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MySpace Treads Carefully With "HyperTargeting"

kdawson posted more than 5 years ago | from the opt-out-in-whatever dept.

The Almighty Buck 68

Ian Lamont writes "MySpace is preparing to boost its advertising systems, by launching a targeted ad platform called HyperTargeting and creating a Web-based system that lets vendors purchase ads without dealing with human sales teams. HyperTargeting will 'look at a person's interests listed on their public profile and then classify the user into particular interest-specific categories.' MySpace claims that early tests resulted in a 300 percent increase in the number of ad click-throughs. The company apparently learned a lot from Facebook's earlier experiences with Beacon — MySpace members will be able to opt out of HyperTargeting, according to the company."

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68 comments

They haven't learned (3, Insightful)

solweil (1168955) | more than 5 years ago | (#23248472)

It sounds like they haven't learned from Facebook. I thought the whole problem is that Facebook had an opt-out rather than opt-in system. This supposed improvement is also an opt-out system.

Re:They haven't learned (1)

EllynGeek (824747) | more than 5 years ago | (#23248554)

Exactly. A person could spend a lifetime opting-out of every damned thing shoved in our faces.

Re:They haven't learned (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23248670)

Exactly. A person could spend a lifetime opting-out of every damned thing shoved in our faces.
"Mr. (Representative/Senator), would you think it fair and reasonable if anyone could fling anything into the face of your wife or daughter and it would be up to your family member to find the correct page on the web to opt out of receiving their particular service and for them to receive a notice that it could take up to 60 days to halt the service? Of course it is no violation as long as it stops within the 60 days."

Re:They haven't learned (3, Insightful)

lbgator (1208974) | more than 5 years ago | (#23249586)

I don't know if this was a serious comment or not, but I have recently taken this tactic. Griping on /. is important so that your views get spread around amongst your peers, but after you have an informed decision - start griping to your elected officials.

Don't like net neutrality? Don't like IP/Copyright law? Don't like the fact that stevia [wikipedia.org] can't be sold as a food additive? Write your govenor/senator/congressman/whomever and let them know. The reason we get these BS systems in place is because the a**hats are in the ears of our representatives. It takes five minutes to write an email - it doesn't have to be eloquent or anything. Just a quick "hey I'm a regular dude and I think that such and such is no good". If the /. crowd in general would take that tactic we could start fighting about xhtml 5 or something.

Re:They haven't learned (1)

aikodude (734998) | more than 5 years ago | (#23250618)

Write your govenor/senator/congressman/whomever and let them know. The reason we get these BS systems in place is because the a**hats are in the ears of our representatives. It takes five minutes to write an email - it doesn't have to be eloquent or anything. Just a quick "hey I'm a regular dude and I think that such and such is no good".

someone please mod parent up. the only way they'll KNOW you want change is if you TELL them you want change.

Re:They haven't learned (1)

NDPTAL85 (260093) | more than 5 years ago | (#23251646)

Yes because a congressman or Senator is going to give a flying frack about opt-in ads.

Nerds have no perspective on whats really important in life.

Re:They haven't learned (1)

Omestes (471991) | more than 5 years ago | (#23253404)

Nerds have no perspective on whats really important in life.

I generally agree. Though, I think this is part of a bigger problem (most things are). I would classify it as "keeping the rights of the consumer higher than the rights of corporations". By making something opt-out you are stomping on this, MySpace might be an innocuous example, but there are others who use opt-out for more deleterious purposes.

If the government can lower itself to make the very effective Do Not Call List, then why not do something about the internet? The internet is no longer a small network of nerds, its in pretty much every household, and pretty much everyone uses it in some capacity. How many users does MySpace even have these days?

The bigger problem is that your congressman or senator isn't going to give a flying "frack" about ANY thing you, a lowly constituent, says. Especially if your in a larger metropolitan district. A lot of politicians have taken the ideology that they're here to take care of us, since we are incapable of doing it ourselves. We're children. On top of that, they are basically opportunists, they want to shape the political world into some abstract image, and not have to deal with the dirty little "people problems" (which is our fault, since we continually vote them in, no matter what awful things they do, as long as they stand with us on our pet moral issues*).

