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Sun's Trading Symbol Going From SUNW To JAVA

CowboyNeal posted more than 6 years ago | from the big-whoop dept.

Sun Microsystems 356

Mortimer.CA writes "Straight from Jonathan Schwartz's weblog, Sun is changing their ticker symbol from SUNW to JAVA: 'JAVA is a technology whose value is near infinite to the internet, and a brand that's inseparably a part of Sun (and our profitability). [...] To be very clear, this isn't about changing the company name or focus — we are Sun, we are a systems company, and we will always be a derivative of the students that created us, Stanford University Network is here to stay. But we are no longer simply a workstation company, nor a company whose products can be limited by one category — and Java does a better job of capturing exactly that sentiment than any other four letter symbol.'"

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FP (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20341935)

Fripple Postino

Not sure if this is a good idea (5, Funny)

jpfed (1095443) | more than 6 years ago | (#20341941)

Hmm... while many programmers are powered by java, all life on Earth is powered at least indirectly by the Sun.

Re:Not sure if this is a good idea (4, Funny)

abolitiontheory (1138999) | more than 6 years ago | (#20342259)

Yeah, what next? Microsoft changes their ticker to SUCK?

Re:Not sure if this is a good idea (1)

morgan_greywolf (835522) | more than 6 years ago | (#20342385)

Nope. Apple's gonna change their ticker symbol to TUNE.

Re:Not sure if this is a good idea (2, Funny)

jimstapleton (999106) | more than 6 years ago | (#20342455)

No, they don't have a product named SUCK.

It'll be "C#" or ".NET". Sure, some of those characters may not be allowed, but with a little of the green lubricant, which MS has more than enough to spare, I'm sure wall street will be willing to have it's gears greased in taht direction.

Re:Not sure if this is a good idea (5, Funny)

Megane (129182) | more than 6 years ago | (#20342533)

They may not have a product _named_ SUCK, but they do have the ZUNE. That's got four letters and describes Microsoft almost as well as JAVA describes Sun.

Re:Not sure if this is a good idea (1)

abolitiontheory (1138999) | more than 6 years ago | (#20342561)

This was going to be my direct reply to the TUNE comment. Right on.

Re:Not sure if this is a good idea (1)

endianx (1006895) | more than 6 years ago | (#20342731)

A name change is not going to help them. Nobody is going to buy until they increase earnings.

Re:Not sure if this is a good idea (2, Funny)

hedleyroos (817147) | more than 6 years ago | (#20342721)

... all life on Earth is powered at least indirectly by the Sun

You've obviously never seen our sys admin. Gaah, you said indirectly and ruined my joke!

Uhm. (3, Insightful)

John_Booty (149925) | more than 6 years ago | (#20341963)

"we are [not] a company whose products can be limited by one category"


So instead of naming themselves after one product category, they're naming themselves after another. Great! The name change makes some sense (who really wants the outdated "workstation" thing attached to their name?) but marketingspeak is just so silly sometimes.

Can't help but think they'll want to do this gain once Java is no longer their flagship product. If they're still around (and I hope they are!)

Re:Uhm. (3, Interesting)

MMC Monster (602931) | more than 6 years ago | (#20341991)

Actually, I was under the impression that SUNW was a more respectable name. Workstation gives the suggestion of serious computer power.

Re:Uhm. (4, Informative)

peterprior (319967) | more than 6 years ago | (#20342075)

Actually it stands for Standford University NetWorks... :)

Re:Uhm. (1, Troll)

MrNaz (730548) | more than 6 years ago | (#20342189)

Java does a better job of capturing exactly that sentiment than any other four letter symbol.

Skipping the obvious vulgarities, how about Standard Language Of Workstations, or S-L-O-W ?

Re:Uhm. (4, Insightful)

John_Booty (149925) | more than 6 years ago | (#20342153)

For customers, maybe, but not for investors - and they're the ones that will see the ticker symbol. The workstation market is near-nonexistent. "Workstations" harken to the days of $10,000 desktop computers like the NeXT Cube and the like. Former workstation companies like SGI have collapsed financially and are scrambling to try and find other ways to make money.

Re:Uhm. (2)

Otter (3800) | more than 6 years ago | (#20342307)

I had periodically wondered what the W stood for but had never connected it with "workstation", and doubt if many investors had. (Anyway, other posters are claiming plausibly that the link to "workstation" isn't even correct.)

