Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

PRO-IP Act Passes Judiciary Committee

Soulskill posted more than 6 years ago | from the cue-thunder-and-maniacal-cackling dept.

The Courts 185

I Don't Believe in Imaginary Property writes "The Pro-IP Act has passed the Judiciary Committee unanimously, thanks to the support of committee chairman Rep. John Conyers (D-MI). We've discussed this before — it's the same bill which would create copyright cops with the power to seize computers, when powers like that have been systematically abused in other areas. But, apparently, they think the bill is just wonderful now, simply because they cut the provision that would've increased statutory damages while keeping the rest. This is the same bill that William Patry called the 'most outrageously gluttonous IP bill ever introduced in the US.'" While we're on the subject of intellectual property, Canadian law professor Michael Geist gave a talk on Monday about "copyright myths."

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

I'm sure this won't get abused (5, Insightful)

Mordok-DestroyerOfWo (1000167) | more than 6 years ago | (#23269238)

I mean the secret police worked out well for Nazi Germany right?

Re:I'm sure this won't get abused (0, Redundant)

CSMatt (1175471) | more than 6 years ago | (#23269520)

Wow. Godwin's Law invoked in the first post.

valid analogy invoked the first (1)

unity100 (970058) | more than 6 years ago | (#23269570)

idiot to jump on an internet fad to harass a valid analogy.

Re:valid analogy invoked the first (1)

CSMatt (1175471) | more than 6 years ago | (#23269590)

How exactly is that a valid analogy? The Nazis were actually killing their enemies, not just rounding them up. I haven't read the PRO-IP Act, but I'm pretty sure that it doesn't mention anything about allowing these copyright cops to kill offenders.

Re:valid analogy invoked the first (2, Insightful)

calebt3 (1098475) | more than 6 years ago | (#23269632)

It didn't start with killing.

Re:valid analogy invoked the first (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23269946)

What really matters is that you're using the word "enemies" without even thinking about it.

The people are "enemies" of the cops? For engaging in imaginary victimless crimes?
The cops are the "enemies" of the people for enforcing absurd and abusive laws?

It no longer matters whether you use words like Nazi once you reveal that deeper thinking,
even as you defend your "enemies".

Re:valid analogy invoked the first (1)

Jurily (900488) | more than 6 years ago | (#23269990)

Yet.

Re:valid analogy invoked the first (2)

HappyEngineer (888000) | more than 6 years ago | (#23270086)

My neighbor's car alarm is worse than Hitler.

See what I did there? I'm obviously claiming that my neighbor's car alarm killed millions of jews.

Some people might get confused and think I was merely expressing intense dislike for my neighbor's car alarm, but people like you know what I mean.

Re:I'm sure this won't get abused (1)

Mordok-DestroyerOfWo (1000167) | more than 6 years ago | (#23269596)

Could have gone with Soviet Russia, but did you really want those floodgates opened up?

Re:I'm sure this won't get abused (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23270264)

Referencing nazis or the holocaust doesn't end intelligent discourse. Morons spouting "Godwin's Law" as if that's some sort of rebuttal do.

moderation? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23269244)

Is anyone else having a problem seeing no comments rated more than 2?

Re:moderation? (1)

nurb432 (527695) | more than 6 years ago | (#23269318)

Nope, its just you.

Re:moderation? (1)

calebt3 (1098475) | more than 6 years ago | (#23269352)

Actually, I have the same problem (although the modifiers are working)

Re:moderation? (1)

Qzukk (229616) | more than 6 years ago | (#23269326)

I saw one 3:Funny over in the Fossett search article.

I guess the modpoint well done gone and ran dry.

Re:moderation? (1)

Brigadier (12956) | more than 6 years ago | (#23269400)

no mod points for me either.

Re:moderation? (1)

mrbluze (1034940) | more than 6 years ago | (#23270054)

No mod points? A sudden burst of unfiltered posts. An unbiased reflection of the vast mediocrity of mankind with all its inanity. Or is it a haystack full of golden needles? Ouch! These stupid analogies are beginning to hurt.

eat my shorts slashdot !! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23269246)

Eat my shorts slashdot !!

The copyright cops have to follow due process and (0)

Joe The Dragon (967727) | more than 6 years ago | (#23269274)

The copyright cops have to follow due process and you have the right to a jury tail.

Re:The copyright cops have to follow due process a (1)

Mordok-DestroyerOfWo (1000167) | more than 6 years ago | (#23269292)

you have the right to a jury tail.
A jury tail actually isn't that bad if you cook it right

Re:The copyright cops have to follow due process a (2, Insightful)

QuantumG (50515) | more than 6 years ago | (#23269294)

Just like in the war on drugs and the war on terror, right?

