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Slackware 12.1 Released

ScuttleMonkey posted more than 6 years ago | from the old-timers dept.

Operating Systems 244

SlackFan writes "Slackware 12.1 has been released, with kernel 2.6.24-5. 'Among the many program updates and distribution enhancements, you'll find better support for RAID, LVM, and cryptsetup; a network capable (FTP and HTTP, not only NFS) installer; and two of the most advanced desktop environments available today: Xfce 4.4.2, a fast, lightweight, and visually appealing desktop environment, and KDE 3.5.9, the latest 3.x version of the full-featured K Desktop Environment.'"

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omfg first (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23282034)

first bitches

Re:omfg first (1)

calebt3 (1098475) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282216)

Is this [wikipedia.org] what you are looking for?

ok and? (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23282046)

same stuff as in every other distro. the same "most advanced desktop environments available today" can be found in hundreds of other distros too. Why not advertise based on what makes slackware different from the rest than taunting the software that everyone else has?

excellent question (4, Interesting)

goombah99 (560566) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282188)

What exactly does go into making a "distro" anyhow. My only experience with this is making my own custom Knoppix CDs that woke up as apache servers. Seemed pretty freakin easy. it was sort of a chinese menu of what you wanted to leave in and leave out.

But of course I was standing on the shoulder's of giants. Someone created the look and feel of that and made all the config files work. But how much of that is what goes into a distro and how much is pretty much set by the packages them selves. e.g. choose gnome and is basically the look and feel set?

these days everything seems like it comes down to four looks, KDE or gnome in user interface and redhatish or debianish in directory layout and packages.

THe only distro I've played with that felt amazingly original in every aspect is Damn Small where everything is different and very tight. (never tried Puppy).

So what exactly goes on to make a "distro". What makes say ubuntu different than one of the four chioices (kde,gnome, debian, redhat)

Re:excellent question (4, Informative)

notamisfit (995619) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282242)

Really, any distribution boils down to package selection, package management, and release engineering. As per your example, Ubuntu uses Debian unstable for packages and apt for management, but only supports a small subset of unstable, and releases every six months. Yeah, just about every GNOME and KDE distro looks the same (well, scratch that for KDE, considering how much Mandriva, SuSE, and Kubuntu patch it all to hell and think they're actually *improving* it). Slackware's more of a throwback to the days when a Linux distro was just an easy way to get a system up and running, as opposed to an all-inclusive software library.

Re:excellent question (3, Interesting)

Ian Alexander (997430) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282676)

If you think DSL is amazingly original then you should try SliTaz. ( http://www.slitaz.org/en/ [slitaz.org] ). They've crammed a working desktop into half the space of DSL, and it's a damn sight more functional, too. It's one of the most unique distro's I've tried so far.

Re:ok and? (0, Troll)

thenextpresident (559469) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282230)

"Why not advertise based on what makes slackware different from the rest than taunting the software that everyone else has?"

Because the people that know Slackware already know what makes it different, and those that don't probably should stay away.

I guess the question is: Why advertise what we already know?

Re:ok and? (1)

Nocturnal Deviant (974688) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282670)

mod this guy up thats slackware in a nutshell props.

Re:ok and? (4, Funny)

Jurily (900488) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282722)

Cool ad. Is the "STAY AWAY!!!" logo on the booting screen too?

Re:ok and? (1)

Phroggy (441) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282290)

Because what makes Slackware different from the other distros hasn't really changed since previous versions. What has changed are the addition of new features that other distros have had, and Slackware is now adding.

Slackware doesn't fuck with upstream. (2, Informative)

karmaflux (148909) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282294)

And that's why I use it.

Incidentally, "taunting" is not the same word as "touting."

Re:Slackware doesn't fuck with upstream. (1)

kokoko1 (833247) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282370)

True slackware never ever fucked with upstream provider.