Re:Uhm. (2, Informative)

PhunkySchtuff (208108) | more than 6 years ago | (#20342641)

SUNW (The stock ticker symbol) = Stanford University Network Workstation.

Sun (the company) = Sun Microsystems.

Re:Uhm. (1)

mikael (484) | more than 6 years ago | (#20342623)

SJNW would have made sense:

S = Servers
J = Java
N = (the) Network
W = Workstations

But just Java? Seem to be ignoring three major markets....

Get a website or something (2, Funny)

florin (2243) | more than 6 years ago | (#20341971)

In related news, Steve Balmer was spotted replacing his previous 'ZUNE4ME' vanity plates with a fresh set which sports the slogan 'JAVAL0L'..

Seriously though, I don't think Java is a particularly big reason for people to like Sun, and tying your company's future to it seems ill-advised.

Re:Get a website or something (1)

Branc0 (580914) | more than 6 years ago | (#20342643)

This is about investors, not about programming gurus or system administrators. JAVA has a big punch, it is associated with a lot of different technologies (because a lot of stuff is made in JAVA) and this is the idea they want to pass trough. The market is 90% psychological and moving the TICKER name from SUNW to JAVA surely can't hurt.

Decafinated Diet Coke (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20341979)

OK, but aren't more younger programmers drinking diet coke and not Java these days?

It's only the stock ticker (4, Insightful)

stony3k (709718) | more than 6 years ago | (#20341981)

While I agree that this sounds silly, do remember that it's just the stock symbol. There are many companies with silly stock symbols (GLW, T, F). I guess they feel that more people will buy their stocks if the name sounds familiar.

Basically, nothing to see here.

Re:It's only the stock ticker (2, Funny)

brajesh (847246) | more than 6 years ago | (#20342097)

AAPL -> JOBS?

Re:It's only the stock ticker (1)

TheRaven64 (641858) | more than 6 years ago | (#20342359)

Completely off topic, but does anyone know why Apple chose AAPL instead of APPL? According to Google Finance, no one else is using APPL.

Re:It's only the stock ticker (1)

Stooshie (993666) | more than 6 years ago | (#20342427)

Not knowing anything about shares this is only a guess, but I assume that when Apple first started trading they were given AAPL. I also assume it's like registration plates and you would have to pay for a custom one. When apple were first listed they were probably more worried about investing the money in RandD.

Re:It's only the stock ticker (1)

Megane (129182) | more than 6 years ago | (#20342553)

Nope... AAPL -> IPOD of course.

Re:It's only the stock ticker (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20342417)

So, what you're saying is, they could have gotten a similar effect if they'd changed their stock ticker to "WTF" or "BFD" (or are those already taken)?

Re:It's only the stock ticker (1)

kripkenstein (913150) | more than 6 years ago | (#20342467)

Indeed, it is only the stock ticker. Anyhow, there is far more interesting news about IT stocks. For example, SCO's stock (SCOX) has almost doubled since it plummeted: SCOX [google.com] . Who the heck is buying it?

I can't really pass judgement (1)

chuckymonkey (1059244) | more than 6 years ago | (#20341983)

on SUN with this because it's hard to predict how the market is going to react. I really don't think that it's going to make all that much difference since it's still the same company and all the same assets that they had before now. Still though with all the things coming out SUN what with all the GPL software and the deal with IBM I think that things are starting to look a little brighter. Also is it just me or does it seem like with the IBM deal that SUN is wanting to get deeper entrenched in the software business IBM wants to start to get out of it?

Coffee (1)

lauwersw (727284) | more than 6 years ago | (#20341989)

Like this reg article http://www.theregister.co.uk/2007/08/23/sun_no_sun w_java/ [theregister.co.uk] is giving the example of VA Linux profiting from the Linux hype with their LNUX ticker, I guess Sun wants to confuse coffee drinkers and profit from that. People think with the global warming that they should stop investing in the sun anyway!

I could probably Google this, but... (1)

Wilson_6500 (896824) | more than 6 years ago | (#20341995)

Who trades under "SUN"?

Ok, I did Google it, and I guess it's "Sunoco." I guess I could've seen that one coming.

(Totally off-subject, but I'm finding that Google should be responsible for a significant decrease in general ignorance: whenever someone wonders some basic question, the answer is usually a few keywords away. This hasn't happened yet for some reason.)

Re:I could probably Google this, but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20342117)

I would argue that it's responsible for an increase in ignorance since people aren't committing things to memory anymore (hey, you can always look it up). To balance this, however, I would say awareness is increasing.

