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India Launches 10 Satellites At Once

CmdrTaco posted more than 6 years ago | from the i-can't-even-juggle-two-satellites dept.

Space 201

freakxx writes "India sets a world record after launching 10 satellites in one go using its workhorse, the Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV). All the satellites were put into their respective orbits successfully. It was the core-alone version of the launch vehicle weighing 230 tonnes with a payload of 824 kg in total. Two of the satellites were Indian satellites, while the rest were from different countries. By this launch, the ISRO has proven its credibility and it is going to boost India's image in the attractive multi-billion commercial market of satellite launches. This was the 12th successful launch of the PSLV."

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201 comments

Building a ... Cluster? (2, Funny)

adpsimpson (956630) | more than 6 years ago | (#23224310)

Suddenly, I'm worried I won't have to imagine a Beowolf cluster of satellites...

Sorry.

On the good side... (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23224946)

On the good side, we don't have to worry about the US military weaponizing space, since the complete ineptitude of conservative ideology will soon leave the US without a means of even getting into space, or the money to put anything there.

Stay the course, fiscal conservatives! You still haven't hit rock bottom!

Re:On the good side... (2, Insightful)

eln (21727) | more than 6 years ago | (#23225456)

I don't know what you're talking about, there aren't any fiscal conservatives in the halls of power anymore. All that are left these days are borrow-and-spend politicians (Republicans have proven to be experts at this, but the Dems aren't exactly falling all over themselves trying to raise taxes or cut spending either).

But yah, no one in Washington is even remotely interested in spending money putting much of anything into space, so any superiority we may have left in regards to space travel is pretty much doomed.

On the evil side... (1)

camperdave (969942) | more than 6 years ago | (#23226040)

I thought the US Air Force had acquired their own launch vehicles once they realized they couldn't rely on the shuttle.

Re:On the good side... (1)

j-pimp (177072) | more than 6 years ago | (#23226534)

Stay the course, fiscal conservatives! You still haven't hit rock bottom!

Our undoing will not be because of fiscal conservatism. I consider myself a libertarian war monger. I'd vote for Ron Paul if he was only pro war. That being said I do acknowledge that my military spending beliefs are not fiscally conservative.

Building a... MIRV? (4, Interesting)

Moraelin (679338) | more than 6 years ago | (#23226496)

Here's a funny thought:

1. India has nukes. (It also sits on huge reserves of Thorium and has breeder reactors, so it can transform them to uranium or eventually plutonium, as needed.)

2. If you can put an object in orbit, you can make it come down wherever you want it to come down. Or use a smaller rocket and/or a heavier load to make them go ballistic instead of orbitting at all. (For reference, the USSR's space program started the other way around. Someone realized that they had build a rocket so powerful to haul nukes, that it could put a small-ish object in orbit.) Rockets are that interchangeable purpose.

3. Inclined/polar orbits? Always good to have for a nuke, if nothing else, to hit a location that's not near the equator. Plus you might want to go extremely inclined to minimize flight time and thus warning time (I think both the USA and the USSR had most of their nukes aimed at each other over the arctic), or to lob them over international waters and avoid pissing off everyone else in their path.

As a bonus: once you can do polar orbits and big payloads, you can use spy sats.

Now I'm not saying India is necessarily aiming to become an ICBM power. Maybe, maybe not. And they're probably not yet ready to willy-wave internationally about it, in any case. But I'm saying I wouldn't be the least surprised if that was at least one factor in funding that space program.

I still remember seeing the news on TV when they had built their first nuke, and the general euphoria. It was waay back, while they were even poorer than today. Arguably that money could have been better invested in industrializing a little faster. But there were people cheering in the streets that they now have a big destructive weapon. I can see a lot of political capital in the implicit "and now we can lob it at anyone too!" message.

Now I'm not singling India out there. I think they're just... humans, like everyone else. And it's a sad thing that we'd rather have a big stick to threaten the neighbours with, than an extra slice of bread.

Leave it to India (5, Funny)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 6 years ago | (#23224318)

You ever seen how many people they can pack in a single traincar?

Re:Leave it to India (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23224498)

they still can't beat THIS, yet...
http://www.chilloutzone.de/files/08040701.html

You beat me to it (^^) (1)

MacDork (560499) | more than 6 years ago | (#23224778)

they still can't beat THIS, yet...
http://www.chilloutzone.de/files/08040701.html

If you could understand what they say in Japanese, it would be more fun. Someone talks to the pushers, '"It must be hard to do this everyday". And the pushers say "OK now, puuuuussh!" "hey a leg is sticking out!"