Re:ok and? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23282298)

"taunting" should be "touting"

its not bastardized (1)

ArchieBunker (132337) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282304)

Some distros started moving config files around and going more towards GUI programs (redhat). At least with Slackware you can still expect to find stuff in the right places, inetd.conf in /etc. Stuff like that.

Re:ok and? (4, Funny)

gambolt (1146363) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282336)

Slackware isn't different from other distros. Other distros are different from slackware.

slackware:linux::Rolling Stones:Rock&Roll

Re:ok and? (2, Insightful)

Inner_Child (946194) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282440)

That's actually a fairly apt analogy - the Stones are one of those bands that people either love or hate, regardless of the band's longevity.

So thank you. Thank you for the first good analogy Slashdot has ever seen.

Re:ok and? (1)

j79zlr (930600) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282806)

The real difference of Slackware is ironic. They don't bastardize their packages with tons of patches. So somehow they are different by not being different? I am now a Gentoo user which is definitely bastardized with tons of patches ;) but I grew up with Slackware and still have much sentimental value with its progress. Nice to see it still kicking.

What makes Slackware different... (4, Funny)

Tumbleweed (3706) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282460)

It's Slacktastic, and chock-full of Volkerdingliciousness! Slackware - part of a well-balanced breakfast.*

* Notes: Not to be used as a flotation device. May stick to certain types of skin. Do not taunt Slackware.

Que pasa? Nada. (4, Funny)

DarrenBaker (322210) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282060)

According to their home page, this is the first interesting thing to happen to Slackware since 2005. It's the most boringest of all distros!

Re:Que pasa? Nada. (5, Insightful)

Pommpie (710718) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282074)

Which is why it works so boringly. No crashes, no wacky untested software with potentially unrealised bugs, no fancy memory-sapping 3D effects... where's the fun in that?

Re:Que pasa? Nada. (1)

paulpuddles (669120) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282296)

Right on brother, its kinda like a straight-edge approach to life. Taking every day sober.

err... on the other hand, screw that. I'd rather fall over on the floor from a 'crash', than sit there and fight the war on paper cuts!

Re:Que pasa? Nada. (4, Insightful)

zappepcs (820751) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282090)

To some it is boring, yet to others it's a sign that not only is Linux not going to go away, but it is available for any business, government institution, school, person etc. to modify and use it as they please. There is no single church around the globe despite the rather vigorous efforts of several groups. There should be no single OS. The simple reason for this is Born out by your comment. We simply cannot all play nice together and agree on what an OS is supposed to be and do. For that reason alone there should never be a single OS. Vive Slackware! Vive la difference.

You never know, one day next year (around March 15th or so) you will find that you have the perfect application for the use of Slackware. All of a sudden, it will seem like a cool OS for that application and you will have a moment of de ja vu and silently thank me for this moment.

Re:Que pasa? Nada. (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23282136)

You never know, one day next year (around March 15th or so) you will find that you have the perfect application for the use of Slackware.
CINNA. O Caesar-
CAESAR. Hence! Wilt thou lift up Olympus?
DECIUS. Great Caesar-
CAESAR. Doth not Brutus bootless kneel?
CASCA. Speak, hands, for me!
Casca first, then the other Conspirators and Marcus Brutus stab Caesar with shards of Slackware disks.
CAESAR. Et tu, Linux?- Then fall, Caesar! Dies.

Re:Que pasa? Nada. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23282320)

LOL. You might as well post a joke about sex on Slashdot, as a joke about Shakespeare.

Nice. (1)

Gazzonyx (982402) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282786)

Best. Post. EVER.

*Sorry, I'm not an orator such as Brutus... he's the honorable man*

Re:Que pasa? Nada. (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23282382)

Slackware was the first distribution I used, a fairly long time ago (3.0? when 1.2.13 was the current kernel). I stuck with it for years until 7.0.0. My problem, I suppose, is that for me it was sort of in no man's land.

