Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

CNN Website Targeted by DoS

CmdrTaco posted more than 6 years ago | from the different-kind-of-d-o-s dept.

Security 187

antifoidulus writes "CNN is reporting that they were the target of a Denial of Service attack yesterday. According to the article, there have been reports on Asian tech sites that Chinese hackers were targeting CNN for their coverage of the unrest in Tibet. One has to wonder if this hacking attempt was government sponsored or not. The Chinese government hasn't been very happy with CNN -- in fact, the Beijing Bureau Chief has been summoned about a day before this happened."

cancel ×

187 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Cold War (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23126890)

Cyber Cold war?

Re:Cold War (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23127148)

It sounds more like a hot war.

And I doubt the Chinese "hackers" were acting without government guidance.

Re:Cold War (2, Insightful)

MrNaz (730548) | more than 6 years ago | (#23127194)

Run! The Germa^WCommu^WChinese are coming!

Re:Cold War (1)

NeverVotedBush (1041088) | more than 6 years ago | (#23127268)

Actually, the Chinese are communists.

Re:Cold War (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23127292)

Only in the most capitalistic sense of the word :P

Re:Cold War (4, Insightful)

winkydink (650484) | more than 6 years ago | (#23127574)

Actually, the Chinese are communists.
In name only

Re:Cold War (2, Funny)

call-me-kenneth (1249496) | more than 6 years ago | (#23127322)

No - !! Not the... comfy packets?!?

Re:Cold War (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23127970)

Are you implying fighting the Nazis was a cold war?

Monty Python Said it Best... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23127812)

The world today seems absolutely crackers,
With nuclear bombs to blow us all sky high.
There's fools and idiots sitting on the trigger.
It's depressing and it's senseless, and that's why...
I like Chinese.
I like Chinese.
They only come up to your knees,
Yet they're always friendly, and they're ready to please.

I like Chinese.
I like Chinese.
There's nine hundred million of them in the world today.
You'd better learn to like them; that's what I say.

I like Chinese.
I like Chinese.
They come from a long way overseas,
But they're cute and they're cuddly, and they're ready to please.

I like Chinese food.
The waiters never are rude.
Think of the many things they've done to impress.
There's Maoism, Taoism, I Ching, and Chess.

So I like Chinese.
I like Chinese.
I like their tiny little trees,
Their Zen, their ping-pong, their yin, and yang-ese.

I like Chinese thought,
The wisdom that Confucious taught.
If Darwin is anything to shout about,
The Chinese will survive us all without any doubt.

So, I like Chinese.
I like Chinese.
They only come up to your knees,
Yet they're wise and they're witty, and they're ready to please.

All together.

[verse in Chinese]
Wo ai zhongguo ren. (I like Chinese.)
Wo ai zhongguo ren. (I like Chinese.)
Wo ai zhongguo ren. (I like Chinese.)
Ni hao ma; ni hao ma; ni hao ma; zaijien! (How are you; how are you; how are you; goodbye!)

I like Chinese.
I like Chinese.
Their food is guaranteed to please,
A fourteen, a seven, a nine, and lychees.

I like Chinese.
I like Chinese.
I like their tiny little trees,
Their Zen, their ping-pong, their yin, and yang-ese.

I like Chinese.
I like Chinese.
They only come up to your knees...

Twofo Live! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23126894)

Twofo Live! [twofo.co.uk]

Niggers targeted by DoW (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23126898)

Denial of Watermelon

RON PAUL 2012

nothing of value was lost (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23126930)


yeah , lets stir up more xenophobia
can we work the Iranians and terrorism into this story ?

Re:nothing of value was lost (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23126956)

The story is about xenophobia.

Re:nothing of value was lost (1, Flamebait)

noshellswill (598066) | more than 6 years ago | (#23127018)

Except your balls, eh padre? Shut down their imports-- take away their oil. STARVE them back into the stoneage. Slap down the Chi-Com b*stards slap them down hard.

In Other News (5, Funny)

jchawk (127686) | more than 6 years ago | (#23126938)

Slashdot is working with the Chinese government to further the DOS attack on CNN by leveraging it's large and generally under-sexed user base!

Re:In Other News (2, Informative)

Arancaytar (966377) | more than 6 years ago | (#23126960)

Heh. But really, the major online news sites are too big to be brought down by normal visitors.

Wait.. (4, Funny)

Adambomb (118938) | more than 6 years ago | (#23127448)

Am I correct in assuming that you're saying slashdot users are normal visitors?

woah.

Re:In Other News (2, Insightful)

niceone (992278) | more than 6 years ago | (#23127006)

I guess normally cnn could handle a slashdotting, but why add to their woes today? Anyway I couldn't read TFA, the sever was dead. Maybe it's best if other people don't try!

Re:In Other News (1)

somersault (912633) | more than 6 years ago | (#23127020)

But if nobody tries to view CNN, the evil commies will still be getting their way! I'm trying to get on it from all my computers, refreshing every 0.0001 seconds just in case.

Really though, if the chinese guv'ment is behind this, I think they're pretty childish. And it's not like they can just keep it up forever.. sooner or later they're going to want to check their email rather than just hitting refresh.

Re:In Other News (3, Informative)

somersault (912633) | more than 6 years ago | (#23127072)

Seemed fine when I tried. TFA says that only areas in Asia were having issues, and that everything was sorted by Friday morning. You're seriously trying to say that you couldn't access the CNN server at all? Sure.

Re:In Other News (1)

budgenator (254554) | more than 6 years ago | (#23127704)

they,CNN, already have Chinese IP addresses blocked, the Chinese have their own people "Great Firewalled of China" so the effects on the fleshies in China is pretty minimal, CNN is a high-load site on a normal day and frequently a target of DDOS attacks so their Admin are well practiced; so it down to a battle of the bot's.

Re:In Other News (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23127904)

Slashdot's user base is *over*-sexed. Just under-fucked.

The Chinese? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23126942)

I for one... ahh nevermind..

Well, let's take a look at this .. (4, Insightful)

ScrewMaster (602015) | more than 6 years ago | (#23126970)

If it wasn't government sponsored, then it was promulgated by some individual or group with substantial resources (a hitherto-unknown botnet, perhaps.) They need to be found out and put away for a few years. On the other hand, if it was sponsored by the Chinese leadership it means they're attempting to extend their brand of censorship worldwide. In which case, they also need to be put away for a few years.

Re:Well, let's take a look at this .. (2, Insightful)

MollyB (162595) | more than 6 years ago | (#23127108)

[...] They need to be found out and put away for a few years. On the other hand, if it was sponsored by the Chinese leadership it means they're attempting to extend their brand of censorship worldwide. In which case, they also need to be put away for a few years.
Sir, I refer you to the concept Belling the Cat [wikipedia.org] . If one found merit in your suggestion, how would you propose to carry it out?
(takes a giant step backwards)

Re:Well, let's take a look at this .. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23127426)

(takes a small step forward with my cane)
I'm a glutton for punishment anyways. I got my ticket to Beijing already. I'll go armed with my shaking stick and a book titled "Speak Conversational Chinese in 10 days". I'll take the train to Tiananmen square and give 'ole Mao a good lecture and a hearty shaking from my cane. That'll learn 'em.

