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A Yottabyte of Storage Per Year by 2013

CmdrTaco posted more than 6 years ago | from the more-bits-please dept.

Data Storage 246

Lucas123 writes "David Roberson, general manager of Hewlett-Packard's StorageWorks division, predicts that by 2013 the storage industry will be shipping a yottabyte (a billion gigabytes) of storage capacity annually. Roberson made the comment in conjunction with HP introducing a new rack system that clusters together four blade servers and three storage arrays with 820TB of capacity. Many vendors are moving toward this kind of platform, including IBM, with its recent acquisition of Israeli startup XIV, according to Enterprise Strategy Group analyst Mark Peters."

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In a Galaxay Close to Home (5, Funny)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 6 years ago | (#23323632)

Impressed, you will be.

Re:In a Galaxay Close to Home (4, Funny)

dreamchaser (49529) | more than 6 years ago | (#23323810)

I think they should use 'Lottabyte' instead.

Re:In a Galaxay Close to Home (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23324052)

I prefer the term lolbyte.

Re:In a Galaxay Close to Home (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23324066)

How about nomnomnombyte?

10^18 bytes ... isn't that "Exabyte"? (4, Informative)

KWTm (808824) | more than 6 years ago | (#23324168)

If I recall: byte, kilobyte, megabyte, gigabyte, terabyte, petabyte, exabyte.
Unless we're talking about the British "billion"?

Re:10^18 bytes ... isn't that "Exabyte"? (3, Informative)

dreamchaser (49529) | more than 6 years ago | (#23324256)

Kidding aside, 10^24 is a Yottabyte [wikipedia.org] .

Yottabyte Fhtagn (4, Funny)

spun (1352) | more than 6 years ago | (#23323936)

What, didn't you know Yottabyte was a Great Old One? First cousin of Nyarlothep, half brother of Shub Niggurath. Described as a multidimensional vortex of spinning disks emitting a terrible screeching, Yottabyte records the souls of the damned.

Re:Yottabyte Fhtagn (3, Funny)

The Redster! (874352) | more than 6 years ago | (#23324212)

... and everybody say... "Yotta!"

Re:In a Galaxay Close to Home (2, Funny)

curmudgeous (710771) | more than 6 years ago | (#23324086)

I'm glad to see I wasn't the only one who initially read that as "Yodabyte".

Re:In a Galaxay Close to Home (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23324302)

Careful, you'd better get those bytes looked at. Yottabytes are notorious for getting infected.

Impressed (2, Interesting)

goombah99 (560566) | more than 6 years ago | (#23324306)

So If a billion people owned 100 Yotta bytes that's 10^9*10^9*10^9*100*9 = 8E30 bits

there's something like 10^49 atoms on earth, and we'll only be able to access the crust of which only 5% is iron, and 80% of the earth is covered with water. so if we assume as a wild as guess that perhaps a part in a trillion of the earth can be made into disk drives then we have

1E37 atoms available for disk drives.

if each yottbyte drive weighs say 1/5 of a kilo and we assume it's built out mainly carbon and has say a mean weight of 20 amu per atom then this is like
6E21 atoms

therefore one could build no more than
1E15 drives all total.

Thinking about this number it also makes me wonder about how McDonalds got all those hamburgers.

Maybe I boofed the math or assumptions. Good thing this is slashdot and I know people will kindly correct me

Re:Impressed (1)

goombah99 (560566) | more than 6 years ago | (#23324404)

Fixing my own math. I see TFS is wrong and a yottabyte is not 10^18 but is in fact 10^24. So is a billion people have a drive that's
1E34 drives.

so that's 100 atoms per drive.

Some how I don't think so.

I'm waiting until 2015 (5, Funny)

WheresMyDingo (659258) | more than 6 years ago | (#23323634)

When I can say "I have a lotta yottabytes"

May the... (0, Redundant)

NoName Studios (917186) | more than 6 years ago | (#23323638)

May the force be with you. More amusing is the fact this story was submitted by Lucas123.

The new term (3, Funny)

nuzak (959558) | more than 6 years ago | (#23323652)

Under the new regime, wouldn't that be a "Yobibyte" or something similarly idiotic?

Re:The new term (2, Funny)

somersault (912633) | more than 6 years ago | (#23323678)

There's no way Yobi could kick Yotta's ass.

Re:The new term (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23323686)

If they start calling it that, I am going to personally track you down and kick you in the shins for putting it in their heads.