Re:I could probably Google this, but... (1)

RocketJeff (46275) | more than 6 years ago | (#20342357)

Sun couldn't (easily) use SUN as their symbol even if it was available. They're listed with NASDAQ and all NASDAQ symbols are 4 characters long (sometimes 5 - the 5th is used as an indicator that there's something unusual about the security). Other examples are MSFT and AAPL (and, for a little while longer SCOX).

Symbols on the other US exchanges are all 3 letters or less. SUN (Sunoco) is listed on the NYSE, as is IBM and T (AT&T). Interestingly enough, the symbol "M" wasn't in use on the NYSE for a long time - the rumors was that it was being reserved for Microsoft (Macy's is now listed with "M").

Re:I could probably Google this, but... (1)

timster (32400) | more than 6 years ago | (#20342683)

This is a bit of a holdover from the days when the NASDAQ was technically not an exchange, but a mere quotation system (with trading done over-the-counter); hence NYSE securities were called "listed" and NASDAQ ones were called "OTC". Now that NASDAQ is a proper stock exchange, the SEC has allowed NASDAQ to retain 3-letter symbols on securities that move to the NASDAQ from some other exchange (as they are just as much "listed" as NYSE securities). So we will soon see some three-letter symbols on NASDAQ, though they do not yet have the authority to assign three-letter symbols to new issues.

/. questions are SO easy these days... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20342383)

Who trades under "SUN"?

Why, everyone under the SUN, of course!

Packages (5, Insightful)

HaydnH (877214) | more than 6 years ago | (#20342021)

As all of the Solaris packages start with the companies ticker, will all future Sun packages now be called JAVAxxxxx? That's going to annoy the hell out of us sys admins =/ Haydn.

Bye Bye Sun! (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20342039)

Time to say goodbye to whatever is left of sun's profitability and stock price. Sun was once known for making an excellent operating system, and rock solid servers.

Now we can know them for making a bloated, non-standards compliant, partially open-sourced toy programming language.

Sure, javascript and other interpreted languages might 'run' the web experience, but their core product, an OS runs the web itself.

Maybe someone can write a web-server, written in java, running on a java vritual machine, written in java. Let me know in a few months when the server manages to actually run, given java's awesome speed.

Re:Bye Bye Sun! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20342069)

The writing was on the wall when they started giving Schwartz the first of his many unearned promotions. The man will preside over the liquidation of the company, and will walk away with a few tens of millions in his own pockets.

It's sad. Sun was a company that mattered, not all that long ago.

Re:Bye Bye Sun! (1)

Phil246 (803464) | more than 6 years ago | (#20342177)

Tomcat?
Resin?
etc?

Re:Bye Bye Sun! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20342319)

Just spouting off acronyms/project names? where's the parent post?

Tomcat == yet another toy

Resin == the speed at which most java programs run, similar to the viscosity of frozen molasses

Re:Bye Bye Sun! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20342487)

Just spouting off acronyms/project names? where's the parent post?

Tomcat == yet another toy

Resin == the speed at which most java programs run, similar to the viscosity of frozen molasses
the parents post ( ie yours ) was modded down as flamebait, since that is all it is.

Re:Bye Bye Sun! (1)

loubs001 (1126973) | more than 6 years ago | (#20342361)

Glassfish, Tomcat and Resin are all indepedant 100% pure Java webservers, all massively scalable and capable of processing 1000's of concurrent connections with performance comparable to Apache.

Re:Bye Bye Sun! (1)

Tjebbe (36955) | more than 6 years ago | (#20342445)

javascript has nothing to do with either sun or java, except for the first four letters of its name.

And indeed, while a lot of websites and maybe intranet applications are built in java, to call its value 'near infinite' is such an overstatement it's plain lying.

There are a lot of technologies and even some programming languages that would completely break the Internet as we know it should they be completely gone one of a sudden. Java is most certainly not one of them.

Microsoft is changing their's too... (4, Funny)

AccUser (191555) | more than 6 years ago | (#20342053)

Look out for BSOD on a stock ticker near you. Unless you are running a real operating system, that is.

Most BSODs aren't Microsoft's fault anymore (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 6 years ago | (#20342375)

Look out for BSOD on a stock ticker near you. Unless you are running a real operating system, that is.
True, Windows used to blue screen all the time back when it was a shell running on top of MS-DOS (especially in the 9x era), but BSODs haven't been a significant problem since Windows 2000, unless you have defective hardware (especially RAM) or defective device drivers. Even Linux will likely panic in such cases.