Re:Well, let's take a look at this .. (1)

multisync (218450) | more than 6 years ago | (#23128232)

Sir, I refer you to the concept Belling the Cat. If one found merit in your suggestion, how would you propose to carry it out?
(takes a giant step backwards)


Madam, I draw your attention to the second section of that Wikipedia article you linked to, which reads

Some scholars have suggested an alternative message to the fable beyond the standard message that "it is easy to propose impossible remedies." They hypothesize that Aesop is not discouraging utopian thought, but rather that he is suggesting that an individual willing to suggest a difficult solution must also be willing to pay the price that the solution details. According to the theory, belling the cat may be an appropriate solution for the mice if the long-term gain outweighs the mice that would be killed by the cat while attempting to put a bell around its neck. This analogy has been applied to joining the military, police department, or fire department.[3]


Also, if you follow the military.com link cited, in that article the author states

If you do a quick Internet search, you'll find several hundred minor variations on this story, nearly all credited to Aesop. Quite a few versions have an Aesopian-sounding moral tacked on the end: 'It's easy to propose impossible solutions.' I've yet to find that (supposed) moral in any print translation of Aesop's Fables, or in any historical reference to Aesop. In fact, I've never seen it anywhere apart from the Internet, leading me to believe that some helpful soul grafted it on about twenty-five hundred years after the original story was penned.


I take your point, you should be willing to consider the sacrifice necessary to achieve your goals, but I think our world is full of examples of people doing just that - making sacrifices for their ideals.

The Wiki article feels a little hinky.

Hackers or government? (5, Insightful)

Alwin Henseler (640539) | more than 6 years ago | (#23127212)

On the other hand, if it was sponsored by the Chinese leadership (..)

Yes, that would be interesting to know. But one of the more insightful views I've heard recently in the China vs. Tibet matter, is that "after so many years of communist rule, it is hard for Chinese people to make a distinction between government, communist party, policy and country". As a result, criticism of Chinese actions concerning Tibet may be felt not as attacks on policy, but attacks on the Chinese people and country. Don't know if that is true, but I'd welcome readers from China to comment on that.

There is a big difference between saying "you are bad" and saying "you are doing something bad". I guess the real gain is that more people (including the Chinese) are talking about Tibet now, and maybe someday the Chinese *people* will realize that Tibetans just want the same thing as the Chinese: run their own affairs, be left alone, and live in peace with their neighbors.

In general I feel that whenever 'weapons' (DoS attacks, censorship, physical force) are used to end a discussion, it means that party has run out of reasonable arguments (and in a way, admits moral defeat).

Re:Hackers or government? (5, Insightful)

Don_dumb (927108) | more than 6 years ago | (#23127368)

Yes, that would be interesting to know. But one of the more insightful views I've heard recently in the China vs. Tibet matter, is that "after so many years of communist rule, it is hard for Chinese people to make a distinction between government, communist party, policy and country". As a result, criticism of Chinese actions concerning Tibet may be felt not as attacks on policy, but attacks on the Chinese people and country. Don't know if that is true, but I'd welcome readers from China to comment on that.

There is a big difference between saying "you are bad" and saying "you are doing something bad". I guess the real gain is that more people (including the Chinese) are talking about Tibet now, and maybe someday the Chinese *people* will realize that Tibetans just want the same thing as the Chinese: run their own affairs, be left alone, and live in peace with their neighbors.

This is clearly one of the real problems with the West criticizing China but it isn't unique to China. Many Americans reacted in a similar manner when the rest of the world criticized the Iraq war (freedom fries anyone) , people took it to be an attack on themselves as well as their government. Someone yesterday pointed out the similarity to the US civil war where the Southerners took criticism of slavery with a personal attack on themselves and their heritage. Just like faith versus fact, it is impossible to have a sane and worthwhile argument.

Re:Hackers or government? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23127462)

Civil War reference?

That take it to a new low on comparisons and smuggness towards the U.S.A..

Re:Hackers or government? (4, Insightful)

Count Fenring (669457) | more than 6 years ago | (#23128002)

Although, as far as I recall, there wasn't an American DDOS attack on British news sources based on the Iraq thing, government sponsored or not.

And as far as the Chinese... as long as you are going to be horrible to entire nations like that, people are going to say bad things about you. Why, look at us! Quit whining about it, either stop or accept that the world can recognize your evil actions for what they are.

I would prefer them to stop, by the way. And I wish we'd (USA) stop treating them like they're our best chums while they're violating human rights on international scales.

Re:Hackers or government? (4, Interesting)

IkeTo (27776) | more than 6 years ago | (#23127606)

> In general I feel that whenever 'weapons' (DoS
> attacks, censorship, physical force) are used to
> end a discussion, it means that party has run
> out of reasonable arguments (and in a way,
> admits moral defeat).

If you ever have access to the discussion of those Chinese youths, you will understand the problem better. There are no longer two "parties" trying to make an "argument". They see the biased report as an intentional attacks to their country. As a person born and lived in HK for a long time, I can understand that news in Western standards normally tries to please their audience, so they are eager to report and exaggerate anything negative about China while tend to neglect or downplay positive things since they don't sell papers. Not for them. What they feel is that their voice goes nowhere except among the Chinese. Even if a large group of Chinese go to demonstrate in London and Paris, they get minimal media coverage. A small group of pro-Tibet people will get a huge noise, in contrast.

They are not just worried, but are angry, literally. If you see it, you will not be surprised by such attacks at all. It is just a matter of when. No, I don't think government intervention is required. Indeed I believe the Beijing government very much want this not to happen at all, given the upcoming Olympiads, but they probably have no way to prevent this.

It is sad that this whole thing fueled a whole generation of Chinese youth who continue to think that their country is being belittled, and think that it all comes because they are not powerful enough. Your dream just goes the reverse direction, unfortunately. But instead of being "against the Tibetans", they are "against the Western world". They more and more are thinking in the lines of "over-power the West", rather than to live in harmony with them. The main result of the current episode is a strong mutual distrust. Europeans mistrust news reported by PRC (never mind they can now report criticism as long as it is not persuading any movement threatening their rule over China), and Chinese in general mistrust any European or American reporting.

Re:Hackers or government? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23127658)

They don't care. That's not "Chinese." Theirs is an insular culture not introspective. Granted western introspective nature does have some narcissistic aspects to it, but not like chinese culture. We recognize our narcissism and generally reguard it as a fault. Chinese are the people they want to be, and they've formed the government they deserve. Never forget they chose "The Gate of Heavenly Peace" for themselves. It wasn't something done to them. It wasn't descended upon them from another planet. It was something they chose for each other, their fellow countrymen. And they all chose to ignore it, accept it, and maintain the status quo. It is the country they collectively chose to form, and reform.