I compiled everything myself, for two main reasons: not everything was available as a Slackware package, and I patch a large number of packages to tweak them in a way I like. The issue with Slackware was package management: it has a package system, but not a terribly sophisticated one. I wrote a little Perl script that works similar to checkinstall, meaning I created all my own packages from source. But Slackware's package management just was not enough for me. No dependency checking, really no features at all, apart from recording the output of tar xfvz.

I could have, probably, gone with a distribution that does everything for you, and learned to appreciate that. Instead I wanted more control, and with Slackware, that would have been too haphazard. So I created my own distribution, with my own package system, init scripts, and so on. It really is from scratch, and it scratches an itch (hah!). I even ported over a lot of BSD tools to replace GNU coreutils, gzip, findutils, etc. It's been great fun.

Slackware was a wonderful learning experience for me but in the end it wound up either doing too much, or not enough, you could say. I'm glad it's the one I picked up first, but I've outgrown Slackware and can't see a need to use it again--I sure did defend it for a long while, though!

Re:Que pasa? Nada. (1)

calebt3 (1098475) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282452)

What did you switch to?

Re:Que pasa? Nada. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23282500)

I switched to the distribution I created. It's not based on anything. The init system was inspired very heavily by FreeBSD but I didn't use their scripts. The package manager is my own, too. Again inspired by FreeBSD, it's ports from sources.

I'm not sure what else is important in differentiating distributions. I've patched a number of the ports, but not heavily. My KDE, for example, won't look much different than if you installed from sources. I'm under the impression that many other distributions customize things like that, so I suppose that's another difference.

Re:Que pasa? Nada. (2, Insightful)

mrbluze (1034940) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282542)

To some it is boring, yet to others it's a sign that not only is Linux not going to go away, but it is available for any business, government institution, school, person etc. to modify and use it as they please

I just read some reviews on Slackware, then Gentoo. I run Ubuntu at the moment. I think people bash Slackware because it's difficult to install and maintain compared to others. But if someone gave me the job of installing Linux onto a computer that will later be difficult to physically access and must work no matter what, say, for example, in an operating theatre, then Slackware is a worthy choice. Seems like it's possible to get exactly the features you desire with slackware and nothing else.

But it seems to me that everybody is thinking that every Linux distro's big wish is to pass the wife-test. Not everybody wants to design, build and maintain their own car. Most people just want a car that works and gets fixed for them, but it would be a sad day if we had no alternatives like slackware.

Re: except you're wrong... (1)

robw810 (819414) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282098)

12.0 released in July 2007. When anticipating a /. arrival, minimizing content on the main page is good.

Re:Que pasa? Nada. (2, Interesting)

celle (906675) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282236)

Another name for boring is rock solid stable. Been using it since 1994. I haven't lost data yet even after my home was struck by the biggest tornado in the United States (2 1/2 miles wide)(it had friends). I was doing a backup and cleaning out the interior of the case when the tornado struck. I went back to what was left of my town(three tornados went through it)(obliterated) and my house(struck by two tornados) the next afternoon. Put the covers back on and removed the server to my fathers. I then cleaned out the case and powered her up. No problems and thats after the server running for six years straight. She's still running strong four years since that day.

Re:Que pasa? Nada. (2, Insightful)

Cairnarvon (901868) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282314)

``Tornado resistance'' is probably more of a hardware feature than a software one, wouldn't you think?

Re:Que pasa? Nada. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23282752)

Karma transcends all boundaries.

Re:Que pasa? Nada. (2, Interesting)

MightyMartian (840721) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282554)

And it's the fastest. I tried Ubuntu's server edition and found it a royal pain in the ass. Part of it, I suppose, is because Slackware was the first distro I installed (way back in 1993 or thereabouts), and has remained very conservative in its setup process, as well as maintaining all the default paths, so that a good deal of software can compile with little or no pissing around. It's packaging system isn't as pretty as Debian's, but is functional.