You're kidding, right? (2, Informative)

donutello (88309) | more than 6 years ago | (#23226056)

Re:You're kidding, right? (1)

mercurialmale (928377) | more than 6 years ago | (#23226666)

That picture is of a train in Bangladesh, not India - you can tell from the rake, which is not Indian Railways, and from the lettering on the plates, which is in the Bengali script. In India, these are ususally in English.

Further, the meme of folks regularly travelling on traintops in India is not entirely accurate - many trains and train lines are electrified, with overhead wires and pantographs making this impossible or at leasst very dangerous. And there's the fact that it's illegal to do so.

Japan trains in 1991 (4, Interesting)

phoneteller (1261402) | more than 6 years ago | (#23225074)

Look at how they used to pack passengers in Japanese trains in 1991 Video of Japanese train in 1991 [beewulf.com] !!

Uh-oh. Where was it made? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23225200)

I don't know about their traincars. I just hope it wasn't made in Bang-galore.

Re:Leave it to India (2, Interesting)

phorm (591458) | more than 6 years ago | (#23225202)

It may be marked as funny, but I find it fairly true that India is definitely a country where the "more-in-less" concept seems to fit. I have a room for rent in my condo, and recently got an email from an family that is moving here and wanted to rent my room (not a small room, but it's still only a single room in a 3bdrm/1bthrm condo) for the parents and their child. When it comes to space and comfort VS saving bucks, the common mentality seems to go with the latter.


I'd imagine that the packed human-conditions may very well affect an overall thinking of how to best-fit as much possible into a small space. A lot of other highly-populated countries seem to be very good at miniaturization for similar purposes.

Re:Leave it to India (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23226456)

Uh, wait... just ONE family? Two parents and one child? The last apartment I lived in, had a two-bedroom one-bath unit next door.
I was able to count 14 people living in it. The conflict I had was this: There was a single water heater for the entire complex. It would have been sufficient for normal occupancy. This, not the lure of low interest rates, was the lash that beat me into home ownership.

Good for India. (-1, Troll)

master_p (608214) | more than 6 years ago | (#23224340)

But what about those 1 billion people (ok, number out of ass, but you get the point) that are starving to death and live in horrible conditions?

Re:Good for India. (2)

alxkit (941262) | more than 6 years ago | (#23224396)

did you not read the article? maybe with this new program they will be able to feed them all.

Re:Good for India. (5, Funny)

Fear the Clam (230933) | more than 6 years ago | (#23224408)

But what about those 1 billion people (ok, number out of ass, but you get the point) that are starving to death and live in horrible conditions?

Leave it to a Mac fanboi to make everything into a joke about Vista tech support.

Re:Good for India. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23225182)

Yeah it's like; every time Ubuntu releases a new version, people asking how is it going to stop US from going to wars :-)

Re:Good for India. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23226362)

Yeah it's like; every time Ubuntu releases a new version, people asking how is it going to stop US from going to wars :-)

Well you have to understand that the US never actually went to war in Iraq. An undisclosed bug in Windows for Weapons of Mass Destruction for Warmongers broadcast spoofed packets announcing that Osama Bin Balmer had 228 patents on WMDs hidden in Iran. This bug also affected Windows for Warplans which sent a mass broadcast of false attack orders to all of Dick Cheney's Windows Live! friends list after the spell checker altered Iran to Iraq.

Re:Good for India. (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23225238)

If you think that money makes you happier you are very wrong.

After having travel led many countries I can find people in rural India may not have electricity, may not have great roads but definitely they are happier than a lot of us folks.

The simplicity of rural life sometime make me wonder whether what we do is really worthwhile.

Re:Good for India. (1)

Ethanol-fueled (1125189) | more than 6 years ago | (#23225684)

They were born into that lower caste because they were MS-DOS users in their past lives.

Re:Good for India. (1)

psamty (749960) | more than 6 years ago | (#23226574)

The ignorance of some Slashdot posters is beyond belief. The US had poor people too, when it launched the first Apollo mission. It still does today, when it's spending on national security is at least twice that of any other nation. Does this mean that it should bring technological advancement to a halt to feed the poor?? The government's job is to to set the country's direction. This creates jobs, creates investment, and eventually leads to better conditions for its citizens. It is not the government's job to make sure you've got food on the table - that responsibility is yours. We have a long way to go - but the only way to get there is by giving the people a sense of empowerment, by making them believe in their country and themselves.