Re:Most BSODs aren't Microsoft's fault anymore (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20342583)

> BSODs haven't been a significant problem since Windows 2000,
> unless you have defective hardware

At that's acceptable to you?

In-memory checksums, error correction?

Even CPU cache is ECCd.

Unless the physical chip on which the kernel resides
is pulled from the board, why should a kernel panic
if hardware is defective?

Toy OS.

Re:Most BSODs aren't Microsoft's fault anymore (1)

tgatliff (311583) | more than 6 years ago | (#20342695)

Listen, I understand what you are trying to say here, and when I used to work on Windows servers exclusively I probably would have agreed with you. Having worked several years now with Linux/BSD/OSX/Solaris servers, though, I can honestly tell you that there is absolutely no comparison in reliability of Windows against Unix in the server enviroment. I mean it is just not even close, and the idea of Windows competing against Unix boxes for reliability is truely laughable. For example, it is not uncommon for me to have Unix servers in production having > 1000 day uptimes running flawlessly, but this type of thing is was unheard of in WIndows world unless it is just sitting there doing nothing.

In short, you would make allot of reasons why to use Windows Servers instead of Unix, but then it comes to reliability and performance, there is just no comparison.

four letter symbols (2, Funny)

OnyxLilninja (1126557) | more than 6 years ago | (#20342057)

But we are no longer simply a workstation company, nor a company whose products can be limited by one category -- and Java does a better job of capturing exactly that sentiment than any other four letter symbol.
I can think of some four letter symbols that express the sentiment a bit better...

Sounds normal to me (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20342113)

Java was a corporate-driven solution to a non existing technical problem, whose only purpose was to lock developers/users into a proprietary technology where you kill most of your machine resources or give up all advertised multiplatform compatibility, sometimes both. When it got opened by Sun, most ideological obstacles were removed, still there are a lot of technical ones.
Before modding me as troll, go ahead and count how many Java programs come in different packages aimed at different platforms, linked with native C or C++ libraries to achieve decent speed; not so different from a tar.gz C or C++ source archive, only much much bigger/slower and not multiplatform.

Want to trade some speed to run you program everywhere? Then go for Python, Ruby, PHP, Perl etc. Java is for corporate drones and Wall Street yuppies.

Now let the flame war begin.

Re:Sounds normal to me (1)

jcr (53032) | more than 6 years ago | (#20342163)

Now let the flame war begin.

What's to flame? When you're right, you're right.

-jcr

Re:Sounds normal to me (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20342227)

Java was originally conceived to run software for set-top boxes. It seems they over-engineered it a tad, then the original market fell through, so Sun had to do something with it. So now we have failed set-top box software slowing down our servers and desktops while fanboys claim it's the best invention since FORTRAN. Thanks once again, Sun.

Re:Sounds normal to me (1, Insightful)

jcr (53032) | more than 6 years ago | (#20342633)

fanboys claim it's the best invention since FORTRAN.

Most of the Java fans I know (as opposed to those who merely tolerate it to pay the bills) have never written a line of FORTRAN.

The love of Java tends to come from people whose previous experience was mostly C++ or VB. What Java demonstrated was just how desperately the world needed a replacement for C++. Pity it ended up where it has.

-jcr

Of course... (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20342125)

Of course Stanford University Network is here to stay, what would Stanford University do without it?

The horse is dead, quit beating it. (-1, Flamebait)

jcr (53032) | more than 6 years ago | (#20342135)

Java was doomed, from the first time anyone ever had to ask the question "which Java?"

It failed on the "write-once, run anywhere" promise, it failed on the security promise, and it failed on the "finally, you'll be free of win32" promise. The ways that Sun screwed this pooch will be the subject of thousands of business-school term papers for years to come.

Changing Sun's ticker symbol to JAVA just tells me that Schwarz has no better ideas than rearranging the deck chairs.

-jcr

Re:The horse is dead, quit beating it. (1)

eknagy (1056622) | more than 6 years ago | (#20342229)

This seems to be an undead horse for me.

I wrote Java programs in a few hours that ran on Windows, Linux and AIX, and were UTF-8 capable.
I used three different brands of JREs (not MS, though) and my programs ran on all of them.
I had less security problems with Java than with ActiveX, Flash or PHP.

Seriously, I think you really need to get some training in how to determine if a horse is dead or not. Or, maybe, you should get a degree in Sales and stop being a troll.