Re:The copyright cops have to follow due process a (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23269406)

The war on copyright infringement is not a sane way to spend the governments money... i mean come on, we're almost at 10 trillion in national debt and now they want to create an organization, with a 7 figure salary guy at the top that seizes computers that jimmy made mp3s on from his cd collection, not knowing that one of those cds had a rootkit that monitored this and turned him in to this organization?!?

WTF like we need a new agency sucking 20-40 million a year just harassing computer users who went on kazza once, not knowing what it was and deleting it when they saw all the pedo crap on it..

Re:The copyright cops have to follow due process a (1)

megaditto (982598) | more than 6 years ago | (#23270100)

Bad analogy: There are exactly zero US citizens held on drug charges without access to courts and lawers. There is exactly one (1) US citizen being held without trial on terrorism charges.

Re:The copyright cops have to follow due process a (2, Insightful)

nomadic (141991) | more than 6 years ago | (#23270176)

Bad analogy: There are exactly zero US citizens held on drug charges without access to courts and lawers. There is exactly one (1) US citizen being held without trial on terrorism charges.

Well, one held without trial on terrorism charges that we know about. I would be surprised if there weren't more.

Re:The copyright cops have to follow due process a (1)

Unlikely_Hero (900172) | more than 6 years ago | (#23269338)

I'm sorry, have you been paying attention recently? That's how things are supposed to be. If things were how they were supposed to be according to the constitution 99% of this bullshit wouldn't even be getting heard by congress.

Re:The copyright cops have to follow due process a (1)

gnosi (893875) | more than 6 years ago | (#23269342)

Since when do any cops have to follow due process

--
There is only one truth -- There is no Sig.

Re:The copyright cops have to follow due process a (1)

lgw (121541) | more than 6 years ago | (#23269592)

"Due process - isn't that how they make Velveeta?" - Bull

Re:The copyright cops have to follow due process a (1)

nickhart (1009937) | more than 6 years ago | (#23269452)

Yet there is an epidemic of abuse of the legal system by the RIAA and MPAA. This is yet another corporate giveaway. It's about protecting the profits of corporations, not defending the public interest. As usual. Welcome to capitalist "democracy."

So-called "due process" is a joke in a nation with 1% of its population behind bars and proven racial disparities in sentencing.

Sweet, sweet jury tail (1)

spun (1352) | more than 6 years ago | (#23269472)

The copyright cops have to follow due process and you have the right to a jury tail.
Good to know the fundamental rights are still being upheld. I gotta get me some of that jury tail, where do I sign up?

Re:Sweet, sweet jury tail (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23269698)

A The Pirate Bay, of course! Any download will do.

So do the regular cops, but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23269496)

That doesn't stop the regular cops from abusing their ability to seize people's stuff.
Do we REALLY need a copyright czar? Who are they protecting here?

Or is my sarcasm detector malfunctioning?

Re:So do the regular cops, but... (1)

plantman-the-womb-st (776722) | more than 6 years ago | (#23269772)

According to the various sources you read, everything on my blog/forum comments/youtube uploads is mine via copyright. Will these "cops" protect me too and seize every computer they can find wth a copy (cache) of my flickr photos?

Re:So do the regular cops, but... (1)

andy_t_roo (912592) | more than 6 years ago | (#23270240)

in http://copywrite.org/2008/01/30/pro-ip-act-of-2007-h-r-4279/ (text of the act as of january), the only place seizure of equiment is mentioned is section 321 a.7.A.iv which reads
"Protecting intellectual property rights overseas by working with other countries to ensure that such countries provide for the seizure of property used to produce pirated and counterfeit goods;"

IANAL but to me it seems that a)it is not the seizure of equipment receiving pirated goods, its the equipment used for duplication, so its the sender not the receiver which would lose the equipment. b) this section isn't talking about actions by american forces against american people, it is talking about american political encouragement towards overseas countries in order to get them to seize equipment also.

Can someone point out to me where generic seizure of computer equipment in copyright violation cases is mentioned?

Re:The copyright cops have to follow due process a (2, Insightful)

moderatorrater (1095745) | more than 6 years ago | (#23269538)

The copyright cops have to follow due process
And in the meanwhile, they can take some meager/manufactured "evidence", turn that into a warrant where they seize every piece of mail, computer, and storage device in your house. Then you have to hire a lawyer. You'll get all of that back when the trial's done in a year or two unless the jury decides to convict you on that same flimsy evidence. 12 peers helps make things reasonable, but it's still a crap shoot, and you're out the lawyer money either way.

Re:The copyright cops have to follow due process a (1)

plantman-the-womb-st (776722) | more than 6 years ago | (#23269544)

The problem being this, copyright infringement is NOT a criminal offence. It's a civil matter. No one, not one single person is in prison for the crime of "copyright infringement", at all.