Troll. Why not yell at the world too (4, Insightful)

Shivetya (243324) | more than 6 years ago | (#23224474)

because as a world there is enough wealth to end hunger.

Yet we don't because it is not so PC to remove the many reasons for that hunger. We also do not have the stomach for it (no pun intended) because it would cost us lives to remove the leadership that routinely starves their own populations.

India is coming forward rapidly, by advancing space science they advance all their sciences. They also give their people something to strive for - something they can show children that India is and what they can become. Let alone the fact that satellites provide better weather monitoring , can track crops and movement of animals. The possibilities of helping their own are a hundredfold, let alone what they can do for others.

Oh, before you troll India again I must ask, did you buy food out this week? If so, why? There are lots of poor people who could have used it in rice to feed a family... so why didn't you help? Oh, yeah, thats because its easier to be a forum troll and blame others for not doing instead of doing yourself.

Re:Good for India. (5, Informative)

ajs (35943) | more than 6 years ago | (#23224538)

But what about those 1 billion people (ok, number out of ass, but you get the point) that are starving to death and live in horrible conditions?
1. 1 billion is nearly the entire population of the country (1.12 billion est.)
2. What better way to improve living conditions than to become a hub for space technology?
3. I think you may be under some misconceptions about the state of Indian rural life as compared to, for example, the state of Mississippi.

If you're not sure that you know what you're talking about, perhaps you should do some research [wikipedia.org] . If you had, you'd be able to say something like:

India has twice the poverty rate of, for example, the U.S., though that has dropped substantially since their independence and is widely seen as a potential model for a rapid exit from third-world status for other nations.

Re:Good for India. (1)

adpsimpson (956630) | more than 6 years ago | (#23224550)

<sarcasm class='troll-feed'>
It's terrible, isn't it, that all foreign people are starving to death in their billions.

Just as well there aren't any poor people in the USA - and hey, those little adventures in the Middle East have really paid off there, haven't they?
</sarcasm>

In seriousness, there are much better ways to phrase what is, essentially, a valid question.

Re:Good for India. (4, Insightful)

JaredOfEuropa (526365) | more than 6 years ago | (#23224654)

But what about those 1 billion people (ok, number out of ass, but you get the point) that are starving to death and live in horrible conditions?
1) Commercial launches such as these pay for themselves and help defray the total cost of the India space programme.
2) High tech stuff like this creates jobs for academics and skilled workers, who'll be part of India's growing middle class. I believe that creating wealth top-down, by having wealth trickle down from an affluent and productive middle class to the poor, works a hell of a lot better than forever "giving that man a fish to eat".

Re:Good for India. (1)

ArcherB (796902) | more than 6 years ago | (#23225566)

2) High tech stuff like this creates jobs for academics and skilled workers, who'll be part of India's growing middle class. I believe that creating wealth top-down, by having wealth trickle down from an affluent and productive middle class to the poor, works a hell of a lot better than forever "giving that man a fish to eat".
Good point!
I can't really think of anytime in history where wealth has been built from the bottom up!

Re:Good for India. (1)

letxa2000 (215841) | more than 6 years ago | (#23225744)

I can't really think of anytime in history where wealth has been built from the bottom up!

Sssh! There are Democrats here and it's an election year so they're bound to claim otherwise, as silly as that may be.

Re:Good for India. (1)

somegeekynick (1011759) | more than 6 years ago | (#23224658)

I think this is an argument similar to those put forward by some Americans against NASA's space programme. And I think the reply to both is the same: The respective Governments are not wasting the entire nation's wealth in the development of space technology and exploration - they do that elsewhere!

Re:Good for India. (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23224782)

Stop whining ... everytime someone (esp India) does something worthwhile, all of a sudden poverty is visible and no other accomplishments. Have you done home work on the % of people who live below poverty line in US of A ? Get a grip and stop the rant, for once admire something, even if it is for few seconds.

Indians will eventually solve their problems.

R

Re:Good for India. (1)

JrOldPhart (1063610) | more than 6 years ago | (#23225498)

Indians will eventually solve their problems.
Hell, they may well rule the world. They already rule the world of customer service, and Quick-E-Marts.

Re:Good for India. (5, Insightful)

esme (17526) | more than 6 years ago | (#23224854)

But what about those 1 billion people (ok, number out of ass, but you get the point) that are starving to death and live in horrible conditions?