Honestly, Nixon "opening" china was probably a mistake. It's cost us our integrity by virtualizing slavery for crappy socks, and cheap crappy DVD players and it's cost them opportunity to escape the morass they've chosen for themselves. There is no morality in Chinese politics, only authority.

Re:Hackers or government? (1, Insightful)

ScrewMaster (602015) | more than 6 years ago | (#23128226)

In general I feel that whenever 'weapons' (DoS attacks, censorship, physical force) are used to end a discussion, it means that party has run out of reasonable arguments (and in a way, admits moral defeat).

The man who raises a fist has run out of ideas. -- H.G. Wells, "Time after Time"

What difference? (1)

zogger (617870) | more than 6 years ago | (#23128294)

"There is a big difference between saying "you are bad" and saying "you are doing something bad"."

I'm not seeing it. If you are doing something bad, that makes you "bad", because it certainly doesn't make you "good" or "neutral". Now you can argue that it is a collective generalzation at this point, but it is sort of hard to distinguish when talking about nations and their general policy, it is commonly used in conversation and people recognize that there are individual differences. The US allegedly "elected" GWB the lesser, even though individually a lot of people did not vote for him, collectively he is still the prez of all the US people, for whatever that is worth, and people elsewhere might think the US does "bad" and they conversationally link the two-even though individuals inside the us might totally disagree with this or that, their disagreement aggregate is not enough to alter what the official government of all the people does. It is enough where there is some collective "bad" there then. China as a nation occupies Tibet, a very large percentage there thinks that is totally cool, the official government does else they wouldn't do it. In their minds it is not bad and any criticism is an affront, but to a lot of people elsewhere it constitutes a collective "bad" policy making them overall "bad" because they are doing it.

Re:Well, let's take a look at this .. (1)

pembo13 (770295) | more than 6 years ago | (#23127776)

No one beats the USA over the head for the shit they do... why does everyone want to gang up China? At least the Chinese government keeps things mostly local.

Re:Well, let's take a look at this .. (1)

hohohmm (1087381) | more than 6 years ago | (#23128130)

If it wasn't government sponsored, then it was promulgated by some individual or group with substantial resources (a hitherto-unknown botnet, perhaps.) They need to be found out and put away for a few years. On the other hand, if it was sponsored by the Chinese leadership it means they're attempting to extend their brand of censorship worldwide. In which case, they also need to be put away for a few years.
Oh man... DDos doesn't always need substantial resources. All you need to do is write a web page that runs some javascript and send it you people and claim this is an act of patriotism. Recent western media reports, riots in Tibet and pro-indepedence protests around the world(some are violent) had fueled Chinese nationalism to a new high point. So it's not botnet or anything, it's just an act of nationalism, and the attackers are not bots, they are human, but probably they don't have an appreciation of the effects.

Time not on their side (0, Troll)

Gothmolly (148874) | more than 6 years ago | (#23126978)

As the world turns against them, and their looming food and environmental disaster grows larger, time is running out for China. It's only a matter of time before they implode.

Re:Time not on their side (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23127048)

time is running out for China. It's only a matter of time before they implode.
Have you ever been to Hong Kong or Beijing? The average person doesn't have a clue about what is happening in China. Which is a problem because they know a lot about what is happening in the West.

Re:Time not on their side (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23128240)

I think most people here can't find beijing on a map much less than being to Hong Kong or China. That's said, I had never been to Hong Kong or China either.

Re:Time not on their side (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23127198)

I doubt they will implode. They now have amazing manufacturing capabilities -- all thanks to the many high-tech companies that outsourced everything to China.

And the way the government works over there, maybe they will just go out and kill anyone who dares to starve and charge the family for the bullet.

If China implodes, chances are good the US will have imploded before they do. And if it comes to that, do you really want any nuclear power to implode? I'm betting they would make demands of Taiwan and Tibet and if there was not cooperation, China would go to war to secure the resources.

And as to time not being on China's side, that's one thing China has always used to advantage. The plan ahead and they wait. They make 5 year plans look like child's play. Think of the Chinese water torture. They use time as an ally.

Re:Time not on their side (1)

CRCulver (715279) | more than 6 years ago | (#23127508)

Think of the Chinese water torture.

There is no evidence Chinese water torture was ever used by the Chinese. It's about as authentic a Chinese custom as the Chinese fire drill.

Re:Time not on their side (1)

unlametheweak (1102159) | more than 6 years ago | (#23127316)

As the world turns against them, and their looming food and environmental disaster grows larger, time is running out for China. It's only a matter of time before they implode.
I think they'd rather expand than implode if things got too dire for China. There are many other small (and not so small) countries in Asia besides Tibet that they can use, and there is a fair amount of appeasement that happens when super powers misbehave.

Re:Time not on their side (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23127408)

According to the National Geographic: China's Lost Girls special I saw awhile back, because of China's strict 1 child per couple policy by the year 2020 there will be 40 million men who won't be able to find a wife. Using them to invade a neighbor (or neighbors) would solve two problems at once, wouldn't it?

"One has to wonder..." (5, Insightful)

Devin Jeanpierre (1243322) | more than 6 years ago | (#23126996)

No, I don't, and nor does anybody else. Since when did an attack coming from a country mean the government was involved? How many domestic hacking attempts have there been against the government? Was the government hacking the government? Hardly. Given the public Chinese outcry against the West for the way we've treated the Tibet issue, isn't it quite possible, quite plausible, that a few people out of 1 321 851 888 candidates took it just a wee bit too far? Why on earth must the government be under suspicion before we even have a clue as to who did it?

Re:"One has to wonder..." (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23127102)

I'm Hey, at least they didn't write "it begs the question"!

Re:"One has to wonder..." (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23127114)

Dude, you don't get it do you? The government would have to be involved, because there is no way any of the 1321851888 people in china could ever disagree with our western ideals! If that were the case I might actually have to accept the idea that every day people might feel differently about stuff than I feel about stuff. And thats just not going to happen.

Re:"One has to wonder..." (4, Insightful)

dreamchaser (49529) | more than 6 years ago | (#23127118)

It is probably more along the lines of a wink and a nod and looking the other way, not organized government sponsorship. As others have noted, the 'Great Firewall' could easily block DOS attacks but didn't in this case.

Re:"One has to wonder..." (1)

RiotingPacifist (1228016) | more than 6 years ago | (#23127256)

It is probably more along the lines of a wink and a nod and looking the other way, not organized government sponsorship. As others have noted, the 'Great Firewall' could easily block DOS attacks but didn't in this case.
Id say more along the lines of shouting "CNN, hate china!, are your patriotic!" then turning the otherway.