Re:The new term (2, Informative)

ajcham (1179959) | more than 6 years ago | (#23323882)

Hate to break it to you, but they already called it that.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yobibyte [wikipedia.org]

Re:The new term (1)

Ed Avis (5917) | more than 6 years ago | (#23323744)

No, 'cos they really do mean yottabyte, 1_000_000_000_000_000_000_000_000 bytes (according to Wikipedia). It would be as silly to use powers of two for annual storage sales by HP as to use powers of two to measure Russian oil exports or the population of China.

Re:The new term (1)

maxume (22995) | more than 6 years ago | (#23324034)

Would using powers of 2 make the measurement different?

Re:The new term (1)

Ed Avis (5917) | more than 6 years ago | (#23324122)

A yobibyte is about 1.2 yottabytes.

Re:The new term (1)

maxume (22995) | more than 6 years ago | (#23324214)

You aren't thinking silly enough. That's not the measurement, it's an expression of the measurement.

Re:The new term (2, Funny)

sm62704 (957197) | more than 6 years ago | (#23324192)

Under the new regime, wouldn't that be a "Yobibyte" or something similarly idiotic?

If it's idiotic you want then it's idiotic you get. "My computer storage has Yobibitybobityboodidybytes."

What's infinity divided by zero?

Re:The new term (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23324342)

What's infinity divided by zero?

Infinity squared?

Ha Ha have any of you jokers noticed (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23323680)

A yotta byte is 10^24 which is a trillion terra bytes
or 10^12 * 10^12

I thought geeks hung out here......

Re:Ha Ha have any of you jokers noticed (4, Funny)

starglider29a (719559) | more than 6 years ago | (#23323738)

yotta yotta yotta...

Re:Ha Ha have any of you jokers noticed (1)

RiffRafff (234408) | more than 6 years ago | (#23323892)

"Grab a brew...don't cost nothin'..."

Re:Ha Ha have any of you jokers noticed (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23323940)

Obviously you are new to typical storage industry math.

Re:Ha Ha have any of you jokers noticed (2, Interesting)

lucas_picador (862520) | more than 6 years ago | (#23324064)

Wikipedia [wikipedia.org] says that a yottabyte is, as you say, not a billion but a quadrillion gigabytes (10^24).

The write-up gets this wrong, but so does the article... in a different way. (It says that a yottabyte is "a thousand exabytes", when it's really a million exabytes. An exabyte is 10^18.)

WTF.

YoddaByte? (1)

electricbern (1222632) | more than 6 years ago | (#23323684)

So will integers be little endian or big endian in YoddaByte drives?

Re:YoddaByte? (1)

ilikejam (762039) | more than 6 years ago | (#23323794)

Yes.

A billion Gigabytes? (4, Informative)

hansraj (458504) | more than 6 years ago | (#23323690)

umm.. wouldn't that be one zettabyte? If I am not off then one yottabyte would be a billion terabyte

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yotta [wikipedia.org]

Oh and btw, (1)

hansraj (458504) | more than 6 years ago | (#23323734)

my conversions are long scale (followed in Germany among other countries). Check the table for short scale conversions that is followed in the US. Either way the summary is wrong.

Re:A billion Gigabytes? (1)

Colonel Korn (1258968) | more than 6 years ago | (#23323760)

umm.. wouldn't that be one zettabyte? If I am not off then one yottabyte would be a billion terabyte

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yotta [wikipedia.org]
Yeah. If it were merely a billion gigabytes, and we assume (not unreasonably) that the average drive is 1 terabyte 5 years from now, then the summary implies that only a million drives will sell in 2013, which would be terrible. Hmm, it's equally hard to imagine a billion such drives shipping, so maybe I'm missing something.

Re:A billion Gigabytes? (2, Informative)

Siener (139990) | more than 6 years ago | (#23323768)

umm.. wouldn't that be one zettabyte? If I am not off then one yottabyte would be a billion terabyte

FAIL all around

A billion gigabytes would be an exabyte. A billion terrabytes would be zettabyte. A trillion terabytes or a quadrillion gigabytes would be a yottabyte.

Wikipedia to the rescue [wikipedia.org]

Re:A billion Gigabytes? (1)

PhuCknuT (1703) | more than 6 years ago | (#23323774)

No actually a billion gigs is an exabyte. A billion terabytes would be a zettabyte.