Re:The copyright cops have to follow due process a (2, Informative)

QuantumG (50515) | more than 6 years ago | (#23269638)

The PRO-IP act would change that.

Re:The copyright cops have to follow due process a (1)

plantman-the-womb-st (776722) | more than 6 years ago | (#23269700)

No it doesn't, please read the act.

Re:The copyright cops have to follow due process a (1)

PeterKraus (1244558) | more than 6 years ago | (#23269708)

I don't think that really matters, you know, In Soviet Russia...

Re:The copyright cops have to follow due process a (1)

Cajun Hell (725246) | more than 6 years ago | (#23269960)

No one, not one single person is in prison for the crime of "copyright infringement", at all.

Sure, use present tense, and say copyright infringement instead of DMCA violation, and no one can say you're wrong. But still, shit happens. [wikipedia.org]

Re:The copyright cops have to follow due process a (1)

plantman-the-womb-st (776722) | more than 6 years ago | (#23270122)

Very correct, thank you for reminding us. We should all remember this, sadly I had nearly forgotten.

You clearly know little about asset forfeiture (1)

MikeRT (947531) | more than 6 years ago | (#23269656)

They can seize all of your assets by claiming that they were involved in a crime. Then, suddenly, your "due process" rights are defended by a public defender because you are dirt poor. "Due process" on property rights was largely destroyed because of the asset forfeiture laws and a bunch of motherfucking judicial scumbags who like to split hairs about issues like whether or not it is really a violation of your constitutional rights to allow the police to "charge your property" with a crime instead of charging **you** with a crime.

So what? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23269678)

This is still a clear demonstration of who "our" representatives really represent.

Re:The copyright cops have to follow due process a (1)

AHuxley (892839) | more than 6 years ago | (#23269888)

The copyright vans drive out in the a.m.
The ip's are real and have real people, with real hd's.
Courts know nothing about "routers" or 'wi fi"

The ip's will have connected to the
server and may have copyright files.

You sit down with a free defence lawyer who just
graduated from real estate and law night school.

A quick look into your hd's finds 'files'.
Time to look at the offer - sign right now and get 15 years.
You must also talk about a few of your friends.
Sign now.
The other option is to face court.
Every file is worth 15 years.
Two new words: consecutive and concurrent.

How many people will get to face court and have a
real computer expert talk about 'routers'?
Best just to sign.

Re:The copyright cops have to follow due process a (1)

HalAtWork (926717) | more than 6 years ago | (#23269986)

And when will that right get taken away?

Re:The copyright cops have to follow due process a (1)

mrbluze (1034940) | more than 6 years ago | (#23270064)

The copyright cops have to follow due process and you have the right to a jury tail.
You will get the best justice that money can buy!

Re:The copyright cops have to follow due process a (3, Insightful)

ScrewMaster (602015) | more than 6 years ago | (#23270070)

The copyright cops have to follow due process and you have the right to a jury tail.

My goodness, what a protected life you must lead.

The reality is that cops follow procedure when and if they feel like it. Furthermore, merely being accused of a crime is a punitive action in this country (taken before you even get your due process and your jury trial.) Getting arrested is no fun, especially if you haven't done anything. Then you have the joyful experience of defending yourself before said jury, and when you lose because the copyright owners have unlimited funds and you do not, you're life is thoroughly trashed. That's even more true when you're fighting for your rights in a criminal court, versus a civil one.

So be very, very careful of accepting any newfound powers our government arrogates to itself, especially those granted at the behest of the private sector.

I think I speak for everyone here (1)

PitaBred (632671) | more than 6 years ago | (#23269286)

I think I speak for everyone here when I say...

"Awwwww, fuck."

In the spirit of Pro-Life (1)

gerf (532474) | more than 6 years ago | (#23269382)

I propose that we call this bill the "Anti-Consumer" bill. Maybe the media would pick up on something that seems a bit more sinister and threatening. After all fear seems to be their calling card these days.

Re:In the spirit of Pro-Life (1)

CSMatt (1175471) | more than 6 years ago | (#23269536)

You forget that the media are the ones pushing for the bill in the first place.

Re:In the spirit of Pro-Life (1)

plantman-the-womb-st (776722) | more than 6 years ago | (#23269792)

Simply put, it's time for box number three.

Its just a matter of time (1)

nurb432 (527695) | more than 6 years ago | (#23269308)

Before we have a bill like this passed and then a bunch of 'ip cops' running around ripping ipods out of your children's hands, and following you home after buying a pack of recordable CDs to search your home.

Either will legally become "probable cause" and justification of an instant warrantless search/seizure/detainment.

Freedom and privacy is screwed and our founding fathers are spinning in their grave.