My dad used to have a similar technique for dealing with bullying when he was a teacher, he would find out the kid had been bullying a 1st year, then get called out to some bullshit, and leave some kid he'd just caught bullying smaller kids, in with his form (who where oldest, biggest bullies) for a few minutes. Im just glad i didn't go to any schools he taught at!

Re:"One has to wonder..." (1)

MickLinux (579158) | more than 6 years ago | (#23127166)

I seem to remember previous articles that showed that the Chinese government had sponsored a cyberwar/spamming/hacking network, and several times has tested it against the Pentagon's systems.

I also seem to remember that Russia had done the same about 4-5 years before.

Not real big news, actually. Although we probably don't do it through so-called hackers, we probably do have government researchers who probe adversary systems.

But (assuming my memory is correct) the fact remains that China's method was to use hackers, and to sponsor spamming as well. So the author validly wonders whether this is in fact the "Chinese Government Propaganda Machine".

I don't know that it really matters. In the end, even if it was a "Chinese Private Propaganda Machine", the views of Chinese are largely controlled by what they see. And what they see right now is that Chinese Supremacy is being challenged by the "Western Government Propaganda Machine", which today means CNN.

Arggh.

Over Here, we do have Propaganda Machines, but most people do not find it necessary to follow. I keep hearing that Over There, they do. Who knows.

Slogan. Slogan. Slogan. I think I'm going to move on to a different topic.

Re:"One has to wonder..." (1)

mi (197448) | more than 6 years ago | (#23127298)

I also seem to remember that Russia had done the same about 4-5 years before.

No, a lot more recently. When Estonia last year move a monument to Soviet Soldier [wsj.com] from the center of a city to the cemetery, Russians (who refuse to accept, that for most of their neighbors their occupation were worse than the Nazis') were very upset.

Both — the government and the people...

In today's China the same sentiment prevails — the Han nationalists are very upset and demand from their government far stronger actions against both the hapless Tibetans and the foreign critics of the Chinese...

And what they see right now is that Chinese Supremacy is being challenged by the "Western Government Propaganda Machine", which today means CNN.

While we remain split and agonizing over our foreign policy, Chinese (and Russian) publics' main qualm is that their governments are not aggressive enough.

We're just like them. (0, Troll)

FatSean (18753) | more than 6 years ago | (#23127998)

Americans and their government refuse to admit that they did wrong by invading Iraq and setting up Gitmo.

*shrug*

Re:"One has to wonder..." (1)

unlametheweak (1102159) | more than 6 years ago | (#23127410)

The Chinese government doesn't have to physically attack Western news agencies that do business in China because:
1) They merely have to threaten to remove these businesses from China.
2) They already have the resources to block Web sites without 'hacking' them
3) There are plenty of anti-Western geeks in China who are more than willing to 'make a point'

Re:"One has to wonder..." (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23127260)

Sounds to me like Devin's message is sponsored propaganda from the Chinese government.

Re:"One has to wonder..." (1)

RiotingPacifist (1228016) | more than 6 years ago | (#23127270)

Why on earth must the government be under suspicion before we even have a clue as to who did it?
Because we wont get any clues, despite their firewall the PRC wont do anything to find out who did it or punish them.

Great Firewall of China (5, Interesting)

Xest (935314) | more than 6 years ago | (#23127016)

The funny thing is, China is one of the few countries in the world that truly has a great big firewall sat at the border of it's internet, so is one of the few countries that actually could do something about massive unexpected loads of outgoing traffic from it's internet.

I'm not defending the great firewall of China, but I think it's worth pointing out that when the goverment has that kind of control over what does and doesn't go in and out if they wanted to they could easily do something to stop these kind of accusations surrounding large scale DoS attacks unless they're happy for them to continue in which case may the stories continue.

Of course there's always captured zombie machines outside the great firewall to do the trick, but certainly here in the UK many ISPs take note of which computers are sending out suspicious traffic, I've known a couple of people have their net access disabled by their ISP for throwing out known virus traffic at least. Most responsible ISPs worldwide could no doubt do exactly the same things.

The real question is could ISPs do this without introducing "feature" creep? My guess is, no, they'd quickly use the tools for blocking bad traffic for blocking things like BitTorrent, well, those few that don't already of course ;)

It's a shame really that the tools are out there to prevent this kind of bad traffic, and yet the bad traffic is all to often allowed through and the tools are used to filter good traffic which is certainly the case with China. There's a question of what's good and bad traffic of course, but that's a debate for another day I think.

Re:Great Firewall of China (5, Informative)

worldthinker (536300) | more than 6 years ago | (#23127098)

Attacks of this kind are usually distributed over a "botnet" so not from one particular geographical location. The amount of traffic needed to affect a large scale property such as CNN would effectively clog the bandwidth for a country like China so they would be affecting hundreds of millions of users just to allow a singular hit. That is why distributed attacks are more common.

Re:Great Firewall of China (1)

brass1 (30288) | more than 6 years ago | (#23127138)

Of course there's always captured zombie machines outside the great firewall to do the trick, but certainly here in the UK many ISPs take note of which computers are sending out suspicious traffic, I've known a couple of people have their net access disabled by their ISP for throwing out known virus traffic at least. Most responsible ISPs worldwide could no doubt do exactly the same things.
Exactly. These guys are doing Command and Control from Internet cafes wherever they are, so there's very little traffic and it's surely wrapped in encryption anyway. Eventually the zombies get shut down, but that may be a matter of hours or days. Unfortunately, current detection and mitigation technologies don't keep up with the rate that new zombies are added to the horde.

The real question is could ISPs do this without introducing "feature" creep? My guess is, no, they'd quickly use the tools for blocking bad traffic for blocking things like BitTorrent, well, those few that don't already of course ;)
Just about everyone with a network bigger than a bread box has some type of attack mitigation gear in place. Most of the good stuff uses deep packet inspection, and many of them run in-line (Tipping Point [tippingpoint.com] , for example). I know it was a shock to most people when Comcast decided to target BitTorrent, but the reality is that deep packet inspection has been in the network for a long time.

Re:Great Firewall of China (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23127196)

"I'm not defending the great firewall of China, but I think it's worth pointing out that when the goverment has that kind of control over what does and doesn't go in and out if they wanted to they could easily do something to stop these kind of accusations surrounding large scale DoS attacks unless they're happy for them to continue in which case may the stories continue."
Please read about stormnet here
http://it.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=08/04/17/2051214

If it's that easy. US won't be hosting the most storm infected machines in the world. Unless as in your own words "they're happy for them to continue ".

Re:Great Firewall of China (1)

pembo13 (770295) | more than 6 years ago | (#23127816)

I am sure the RIAA/MPAA FBI/CIA would _love_ to have a firewall across the USA.... for all I know maybe they do. We know China has one because they are pretty transparent about it.

Are we Sure? (1)

Walzmyn (913748) | more than 6 years ago | (#23127034)

Are we sure this was an actual atack on CNN? Could it have been that they did something right for a change and more than 10 people tried to hit their site and the server just couldn't handle it?

wow (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23127046)

So if a website is already suffering from a dDoS, we should then slashdot it.... That makes sense.