Elmar

Re:The horse is dead, quit beating it. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20342535)

"I wrote Java programs in a few hours that ran on Windows, Linux and AIX, and were UTF-8 capable."

"used three different brands of JREs (not MS, though) and my programs ran on all of them."

"I had less security problems with Java than with ActiveX, Flash or PHP."

Translation: "I wrote a 'hello world' program. It worked. It worked on anything I tried it on, yay java!

Re:The horse is dead, quit beating it. (1, Insightful)

nwbvt (768631) | more than 6 years ago | (#20342257)

Java is one of the most popular programming languages today. It is arguably the default language for modern business applications. You may not like it, but that does mean it is doomed.

That being said, this seems like a strange move for sun. Their influence over Java is already fading, and this only makes them look more like a one trick pony that has only really made one worthwhile contribution to the IT industry.

Re:The horse is dead, quit beating it. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20342351)

Java may be a going concern on the server, but "default" language for business applications (like on the desktop), hardly. Maybe now that SUNW is JAVA they can make their JAVA JRE actually install in a business correctly? For example, real large businesses don't have their users be Admins and they push out their software via a package/software management system. Try having JRE 1.5.x or 1.6.x install silently or with the minimal UI (progress bar only). It installs, but only half way works. Wonderful! Go JAVA.

Re:The horse is dead, quit beating it. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20342443)

Perhaps they could fix the numerous problems which require me to have to maintain numerous different JREs on different machines and carefully juggle the classpath etc. so that the fucking software works in the first place.

No doubt some fanboy will now try to defend Sun and blame the shitty software developers for software that depends on specific JREs. They'll ignore the fact that Suns inability to design Java correctly in the first place is what enabled these developers to turn out crap, of course.

Re:The horse is dead, quit beating it. (1)

jcr (53032) | more than 6 years ago | (#20342579)

software that depends on specific JREs

Bingo! Give the man a cigar.

Years ago, my first impression of Java was that it was absurd that end users had to know or care which Java a given app depended on.

-jcr

Re:The horse is dead, quit beating it. (2, Insightful)

PinkyDead (862370) | more than 6 years ago | (#20342515)

Absolutely agree about the popularity of Java - but I think that it's Java popularity with the Business side of the house as opposed to the Technical side which is the significant element.

My guess is that Business loves Java because you can throw developers at a problem and be seen to be dealing with it - because there isn't a problem that cannot be solved by piling on the bodies, right?

(Confession of bias: I like Java, don't love it - it's good enough).

Re:The horse is dead, quit beating it. (3, Informative)

Teckla (630646) | more than 6 years ago | (#20342415)

Java was doomed, from the first time anyone ever had to ask the question "which Java?"

The most popular programming language [tiobe.com] on the planet is doomed?

It failed on the "write-once, run anywhere" promise

You mean, the Java programs I write that run on Linux, BSD, Solaris, HP-UX, AIX, Windows, and AS/400 aren't actually working? You should have told me sooner! Maybe you can tell me how, exactly, they're not working, because they seem to be working fine!

it failed on the security promise

Because we hear about buffer overflow exploits in Java programs leaving your machine vulnerable all the time? Oh, wait. We almost never hear about those.

and it failed on the "finally, you'll be free of win32" promise

That's funny, it freed me from the Win32 API, and dozens upon dozens upon dozens of other developers I know.

The ways that Sun screwed this pooch will be the subject of thousands of business-school term papers for years to come.

Yeah, right. We'll look back and see how badly Java failed, because it only retained the #1 crown for a few decades (or more).

You need a reality check.

Re:The horse is dead, quit beating it. (-1, Flamebait)

jcr (53032) | more than 6 years ago | (#20342537)

You need a reality check.

Good advice, you should take it. Java has peaked, and it's all downhill from here.

-jcr

Re:The horse is dead, quit beating it. (1)

pubjames (468013) | more than 6 years ago | (#20342441)

Personally I think Sun secretly never wanted Java to succeed, at least on the web/desktop. That is the only way I can explain what an incredible screw-up they made of it.

I remember what Java was at the height of its hype. Joe Public would come across a website that required Java, they'd click on the link to go to the site to download it, and be presented with a page where it was very difficult to tell what you should download - there would be a list of a dozen things with meaningless code names (Java 1.2 SDK, Java 1.2 XYZ APIs, etc, - meaningless to a non-programmer) and even once you had selected one there would be a complex install process, only to find out you'd chosen the wrong one.