Re:A billion Gigabytes? (2, Informative)

drodal (1285636) | more than 6 years ago | (#23323806)

No, a billion giga bytes is an exa byte 10^9 * 10^9 = 10^18 so a billion terabytes is 10^9 * 10^12 = 10^21 = zeta byte

Re:A billion Gigabytes? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23323972)

Either way, that's a yotta bytes, nyuck nycuk

Re:A billion Gigabytes? (3, Insightful)

neokushan (932374) | more than 6 years ago | (#23324020)

Remember, guys, "Billion" means two different things depending on which part of the world you're in, so make sure you're not getting into a debate between an american and a brit who are both probably right and wrong at the same time.

Re:A billion Gigabytes? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23324190)

I can't recall a time that billion has meant anything other than 10^9 amongst pleasant company. It's clearly winning the fight.

Yottabytes (2, Funny)

sm62704 (957197) | more than 6 years ago | (#23323696)

Yow! That's a lotta bytes!!!!

Re:Yottabytes (0, Redundant)

gstoddart (321705) | more than 6 years ago | (#23323726)

Yow! That's a lotta bytes!!!!

or, "a yotta bytes" as it were. :-P

Cheers

Re:Yottabytes (1)

WheresMyDingo (659258) | more than 6 years ago | (#23323960)

Yow! That's a lotta bytes!!!!

Reminds me of a tune...

Way deep inside
Hard drive
You nneed me!
BUM, BUM!
AAAAAaaaaaaaaaaa...a...a..
You wanna whole lotta bytes!
ERM!
You wanna whole lotta bytes!
ERM!
You wanna whole lotta bytes!
ERMmmmmmm

A billion gigabytes? (1)

ObjetDart (700355) | more than 6 years ago | (#23323704)

I believe a "yottabyte" is 1 billion petabytes, not gigabytes.

Re:A billion gigabytes? (4, Interesting)

gstoddart (321705) | more than 6 years ago | (#23323772)

I believe a "yottabyte" is 1 billion petabytes, not gigabytes.

God, that hurts my head. I remember being at a university seminar in '91 or so, and one of the presenters was talking about petabytes.

At the time, it drew blank expressions and he had to explain that it was the one after terabytes (since that was an abstraction to most people).

I often find myself awed by just how much you can buy nowadays cheaply. I'm told that at Costco nowadays, you can buy a terabye of disk storage for about $250 CDN -- that's utterly mind-boggling to someone who remembers single-density, single-sided floppy drives.

Crazy stuff.

Cheers

Re:A billion gigabytes? (1)

Tanktalus (794810) | more than 6 years ago | (#23324230)

Yes. I bought a 1TB "drive" (it's actually two drives in a RAID configuration) with an ARM processor running Linux from CostCo, and connect to it via samba and nfs, all for $320. They're now selling a 2TB unit for about $430.

I've also ordered a new machine with a 1TB drive from a nearby small computer store - that one is about $340 for a single SATA drive.

I still remember spending $1800 for my first 1.2GB drive that was SCSI-based ... back in 1993.

Re:A billion gigabytes? (3, Funny)

Gilmoure (18428) | more than 6 years ago | (#23324310)

I like to break out my Dec. 1986 copy of MacWorld and look at the prices for hard drives and RAM back then. Oh man, if I had a time machine, I scoop up a butt-load (metric) of 30 pin 1 MB SIMMS and live like a king.

In 1986.

Good gravy, I remember the music and pants back then.

Nooooooooo!

Yottabyte? (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23323708)

Well, here is one compelling reason to stop developing ever larger and larger storage - silly names.

And at the other end of the spectrum you have the nybble.

Which billions? Which gigabytes? (2, Insightful)

LoonyMike (917095) | more than 6 years ago | (#23323714)

How much exactly does that mean?

- 10^9 * 10^9 bytes
- 2^30 * 2^30 bytes
- 10^9 * 2^30 bytes
- 10^12 * 2^30 bytes (non-american billions)
- ...

You never know, these days

Re:Which billions? Which gigabytes? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23323786)

> (non-american billions)

Or British. I think there's some former colonies who still go by the old system, but the rest of the world long switched over.

Re:Which billions? Which gigabytes? (1)

s0litaire (1205168) | more than 6 years ago | (#23323850)

Who cares with all that mathematical Technobabble!! All we really want to know is how many.... MP3's Divx's DVD's Blu-ray's ...can a yottabyte hold!!! :D:D

Re:Which billions? Which gigabytes? (1, Funny)

Midnight Thunder (17205) | more than 6 years ago | (#23324106)

How much exactly does that mean?