Not smart (2, Insightful)

sdo1 (213835) | more than 6 years ago | (#23127052)

If it is a government sponsored attack, then it's really not very smart. It just serves to bring attention to the issue, not bury it.

Poking at big news bureaus like this doesn't make them back down. It makes them more resolute in their reporting and possibly (probably) more biased against your cause.

-S

suppositories (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23127066)

they melt in your ass, not in your hand

Who's looking for a scapegoat? (0, Flamebait)

bogaboga (793279) | more than 6 years ago | (#23127084)

I am afraid that actual incompetence on the part of CNN is being overlooked here. I ask CNN not to look for a scapegoat on this issue.

There are ways to mitigate the effects of a DoS attack. Knowing how US companies have exhibited incompetence in the past, I will not be surprised if it is the case this time round.

Irony Alert! (4, Interesting)

ScentCone (795499) | more than 6 years ago | (#23127152)

I ask CNN not to look for a scapegoat on this issue ... Knowing how US companies have exhibited incompetence in the past, I will not be surprised if it is the case this time round

Right! Who needs a scapegoat? Obviously this is likely the fault of US companies. There's no point blaming someone when we can blame someone that it's more slashdot-friendly to blame. The man! Teh evil corporations!

For what it's worth, I spent most of my day yesterday in rent-a-brain mode mopping up after a web site defacement that was attempted from half a dozen Chinese IP addresses, succeeded from another one, and which was throwing JS-based redirects at browsers so they'd wind up on web sites hosted in China, where trojan-flavored malware was being served up. There's no way that a country with Draconian content sniffing and a country-wide firewall like China's doesn't know when operations like that are flourishing. FWIW, the demographics targeted in this case were mil/defense types, and the visible content on the redirected target was meant to momentarily confuse people expecting that the specific content they'd have been expecting. Year Of The Rat, indeed.

Re:Who's looking for a scapegoat? (1)

NeverVotedBush (1041088) | more than 6 years ago | (#23127262)

It's pretty easy to identify a DoS/DDoS attack. Then your question becomes one of would CNN simply lie to attribute their alleged incompetence to a possibly Chinese DoS attack.

I doubt it.

CNN has no D(D)oS protection (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23127116)

I thought CNN was using CDN and load balancing to deal with wanted / unwanted traffic spikes. This is just DoS and not DDoS (which is even hard to stop). Currently there is no information available about PPS (packets per second) and attack type such as floods (SYN / UDP flood) or logic or software attacks.

Large ISP offers service called clean pipe technology to filter out junk. You can also use expensive DoS/DDoS mitigation deice. However, these devices works best if you have fat pipe. One can also try out commercial proxy service anti-DDoS service.

I'm no security expert but love to trace security related stuff ;)

corepirate nazi execrable targeted by GOD (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23127128)

1000 years of darkness coming to an end? let yOUR conscience be yOUR guide. you can be more helpful than you might have imagined. there are still some choices. if they do not suit you, consider the likely results of continuing to follow the corepirate nazi hypenosys story LIEn, whereas anything of relevance is replaced almost instantly with pr ?firm? scriptdead mindphuking propaganda or 'celebrity' trivia 'foam'. meanwhile; don't forget to get a little more oxygen on yOUR brain, & look up in the sky from time to time, starting early in the day. there's lots going on up there.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20071229/ap_on_sc/ye_climate_records;_ylt=A0WTcVgednZHP2gB9wms0NUE
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20080108/ts_alt_afp/ushealthfrancemortality;_ylt=A9G_RngbRIVHsYAAfCas0NUE
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/12/31/opinion/31mon1.html?em&ex=1199336400&en=c4b5414371631707&ei=5087%0A

is it time to get real yet? A LOT of energy is being squandered in attempts to keep US in the dark. in the end (give or take a few 1000 years), the creators will prevail (world without end, etc...), as it has always been. the process of gaining yOUR release from the current hostage situation may not be what you might think it is. butt of course, most of US don't know, or care what a precarious/fatal situation we're in. for example; the insidious attempts by the felonious corepirate nazi execrable to block the suns' light, interfering with a requirement (sunlight) for us to stay healthy/alive. it's likely not good for yOUR health/memories 'else they'd be bragging about it? we're intending for the whoreabully deceptive (they'll do ANYTHING for a bit more monIE/power) felons to give up/fail even further, in attempting to control the 'weather', as well as a # of other things/events.

http://video.google.com/videosearch?hl=en&q=video+cloud+spraying

dictator style micro management has never worked (for very long). it's an illness. tie that with life0cidal aggression & softwar gangster style bullying, & what do we have? a greed/fear/ego based recipe for disaster. meanwhile, you can help to stop the bleeding (loss of life & limb);

http://www.cnn.com/2007/POLITICS/12/28/vermont.banning.bush.ap/index.html

the bleeding must be stopped before any healing can begin. jailing a couple of corepirate nazi hired goons would send a clear message to the rest of the world from US. any truthful look at the 'scorecard' would reveal that we are a society in decline/deep doo-doo, despite all of the scriptdead pr ?firm? generated drum beating & flag waving propaganda that we are constantly bombarded with. is it time to get real yet? please consider carefully ALL of yOUR other 'options'. the creators will prevail. as it has always been.

corepirate nazi execrable costs outweigh benefits
(Score:-)mynuts won, the king is a fink)
by ourselves on everyday 24/7

as there are no benefits, just more&more death/debt & disruption. fortunately there's an 'army' of light bringers, coming yOUR way. the little ones/innocents must/will be protected. after the big flash, ALL of yOUR imaginary 'borders' may blur a bit? for each of the creators' innocents harmed in any way, there is a debt that must/will be repaid by you/us, as the perpetrators/minions of unprecedented evile, will not be available. 'vote' with (what's left in) yOUR wallet, & by your behaviors. help bring an end to unprecedented evile's manifestation through yOUR owned felonious corepirate nazi glowbull warmongering execrable. some of US should consider ourselves somewhat fortunate to be among those scheduled to survive after the big flash/implementation of the creators' wwwildly popular planet/population rescue initiative/mandate. it's right in the manual, 'world without end', etc.... as we all ?know?, change is inevitable, & denying/ignoring gravity, logic, morality, etc..., is only possible, on a temporary basis. concern about the course of events that will occur should the life0cidal execrable fail to be intervened upon is in order. 'do not be dismayed' (also from the manual). however, it's ok/recommended, to not attempt to live under/accept, fauxking nazi felon greed/fear/ego based pr ?firm? scriptdead mindphuking hypenosys.

consult with/trust in yOUR creators. providing more than enough of everything for everyone (without any distracting/spiritdead personal gain motives), whilst badtolling unprecedented evile, using an unlimited supply of newclear power, since/until forever. see you there?