Or perhaps they guy in charge of their "download Java" page was receiving brown envelopes from Microsoft? I just find it hard to believe that with the billion dollars worth of free hype Sun got with Java, they managed to screw up such a fundamental and simple aspect of it as making it easy for end users to install.
 

in another news... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20342143)

Microsoft's symbol becomes DNET? ;-)

Re:in another news... (2, Informative)

curmudgeon99 (1040054) | more than 6 years ago | (#20342155)

Microsoft's symbol becomes EVIL

The full quote regarding Sun's symbol change (5, Funny)

lancejjj (924211) | more than 6 years ago | (#20342145)

The quote was truncated. Here it is in its totality:

"But we are no longer simply a workstation company, nor a company whose products can be limited by one category -- and Java does a better job of capturing exactly that sentiment than any other four letter symbol.

Our first choice was the even more accurate DEAD, but that symbol was already taken by Emerson Burial Caskets."

Re:The full quote regarding Sun's symbol change (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20342425)

One of my uni classes this semester is taught using Java. I was planning to use (and have been using) this opportunity to learn Java so I can add that language to my (pretty limited) retinue. There have been a few comments, like this one, that say that Java is crap and dying. If this is the case, should I get this Java unit over and done with ASAP so I can focus on another language, or is it really a marketable skill?

Re:The full quote regarding Sun's symbol change (1)

gerbalblaste (882682) | more than 6 years ago | (#20342611)

Don't be too worried, Java is a marketable skill, if your good at it. A lot of people don't like it because it is slower than other languages and it is larger. If your good with java you'll have no worries, but if your shit you will be the reason these other folks hate java.

Re:The full quote regarding Sun's symbol change (1)

jcr (53032) | more than 6 years ago | (#20342697)

Java is a marketable skill,

Yeah, it's great for InfoSys and the rest of the offshore body-shops. For an individual engineer, it's a very crowded market, and a lot of people are willing to hack Java code for $40/hr.

-jcr

Re:The full quote regarding Sun's symbol change (2, Informative)

dwarfking (95773) | more than 6 years ago | (#20342719)

Java is not dead or dying, regardless what many on /. like to say. There are basically two primary platforms now for custom in-house business development: Java and .NET.

Businesses that are predominately Windows based (desktops, servers, SQL Server, etc) find the holistic approach of .NET and the Visual Studio tool suite (which is a decent development environment) to be the best model for them. Businesses that are more heterogeneous tend to use Java more. You are likely to find very few businesses trusting application development to Python, Ruby, TCL or the next big thing. You might see use of PHP for web front ends, though DHTML/AJAX front ends are becoming very common, but usually business logic is either in Java or .NET.

It seems the folks on /. have a problem with Java for the very reason that it is accepted by businesses. There is a strong anti-business, anti-management sentiment here, to the point that anything actually liked by business (i.e. PHBs) must by definition be bad.

Java is a designed environment, has recommended approaches to use, has corporate support from tools vendors. In other words, it isn't intended to be a quick and dirty tool, it is intended for serious, business critical software development. As others have pointed out, it actually does run on multiple operating systems as advertised.

It must be the hacker (in the original sense) mentality that permeates /. and makes folks favor scripting languages like Ruby and Python over Java. It is possible one of these other languages/platforms will overtake Java's position in business, if they get solid base libraries and tool vendor backing, but until then Java is not dead.

Kinda makes sense, I guess... (1)

blcamp (211756) | more than 6 years ago | (#20342157)


Other companies have used their chief product as thier ticker symbol. Anheuser-Busch, for example, has a ticker symbol of BUD.

But in reading TFA, I can't help but feel like I'm being beat over the head with a marketing stick.

I mean, come on now... "a technology whose value is near infinite to the internet"???

Give me a break... I work in a .NET shop. Guess how much JAVA we use. Guess how important it is in our apps.

Re:Kinda makes sense, I guess... (1)

Colin Smith (2679) | more than 6 years ago | (#20342287)

Give me a break... I work in a .NET shop. Guess how much JAVA we use. Guess how important it is in our apps.
Mmmmm. It shows you Microsoft's .NET strategy 5 years before they know themselves?

 

Re:Kinda makes sense, I guess... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20342469)

.NET is a direct Java clone.

So in a way, you are using Java. You just don't realize it.