Re:Que pasa? Nada. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23282794)

Here here! Me too- SLS then Slackware- around 1994. I'm doing some RedHat, Fedora, Ubuntu, Gentoo, etc. It's all fun, but I just can't warm up to the rpm thing. It's got some cool features, but it's easy to fsck up and then you're fscked. Slack packages are simple, clean, tight, and PLAIN TEXT readable and editable. An all around solid distro and like so many others- I've had NO problems, even when really pushing things like library version skew. The ONLY trouble I ever had was with ReiserFS...

Thank you Patrick! I truly hope I can make some $ and send you some!

Hooray for slack! (5, Insightful)

lambent (234167) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282066)

The first distro I ever installed, and the one that's changed the least over the years. You may say that is a bad thing, but Slack is the only distro i can think of that hasn't succumbed to bloat, rot, ego, or the all-things-to-all-people syndrome. It may have stagnated for a while, but it's good to see it get back to a more regular release schedule.

Back from the dead. (0, Offtopic)

tumbaumba (547886) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282080)

Could the Duke Nukem be far behind?

Fix URL, please - s/org/com/ (5, Informative)

robw810 (819414) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282088)

The official Slackware site is at slackware.COM, not slackware.ORG. (and it's already dead as of comment #3).

All hail Pat and the Slackware Team (2, Insightful)

stox (131684) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282092)

They just keep going, and going, and going!!

Bittorrents ... (4, Informative)

ClickOnThis (137803) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282106)

... are listed on this page:

http://www.slackware.org/getslack/torrents.php [slackware.org]

Re:Bittorrents ... (2, Funny)

notamisfit (995619) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282114)

Seed you bitches! Rescue me from Ubuntu hell!

Re:Bittorrents ... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23282544)

Unconvincing username? Check.
Obscure referential sig? Check.
Playing to current popular /. groupthink? Check.
UID around the one million mark? Check.

Do the world a favor and kill yourself.

Re:Bittorrents ... (wrong tld again) (0, Redundant)

robw810 (819414) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282124)

and again, it's .COM, not .ORG

Re:Bittorrents ... (wrong tld again) (1)

ClickOnThis (137803) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282152)

and again, it's .COM, not .ORG
Blame the summary. I clicked through to the announcement, then navigated to the torrent page. In any case, the .org and .com addresses both point to the same IP address, so no big deal?

Re: destination ip addresses (1)

robw810 (819414) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282180)

slackware.com has address 64.57.102.34 slackware.org has address 12.246.148.57

Re: destination ip addresses (1)

ClickOnThis (137803) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282318)

slackware.com has address 64.57.102.34
slackware.org has address 12.246.148.57
True, but the www.slackware.com and www.slackware.org addresses both point to 64.57.102.34.

Re www ip (1)

robw810 (819414) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282348)

Aha! Whoever maintains the .org must have noticed and changed his www record, or perhaps I just haven't noticed that before. I'm betting on the first one. :)

Re:Bittorrents ... (wrong tld again) (1)

robw810 (819414) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282156)

Modded "redundant" ?? I guess at least one of the people with mod points this time around needs a "-1 HUA"

Re:Bittorrents ... (wrong tld again) (1)

Gazzonyx (982402) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282956)

HUA?

Re:Bittorrents ... (wrong tld again) (1)

Frosty Piss (770223) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282164)

and again, it's .COM, not .ORG
Looks like a mirror. Is there a difference?

Re:Difference in .org and .com (3, Informative)

robw810 (819414) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282198)

Yes, there is a difference. Patrick controls one of them, and has no control over the other. Just because it's a mirror right now does not mean that it will be a mirror in ten minutes.

is it still painful to install? (-1, Troll)

timmarhy (659436) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282150)

I remeber trying to install slackware (7 i think) and it was so painful i had to burn the cd, least anyone else ever attempt to use it.

Re:is it still painful to install? (1)

notamisfit (995619) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282210)

Eh, it's not too bad. It's ncurses based (no super-pretty, takes 10 minutes to load anaconda crap), and partitions still have to be done by hand (although cfdisk is a lot nicer than regular fdisk). All in all, just regular Linux install stuff (select packages, set time zone, configure network, yadda yadda yadda).