If you write your congress critter, it is guaranteed that they will NEVER read it. They won't even know you wrote it. It will be tallied up by a bored aid, shredded, and have a stock reply in the mail. But no one will ever read it or care. The only chance we have to influence our officials is now the vote, outside of that, we don't exist or matter anymore.

Ouch... Sorry for the rant.

Re:They haven't learned (1)

aikodude (734998) | more than 5 years ago | (#23254156)

Yes because a congressman or Senator is going to give a flying frack about opt-in ads.
they have to give a flying frak about something. they certainly won't if no one tells them about it. maybe when you write you can think of some way to link it to "think of the children"... :)

Re:They haven't learned (1)

Henneshoe (987210) | more than 5 years ago | (#23252840)

I don't get this argument. It is not like Myspace or any other service your are griping about is some government program that you are entitled to. They are a business trying to make money. Increasing the relevance of their ads helps increase their revenue. Technologies such as ad-blockers are becoming main-stream and will tend to decrease their revenue. Measures like targeted marketing may be needed to maintain their current profitability. IMHO, you are lucky these services give you an option to opt-out. I guess it must make some sort of business sense for them.

Re:They haven't learned (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23248952)

That was only with the Beacon feature. Facebook also has Facebook Social Ads which work the exactly the same way these MySpace ads will work and cannot be opted-out of. Amazingly the world didn't end when they launched it. Privacy nuts need to get over these things.

Re:They haven't learned (1)

anexkahn (935249) | more than 5 years ago | (#23249116)

I don't see how it is a problem for marketers to review information you have posted on your public profile in order to better target ads. What's the difference between this and the ads Google uses? They too are ads targeted based on page content. But, it sounds like this simply does a better job of mining information from the page since MySpace would have a better understanding of the context of the information they are looking at.

No, that's not the biggest Facebook problem. (1)

Estanislao Martnez (203477) | more than 5 years ago | (#23252310)

The biggest problem with Facebook Beacon isn't the opt-out (though that is indeed a problem). The problems with it are:

1. It broadcasts users' purchases to Facebook, which then broadcasts them to other users.

2. Facebook gets paid to coopt their users' identities to promote their commercial partners' products. This is really the nastiest one, if you ask me.

3. According to the lawsuit recently filed against Blockbuster and Facebook [arstechnica.com] , it continues to unlawfully share information about users who have opted out.

I don't think that MySpace using information volunteered by its users to target ads to them is unlawful at all.

Re:They haven't learned (1)

caramelcarrot (778148) | more than 6 years ago | (#23258438)

I was under the impression that facebook ALREADY DOES THIS. If you go on facebook.com and ask to submit a poll or ad, you can select which demographics you want and put in interets/music/activities. I've been targetted by ads for concerts by a few bands. This is nothing like beacon, which supplied information to facebook about outside activities.

too targeted (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23248496)

Well I guess if i'm going to have to look at an ad it might as well be one that i'm interested in. though i hope they don't start showing me ones that make me want to rethink who i am. thats a little too targeted

I hope people exodus in droves (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23248562)

I'm so tired of these greedy companies. News Corp was already making plenty of money. http://www.tvweek.com/news/2008/02/broadcast_cable_web_growth_lif.php [tvweek.com]

There is no need for them to do things like this.

So, MySpace and Facebook have both now jumped the shark. What company is it time to move to?

It's a business (1)

EmbeddedJanitor (597831) | more than 5 years ago | (#23248602)

News Corp bought it to make money. The only way to make money is through advertising. Don't like it? Don't use it!

Contrary to your egocentric beliefs, nobody owes you anything.

Re:I hope people exodus in droves (1)

thatskinnyguy (1129515) | more than 5 years ago | (#23248610)

So, MySpace and Facebook have both now jumped the shark. What company is it time to move to?
Verizon, AT&T, Bell Systems, Quest, [your phone company here]. At least they won't try to push ads through your phone (if you still use your phone as a phone) and it won't take 5 minutes for blingtastic pages to load. Dispense with the pages and talk to people like you used to. It's far more natural. And, in most cases, less annoying. Welcome to social networking the way it was meant to be!

Re:I hope people exodus in droves (1)

Gideon Fubar (833343) | more than 5 years ago | (#23248630)

Welcome to social networking the way it was meant to be! And then get off my lawn!

Fixed that for you. ;)

Re:I hope people exodus in droves (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23248650)

Two memes in one post.