I'm always amazed by this kind of arrogance towards developing nations. This kind of comment is seen any time there's a post about the OLPC project, for example.

Do you really think it would be productive if the government of India spent its entire time trying to directly alleviate hunger and poverty? Don't you think that encouraging industries that provide high-paying jobs is a good part of a long-term strategy to improve people's lives?

More to the point, did it never occur to you as a (presumably) well-educated, technically-inclined person that education, science and technology were part of the solutions to the developing world's problems, not just a distraction?

-Esme

Re:Good for India. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23225370)

India has jumped ahead to ventures such as this without constructing an infrastructure for the system. Its not just poverty and being poorly fed, its roads..hospitals..power..water. Of course everyone loves to say we've launched satellites into space. But I'm sure the people of India would rather have food on the table than satellites in the sky.

Re:Good for India. (3, Interesting)

Eastender (910391) | more than 6 years ago | (#23226254)

I am an Indian. I live in New Delhi. Having a a fair amount of exposure to the business world (2 decades), I have experienced more than my share of arrogance and well, I also have experienced the brilliance of the people from US and Europe. Things are changing, attitudes to Indians are becoming a little more respectful (though we tend to exasperate a lot of people with our casual attitude at times ...) India had made immense investments in education, science, technology, poverty alleviation schemes and infrastructure etc... though not always wisely, efficiently and hardly ever in ways free from corruption and exploitation by the political-business interest groups, Thankfully, something still got through to the people and they made the best use of it. That is the story of India: We are making it despite the government, which much to its dismay (any govt in power, I am happy to say, is discovering this), is finding that it has to give back to the people something, else it gets voted out of power. Democracy rocks. In India, it may be chaotic, but at the end of the day it works. I dunno why. :) I am loving it!

Re:Good for India. (4, Insightful)

kgskgs (938843) | more than 6 years ago | (#23225484)

But what about those 1 billion people (ok, number out of ass, but you get the point) that are starving to death and live in horrible conditions?


Every time I read a comment like this, I don't know what to say.

Do you know what is the single biggest thing that has helped poor farmers all across India? Please visit http://www.echoupal.com/ [echoupal.com]

It is a website for small farmers. Even for those farmers who don't have Internet, there are kiosks in villages where volunteers explain them and help them use the website.

Using this, the farmers network and help each other solve problems. Single biggest benefit of this has been spotting and eliminating corrupt middlemen who give unfairly low price to farmers and sell it for high price to traders. This one advantage is worth entire effort behind this initiative.

Unfortunately Western media does not find these stories interesting. They love to show poor hungry children begging for food. Then they get to portray the Western world as the noble minded donor.

The truth is even poor people want to work hard and improve their lifestyle. Information technology, Internet, communication infrastructure, is what will give them a chance. It is absolutely right thing if a poor country with a billion hungry people launches satellites. It is better than a rich country launching wars.

Re:Good for India. (1)

NotBornYesterday (1093817) | more than 6 years ago | (#23225568)

I see your point, but surely you realize that postponing progress will not cure any problems in India or anywhere else. If we in the US had put our space program off until all our citizens were fed, we'd still be on the ground. Ditto everyone else in space. If you feel badly about world hunger, I could suggest a few nice charities you could give to ...

Well, sure, they have the cheap launch system. (2, Funny)

rbrander (73222) | more than 6 years ago | (#23224370)

It's like the Chinese causing earthquakes by all jumping off a chair at the same time: you just need a teeter-totter and 127-million Indians all jumping on the other end at once...

Re:Well, sure, they have the cheap launch system. (1)

Missing_dc (1074809) | more than 6 years ago | (#23224934)

It's funny you said that. When I read the headline, I imagined a giant trebuchet flinging the satellites into their respective positions like a bucket of rocks. Now mine isn't as Non-PC as yours, but its the same concept.

Is India feeling inadequate? (-1, Flamebait)

UnknowingFool (672806) | more than 6 years ago | (#23224416)

India, it' okay if you can't launch the largest satellites like the US and Russia. You don't need to launch the most just to prove yourself. Remember size doesn't matter.

[Snicker]

Sorry, I almost said that with a straight face.

Re:Is India feeling inadequate? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23224878)


âoeFirst they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win.â

I guess India's up to step 2.