"If my people, which are called by my name, shall humble themselves, and pray, and seek my face, and turn from their wicked ways; then will I hear from heaven, and will forgive their sin, and will heal their land."

meanwhile, the life0cidal philistines continue on their path of death, debt, & disruption for most of US. gov. bush denies health care for the little ones;

http://www.cnn.com/2007/POLITICS/10/03/bush.veto/index.html

whilst demanding/extorting billions to paint more targets on the bigger kids;

http://www.cnn.com/2007/POLITICS/12/12/bush.war.funding/index.html

& pretending that it isn't happening here;

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/world/us_and_americas/article3086937.ece
all is not lost/forgotten/forgiven

(yOUR elected) president al gore (deciding not to wait for the much anticipated 'lonesome al answers yOUR questions' interview here on /.) continues to attempt to shed some light on yOUR foibles. talk about reverse polarity;

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/environment/article3046116.ece

Re:corepirate nazi execrable targeted by GOD (1)

AndGodSed (968378) | more than 6 years ago | (#23127952)

I am guesssing parent was one of the Chinese propagandists trying to tell us something.

Let me say this, friend, at /. we believe in a concept called freedom of speech. You might not be familiar with it.

Now either fit in with the rest of the world - or hide behind your firewall.

Just don't try and form us into your vision of what the world should look like.

CNN was at fault too (2, Interesting)

jm1234567890 (888822) | more than 6 years ago | (#23127140)

I'm not saying this DoS attack is justified. However, one cannot deny that many of the CNN reports were either falsified or out of context.

Re:CNN was at fault too (1)

TristanGrimaux (841255) | more than 6 years ago | (#23127246)

So... this DoS attack HAS TO BE A LIE, or there was a DoS, but somewhere else?

Re:CNN was at fault too (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23127520)

But according to this [youtube.com] , Google search results for problems in China come up empty!

One has to wonder? (0, Flamebait)

X.25 (255792) | more than 6 years ago | (#23127186)

One has to wonder if this hacking attempt was government sponsored or not.

You are a retard.

Based on what fucking evidence/facts did you come to conclusion that you could even remotely involve government?

Because you're a retard and prejudicial?

Let me guess, you base your opinion about other countries by watching/reading CNN, eh?

Re:One has to wonder? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23127772)

Based on what fucking evidence/facts did you come to conclusion that you could even remotely involve government?
Because the Chinese government runs the Great Firewall of China?

CNN: Snow machine is Snowed under. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23127202)

CNN is down right now!

Where else am I going to get my celebrity gossip and insightful tech advice? Where else am I going to be able to read every article and never see anything of any substance whatsoever?

Damn, I guess I'd better go get a copy of USA today then....

What's the use... (1)

cephah (1244770) | more than 6 years ago | (#23127230)

in doing a DoS attack against a major site such as CNN? It will come back online very shortly again, and it'll generate even more media fuss, hello Streisand effect http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Streisand_effect [wikipedia.org] The Chinese government has no incentive to support such actions. Risk vs. gain factor alone should be enough to dismiss such thoughts.

Another baseless assumtion on slashdot (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23127266)

Here we go again,

At first, slashdot assumed automatically that the counterfeit DFI motherboards are from China while there are no indication in the source article. (Slashdot did update later on to clarify the post)

Now, slashdot does it again by assuming the Chinese (and maybe) their government is involved. I've read the CNN article before the story came up here in slashdot. In the original CNN story, they clearly stated that "We do not know who is responsible, nor can we confirm where it came from"

What ever happen to all the good old unbiased news?

State Sponsored Information Operations (2, Informative)

FurtiveGlancer (1274746) | more than 6 years ago | (#23127278)

We can rest assured that state sponsored hacking is going on. We're doing it. Google "AF Cyber Command" As to whether the Chinese government is involved, that will be difficult to ascertain with any confidence for several reasons (see Great Firewall posts above). Foremost, we didn't invent pausible deniability. The Chinese have perfected inscrutability across the centuries.

PRC POV for Asia newbies (1)

Mr Accountable (1133989) | more than 6 years ago | (#23127288)

Disclaimer: I am no apologist for any party here, sorry for the length of this post.

1 According to English Wikipedia's article "Mongolia", between 50% and 94% of Mongolians follow "Tibetan Buddhism" as their primary religion. Of course historically China is to Mongolia as the Boston Red Sox are to the New York Yankees. The relationship between Mongolia and Tibet seems to drive China's occupation of Tibet; I have yet to hear a pro-Tibet protester talk about it, it seems most germane.

2 Having had the opportunity to learn Chinese, I know that the underlying principle of The Great Firewall is to protect Chinese people from being taken advantage of by Westerners. It's a racialistic thing, it's like apartheid, so impossible to fix, Westerners can be unconscious of what they are doing in the context of other methods of thought, no matter how hard they try to be nice.

3 .......Which is why regulations (within the PRC and other countries) can be so difficult and strong.

To relativise this set of 3 statements:

American late night talk show host Jay Leno (on NBC) often pokes fun at British people with accusations of weakness; as a fan of European soccer and of rugby, I know this to be ridiculous; Brits must hear these Leno comments with a great deal of disbelief; I have a similar disbelief for people who don't understand why the PRC government does what it does. If one knows why something is happening, then one can go ahead and do something about it. If one doesn't know why , one may as well be a puppy chasing one's own tail.

I know well, people are sincere about (obviously pertinent) complaints about the government and one keeps looking for traces of literacy in all this illiterate reasoning.

Or is it "pre-literate" reasoning? idk

Re:PRC POV for Asia newbies (1)

SanityInAnarchy (655584) | more than 6 years ago | (#23127452)

Having had the opportunity to learn Chinese, I know that the underlying principle of The Great Firewall is to protect Chinese people from being taken advantage of by Westerners.

That may be the common view over there. It may even be believed by most of the government. But having had the opportunity to learn George Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four, it seems much more likely that it is part of a Chinese propaganda machine -- that at least a few people on the top have set it up to prevent dangerous ideas from reaching the Chinese people.

Westerners can be unconscious of what they are doing in the context of other methods of thought, no matter how hard they try to be nice.

So if I understand this right, you're claiming that the purpose of the Great Firewall is to prevent Chinese people from being shocked or offended by Westerners?

If that really was the case, it would be simpler and cheaper to distribute software filters to each computer, and have them be opt-out. There is no need to force that protection onto people.

American late night talk show host Jay Leno (on NBC) often pokes fun at British people with accusations of weakness; as a fan of European soccer and of rugby, I know this to be ridiculous

First, he's a comedian. He often pokes fun at all kinds of people, and says all kinds of baseless things -- not because they are true, or even kind, but because they are funny.

And second, this is a great example of what life would be like without the Great Firewall -- Brits must, indeed, hear these comments with disbelief, but they can always choose to turn Leno off. Because anyone can say anything, there is always something else to watch -- you can always find the people who agree with you. They can even call Leno up to complain.