Re:is it still painful to install? (3, Funny)

aaronbeekay (1080685) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282214)

If you considered it "painful" to burn the CD, maybe Linux wasn't the best choice in the first place.

Re:is it still painful to install? (2, Funny)

Colonel Korn (1258968) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282324)

If you considered it "painful" to burn the CD, maybe Linux wasn't the best choice in the first place.
He meant that he placed the CD in a fire.

Re:is it still painful to install? (1)

calebt3 (1098475) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282334)

Why on earth would he do that?! That could RUIN IT!!

(I kid, I kid)

Re:is it still painful to install? (1)

timmarhy (659436) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282414)

you really do have to explain things slowly for some people.....

Re:is it still painful to install? (0, Troll)

celle (906675) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282282)

Painful? Go back to the kids room(windows) this board is for the adults. Spoiled little brats!!

Re:is it still painful to install? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23282750)

The difference is amazing. Its as easy as vista.

So tell me... (1)

FoolsGold (1139759) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282154)

Why do they call it Slackware?

Re:So tell me... (1)

notamisfit (995619) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282172)

Because it has the highest amount of slack in any Linux distro.

Re:So tell me... (4, Informative)

Nimey (114278) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282184)

Patrick (the maintainer) is a SubGenius [wikipedia.org] .

Re:So tell me... (1)

mrbluze (1034940) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282594)

Patrick (the maintainer) is a SubGenius [wikipedia.org].
Well, for a distro that was supposedly inspired by the religion, Slackware is not particularly funny or amusing but much of the installation process does make you think it's intended to make a parody of the user and teach them the true meaning of absurdity.

Re:So tell me... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23282846)

Not only that, but it's supposedly the origin of the name slackware.

Re:So tell me... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23282196)

It's from the Church of the SubGenius [wikipedia.org] .

Re:So tell me... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23282240)

The maintainers are too big of slackers to even package Gnome. I mean, come on.

Re:So tell me... (1)

Phroggy (441) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282312)

Yep, apparently they decided building Gnome is a pain in the ass, and somebody else [droplinegnome.net] was already doing a better job anyway, so why bother?

Re:So tell me... (2, Funny)

gambolt (1146363) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282366)

ask Bob

Xfce ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23282224)

What manner of beast is this? Real Slackware users prefer fvwm2.

NB I can't imagine Volkerding not including fvwm2, skipping Gnome , yes, fvwm2 never.

Re:Xfce ? (3, Informative)

notamisfit (995619) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282260)

WTF? 12.1 ships with FVWM 2.4.20. Along with blackbox, fluxbox (my personal fave), windowmaker, and twm, the REAL man's window manager.

Re:Xfce ? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23282292)

Real men use ratpoison.

Will it like my Hauppauge PVR-150 TV card (1)

bogaboga (793279) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282228)

Where as most distros I have tried will recognize and work well with the mentioned card, my efforts to have those distros recognize and fully utilize the remote control which comes with the card have failed at best! The whole exercise was full of frustrations culminating in giving up.

It's my hope that someone can tell me that "Yes, Slackware will work for you."

But will will not be surprised if Slackware turns out to be just like the distros I have tried.

If you asked me whether Linux sucks, I'd unequivocally say..."Yes it does, and it does so big time." All because of a remote control that does not work.

Before I get flamed, I would like to say I read and followed all howtos I could google and yes I am no newbie to Linux's command line.

Re:Will it like my Hauppauge PVR-150 TV card (1)

notamisfit (995619) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282268)

You do know that hardware is a kernel thing, not a distro thing, right? If no other Linux distribution supports it, Slackware more than likely will not.