Pure genius...

Re:I hope people exodus in droves (1)

Gideon Fubar (833343) | more than 5 years ago | (#23248774)

The fact that this is a Myspace thread is the only possible explanation. Their standards are lower there, or so i hear.

Re:I hope people exodus in droves (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23249044)

The fact that this is a Myspace thread is the only possible explanation. Their standards are lower there, or so i hear.

I think myspace/facebook are kind of the new AOL, minus the free CDs. Sometimes I wish we could fork the Internet back to 1992. The general lack of bullshit kinda would make the 1200 baud worth it.

(1992 called, they want their Internet back?)

And get off my lawn.

There. I fixed it for me.

Re:I hope people exodus in droves (1)

Gideon Fubar (833343) | more than 5 years ago | (#23249072)

Win++

OTOH, +++ATH0

Not so smartmodem now, are we? 1992 might not be far enough ;)

Re:I hope people exodus in droves (1)

justinlee37 (993373) | more than 5 years ago | (#23248662)

I'm so tired of these greedy companies. News Corp was already making plenty of money.

Uh, does it hurt anything for them to continue? Is it bad for them to improve their platform? By your logic, we should never have invented the automobile, because we were already making plenty of money selling bicycles and donkey-carts. Stupid greedy companies, not keeping us in the stone age.

Re:I hope people exodus in droves (1)

Nullav (1053766) | more than 5 years ago | (#23248892)

And what do targeted ads give anyone other than those pushing them? I'm not arguing with selling ads on an otherwise free service, just that horrible car ana-- Oh, Slashdot! Carry on, then.

Ingrate! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23248744)

Whats' the matter aren't we "social" enough for you?

Rupert Murdoch, (1)

Burz (138833) | more than 5 years ago | (#23255172)

Pied Piper of the Internet youth.

An exodus from there could only be a positive thing.

Not all that bad, really (2, Interesting)

HadouKen24 (989446) | more than 5 years ago | (#23248582)

If done properly, this really isn't a bad thing for users. It only uses information put on your public profile. You really shouldn't have anything incriminating or overly personal on there anyway. I mean, if you're willing to share it with strangers (I assume that's what "public" means), why would it be a problem for an ad company to see it? That's not to say that there aren't nefarious uses to which this kind of thing could be put. But just from what I read in the article, there doesn't seem to be too much of a problem.

Re:Not all that bad, really (1)

Nullav (1053766) | more than 5 years ago | (#23248938)

But think about the poor sap with 'penis/breast enlargement' and 'horse porn' in his profile. It'll be just like the rest of the Internet. That's just not something you wish on someone.

Re:Not all that bad, really (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23250652)

But think about the poor sap with 'penis/breast enlargement' and 'horse porn' in his profile. It'll be just like the rest of the Internet. That's just not something you wish on someone.
No, just 4chan.

Ads (1)

r2q2 (50527) | more than 5 years ago | (#23248590)

On one hand you face an improvement for the buyers and sellers for ads. On the other hand you have privacy concerns. Opt-in systems work better in theory but then why would people want more ads in the first place? Given the valuation of social networking I wonder how do people think about turning that into greenbacks?

Re:Ads (1)

QuantumG (50515) | more than 5 years ago | (#23248612)

They wouldn't opt-in for more ads, they'd opt-in for ads that are more relevant.

Re:Ads (1)

Omestes (471991) | more than 5 years ago | (#23253476)

Sure people would opt-in for ads. Tie it to some silly service, that you only get if you get the ads, call it "MySpace PRO!!!1one!" or some such. The user would get "exclusive" profile "bling", and receive ads for fre3 v1agra.

Hell, its MySpace, you could make selling their identity to Nigerians opt-in for something silly and superfluous, and a significant portion of users would. I don't think the typical MySpace user is know for their forethought and impulse control.

members will be able to opt out of HyperTargeting (1)

iminplaya (723125) | more than 5 years ago | (#23248634)

Yeah, yeah. And you can retire from the mafia, too.

Re:members will be able to opt out of HyperTargeti (1)

ChefInnocent (667809) | more than 5 years ago | (#23252914)

I recently opted out of advertising from MySpace...I closed my account.