Just remember, the technological curve that India's on is a lot sharper than the one the US has had, and the last 8 years of stunting science in the US by the current administration is only going to hurt long-term.

--iamnotayam

Re:Is India feeling inadequate? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23225000)

Why not search the net before blowing hot air out of your ass. http://www.space.com/spacenews/archive06/India_032706.html/ [space.com]

Looks like the Russians are using ISRO's services to launch their satellites.

AAUSAT-II (4, Informative)

wizards_eye (1145125) | more than 6 years ago | (#23224436)

One of the satellites is made by students at Aalborg University.

You can follow the status here:
http://aausatii.space.aau.dk/eng/ [space.aau.dk]

10 Satellites at once.. (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23224438)

yeah, they learned it watching 5 people riding a 2 wheeler..

Recommendations (4, Interesting)

Wowsers (1151731) | more than 6 years ago | (#23224496)

Someone should tell the European Union about this way of launching satellites... then the politicians might stop wasting vast amounts of European taxpayers money on their own vastly over-budget but completely worthless GPS system, using the tracking of road drivers as one excuse for it's existence.

Re:Recommendations (4, Insightful)

JaredOfEuropa (526365) | more than 6 years ago | (#23224862)

Politicians might stop wasting vast amounts of European taxpayers money on their own vastly over-budget but completely worthless GPS system
From Wikipedia:

Galileo is intended to provide more precise measurements to all users than available through GPS or GLONASS, better positioning services at high latitudes and an independent positioning system upon which European nations can rely even in times of war or political disagreement.
It might be redundant for many positioning applications, but completely worthless...?

According to the same source, the EU is spending 3.4 billion Euros on this. This is just half of what we're spending on "administration" this year, and considering the other truly worthless crap we are spending money on, having our own GPS system is a pretty good goal in comparison.

Re:Recommendations (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23225496)

Galileo isn't "our own GPS system" it is intended to complement GPS. In particular it will be aimed at providing a reliable service for applications where interruptions could be costly or even dangerous (ship navigation and the like ).

Furthermore, because of differences in how Galileo and GPS transmit their signals it should be possible to combine data from the two to get a more accurate position than would be possible with either system on its own ( or alternatively, just SOME estimate where none would otherwise be available ). The two systems are thus truly complementary and not really substitutes in the classical sense.

Re:Recommendations (1)

afidel (530433) | more than 6 years ago | (#23226764)

Hmm, well India is now a partner in GLONASS so there will soon be a total of three global positioning networks. Assuming they all use different frequencies a smart device should be able to do much quicker and much more accurate atmosphere corrections. I can't imagine that being a bad thing =)

Re:Recommendations (3, Insightful)

ballfire (807022) | more than 6 years ago | (#23225636)

You know, with this satellite they injected a total of 824 Kg into a 625 Km orbit.

Galileo has an orbit with a altitude of 23222Km with 675Kg a satellite. [wikipedia.org]

How could this be used to launch Galileo?

Re:Recommendations (1)

ballfire (807022) | more than 6 years ago | (#23225668)

Sorry, where it says "with this satellite" it should say "with this launcher"

Finding a Niche (1)

FurtiveGlancer (1274746) | more than 6 years ago | (#23224518)

It seems India has found a niche to fill in the space game. They serve a low/medium highly inclined polar orbit, not nearly geostationary, but still a need to be filled.

Isn't this supposed to be the century India passes China as the most populous nation on earth? Those folks are going to need jobs.

16 satellite launch ... (4, Informative)

kharchenko (303729) | more than 6 years ago | (#23224596)

last year [satnews.com] . But still, it's impressive. Although I think they're putting them in SSO and not LEO just yet.

Re:16 satellite launch ... (2, Informative)

doctor_nation (924358) | more than 6 years ago | (#23225510)

Er, SSO is LEO. According to Wikipedia, SSO is usually at an altitude of 600-800km, and LEO is defined as any orbit between 160km and 2000km. ISS is only at an altitude of 350 km. If you're in any kind of stable orbit (i.e. above the atmosphere), you're in LEO or higher.

Also, considering the size of a Cubesat (1 kg, 0.1 cubic meter), you could launch several hundred on any launch vehicle.

I have this picture in my head... (4, Funny)

jskline (301574) | more than 6 years ago | (#23224624)

Of one day looking up and really noticing that the available amounts of sunlight has been diminishing due to the rampant expansion of tracking and communications satellites being pushed into orbit by all the nations of the earth.