Re:Will it like my Hauppauge PVR-150 TV card (0, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23282316)

Most distros do not install the librdf by default. Functions that require ir controls are run by this library or variants of it. So the hauppauge cards will work with x11 graphics but will not have full function. I would suggest that you try the myth tv setup distros, they are multimedia oriented and have remote control libraries installed by default. I have had ir devices working in Slackware for years but then again I prefer compiling things from source and in this respect Slackware is the best disto for this hands down. During the install you can specify that you want to create a development workstation and Slackware will install the environment flawlessly. Distros like Ubuntu are not developer friendly because they are sudo based and you will have a hell of a time compiling anything from source unless you get all the right development libs after install and setup a genuine superuser so that you can compile C programs.

Re:Will it like my Hauppauge PVR-150 TV card (1)

bcat24 (914105) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282404)

Distros like Ubuntu are not developer friendly because they are sudo based and you will have a hell of a time compiling anything from source unless you get all the right development libs after install and setup a genuine superuser so that you can compile C programs.


Why exactly would someone need to be root to compile a C program? gcc works just fine on my Ubuntu box from an ordinary user account.

Re:Will it like my Hauppauge PVR-150 TV card (1)

X0563511 (793323) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282410)

Need root? "sudo su".

Problem solved, you are now in a shell with UID/GID of 0.

That said, I am now pulling down all the torrents (and I'll seed with my whopping 20k/s upload throughput). Can't wait for slamd64 to put 12.1 out! (64-bit pure slackware variant)

Re:Will it like my Hauppauge PVR-150 TV card (1)

Neil Hodges (960909) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282558)

Or even better: sudo -s

OT: how is slamd64? (1)

Gazzonyx (982402) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282818)

How is slamd64? I run Slackware on my 32 bit server, and BlueWhite64 on my 64 bit. The toss up was between slamd64/bluewhite64 and, IIRC, bluewhite had more seeds. FWIW, they've been less than a day behind Kurt, releasing an RC right after each Slackware RC (you can see them trail each other by hours on distrowatch.com, these guys must have concurrent rsyncs running to the compiler!). I've only had one issue with bw64, a bad obscure header file of all things... their 64 bit version of the library had some stupid typo in it or something. Other than that, it's been almost as good as Slack.

Re:Will it like my Hauppauge PVR-150 TV card (1, Interesting)

nawcom (941663) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282342)

actually, if there is any known kernel module that gets your card to work, then of course slackware supports it.

I've been using Slackware forever, and there is one simple reason - it seems like it's the only distribution out there that is still Linux.

Wtf do I mean by that? Every linux distro out there is branching off into their own little world, making them look like they are complete different operating systems. In fact, a lot of new linux users look at distributions that way. They don't like the fact that, yes, I can compile the sources of all your special ubuntu software, and make my slack install literally clone your standard ubuntu installation. Hardly anything has changed in the framework of slackware since the beginning, which is why I look at it as the only distribution that "is" still "Linux"

Back to the parent post; you want to know how to get your wireless card to work? you compile the driver (a ton easier than you think) and read the README and INSTALL file that comes with it. Aka follow directions.

I had to deal with my girlfriend's openSUSE installation because she was struggling to get ndiswrapper to work. She had to download a new kernel, download patches for the new kernel that enabled ndiswrapper, which required more patches to the kernel in order to support the dependencies for the ndiswrapper module. After that, she runs the program to have it read the windows driver for her broadcom card, and it was a no go.
I come over, took a look at the situation, and I downloaded the source code for ndiswrapper, compiled it (a simple make; make install) - loaded up the module (modprobe) and ran the ndiswrapper command line program. it worked.

I guess you can use this as proof that linux isn't yet ready for your mainstream user, but it also shows that distributions are going in their own little directions. Slackware still works, and works well. I applaud the person who posted about stability and such, because it's true.

And for your PVR-150, here you go: http://www.mythtv.org/wiki/index.php/Hauppauge_PVR-150 [mythtv.org] - read up :)

Re:Will it like my Hauppauge PVR-150 TV card (1)

Neil Hodges (960909) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282562)

Hey, that sounds like why I use Gentoo. Sure, USE != --with-, but it still grants a greater degree of flexibility than a lot of those (pure) binary distros, especially when it comes to kernel stuff.