Re:Its just a matter of time (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23269460)

Many of our forefathers in the US kept heading west for freedom. We have pretty much ran out of "west" and for that matter many of the west coast laws are some of the most absurd in the country and the ability to just walk away and become a mountain man or backwoodsman is ever decreasing as well as having laws passed against it. Access to the stars and other livable planets are not yet attainable and as science fiction combined with human history has shown us, even then the empire shall follow. So we either find a way to deal with this or hasten our fall.

Re:Its just a matter of time (1)

PeterKraus (1244558) | more than 6 years ago | (#23269720)

Had I had mod points, +1 Interesting...

Re:Its just a matter of time (1)

lgw (121541) | more than 6 years ago | (#23269610)

Either will legally become "probable cause" and justification of an instant warrantless search/seizure/detainment.
The cops stopped needing that quite some time ago. Seems DWI checkpoints were more important to the voters than the 4th Amendment. Then cam the War and Drugs, and then the War on Terror, and now there's not much that calls for a warrant any more.

Re:Its just a matter of time (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23269746)

Wait, what? You consider taking a breathalyzer test to be an unreasonable search? Or do the cops in the US do weird things with their drunk driver policing?

Re:Its just a matter of time (1)

calebt3 (1098475) | more than 6 years ago | (#23269758)

I they are stopping you for it...

Re:Its just a matter of time (1)

earthforce_1 (454968) | more than 6 years ago | (#23269848)

1. Put copy of kid's book report HarryPotter.txt on P2P server
2. Wait for DMCA notice
3. Immediately call cops to raid the offices of Media Sentry because they have clearly downloaded YOUR copyright work.

Re:Its just a matter of time (1)

Reziac (43301) | more than 6 years ago | (#23269926)

Or require a permit and license to purchase CD/DVD media. And as a condition of the license, you agree to allow warrantless search of your property at any time.

Don't think this could happen?? Well, here's an existing precedent: this is EXACTLY what you agree to if you have a kennel permit (notably in most California jurisdictions, but also in some other states) -- the terms of the permit state that your property can be searched at any time, for any or NO reason, WITHOUT A WARRANT.

In the words of G. Gordon Liddy (post prison) (4, Informative)

Unlikely_Hero (900172) | more than 6 years ago | (#23269328)

When a fed comes to your door, I have three words for you. Headshots headshots headshots. They wear armored vests and helmets so aim for the eyes. (paraphrased)

Re:In the words of G. Gordon Liddy (post prison) (1)

Ethanol-fueled (1125189) | more than 6 years ago | (#23269402)

Most of will agree with you but they'll be too afraid to mod you up. Sad.

Re:In the words of G. Gordon Liddy (post prison) (1)

Kjella (173770) | more than 6 years ago | (#23269534)

Yeah, because eeeeeverybody here agrees to cop killings over some dispute about copyright violations. Now I don't know what'd happen if I got on your bad side, but I think you're one of those that make me very much pro gun control laws...

Re:In the words of G. Gordon Liddy (post prison) (1)

KlomDark (6370) | more than 6 years ago | (#23269662)

Because gun control laws have proven so effective in reducing crime, right?

Come on guy, give me a fucking break. All those laws do is make it more difficult for law-abiding citizens to obtain life-preservers to use to protect themselves against the people who just ignored the gun laws.

Re:In the words of G. Gordon Liddy (post prison) (2, Interesting)

Unlikely_Hero (900172) | more than 6 years ago | (#23269696)

Oh the cop killing routine. Fed != Cop. "Cop Killing" brings up the image of a posterboy neighborhood cop getting shot by some asshole who was drunk driving. Law enforcement from the federal government is a great deal different than local or even state. What's the big difference? Feds can make you disappear. No trial, no "due process". They can quasi-legally make you disappear (see black sites in Hungary, etc). Dispute about copyright violation is different from someone coming into my home, violating my personal sovereignty and taking my belongings because I'm acting against the wishes of a cartel. I'm honestly not a violent person, but when assaulted in any way I consider it to be my human right to defend myself from aggressors unless I aggressed upon them and if the aggression was not violent I would ask that they come discuss it with me rather than a show of force. Anyone who can't stay out of other people's business unless they're coercing them should be considered a threat to your life.

Re:In the words of G. Gordon Liddy (post prison) (1)

plantman-the-womb-st (776722) | more than 6 years ago | (#23269842)

Amen my brother, Amen.

(this is in reference to the Amen Break, an extremely over used piece of audio that the originators were never paid for, nor were they granted copyright)

Re:In the words of G. Gordon Liddy (post prison) (2, Interesting)

Ethanol-fueled (1125189) | more than 6 years ago | (#23269726)

I was half-joking. I don't own a gun and don't plan to own one, but if some enforcer wants to seize my gadgets just because of the music on them then I fully support the beating, maiming, and bukkake'ing of them. Just not shooting them in the head, because that would be savage.