Then we begin to see the outcome as diminished crops, rampant expansion of the polar ice belts, strange drops in cancer rates from excessive sunlight exposure in bikini clad Caucasian women;... And some strange little guy on the global news service saying something about "the sky is falling; the sky is falling!"...

Re:I have this picture in my head... (1)

Prisoner's Dilemma (1268306) | more than 6 years ago | (#23225142)

Then we begin to see the outcome as diminished crops...
The crops just need more Brawndo. It's got electrolytes.

Re:I have this picture in my head... (1)

op12 (830015) | more than 6 years ago | (#23225362)

...one day looking up and really noticing that the available amounts of sunlight has been diminishing due to the rampant expansion of tracking and communications satellites being pushed into orbit by all the nations of the earth.
Finally, a solution to global warming!

Re:I have this picture in my head... (1)

berashith (222128) | more than 6 years ago | (#23225488)

strange drops in cancer rates from excessive sunlight exposure in bikini clad Caucasian women
so we can end cancer by simply placing white women in bikinis? sign me up for the test!

Laugh while you can (4, Insightful)

oliderid (710055) | more than 6 years ago | (#23224744)

Most of the above posts make fun of India. Well I must say that this record is quite impessive considering all the fuss the ESA made over their launch of two satellites in a row few years ago.

Few things I have noticed the last years:

  • they bought Jaguar from Ford few weeks ago.
  • They established serious businesses competing in our fields (computer).
  • Math has been an indian skills for centuries.
  • The indian state is democratic.

Sure they still have a long road ahead (poverty, bureaucracy, nationalism, protectionism,akward traditions, etc.) but they are definitely on the right path.

Re:Laugh while you can (1)

Yvanhoe (564877) | more than 6 years ago | (#23224914)

We need to stop mocking India and to stop fearing China. Things will balance out.

Re:Laugh while you can (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23225404)

We need to stop ... fearing China. Things will balance out.
I think that historical evidence indicates that those who fail to fear China eventually become China. No thanks.

Re:Laugh while you can (1)

Yvanhoe (564877) | more than 6 years ago | (#23225976)

Self preservation and prudence do not always come from fear.

Re:Laugh while you can (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23226800)

What, exactly, are you referring to?

In any case, most of the things that current established nations (especially European nations or the US) have to fear are internal and economic, not threats from other nations (or terrorists for that matter).

When was the last time a decent-sized nation where things were going good internally was conquered by an external force?

Re:Laugh while you can (2)

bondjamesbond (99019) | more than 6 years ago | (#23225034)

Don't forget Range Rover, or is that the same company? Also, an Indian discovered Algebra, if I remember my Math History course.

Re:Laugh while you can (1)

punit_r (1080185) | more than 6 years ago | (#23225386)

Few things I have noticed (about india in) the last years:

they bought Jaguar from Ford few weeks ago.

Don't forget Range Rover, or is that the same company?
Yes it is --- Tata Motors [wikipedia.org] .

Re:Laugh while you can (0)

DNS-and-BIND (461968) | more than 6 years ago | (#23225262)

Hahaha...oh, oh, my side hurts...hahaha...

I see that you have obviously never been to India. And I like how you bash India's thousands of years of culture by calling it "awkward traditions".

Re:Laugh while you can (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23225482)

A good list. Thanks for seeing India in positive light.

But as an Indian, I am not so sure about the last item. Theoretically, yes, we are a democratic union of states. Practically, in every election, you will have hard time deciding which candidate has less murders, rapes and extortion changes against his/her name - that too assuming that your name is in the voters' lists, and you will actually be able to vote.

Democracy lives only in the memory. The country has gone to pigs. All the development and progress you see is IN SPITE of the government, not BECAUSE OF. But the Indian soul has been battered and bruised so much over last 1000 years, that when its raped by its own, it doesn't even hurt anymore.

But as our politicians love to say every freaking time they visit another country, we are the largest fucking democracy in the world. And the world likes to repeat it.

Re:Laugh while you can (1)

AncientPC (951874) | more than 6 years ago | (#23225926)

On top of that, why can't the US achieve this sort of payload efficiency? Our space program has been around for ~50 years now and we're spending significantly more per satellite to launch them.

Re:Laugh while you can (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23227014)

and they have nukes.

In other news... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23224762)

The United States sets a world record after shooting down 10 satellites in one go...

MIRV demonstration? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23224816)

Is this launch a not so subtle warning that India is capable of MIRV technology?