But that's the point -- they have a choice. Maybe some of them can laugh at themselves enough to find it funny. (I don't know, haven't seen these particular Leno jokes.)

Sticks and stones can break your bones, but words can never hurt you.

I know well, people are sincere about (obviously pertinent) complaints about the government and one keeps looking for traces of literacy in all this illiterate reasoning.

I'll be the first to admit, I don't actually know what is going on in China. I don't know the language -- any of them. So if I've gotten something wrong, feel free to correct me.

But I don't feel that it matters why they think they are doing this. Does it matter why a murderer kills? It may be an interesting psychological study, but it is simpler to agree that murder is wrong, and whatever his reasons for doing it, he must be stopped. That is why I don't feel I need to understand the rationale behind the Golden Shield Project -- I believe that forced censorship is wrong, and must be stopped, no matter what its intention.

Re:PRC POV for Asia newbies (1)

Mr Accountable (1133989) | more than 6 years ago | (#23127510)

So if I understand this right, you're claiming that the purpose of the Great Firewall is to prevent Chinese people from being shocked or offended by Westerners?


- No, it has to do with the potential criminality of Westerners rather than the prospect of being merely being shocked or offended.

But let me try to be helpful:

When one commences to study Chinese, one temporarily de-emphasizes obviously pertinent complaints about the government.

After study, one has standing within the Asian community, and is allowed to speak about issues.

It's like "leveling up" in Worlds of Warcraft.

Re:PRC POV for Asia newbies (1)

beadfulthings (975812) | more than 6 years ago | (#23127626)

If it's pre-literate reasoning, then I'm guilty, guilty, guilty. I would submit, though, that it can be an unconscious but powerful force.

Over just the past twelve months I've had to worry about whether I was poisoning my kids, dogs, and self--all with items manufactured in China.

When I sit down to my desk to look at the server logs, the firewall reports that it's blocked umpteen hundred illegal login attempts over the past day--more than half from China. I turn to the website logs and find that the Baidu spiders are mounting the rough equivalent of a DOS attack just because of their interminable crawling. Apparently robots.txt files are for foreigners. I recall with annoyance trying to contact somebody from Baidu with a courteous communication asking how to limit the crawling--only to have my email bounced because my ISP is blocked over there. Blocking out entire ranges of addresses or the TLD seems to me to be an act of bigotry and ignorance. But it is so tempting just to do it to gain some peace and quiet and give the poor server a rest.

My other work (with gemstones and jewelry) is compounded and made more arduous these days. Is this string of turquoise really from the Sleeping Beauty Mine in Arizona, or is it white chalk ground up and dyed Persian blue by some ingenious folks in--where else but China? (The only way to tell for certain is to destroy one of the stones.)

To be very truthful, it's almost impossible to maintain a sense of objectivity and fairness when one is confronted with these constant, nagging, somewhat low-level annoyances. (I'm not sure that having a kid exposed to lead, or dealing with an injured family pet is actually "low-level.")

The Chinese people and government need to realize that they're faced with an enormous public-relations problem. It's like a pernicious weed with roots in all sorts of places. Only one of them involves Tibet. It's tempting to buid a multi-faceted Great Firewall of my own, just to gain some respite from it.

Chinese anti-CNN site (2, Informative)

solweil (1168955) | more than 6 years ago | (#23127362)

http://bbs.sina.com.cn/zt/w/08/attackcnn/index.shtml [sina.com.cn] The banner at the top says: "Rise up! Resist the demonization of the Tibet incident! Chinese netizens, open fire on CNN and other western media!"

Life iin China (3, Informative)

canadian_in_beijing (1234768) | more than 6 years ago | (#23127370)

Lived in Beijing for a few years now and it's scary how the government controls and spins information. They allow protests when convenient, recently Careforre (bigger than CNN issue) because of the torch relay demonstrations. So it would be interesting to see if these attackers also try to take down the Careforre website. Nationalism is borderline crazy around here lately...not sure if it's the government or individuals who launched the attack...but in China the government controls the people so it all boils down to one suspect.

Why Is It... (0, Troll)

IonOtter (629215) | more than 6 years ago | (#23127374)

...that everyone automatically assumes that any allegedly "hostile action" coming out of China is being perpetrated by the government?

What about ordinary citizens?

I mean, come ON people! China was a superpower TWO THOUSAND YEARS before the Egyptians were building their pyramids! There's just a teeeeeny-tiny smidgen of National Pride, here folks. Not to mention that a full half of everything we have in our so-called 'modern world' came from Chinese inventions a few thousand years ago?

And here WE are, not even 400 years old, acting like we're all that.

Please. This isn't an attack by the Chinese government? This is a proper bitch-slapping by a bunch of kids in the Chinese equivalent of Kintergarten who got mad because we're dissing their national heritage.

Re:Why Is It... (1)

canadian_in_beijing (1234768) | more than 6 years ago | (#23127446)

Have you ever been in a local Chinese school? There is no way such an attack could originate from such a place. I visited one a few years back...supposed high end western school. Felt like jail, marching in the morning, afternoon and night. Won't even get into it, but these kids lives are heavily controlled. They do not have free time to enjoy such extra curricular activities as launch a DOS on CNN.

Why do people suspect the Chinese government? Because the government filters, screens and heavily spins what the country receives for news. The firewall and censorship does not only include the internet...we are talking radio, tv, film, magazines, etc.

If the government wasn't so good at spinning info and forcing issues on people this would never happen. Overall Chinese people know very little about the outside world, except for what the government tells them. Chinese people would never under any circumstance do anything so risky as launching an attack on another country without permission from the government.

Pogramming not hackers... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23127424)

I suspect bad programming in the advertisements on CNN's website, and not hackers are afoot - I've noticed several pages reset my browser mysteriously.

Chinese Government (2, Informative)

RAMMS+EIN (578166) | more than 6 years ago | (#23127478)

``One has to wonder if this hacking attempt was government sponsored or not.''

There's probably no need. The thing that many people don't seem to realize that the information chinese people in China get and the information people outside China get are very different, and what the implications of this are. I've met a number of people from China, and, simply put, there is a world of difference between what is common knowledge here and what is common knowledge there.

Where many Americans see the chinese government as a repressive tyranny that needs to be overthrown to allow the chinese people to be free, the chinese see huge economic development and modernization. Where I've heard Europeans call the One Child Policy a crime against humanity, I've heard chinese people call it an unfortunate necessity, put in place for the good of the people. The Dalai Lama? How dare he criticize the chinese who have done so many good things for him! And you may not realize it, but the chinese government is actually doing a lot of good things for the environment.

Of course, the chinese government isn't perfect, and I think everybody will agree. But, knowing what a chinese person in China does, some of the things that foreign press agencies have been saying about China are completely outrageous. And when they are also critical of your country, some people will get angry. In a large country like China, that means a lot of angry people.