I've got a great symbol... (0, Redundant)

csoto (220540) | more than 6 years ago | (#20342205)

LAME

Sun has brand recognition, even if only in the silly "dot in dot com" thing. Why change it? Nobody knows what JAVA is. How about BOMB?

a first step down a slippery slope? (1)

crgrace (220738) | more than 6 years ago | (#20342251)

Wouldn't JAVA make more sense as Starbucks' stock symbol? I liked SUNW. I have fond memories about learning to program on SUN and HP workstations. HP has already mostly phased out their UNIX workstation line, and this seems to be (potentially) a first tentative step for SUN to become more like IBM and move away from hardware as their bread and butter.

I write this from a SUN Linux box, so I certainly hope this isn't the case.

For sufficiently small values of "Infinite" (1)

nagora (177841) | more than 6 years ago | (#20342261)

JAVA is a technology whose value is near infinite to the internet

What on Earth is this idiot talking about?

TWW

Re:For sufficiently small values of "Infinite" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20342457)

He is talking about applets dominating web pages!

Re:For sufficiently small values of "Infinite" (1)

Megane (129182) | more than 6 years ago | (#20342665)

I think he's talking about how I disabled Java in my web browser two weeks ago, due to the report of some asshole figuring out a way for (cr)applets to take over your browser to make even more annoying adware... and haven't noticed the difference!

Now when is Adobe going to change their stock ticker to FLSH?

What??? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20342315)

Are they hoping to get some halo effect from rising coffee futures or something?

It makes no sense. It's probably some upper management "must look like we are doing something, even if it is meaningless" plan.

Perhaps they're trying to increase share price... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20342333)

...because in my experience, Java increases the size of things by at least 25%.

Re:Perhaps they're trying to increase share price. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20342705)

$$$ Buy JAVA it incrase penis size by 25%!!! only $9,95!!!!1 $$$

most investors mightn't be /.ers... (1)

MassiveForces (991813) | more than 6 years ago | (#20342355)

But I assume they may reason Java's bean economy will never take a hit as long as they're in business anyway. What soothes the soul better when a new popup window finds its way around?

Unfathomable. (4, Insightful)

MythMoth (73648) | more than 6 years ago | (#20342367)

I'm a developer who uses Java almost exclusively these days. I enjoy working with the language, and I think it's the cat's PJs when putting together big enterprise sites. And I think this move is... stupid. BUT I'm a developer, so I know nothing of the mystical ways of marketing. It might all be BS or there might be something in it; I don't really care all that much.

However, I do take substantial issue with one thing that Schwartz said, which I think is pretty badly thought out:

As for working professionals, I had dinner with a financial analyst a few months ago who said he saw the Java launch experience "a few times a day" when accessing intranet applications - as did tens of thousands of his fellow employees.
He's basically saying: "We shove a splash screen in users faces every day". This is a Bad Thing! He's making users associate Java with applications that have poor performance - by definition if they're seeing this they're not getting to the application they want to work on as quickly as they should. The poor performance (web server performance) is out of their hands, but it's in their control to prevent the association with their brand!

I have high regards for Sun employees in general. Their management, however, I have my doubts about.

Re:Unfathomable. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20342391)

"This is a Bad Thing! He's making users associate Java with applications that have poor performance.."

Hint, it's not the web server that has poor performance, it's Java itself. I should not have to load a 100Mb+ interpreter, sorry 'Virtual Machine' to execute some bloddy java crapplet.

But then again, when you flood the market with typists, sorry 'Java professionals', who can only apply the latest 'Cookbook' solutions to solve generic problems, you reap what you sow.

Re:Unfathomable. (1)

MythMoth (73648) | more than 6 years ago | (#20342423)

Yawn. This troll is stale. Try something more imaginative.

Should APPL become IPOD? Silliness. (5, Insightful)

dpbsmith (263124) | more than 6 years ago | (#20342389)

GE does a lot of things besides manufacture light bulbs and generators. In fact they do a lot of things besides manufacturing light bulbs, generators, medical equipment, jet engines, finance, plastics, and railroad locomotives. Yet they feel no need to change their trading symbol.

Does anyone think that it would help Apple to change its trading symbol from APPL to IPOD?

Does AT&T worry that people will think telegraphs are old-fashioned?

GE, Apple, and AT&T are just names. For better or worse, people know what these companies are, not because of the names, but because of the companies. And the trading symbol is one step further removed.

SUN is an acronym for Stanford University Network. It should be a proud part of the company's heritage.

Wanting to fiddle with the trading symbol is a sure sign of a company that has no idea of what its identity is or what it is or should be doing. It also indicates an unhealthy focus on the stock, rather than company's business itself.