Re:MIRV demonstration? (1)

ivanmarsh (634711) | more than 6 years ago | (#23225428)

That was my first thought.

For a while there I thought the world wouldn't end in a fiery apocalypse. Oh well.

I guess India's doing pretty well (1)

Apple Acolyte (517892) | more than 6 years ago | (#23224826)

We seem to have trouble each time we launch a single space shuttle. . . .

Re:I guess India's doing pretty well (1)

MBGMorden (803437) | more than 6 years ago | (#23225042)

Oh please. The false drama is too much to bear. The shuttle has had 121 launches total. We lost 2 of them. That's a 98% success rate. Despite the shuttle loses being bad PR and a very sad event, the program as a whole has been hugely successful.

Re:I guess India's doing pretty well (1)

afidel (530433) | more than 6 years ago | (#23226850)

Not to mention that the first loss was completely avoidable if they had just listened to their technical advisor's! The shuttle program was designed with a loss rate of 1 in 100 launches and if it wasn't for the stupid PHB's we would be at 20% better than that. The follow up is designed with a loss rate of 1 in 1000 launches, but at a reduced technical capability.

Re:I guess India's doing pretty well (1)

eln (21727) | more than 6 years ago | (#23226034)

Are you trying to say we should try launching 10 space shuttles at once?

These Satellites Are Weaponized (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23224856)



as M.I.R.V.s [wikipedia.org] .
against the United Gulags of America.

Nuclear Proliferatingly Yours,
George W. Bush [whitehouse.org] .

Watch out Springfield (4, Funny)

tab_b (1279858) | more than 6 years ago | (#23224898)

Too bad it wasn't 8 satellites, then they could have named them: Anoop, Uma, Nabendu, Poonam, Priya, Sandeep, Sashi and Gheet - and then the rocket itself would have been: Apu [wikipedia.org]

Most of those sats were built by amateurs (3, Informative)

Muad'Dave (255648) | more than 6 years ago | (#23225108)

Six of those ten satellites were Amateur Radio payloads [amsat.org] . At least one is based on the de facto cubesat [delfic3.nl] standard developed by California Polytechnic State University. You can now order your own off-the-shelf flight qualified cubesat [cubesatkit.com] , just in time for Christmas!


The Delfi-C3 sat is relying on the Amateur Radio operators around the world to help capture telemetry and forward it to their earth station. Pretty cool, in my book.

Re:Most of those sats were built by amateurs (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23226350)

Well, not really, C3 is aprox 10x10x30 cm not the de facto 10x10x10 cm.

Meanwhile, U.S. has stagnated... (1)

Jane Q. Public (1010737) | more than 6 years ago | (#23225278)

With no replacement yet in sight for its Shuttles, which are scheduled to be retired in 2010.

How terribly sad. Thanks, George Bush.

Re:Meanwhile, U.S. has stagnated... (1)

gnick (1211984) | more than 6 years ago | (#23225768)

With no replacement yet in sight for its Shuttles, which are scheduled to be retired in 2010.

How terribly sad. Thanks, George Bush.
But, IIRC, George promised us that we'd be putting a man on Mars. Just like his exit strategy, he has a solid plan - He's just waiting on his last day in office to surprise us with it. Have a little faith.

Re:Meanwhile, U.S. has stagnated... (1)

moosesocks (264553) | more than 6 years ago | (#23225876)

There's nothing terribly special about this sort of launch. The PSLV is a fairly unremarkable vehicle, and there have been launches that have included more than 10 [satnews.com] satellites in the past.

America did indeed even participate in the Russian launch listed above.

This launch also has virtually nothing to do with the Shuttle, which is primarily a manned crew vehicle. Retiring the shuttle is probably a good decision, given that it failed to fulfill its original design goals of being safe, cheap, and easily reusable. Unless nationalistic pride matters that to you, there's no reason why NASA shouldn't use Soyuz for the time being.

Re:Meanwhile, U.S. has stagnated... (1)

peragrin (659227) | more than 6 years ago | (#23226314)

The shuttle is safe, and fairly easily reusable.

Cheap not so much, the Turn around time wasn't what was predicted either, but still the we normally launch a shuttle every 3 months.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_space_shuttle_missions#Flight_statistics [wikipedia.org]

Name one other space vehicle that comes anywhere close to those statistics. It's not the Soyuz where the shuttles carry twice the personnel, many times the payload, and still have some 30% more launches.

the shuttle isn't cheap but it is also the only large scale vehicle of returning satellites to earth safely. My only hope is that before they retire the shuttles they go get the Hubble Space telescope and put it up on display in the Smithsonian. That is a mission worthy of showing just how superior the shuttles are.