Re:Will it like my Hauppauge PVR-150 TV card (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23282436)

If you asked me whether Linux sucks, I'd unequivocally say..."Yes it does, and it does so big time." All because of a remote control that does not work.

Wow. Get some perspective, please. One single unsupported device, and you think it unequivocally sucks big time?

Nah, on second thoughts, I don't think you're serious, I just think you are trying to goad people into helping you. Low move. If you want help, annoying people on purpose isn't nice, even if it does occasionally get results.

Re:Will it like my Hauppauge PVR-150 TV card (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23282550)

Ummm... yes.

If you install everything you need, it will. It's working 100% with a PVR-150 with IR transceiver for me in a mythtv box running slackware 12.0 at this moment. Hell, it probably worked on slackware 11.0.

You will need to upgrade the kernel, download the firmware, and run this [blushingpenguin.com] patched LIRC. But for someone using slackware, that's all in a days work.

Re:Will it like my Hauppauge PVR-150 TV card (1)

amiga3D (567632) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282640)

"If you asked me whether Linux sucks, I'd unequivocally say..."Yes it does, and it does so big time." All because of a remote control that does not work." I'd say that the fact that the Hauppauge PVR-150 works at all on linux is a sign that linux doesn't suck. The fact is that despite the fact that Hauppauge and other similar manufacturers are hostile to linux and refuse to write drivers or to provide the info for others to write them there are still many cards that do work. This is a testament to the skill and ingenuity of OSS developers who should be lauded for their hard work and perseverance but instead are slammed by the ignorant who wrongly place the blame on them instead of the real culprits. If you want to bitch about your remote not working on linux....call Hauppauge and bitch at them!

Re:Will it like my Hauppauge PVR-150 TV card (1)

Straterra (1045994) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282688)

Wait..You are going to say a whole OS sucks because you can't get a remote to work? You are aware there are fully compatible USB remotes, right?

It seems to be YOUR fault that you didn't investigate the hardware before buying it. You act as if Linux is the only OS to not have drivers for stuff.

I seem to remember 64-bit versions of Windows missing lots of print drivers.. Get over it, spend $25 to get a working remote.

Re:Will it like my Hauppauge PVR-150 TV card (1)

Skapare (16644) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282880)

If you asked me whether Linux sucks, I'd unequivocally say..."Yes it does, and it does so big time." All because of a remote control that does not work.

If you asked me whether Hauppauge hardware sucks, I'd unequivocally say..."Yes it does, and it does so big time." All because of an OS that does not work.

Re:Will it like my Hauppauge PVR-150 TV card (1)

incripshin (580256) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282904)

Some hardware can take a bit of work to get working. Maybe it wasn't configured into the kernel. Maybe it was built into the kernel and has to be loaded in with a slew of special options. You can't be afraid to get your hands dirty.

Another option might be to consider one of the BSDs, which all have their own kernels. If they have a driver, it would likely have been written by completely different developers. I have heard of cases where BSD drivers helped where linux drivers didn't.

Re:Will it like my Hauppauge PVR-150 TV card (2, Insightful)

julesh (229690) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282916)

It's my hope that someone can tell me that "Yes, Slackware will work for you."

Slackware will work for you if you know how to make it work. Slackware is a distribution for experts. Slackware is a distribution for people who don't mind^W^Wwant to get their hands dirty.

Congratulations, Pat! (2, Insightful)

hitest (713334) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282418)

Congratulations, Pat! Thanks for your dedication:-) I'll always be a Slacker!

If it's not good enough for Linus Torvalds (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23282530)

...then it's not good enough for me.

ahh, the good old days... (1)

pjr.cc (760528) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282666)

Everytime i see a post about slackware it brings back some old memories... slackware was the first distro i'd used (tho not the first time i'd used linux) and i think the only other options at the time were yggdrassil and sls.