Re:Should APPL become IPOD? Silliness. (1)

Nick Harkin (589728) | more than 6 years ago | (#20342739)

Well, whilst I agree with your general point, you would be less likely to mistake IPOD as belonging to someone else than you would, say, APPL.

Being as Apple Inc. trades under AAPL, not APPL.

Java is completely irrelevant (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20342395)

Were Java to disappear this instant, all work done by it could be replaced using other existing technologies. Near infinite value? No, I wouldn't touch Java with a 10 foot pole, because it's crap and I don't need it for anything. But I guess if I ever want to make a slow, ugly application that needs another application installed just to run, I might look into it again.

so... (1)

cosmocain (1060326) | more than 6 years ago | (#20342555)

...when's SCO changing to DEAD, CRAP or STLN...or...BTTM?!

Heh, could cause some confusion (1)

arkham6 (24514) | more than 6 years ago | (#20342595)

Since Solaris packages are all marked by the originating company's stock ticker (VRTSvcs, SUNWlp), won't it cause a little confusion to start seeing things like JAVAapp, or JAVAexplorer?

.NET Redux? (1)

Luscious868 (679143) | more than 6 years ago | (#20342617)

It reminds me of when Microsoft started adding ".NET" to everything a few years back. Stupid and confusing and ultimately, a waste of time and money.

Wait a sec.... (2, Interesting)

Churla (936633) | more than 6 years ago | (#20342619)

So they don't want to just be associated with workstations, so they change their symbol to the name of one particular software product they produce. I boggle at this.

Why not change the symbol to something like SunS (Sun Systems, oops taken), or SunT (...technologies) , or Sunn (...networking, but also taken...)

You get the idea. Keep the identity they have as Sun, because that does carry recognition. Far more than I think they think Java does. It would be like MS changing their ticker to WNDZ or the federal government getting the ticker symbol DCMA...

And in later news (1)

GrEp (89884) | more than 6 years ago | (#20342637)

And in later news Microsoft is changing its ticker to BSOD.

Can SCO change theirs? (2, Funny)

Jason Levine (196982) | more than 6 years ago | (#20342649)

If so, I have some suggestions:

TOAST
KAPUT
DEAD
MLTDN
NOCSE
PWNED <---- I hated to put that last one in there, but after the way the judge ruled against them and given their current situation, I think it applies nicely.

Strange (1)

TheGreatDonkey (779189) | more than 6 years ago | (#20342651)

Why change your ticker symbol from your company name to one particular product? This is akin to Apple (AAPL) changing their symbol to IPOD. As an admin who still maintains a number of Sun servers, this now raises some question as to how committed Sun is to the hardware market in the future, or whether they will go to a software model. This is starting to sound more and more like a company without a strong vision of its future, and right now some exec found that Java is one of the last jewels of hope, so software development is the current trend to see if it sticks (Borland?).

LNUX (2, Funny)

DogDude (805747) | more than 6 years ago | (#20342711)

This message is brought to you by "LNUX": A company that has nothing to do with "Linux" anymore, and has only made money by selling off pieces of itself. (Slashdot is owned by Sourceforge, which used to be VA Linux, etc.).

In other words, changing their ticker name to "JAVA" doesn't necessarily bode well.

Infinite Java (0, Flamebait)

MECC (8478) | more than 6 years ago | (#20342713)

JAVA is a technology whose value is near infinite to the internet


Actually, when someone tries to sell me a product by pointing out that its done in java, I have to politely see them to the door. I already have several commercial java products which require a specific JRE versions, and installing a newer JRE often breaks one of them (they'll check to see of other JRE versions are present, and decide not to run for compatibility reasons). I have to be able to run them to meet client SLA requirements. So, because java is not compatible with itself, the only response I can give to the "and its done in java" selling point is "sorry to hear that". While there are workarounds to the java self-incompatibility problems, they're not worth it. The only other really satisfactory solution is to run a VM for each version of java needed. Also not worth the effort.

Does Sun have some kind of solution to java?

Serious Genius (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20342735)

Seriously think about this from a corporate point of view? Who makes Java? Sun, IBM, even microsoft claims to have a java implementation.

So for the next long time when you Google for Java what are you doing to get?

Also this is a definite way to get top hit in Google for searches on Java because stock tickers always come up first so whenver you Google for Java you'll get Sun up there first thing. This, in my mind, effectively made sure everybody knows who really wrote Java first and whose Java is the "real" Java.
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