Great Marketing... (1)

Marinated_Brain (1262922) | more than 5 years ago | (#23248640)

So... does this mean the wanna be gangsters will now have an add for a Glock on their page? That would be terribly efficient marketing...

Re:Great Marketing... (1)

Marinated_Brain (1262922) | more than 5 years ago | (#23248666)

Gah, I meant "ad" My Myspace page will obviously have ads for various typing programs

Myspace advertisers are mostly bottom-feeders (4, Interesting)

Animats (122034) | more than 5 years ago | (#23248668)

Myspace has very low ad rates for contextual ads, and very low quality advertisers. The typical Google AdSense ad is something like "Free MySpace Backgrounds, Profile Layouts, Smileys all in one place. Download them all for Free!"

Their banner ads tend to be from major consumer brands, and are probably more valuable than the contextual ads.

Increased click-through rate is not necessarily a win. Remember, there's that 10-15% of Internet users who produce 50% of the click-throughs, but don't buy much. (That's probably Myspace's demographic.) The advertiser problem today is to make those users go away, instead of paying Google money for their clicks.

As the metrics get better, it's becoming clearer that what's good for the advertiser is quite different from what's good for the online ad delivery service. The advertiser wants a sale; the ad service wants a click. This is starting to be a problem for Google as advertisers realize that the "Google content network" often has negative value and opt out.

Re:Myspace advertisers are mostly bottom-feeders (1)

shird (566377) | more than 5 years ago | (#23248754)

A premium adsense customer like myspace would be able to pick their ads from Google - they would not be truly contextual. Plus advertisers would be able to target Myspace specifically. The sad fact is these are the ads that would be making the best money on myspace, as they are the most deceptive to users and therefore generate the most clicks.

Re:Myspace advertisers are mostly bottom-feeders (1)

JasterBobaMereel (1102861) | more than 5 years ago | (#23249404)

My Myspace profile has nothing about me! even the name is not mine ... the only thing people could work out from it is my taste in music

I don't use it for "social networking" I use it to find new bands ... unless the adverts are for music I might like they will be ignored....

 

Re:Myspace advertisers are mostly bottom-feeders (1)

rtb61 (674572) | more than 5 years ago | (#23250380)

Hyper-targeting, targeting the most naive and gullible ie. children. Make no mistake, when it comes to something like myspace, basically a peer pressure marketing forum, they are targeting those who lack the experience and maturity to deal with saturation advertising.

As for hyper-targetting, that is of course just a PR=B$ marketing term to camouflage reality and draw in the sellers.

Firefox + AdBlock (3, Funny)

firefly4f4 (1233902) | more than 5 years ago | (#23248690)

Web pages have ads? That's news to me.

Re:Firefox + AdBlock (1)

electrosoccertux (874415) | more than 5 years ago | (#23248886)

I'd really like an ad extension that would let me say "on this site, go ahead and display all the ads. But if you see those same ads being served on another site, don't allow them"

I use NoScript and while you can "Allow" Slashdot.org, you can't "allow" all the other domains that serve ads to Slashdot. I wish they would make one like this so that I can "support" my favorite websites by showing the ads on my favorite websites (but not all of them), which I can then occasionally click out of interest and/or goodwill towards the site to support it.

Re:Firefox + AdBlock (1)

conan1989 (1142827) | more than 5 years ago | (#23248894)

i've used ABP to convert many to using firefox, firefox wouldn't be the same without it. currently working on getting the company i work for to use it on all boxes, under "saving bandwidth"

Re:Firefox + AdBlock (1)

spikedvodka (188722) | more than 5 years ago | (#23249412)

I have converted my company... It's a pain though... I wish I could figure out how to make an installer with it pre-installed for all users

Recently got worse than Facebook (1)

hovercycle (1118435) | more than 5 years ago | (#23248740)

I just deleted my account with NewsCorp. The new adverts and _new_ cutties from match dot com make it hard to concentrate when your drunk and want to email that friend you keep in contact with using Myspace. Not even worth the variety of music anymore! IRC and Forums is what I focus on.

Re:Recently got worse than Facebook (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23248998)

Seconded, even thirded! If I need a place to talk with people, I'll make it. I'd sooner set my keyboard alight before joining a 'social network'. (Then again, FaceMySpaceBook targets those who don't.)