Re:In the words of G. Gordon Liddy (post prison) (2, Informative)

frdmfghtr (603968) | more than 6 years ago | (#23269668)

Most of will agree with you but they'll be too afraid to mod you up. Sad.
That's because there is no "agree/disagree" moderation option. If you agree or disagree you respond to the post.

Re:In the words of G. Gordon Liddy (post prison) (1)

lgw (121541) | more than 6 years ago | (#23269622)

Ahh, but he Liddy issued a public retraction a few days later, something like "I'm sorry I asked my listeners to shoot the feds in the face ... the groin is a better target". Nothing I could possibly add to *that* comment.

Re:In the words of G. Gordon Liddy (post prison) (1)

Ortega-Starfire (930563) | more than 6 years ago | (#23269988)

Heh. I have six words for you: BOOM! Headshot!!! BOOM! Headshot!!! BOOM! Headshot!!!

All IP is equal (1)

Fluffeh (1273756) | more than 6 years ago | (#23269330)

but some IP is more equal than other IP.

I'm both saddened and glad (1)

VGPowerlord (621254) | more than 6 years ago | (#23269360)

I'm saddened that Rep. John Conyers (D-MI) doesn't represent my district so I can't try to get him recalled. At the same time, I'm glad I didn't elect him to office.

As for the bill, there is nothing to be glad for there.

Waste of my tax dollars. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23269370)

Copyright infringement is a civil offence, its the responsibly of the owner to enforce their copyright, why then are people trying to create a federal division to enforce it?

Police forces already have enough problems with funding and manpower trying to stop real criminals, you know, robbers, murderers, arsonist, thieves and druglords. People who are actually a threat to society.

If i saw one of these copyright cops set up in my area, I think I'd wait 'till a real crime hit the news, like say a kidnapping. Then I'd sue them for wasting my tax dollars, I'd stand my happy ass up in front of a jury and ask why my tax dollars are being used to protect some corporations profit margin instead of searching for that missing little girl.

And I'd stack the fuck out of that jury, I'd do my damnedest to insure everyone on that jury was a parent, and I'd dare the defending lawyer to explain why the profit margin on the latest pop album is more important than finding a missing child.

And then I'd push my state legislature to outlaw these 'copyright cops'.

Re:Waste of my tax dollars. (5, Informative)

Tackhead (54550) | more than 6 years ago | (#23269430)

Copyright infringement is a civil offence, its the responsibly of the owner to enforce their copyright, why then are people trying to create a federal division to enforce it?

Because that's how you gain power. By making criminals of your subjects, you gain power over them - the power to threaten them with fines, imprisonment, or death. How can your government control you if you've broken no law? It can't -- at least, not reliably -- so it makes up laws that are impossible to follow or interpret, and in so doing, forces us to jump through its hoops to avoid imprisonment. It doesn't matter whether they catch all the "criminals", only that they catch enough to make examples of. Eventually, you find yourself complying, if for no other reason than that you're afraid that someday you might be picked as the "example".

"Did you really think that we want those laws to be observed?" said Dr. Ferris. "We want them broken. You'd better get it straight that it's not a bunch of boy scouts you're up against - then you'll know that this is not the age for beautiful gestures. We're after power and we mean it. You fellows were pikers, but we know the real trick, and you'd better get wise to it. There's no way to rule innocent men. The only power any government has is the power to crack down on criminals. Well, when there aren't enough criminals, one makes them. One declares so many things to be a crime that it becomes impossible for men to live without breaking laws. Who wants a nation of law-abiding citizens' What's there in that for anyone? But just pass the kind of laws that can neither be observed nor enforced nor objectively interpreted - and you create a nation of law-breakers - and then you cash in on guilt. Now that's the system, Mr. Rearden, that's the game, and once you understand it, you'll be much easier to deal with."

- Ayn Rand, Atlas Shrugged, 1957

And for those who automatically reject everything Rand wrote (because they don't like some of what Rand wrote), how about a former Attorney General and US Supreme Court Justice?

"With the law books filled with a great assortment of crimes, a prosecutor stands a fair chance of finding at least a technical violation of some act on the part of almost anyone. In such a case, it is not a question of discovering the commission of a crime and then looking for the man who has committed it, it is a question of picking the man and then searching the law books, or putting investigators to work, to pin some offense on him." - Robert H. Jackson [slashdot.org] , 1940

And then I'd push my state legislature to outlaw these 'copyright cops'.

And then your Federal overlords would threaten to withhold highway funding, and your state legislature would cave.