Stop insulting (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23225282)


You realize that not all of India lives in poverty right? When foreign nations look at US news, they see guns in schools and that becomes their image of the US. When people travel to India/watch the news, they travel to rural areas to look at what life is like. They don't remember the urban cities, they remember the poor citizens walking back and forth from wells to get water.

Ignorance is another reputation the US has. Stop ruining our image, educate yourself before you start stating vacuous comments.

WHY DO YOU HATE AMERICA!!!!!!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23225410)

*sniff*

poverty == india , always ?? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23225372)

I just see this coming up on every forum. What people overlook is that India's population >> EUs population, can Europe concieve any (democratic)system working on that scale? "Assuming" the benefits of the space program are restricted to the 'elite' 10%, that number is much greater then the population of France/germany or any other european country.

~~johri.

Outsourcing... (0, Offtopic)

PhearoX (1187921) | more than 6 years ago | (#23225418)

Cue the "efficiency experts" strolling through NASA hallways and the subsequent outsourcing of US satellite delivery and deployment.

I read a story about the outsourcing of PREGNANCY to India... Surrogate mothers carrying babies for "working women" who don't have time to be pregnant, but apparently will find the time to nurture and develop a child as a contributing member of society. *rolls eyes*

I wonder if I could outsource my job to some Indian kid for a couple hundred bucks a month and keep cashing my paycheck...

Iridium (1)

Quiet_Desperation (858215) | more than 6 years ago | (#23225716)

Wasn't Iridium at some point going to launch 12 or 16 at a time before that whole mess fell through?

What ever happened to all those plans for "Internet in the sky" with constellations of hundreds of satellites? Pie in the sky? Guess so.

Re:Iridium (1)

afidel (530433) | more than 6 years ago | (#23227046)

Latency is horrible to satellites and bandwidth is limited by device transmit power. A much better idea is very high altitude balloons. Use solar power to keep the balloon within tolerance and you have basically solved both problems while having a launch cost a fraction of what even a small comm satellite costs.

AMSAT (1)

driftingwalrus (203255) | more than 6 years ago | (#23226064)

My understanding is that this vehicle had more than one amateur radio satellite on board, as well.

Chill ppl (0)

notaknight (1280702) | more than 6 years ago | (#23226078)

Yup, it was only amateur sats they sent at the expense of short term benefits to the poor. Kudos for the technological endeavor. Lets not take this beyond that.
Chinese: Love their intelligence, hate their accent
Americans: Love their values, hate their government
Indians: Love their ambition, hate their mediocrity
Everyone's different and its OK. Why is this so hard to understand? In 200 years, everyone in the world would be CHAMERIDIANS anyway. (ref: Peter Russel - sooner or later 1/3rd the population of the world is gonna hump the other 2/3rd).

Re:Chill ppl (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23226166)

The primary payloads was an Indian mapping satellite. All the rest were tiny in comparison, and basically used excess capacity. They paid their own way nonetheless.

Running headlong towards.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23226236)

I've just come back from 2 weeks living with relatives in Porbandur, Gujarat (the most prosperous state in India according to my cousin :)

Chief Minister Modhi has actually done a pretty good job of improving the state instead of lining his own pockets (as ministers usually do in India)

If he gets elected Prime minister (which is doubtful considering he doesn't cowtow to the US) then I have no doubt that India will become at the very least a "first world" country in the next decade

However, rumours of his sanctioning of the violent backlash against Muslims after the train attack near Ayodhya makes me wonder just what kind of first world country India would become...

There's another name for this technology. (1)

GigG (887839) | more than 6 years ago | (#23226372)

MIRV Multiple independently targetable reentry vehicle.

If I were Pakistan I'd be very concerned.

Hey Pakistan, China, (1)

hey! (33014) | more than 6 years ago | (#23226378)

think maybe you're supposed to notice these things could've been warheads rather than sattelites?

I'm just asking.

10? Only 10? (2, Funny)

SeekerDarksteel (896422) | more than 6 years ago | (#23226618)

That's sad. My Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle goes up to 11.....satellites.

Take that America! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23226704)

Heh heh heh!

Yuo Fail I7! (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23226828)

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