... From the American Journal of Orthodontal and Dentofacial Orthopedics 2004 Aug;126(2):186-93 Repair of orthodontically induced root resorption by ultrasound in humans. El-Bialy T, El-Shamy I, Graber TM. Faculty of Dentistry, King Abdulla h Aziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Root resorption is an adverse outcome of orthodontic tooth movement. In addition to the iatrogenic response and compromising the crown-root ratio, root resorption has led to increased malpractice litigation against orthodontists. A clinically acceptable method of treating root resorption has not been validated in the literature to date. Previous research has shown that low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) can enhance healing of various types of traumatized connective tissues and stimulate dental tissue formation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of LIPUS on the healing process of orthodontically induced tooth-root resorption in humans. Twelve orthodontic patients who were seeking orthodontic treatment that necessitated extracting the first premolars before mechanotherapy participated in this study. For each patient, buccally activated springs were used to tip the maxillary first premolars buccally, with an initial force level of 50 g; the springs were checked weekly to ensure continuous force levels. A short period of LIPUS was applied to 1 side of each patient's mouth, with the other side used as a control. After 4 weeks, the experimental premolars of all patients were extracted, and the premolars of 6 patients were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM); the premolars of the other 6 patients were studied histologically. The number and total area of resorption lacunae as examined by SEM were compared between the LIPUS-treated and the control premolars with a t test. The SEM study showed a statistically significant decrease in the areas of resorption and the number of resorption lacunae in the LIPUS-exposed premolars. Histologic examination showed healing of the resorbed root surface by hypercementosis. The results of this study provide a noninvasive method for reducing root resorption in humans.

Re:Horse Hockey! (1)

mrchaotica (681592) | more than 8 years ago | (#15627208)

Yes, growing back teeth after a game of "horse hockey" would be a good application for this technology. : )

Was this really needed? (1)

Herkum01 (592704) | more than 8 years ago | (#15626943)

Just great, the people that we refer to as sharks will start to grow back their own teeth, they will never stop being a menace to society now!

Darn you Canadians!

Regrow Teeth (5, Funny)

rocketjam (696072) | more than 8 years ago | (#15626954)

Thweet!

The English (0)

asifyoucare (302582) | more than 8 years ago | (#15626968)

Finally, the English can look like us.

(Actually I'm Australian, but that kind of ruins the joke).

So what makes this different from Exogen? Size (1)

Benanov (583592) | more than 8 years ago | (#15627112)

Exogen (website: http://www.exogen.com/ [exogen.com] , warning, flash and WMV alert) is basically an ultrasound device that's supposed to accelerate the healing of fractures. A lot of the media demonstrates the forearm because that was where most of the testing was done. SWMBO's mother broke her upper arm and used this system for a while; it did help...once she quit smoking.

So this all that different enough to deserve a patent? That it's an implant/crown/etc. instead of an external system.

The idea of using ultrasound to grow bone is nothing new. The size is.

End of dentures in sight? (1)

Mostly a lurker (634878) | more than 8 years ago | (#15627123)

We shall probably need to wait until patents expire before any significant commercialisation of this occurs, but does this, in principle, mean that we can replace diseased teeth new natural ones, rather than replacing them with dentures?

Great! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15627157)

This means that curbing isn't so harmful after all.

Makes Sense (0, Troll)

Borland (123542) | more than 8 years ago | (#15627160)

They have closer cultural ties to Britain than the US. Just think of the market potential!

Re-grow a bone, eh? (1)

Anonymous Cowled (917825) | more than 8 years ago | (#15627200)

its not just me that thinks that's funny, is it?

elephants (1)

tau0 (774148) | more than 8 years ago | (#15627289)

Elephants do not die from old age, they die from starvation
(and of course they are killed by humans).
In the course of their lifetime they get a set number of
sets of teeth and after the last set is worn away, they
starve.
Now we can save them - just need someone to put the pea
size devices in their mouths.

Dr. McCoy would be jealous! (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15627306)

What's next? All I can say is WOW, I've lost s few teeth from gum disease.

It isn't nearly as impressive as the technological miracle I've experienced the last 2 days.

I wore glasses since age 7 (yes I'm a nerd). I switched to contacts 4 years ago, and had to have reading glasses as well as contacts. I used to be four-eyes, now that I'm old it's six eyes.

Then I got a cataract in my left eye. The specialist told me of a new implant that was only approved in 2003, and extra $1900 above what insurance pays. As it's a one shot deal (they can't remove an implanted artificial lens) I went temporarily broke on it.

Dr. McCoy would have been jealous of all the technology in the operating room.

In the recovery room I could read the clock on the wall without any external corrective lenses for the first time in memory (I've worn glasses since 1959). The next day (yesterday) the eye doctor tested my eye, 20-20. For the first time in my life I have no restrictions on my driver's license!

Last week I had the type on the browser enlarged, plus wore reading glasses. Today I have the type set for normal, and no reading glasses. They tell me in a month I'll be able to read six point type w/o reading glasses!

In Star Trek II, McCoy gives Kirk a pair of antique reading glasses because he's allergic to the drug that cures age related nearsightedness.

We're still 200 years from the 23rd century, but we've passed Star Trek tech. Even McCoy didn't have these implants at his disposal! The implant I got, called a Crystal Lens, cures nearsightedness, farsightedness (both age-related and youth myopia), cataracts, and even astigmatism!

I'll get the other eye done in a few years. Then maybe I'll get some Canadian teeth!

(anti-MRC="botched". Couldn't be more wrong!)

The rats will sue (1)

Frightening (976489) | more than 8 years ago | (#15627308)

Copyright(C) 1434500 B.C

Fun-fact: rats have been regrowing their teeth since Elvis.

Note to the humorless: please don't ruin joke by posting scientific facts about rats/humans

I know a country who will be REALLY HAPPY (0, Troll)

p51d007 (656414) | more than 8 years ago | (#15627327)

Britian.........anyone ever notice they have poor dental hygiene?

My state needs one (1)

reverend_rodger (879863) | more than 8 years ago | (#15627374)

I speak on behalf of all the people of Alabama when I say: We's need one o' 'dem there teef regrowers!

In other news (1)

LeonardsLiver (885268) | more than 8 years ago | (#15627412)

marriage rates in Kentucky & Tennessee have skyrocketed.

Coincidentally (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15627419)

The entire country of England erupts in mass celebration.

I knew my years of not brushing would pay off (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15627479)

For years I thought "You know, teeth can't be too hard to create, why brush when I am sure that someone will invenet a way to replace them before mine get pulled."

What will happen to my favorite jokes? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15627525)

How do you complement a Canadian?

Nice tooth.

How do you know the toothbrush was invented in Canada?

Otherwise, it would be called a teethbrush.
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