This is NOTHING like the Facebook Beacon issue. (2, Insightful)

wdavies (163941) | more than 5 years ago | (#23248798)

Its just an extension of demographic advertising, augmented with data-mining of more content based information (such as what bands you say you like).

Yahoo does the same sort of thing, and so would Google if they had more of a portal (and pretty sure they will build user models from your searches eventually - what do you think Google Toolbar's motivation is). Yahoo's is more subtle (and more insidious even) as they are tracking your page views on the Yahoo site, and building a model of you in terms of things like finance, football, blah.

MySpace's targeting is based on what YOU EXPLICITLY SAY about yourself in public. For sure, if you're profile is completely private, then perhaps they shouldn't mine your data for targeting, but frankly, its really hardly an invasion of privacy (unlike sharing your video rental/purchases would be cf Facebook). It will probably take into account groups and bands you link to.

It should result in better ads for users (assuming you are willing to assume ads for free hosting is a reasonable trade off).

Winton

Re:This is NOTHING like the Facebook Beacon issue. (2, Funny)

pandrijeczko (588093) | more than 5 years ago | (#23249066)

Its just an extension of demographic advertising, augmented with data-mining of more content based information (such as what bands you say you like).

I'm into "Uriah Heep" & "Blodwyn Pig" so please - hit me with those adverts targetted for middle-aged hippie rockers. I could do with a new kaftan.

Re:This is NOTHING like the Facebook Beacon issue. (1)

wdavies (163941) | more than 5 years ago | (#23253294)

hah hah :)

Re:This is NOTHING like the Facebook Beacon issue. (1)

JasterBobaMereel (1102861) | more than 5 years ago | (#23249250)

I have seen targeted ads - Unfortunately I am not a demographic, I am a person, so the majority do not apply to me ...

I would prefer no ads, If I have to have them then I would prefer ads the do not apply to me so I can ignore them, if they appear to apply to me then they look tempting (but turn out to be useless 99.9% of the time so annoy me even more!)

Re:This is NOTHING like the Facebook Beacon issue. (1)

wdavies (163941) | more than 5 years ago | (#23253418)

I actually find stupidly /non targeted ads as dumb and annoying. Frankly if I was an advertiser, I would wish that Yahoo would not subject me to a barrage of Match.com and Netflix ads, especially given that (a) I state in my profile I'm married and (b) I have my Netflix Queue in my.yahoo.com page.

I understand your reasoning, but to be honest, advertisers end up having to put out MORE ads in order to get their message across. Would you rather 1 targeted per 10 pages, or 1 random ad per page?

Not saying it will go like that, but its all about the cost of conversion in the end.

Re:This is NOTHING like the Facebook Beacon issue. (1)

JasterBobaMereel (1102861) | more than 6 years ago | (#23272870)

But they won't they will send me 10 pages of "targetted" ads instead ....

Re:This is NOTHING like the Facebook Beacon issue. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23253536)

Unfortunately I am not a demographic, I am a person

Which, oddly, puts you into the demographic of bitter individualists.

We will start targeting you thusly.

Thank you,
The People Who Target Bitter Individualists Just Like You

Value-Add for the emo set! (1)

NilObject (522433) | more than 5 years ago | (#23248800)

Those are going to be some great ads, I bet.

"Razor blades and black hair dye, half-off!"

A better use for keywords. (2, Insightful)

mecenday (1080691) | more than 5 years ago | (#23248946)

It'd be great if myspace could use the same technology to help their *users* find people with similar interests, instead you have to wade through a sea of groups, forums, and crappy search results. lol. I guess advertisers come first, it's a business afterall.

On another note, damn I hate context ads. Everywhere I go Google serves up "meet hot local shemales" ads, because I happen to be transgender and that's probably the most profitable keyword on my profile.... everywhere, the same damn ad. It's like Google's some sort of overbearing e-pimp who doesn't take no for an answer. Bastards.

I'm so tired of that Slashdot rant that goes: "People don't block ads if they're targeted, because it's not as annoying." Targeted ads are *far* more annoying because they pick one expensive keyword and bombard you with it everywhere you go.

I suspect Myspace will be more of the same, but stupider. [Blocked!]