Re:Waste of my tax dollars. (1)

NeutronCowboy (896098) | more than 6 years ago | (#23269954)

Let me ask you something - if everyone is guilty of something, how do government officials stay in the office? Either they can be found just as guilty of something, and then everyone's on the same footing - and Ayn Rand falls flat on her face. Or they are exempt from laws that affect the regular plebeians, and then the issue is with a complete lack of government control and rule of law - and Ayn Rand falls flat on her face. Either the problem she mentions doesn't exist, or there's a far more significant problem at hand.

And if we're looking not at an abstract concept, but at the reality of government, that idea falls even more apart. Yes, there is a reality that there are currently far more laws than necessary on the books. To attribute that to farsightedness and a long-term power grab is to attribute qualities to politicians that I have barely ever seen.

I find this quote to be one of her more ridiculous assertions. It baffles me why it keeps being trotted out.

Re:Waste of my tax dollars. (2, Insightful)

mrchaotica (681592) | more than 6 years ago | (#23270260)

Either they can be found just as guilty of something, and then everyone's on the same footing - and Ayn Rand falls flat on her face. Or they are exempt from laws that affect the regular plebeians

What are you, stupid? They're not exempt from the laws; they're exempt from the enforcement. In other words, they decide who gets investigated, so they simply decide that it won't be them!

Re:Waste of my tax dollars. (1)

Reziac (43301) | more than 6 years ago | (#23269962)

Somehow I find Jackson's statement by far the more chilling of the two. Thanks for the cite.

Oh, fixed link, I hope: http://roberthjackson.org/ [roberthjackson.org]

Re:Waste of my tax dollars. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23269488)

Actually none of this will occur. Most people will just whine in their blog when the Senate makes a similar bill, both bills get merged, the President signs it, and our tax dollars will be used to guard the profits of the record labels, so they can keep selling Britney Spears records.

It will be just like laws about speeding and drug charges. People will whine how packed our prisons are getting, and point to the numerous abuses of the law (as the law gets upheld again and again in courts with the simple argument by the plaintiff/prosecutor that the law is "merely a clarification of existing law", but that is it. The law will remain on the books for the foreseeable future because it is another source of revenue. What city, county, or other municipal district would not love a law allowing them to seize stuff and sell it for profit?

Look at the DMCA, and how it is repeatedly upheld in US courts.

Want to do something now before the Kopyright Kops knock on your door? Donate to the EFF, write to your Congress people with a valid reason, something other than "wah, I want my warez or mp3z", and make it known NOW during election year that if any Congress-peeps who look at this law will not get your, or anyone you can pursuade's vote, regardless of party. This is not a law that people understand enough to protest against, but what would help keep this from seeing the light of day are press snippets of people against this law with reasonable reasons why.

The only good thing is that we can run the clock out on this law, and force this back to square one, if enough people actually would do something other than perhaps post a whine on a public forum.

Re:Waste of my tax dollars. (1)

plantman-the-womb-st (776722) | more than 6 years ago | (#23269690)

Look at the DMCA, and how it is repeatedly upheld in US courts.
Please cite a single criminal case to which this statement applies.

You can't, it has never happened.

Copyright infringement is a civil matter, not a criminal offense.

In the words of Bill Hicks... (2, Funny)

Picass0 (147474) | more than 6 years ago | (#23269404)

I prefer the political puppet on the right.
Well, I prefer the puppet of the left.

Hey, the same guys are controlling both puppets! We're fucked!

Re:In the words of Bill Hicks... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23270112)

Just in case anyone thinks he's just joking:
http://opensecrets.org/pres08/index.asp?cycle=2008 [opensecrets.org]

John Conyers (1)

Vinegar Joe (998110) | more than 6 years ago | (#23269420)

Is a corrupt piece of crap who should be behind bars.

Geist.. yeah, sure (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23269470)

I signed up for Geist's "opt out" site, now I get about TEN TIMES AS MANY telemarketing calls every day. HMMMMMM>?

All California Reps and Senators will vote Yes (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23269484)

Sadly all California Congress reps and Senators will vote to pass this fascist pro corp anti citizen crap. It's hardly even worth writing them asking them to oppose it. We don't need more Federal Police and Prisoners.

Re:All California Reps and Senators will vote Yes (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23269546)

Sadly all California Congress reps and Senators will vote to pass this fascist pro corp anti citizen crap. It's hardly even worth writing them asking them to oppose it. We don't need more Federal Police and Prisoners.
I live in California and I did write them. I got a letter back thanking me for supporting strong IP laws, and promises that they will continue to support such laws. I get constant reminder of how these elected congresscritters isn't listening to voters every time I write them about issues.

Re:All California Reps and Senators will vote Yes (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23270056)

I got the same letter from Feinstein which is why I posted that. As I live in a hick town in Central California I guess my soon free and recent Anime fansubs are about to disappear as are most of the IRC networks I lurk on. Time Warner is about to loose me as a customer as I don't watch Cable TV.