Remember the flame wars that were all over the net and the media when foreigners criticized the Bush government, its warlike policies, and their attempts to deceive the American people and the world? The same thing is now happening in China. The good thing about it all is that it raises awareness, in China, about issues that are important to the rest of the world. The bad thing about it is that it seems that the criticism is being turned into evidence of a worldwide conspiracy against China.

Of course, this is the wrong way to deal with criticism. The right response would be to find the cause of the criticism and only then decide on an appropriate action. Perhaps the critics have a point and the situation should be improved. Perhaps the critics are misguided and they should be corrected. Or perhaps their criticism is unfounded - in which case the appropriate response may be to ignore them or to criticize them in turn. Silencing critics is not, I think, an appropriate response.

One really interesting question is, though, how well informed are the critics? How sure are _you_ about the real situation over in China?

Re:Chinese Government (1)

Mr Accountable (1133989) | more than 6 years ago | (#23127608)

``One has to wonder if this hacking attempt was government sponsored or not.''


This isn't an answer to the question, it is just something to think about in:re the Chinese internet:

Between 2002 and 2007, the Chinese Standing Committee, (9 people), was comprised of 9 engineering school graduates, including Hu Jin Tao. In 2007 there was a party congress and a few new members joined the committee, I haven't looked to see if the committee is still 100% engineering school graduates.

In other words, the Chinese government are nerds. And, I wonder where the Asian equivalent of Slashdot is located.

Re:Chinese Government (1)

canadian_in_beijing (1234768) | more than 6 years ago | (#23127712)

Why would there be no need to figure out if the government was behind this? You are absolutely crazy to think this...if the Chinese government is trying o expand their firewall capabilities to the rest of the internet world they need to be stopped immediately!

Yes Chinese people have access to very different information because their government heavily restricts what is shown to them...the truth is sometimes hidden. For example a while back their was a decent reporter who got poached to CCTV from BTV because he was good at uncovering stories. So he found a story and proved that because of rising pork prices a restaurant had been putting cardboard with pork sauce in their Baozi (fluffy dumplings). This was bad timing with the international pressure about lead, etc. It was accurate and good reporting backed up with hidden cameras. What happened to this story? It got denied in the media the next day and the Chinese people were told it was a hoax. The reporter had lied and made up the story is what Chinese people thought from then on. What happened to the reporter? He is in jail.

Chinese people have different versions of the story...just like CNN. The Chinese government put huge spin on this and now everyone (including my Chinese girlfriend and all my Chinese friends in Beijing) think that CNN is attacking Chinese people. Mr. Flaterty went on air and confirmed that he was talking about the government and not the people... the news in China did not show this and Chinese people continue to believe that he was insulting every single Chinese person.

Facts are stretched and Chinese people only know what the government wants them to know. If the government wants protests they allow them (recently Careforre supermarket incident). We all know what happens when the government doesn't want protests...

People in China are not allowed to know the whole story and make up their own minds about what is good/bad. This is not 'raising awareness' in China... it is spun to build nationalistic pride and the government is heavily promoting a 'us vs them' approach. Scary stuff happens with such nationalism.

The Chinese government has played a large part (directly or indirectly) in the CNN DOS.

Re:Chinese Government (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23128216)

Iâ(TM)ve noticed the exact same thing. Many chinese donâ(TM)t have a clue to whatâ(TM)s going on or whatâ(TM)s happened in China. Iâ(TM)ve spoken to highly educated chinese lawyers and doctors and itâ(TM)s freighting. Because of the censorship we know (in some aspects) more about China then the population does.

Chinese Fascism = Radical Islamism (-1, Troll)

unity100 (970058) | more than 6 years ago | (#23127490)

there is no difference between them. both bunches are brainwashed, bigoted foktards.

cnn.com not accessable from Thailand... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23127548)

I live in Thailand end experienced the DoS. For a few hours it seemed like cnn.com simply didn't respond. Everything is back to normal now.

China ain't no_dang communist state! (0)

OldHawk777 (19923) | more than 6 years ago | (#23127710)

China is a totalitarian corporatist administered state, much like the USA is a dogma corporatist administered state. What's the difference?

Well the answer is easy; The USA purges reason with dogma, and China purges reason with corpses. Either way you end up with compliant manageable and exploitable thoughtless masses. IOW: They both ain't free, but the USA is way more fun.

NOTE: The China government directs the DDoS, and the USA government teaches the Free-Press (if any is left in the USA) that there is no more Free-Press without dogma compliance to the Corporate States of America (CSA). The return of the 1860 CSA slave state ... now Plantation=Corporation, dry-goods store is now the corporatist loan-sharks, the flimflam man has become the insurance scam ... US is just the poor servants, following the will of god, and our white-collar masters.

I suspect, proportionally, far less USA Citizens are literate today than 50 years ago. Most well-off USA Citizens delude themselves into believing that almost everyone (99%) in the USA can read as well as them, live in a close to reasonable house, have enough to eat ..., but fuel prices, health care, and poor people (unless they fight our wars!) are the only real problems in the USA and Economy.

Has anyone compared the Federal Government bills daily/monthly/annual War$ to Edu$, Sci$, R+D$ ... and the daily/monthly/annual cradle to grave quality of life cost for a USA Citizen?

What is the social security fund, infrastructure investments/rebuild, child health care, PO$ shortfall compared proportionally to WAR$ spent?

When thieves take the money/value from USA Parents that goes to improving the quality of life for their family/children, and then the thieves (politicians, plutocrats, clergy ...) blames the grand-parents for the theft ... only a lack of reason and pure dumb dogma faith allows insanity to be acceptable to US.

We are a fallen people and will remain such, like the Chinese, Arabs, Persians, Mexicans, Africans ... until we regain our reason, courage, and a self-provoked will to learn the truth, act for the best of all US, and to be the best of people for all humanity.

Institutions are not a Democracy of the People!
Corporate Welfare is not Ethical or Capitalism!

Glad they leave FOX News alone (3, Funny)

cryptodan (1098165) | more than 6 years ago | (#23127846)

I am glad they left FOX News alone, at least they can still be contacted for news.

CNN is entertainment, not information (1)

oldsaint (736226) | more than 6 years ago | (#23128000)

The Chinese should ignore CNN and Jack Rafferty, like everyone else. Well, I suppose it is like American Idol, and has a perverse entertainment value to many, but certainly no content. Attacking the CNN website, or protesting CNN in any way, is just noise on the audience meter, and they love it.

US Government (1)

iamfrankie (1275960) | more than 6 years ago | (#23128078)

I would recommend all slashdot articles that are related to conspiracies and happened in the US to add the statement "One has to wonder if this XYZ was sponsored by the US government or not". Any specultaion of this kind is simply nonsense.

Don't Be Too CNN (1)

megabulk3000 (305530) | more than 6 years ago | (#23128228)

And then there's this recently penned Chinese pop song, Don't Be Too CNN [hindustantimes.com] , accusing Western media of distorting reportage on China.
Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>