FaceBook Ad Platform Does This (1)

copdk4 (712016) | more than 5 years ago | (#23249010)

FB already allows one to target by profile items or keywords.. It does not do any form of "hyper" "meta" clustering.. but its provides pretty good targeting based on location and age.. which itself is very powerful.

And when was the last time you clicked an ad? (1)

Haoie (1277294) | more than 5 years ago | (#23249024)

No, really. I don't even remember when I did it last.

Re:And when was the last time you clicked an ad? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23249138)

adblock for firfox kinda does that to ya.

fake that sucker (1)

ILuvRamen (1026668) | more than 5 years ago | (#23249042)

Well I guess it's time to throw in some fake bullshit data lol. Who knew I was interested in knitting, wooden clog dancing, and teraforming moons. Well the ad people know now lol.

Could be improvement for users (2, Insightful)

Nerdposeur (910128) | more than 5 years ago | (#23249254)

I haven't used MySpace in a long time, but when I did, I was annoyed at how UN-targeted their ads were. I had listed lots of Christian music and writers in my profile, but was always getting skanky ads that bordered on obscene. Adblock didn't stop all of them.

At the time, I emailed them to say that they were wasting an opportunity and hacking off their users by ignoring the very profile information they had collected when it came to displaying ads.

I don't think privacy is as big a deal here as in say, Google searches. After all, you've already knowingly posted your profile information; what's the harm in them using it to give you ads you won't hate (as much)?

Re:Could be improvement for users (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23250646)

I agree with the above poster for the most part. Provided they aren't giving your information out to the companies themselves and instead just running an algorithm to pick which ad to use is the problem. /. does the same thing. It's just that they get to use a lot simpler algorithm:
if(true) {
  adToShow = new AdFactory.getTechAd();
}

Arrrrr me consumers, prepare to be hoarded (1)

surfingmarmot (858550) | more than 5 years ago | (#23249794)

Aye, then we'll monetize ya. Savvy?

Ahh yes (1)

Ozric (30691) | more than 5 years ago | (#23250074)

I would like to target my ads to the OPT OUT market please.

thank you

Great! (1)

PenguinGuy (307634) | more than 5 years ago | (#23250842)

Makes me happy that I dumped MySpace. Just more crap I can avoid..

Nothing is free (1)

GottliebPins (1113707) | more than 5 years ago | (#23252568)

Why is it that people who upload reams of photos to social networks and gigs of videos to public video sites expect that it should all be for free and get all bent out of shape when the owners of the site sell advertising geared specifically for the people who use the site? Why is it they start yelling about privacy and security after just telling half the world all their personal details and displaying all of their embarassing moments on video? People don't create websites to lose money. Every cool idea for a website has behind it the desire to make money. Let's say for example you create a website to attract geeks, we'll call it slashdot ;) Now what kind of ads are going to be most effective? Products to improve your sex life? Geeks don't have sex lives. No, you sell things that geeks like. So targeting ads is good for advertisers, it's good for site owners, and it's good for the site visitors, who are most likely to be interested in those kinds of products. No one else is going to see the same ads you see. So there's no need to get embarassed if every site you visit knows you need viagra.

MySpace Thinks I'm Gay (1)

Sloppy (14984) | more than 5 years ago | (#23253188)

Ads for HP Lovecraft-related stuff: check, I have references to HPL on my profile. Ads for heavy metal stuff: check, tons of metal stuff. Ads for "computery" stuff: check, I have references to computer-nerd stuff on my profile. Ads for meeting fellow gays: WTF? Nothing on my profile about being a drama nerd, or wearing womens' clothing, or pressing wild flowers. Is it because I'm a fan of Rob Halford? Is it because I don't ever become friends with any of the hot webcam babes?

More pr0n and virus ads I guess... (1)

Doug52392 (1094585) | more than 5 years ago | (#23255200)

I left MySpace after just a month using it. It sucked, period. I can guarantee that since MySpace ALWAYS leaves the door WIDE OPEN for auto register programs and spammers, all a company distributing malware or pr0n with malware in it have to do is automatically generate new accounts for this service. A computer would never pick that up, especially a computer run by the people with the WORST SECURITY EVER!

Re: (1)

clint999 (1277046) | more than 6 years ago | (#23260664)

Win++ OTOH, +++ATH0 Not so smartmodem now, are we? 1992 might not be far enough ;)

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"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
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