Contact him! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23269582)

I don't know why, but they left out the contact link [house.gov] , where you could let Rep. Conyers know what you think of this bill.

This is Perfect! (1)

PurpleZebra (1201249) | more than 6 years ago | (#23269598)

Now all we have to do is look at who sponsored this bill and we can find out who is taking bribes seeing as this has absolutely nothing to do with America but only lining the pockets of the great John Conyers!

Just patent democracy to show them! (1)

Doug52392 (1094585) | more than 6 years ago | (#23269604)

Here's the PERFECT solution to showing those politicians in Washington just how fucked up the patenting system is: patent "The act of participating and voting in a Presidential election in the United States", then sue the government for copyright violations! Or better yet, patent "The act of holding a Congressional session"

Wait... (1)

calebt3 (1098475) | more than 6 years ago | (#23269606)

If they unfairly seize a Linux box, and that seizure is proved in court to be unconditional, could one demand compensation for the value of <i>everything</i> lost? I understand the Red Hat source code is worth ~$5.5 billion...

Re:Wait... (1)

calebt3 (1098475) | more than 6 years ago | (#23269618)

Gahh. Stupid italic tags. I forgot I was trying Extrans...

Actually, this could be fun (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23269634)

I haven't read the bill, so I could be off the mark, but if we have IP cops, then there's someone I can call when somebody doesn't respect my creative commons licensing. This is great. Let's use the cop police. Let's start by passing the word amongst US flickr users:"If somebody rips a picture of yours without your authorization and against your licensing terms, call the IP police!"

I'm sure they'll be real glad investigating all these IP violations.

Re:Actually, this could be fun (1)

Rod Beauvex (832040) | more than 6 years ago | (#23270296)

You do realize you won't have access to this service, right?

quickboot (1)

symbolset (646467) | more than 6 years ago | (#23269642)

Boot the rascals out. All of them. Even the ones that vote against it will do so because passage of this evil plan is a foregone conclusion and so the powerful puppetmasters will vote against it to a negotiated victory for the plan. Out with them. All of them.

If you give a damn about liberty and privacy boot the rascals out.

Re:quickboot (3, Interesting)

calebt3 (1098475) | more than 6 years ago | (#23269748)

Something another /.er posted at some point that I found interesting:

===================
545 People
By Charlie Reese --

Politicians are the only people in the world who create problems and then campaign against them.

Have you ever wondered why, if both the Democrats and the Republicans are against deficits, we have deficits?

Have you ever wondered why, if all the politicians are against inflation and high taxes, we have inflation and high taxes?

You and I don't propose a federal budget. The president does.

You and I don't have the Constitutional authority to vote on appropriations. The House of Representatives does.

You and I don't write the tax code, Congress does.

You and I don't set fiscal policy, Congress does.

You and I don't control monetary policy, The Federal Reserve Bank does.

One hundred senators, 435 congressmen, one president and nine Supreme Court justices - 545 human beings out of the 300 million - are directly, legally, morally and individually responsible for the domestic problems that plague this country.

I excluded the members of the Federal Reserve Board because that problem was created by the Congress.

In 1913, Congress delegated its Constitutional duty to provide a sound currency to a federally chartered but private central bank.

I excluded all the special interests and lobbyists for a sound reason. They have no legal authority.

They have no ability to coerce a senator, a congressman or a president to do one cotton-picking thing.

I don't care if they offer a politician $1 million dollars in cash. The politician has the power to accept or reject it.No matter what the lobbyist promises, it is the legislator's responsibility to determine how he votes.

Those 545 human beings spend much of their energy convincing you that what they did is not their fault. They cooperate in this common con regardless of party.

What separates a politician from a normal human being is an excessive amount of gall.

No normal human being would have the gall of a Speaker, who stood up and criticized the President for creating deficits.

The president can only propose a budget.

He cannot force the Congress to accept it.

The Constitution, which is the supreme law of the land, gives sole responsibility to the House of Representatives for originating and approving appropriations and taxes.

Who is the speaker of the House?

She is the leader of the majority party.

She and fellow House members, not the president, can approve any budget they want.

If the president vetoes it, they can pass it over his veto if they agree to.

It seems inconceivable to me that a nation of 300 million can not replace 545 people who stand convicted -- by present facts - of incompetence and irresponsibility.

I can't think of a single domestic problem that is not traceable directly to those 545 people.

When you fully grasp the plain truth that 545 people exercise the power of the federal government, then it must follow that what exists is what they want to exist.

If the tax code is unfair, it's because they want it unfair.

If the budget is in the red, it's because they want it in the red.

If the Marines are in IRAQ, it's because they want them in IRAQ.

If they do not receive social security but are on an elite retirement plan not available to the people, it's because they want it that way.