Sooo many floppies. Its good to see it still survives and thrives.

Re:ahh, the good old days... (1)

sconeu (64226) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282746)

According to Wikipedia, Slack is actually a derivative of SLS [wikipedia.org] .

Kinda amateurish (1)

rastoboy29 (807168) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282742)

Slack was my first Linux distro, and I still fondly remember downloading the floppy iso's with so much excitement.  That's why recently I decided to give it another whack.

I have to say though, it lacks a lot of the polish of the more recent distro's, and this is not a good thing.  It's been several months so I don't recall the details, but I mostly just recall having the same sorts of issues that I had on other distros several years ago, but are now annoyance free in those other distros.

It's not just a matter of being slim and sleek--it's a bit emaciated ;-)

xfce? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23282754)

I want my damn fluxbox!

Re:xfce? (1)

Gazzonyx (982402) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282848)

Fortunately Slackware has a GCC on board, and almost every library you could wish for. No one is stopping you from compiling it, using an RPM, or a deb, a slackscript, using makepkg and installpkg, a bitrock installer, yum, or apt. It's your OS; treat it as such.

Re:xfce? (1)

nijk (781345) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282946)

It comes with fluxbox, too :)

Illness (2, Interesting)

Tragek (772040) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282774)

Whatever happened with Patrick's illness?

afterstep? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23282852)

slackware was my first distro too. I used fvwm, something else and afterstep. I loved afterstep a lot, but then versions after 1.x were too bloated for my taste. Is afterstep-classic still alive? shipping? I'll try slackware for just that if nothing else

I thought this was news for nerds.... (4, Insightful)

Skylinux (942824) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282868)

WTF is going on here? I have been reading through the comments and it appears as if most "nerds" have been pussy wiped by other distros and don't understand the point of actually knowing your OS.

If you learn Slackware, you know Linux! Why is that you ask?
Because Slackware does not come with a bunch of highly modified packages, Slackware is build using tested and known to be working code. Configuration and partition is done by hand. Slackware does not crash if setup properly, it is a perfect OS for any server or Desktop.... if you know what you are doing but it is not for you grandma. It is an Operating System for "real" nerds :)

With all the bitching about lack of features in Slackware, it may be time for you "nerds" to go and load up Vista for the ultimate hand holding experience.

You all remind me of that computer technician we have at work, he thinks he is the freaking king but knows nothing about computers. He fixes issues by running every GUI tool on his thumb drive and hoping that one of them sticks. When I ask him how he fixed it, he has no clue and says that "Tool xyz" fixed it. When I ask him to run "regedit" his eyes open wide and he starts to sweat.... cold sweat.
Dude you are not a computer tech, geek, nerd, hacker .... whatever. Go home and learn something.... almost forgot, he is A+ certified, uhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh

Same goes for Slackware, use it, learn it, know Linux or use openSuSE and stop the bitching.

Re:I thought this was news for nerds.... (4, Insightful)

Dusty101 (765661) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282968)

Although the parent post's a bit... overcaffeinated, he has a point: maintaining a Slackware box teaches a lot about Linux overall. As a stepping stone for those who find it "as user-friendly as a rattlesnake", might I suggest they try out VectorLinux ( http://vectorlinux.com/website2/ [vectorlinux.com] )? It's a Slackware-derived distro that's easier to get to grips with, & runs nice & quickly on old boxes (which is why I often use it). Not totally pure in terms of 'free' (as in speech), but rather usable.

System Requirements (4, Interesting)

dotancohen (1015143) | more than 6 years ago | (#23282932)

The slack site lists these as the system requirements:
        * 486 processor
        * 16MB RAM (32MB suggested)
        * 100-500 megabytes of hard disk space for a minimal and around 3.5GB for full install
        * 3.5" floppy drive

Does one really need a floppy drive to install it? Of my two desktops and single laptop, none have a floppy drive anymore.
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