There are no insoluble government problems.

Do not let these 545 people shift the blame to bureaucrats, whom they hire and whose jobs they can abolish; to lobbyists, whose gifts and advice they can reject; to regulators, to whom they give the power to regulate and from whom they can take this power.

Above all, do not let them con you into the belief that there exists disembodied mystical forces like 'the economy,' 'inflation' or 'politics' that prevent them from doing what they take an oath to do.

Those 545 people, and they alone, are responsible.

They, and they alone, have the power.

They, and they alone, should be held accountable by the people who are their bosses - provided the voters have the gumption to manage their own employees.

We should vote all of them out of office and clean up their mess!

Charlie Reese is a former columnist of the Orlando Sentinel
================

Re:quickboot (1)

Simple-Simmian (710342) | more than 6 years ago | (#23270092)

Hear, hear.

Re:quickboot (1)

rts008 (812749) | more than 6 years ago | (#23270098)

Wow.
That's what I call 'calling a spade a spade' in very eloquent words.
Wow.

BTW, thanks very much for this. One of the more thought provoking things I've seen here in a while.

If this passes... (2, Insightful)

MrKaos (858439) | more than 6 years ago | (#23269666)

soon after will we have

Seed cops; Those seeds are copyright - you cannot plant them/you violated copyright by planting them

IP cops; thank you for welcoming us to your business, we will now audit all of your computer systems

RIAA cops; thank you for welcoming us to your home, we will now audit all your media for copyright violations

MPAA cops; You know when you pirate a movie a small child dies in a third world country, you should be ashamed of yourself

And of course the "say goodbye to innovation cops", these guys will be the thought police come to audit your head for having ideas that just happened to already be copyright.

Big Mother in sooo many ways.

Re:If this passes... (1)

revengebomber (1080189) | more than 6 years ago | (#23270032)

soon after will we have

Seed cops; Those seeds are copyright - you cannot plant them/you violated copyright by planting them

We already have that. It's called Monsanto Co., Legal Division.

Maybe people will stop watching. (2, Interesting)

analog_line (465182) | more than 6 years ago | (#23269940)

Don't get me wrong, I think this is insane, and I hope it goes the way of similar bills before it, but the tighter the so-called "content cartels" grip on their copyright, the more persuasive the arguments for Creative Commons, GPL (v2 or v3), and other similar copyright-related social movements become. The same laws that protect the iron grip of Disney on Mickey Mouse for as long as they can legislate it, also protect those who participate in the Creative Commons (like Nine Inch Nails to take a totally non-random example) from the Disneys, the Time Warners, and the Sonys of the world. They can only be the gatekeepers of "the culture" if YOU choose to pay the entry fee. There's plenty enough out there that they don't control, that they CAN'T control anymore. All this sound and fury is trying to make people focus on them instead of looking for alternatives. There's no such thing as bad publicity, and all that.

The onus is on those who claim that art should be for love and not money to put up or shut up. If you're an artist, go make some art under something like Creative Commons that both allows you to make money off it when someone else is making money off it (and sue the pants off them if they don't pay you for it), and allows people who aren't making money off it to spend as much money as they want spreading the word about how awesome you are. If you're not an artist, don't forget that artists need to eat as much as you do. Actually reach into that wallet and give money to artists that take a chance and produce work that you like under a Creative Commons license (or some other license with terms that aren't crazy) and be as generous as you can afford. Every Tom, Dick, and Sally that releases something under Creative Commons isn't worth supporting just because they're releasing as Creative Commons. There is a TON of freely distributable junk out there. However there ARE people out there that every one of us reading this story would feel comfortable supporting, and rather than shovel money on a monthly basis into Comcast's, or Sirius', or Time Warner's or whomever's bank account for content that isn't worth using as toilet paper, a small fraction of that money could make a world of difference for one of the people that IS taking a risk and releasing good content under terms that are reasonable.

Where the hell is the Creative Commons Foundation of the Arts, taking donations and patronizing quality artists that release work under the Creative Commons like the foundations supporting free software? Do you think this stuff grows on trees?

That's okay, history proves differently (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23269952)

Prohibition was a CONSTITUTIONAL change. And even it didn't work.

So puny laws like this one won't have any effect against the pirates, united, who will never be defeated.

You faiDl it (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23269992)

a full-time GNAA 'superior' machine. The future Of the [tuxedo.org],

Effective ways to push against this? (1)

H310iSe (249662) | more than 6 years ago | (#23270204)

Any suggestions for effective ways American citizens can push against this legislation? Somehow I feel emailing my congresswoman doesn't really do much (and Pelosi probably opposes it anyway, I hope...).

Howabout non-us citizens (i.e. my French and Canadian friends) anything productive they can do?

Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?