More pr0n than you can even imagine ;)

PENIS PENIS HAHAHAHAHAHA PENIS (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23323732)

my dick

Dell ships a billion gigabytes now. (-1, Offtopic)

jcims (316827) | more than 6 years ago | (#23323752)

Wankah

I Believe It (1)

MrCrassic (994046) | more than 6 years ago | (#23323764)

I wouldn't be too surprised if we hit 10TB arrays next year, so this kind of progression seems like it's possible. Data's cheap nowadays!

Re:I Believe It (1)

PacketShaper (917017) | more than 6 years ago | (#23323888)

Next year? I just put a 24 TB Raid6 array online and have two more in the works for this month.

Re:I Believe It (1)

vidarh (309115) | more than 6 years ago | (#23323898)

What do you mean "hit"? Unless you mean "we" as in your family or your employer we're well past that point already.

There are a lot larger arrays than 10TB for sale. The company I order servers from at work delivers standard configurations up to 24TB, and the only reason they don't offer anything larger is that their customer base is mainly relatively small companies that wouldn't need it. IBM sells "off the shelf" systems that can scale to at least 512TB...

Heck, I've got the space for more than 10TB worth of RAID5 storage in my home machine, just no use for it (might come in handy for heating come winter, though...)

Re:I Believe It (1)

MrCrassic (994046) | more than 6 years ago | (#23324244)

I meant this from a consumer standpoint. It's extremely rare for one to find an individual with anything more than 10 TB, even at the file-sharing server level (though they do probably exist). Same thing as people having more than 8GB of RAM on their computers; they're out there, but not widespread yet.

Re:I Believe It (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23323968)

No, Storage is cheap. Data is still expensive to create, unless you are talking about the p2p shares.

Re:I Believe It (4, Insightful)

Hatta (162192) | more than 6 years ago | (#23324166)

Data's easy to generate. It's useful data that's difficult.

In my server (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23323782)

Let me know when i can get a yottabyte of storage into my server. I have alot of porn I need to store.

Re:In my server (1)

cashman73 (855518) | more than 6 years ago | (#23324112)

Who needs a girlfriend, when you can store that much porn! ;-)

Finally... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23323798)

I can have enough room for my porn collection....

Re:Finally... (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23323838)

I was getting concerned, it took over 10 minutes for someone to reference porn.

That's a lot of storage. (1)

AndGodSed (968378) | more than 6 years ago | (#23323804)

How long before I can get one of those on a pen-drive?

I refuse to dump floppies until then.

Re:That's a lot of storage. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23323964)

It will be required for Windows 2011 Ultimate edition.

So confused (4, Funny)

UnknowingFool (672806) | more than 6 years ago | (#23323852)

This new unit of data confuses me. I only think of data sizes in terms of Library of Congresses (LOCs), mass in terms of stones, and lengths in terms of horse hands. Now get off my lawn!

Re:So confused (1)

Ilan Volow (539597) | more than 6 years ago | (#23324334)

You'll need to upgrade that lawn to a football field so we can describe the new data size as "a football field of gigabyte hard drives".

Lottabyte (2, Insightful)

davidwr (791652) | more than 6 years ago | (#23323868)

I prefer the nebulous term "lottabyte."

Lottabyte: An unspecific term meaning the amount of storage you think you need but know you can't afford.

Re:Lottabyte (2, Funny)

Chyeld (713439) | more than 6 years ago | (#23324062)

Not to be confused with the Lolitabyte, which is a unit of measure peculiar to 2chan style boards...

Illegal? (2, Funny)

davidwr (791652) | more than 6 years ago | (#23324296)

Not to be confused with the Lolitabyte
Having that much storage should be against the law.

Re:Lottabyte (2, Funny)

UnknowingFool (672806) | more than 6 years ago | (#23324102)

Lottabyte: An unspecific term meaning the amount of storage you think you need but know you can't afford

Or in the vernacular: Crapload

Shit (3, Funny)

Ariastis (797888) | more than 6 years ago | (#23323870)

This means I have to find a whole lot more porn if I want to keep up...

It may be spelled 'Yottabyte'... (1)

stoofa (524247) | more than 6 years ago | (#23323904)

But it's pronounced 'Throat-Warbler Mangrove.'

A billion gigabytes? (1)

Paradise Pete (33184) | more than 6 years ago | (#23323926)

Considering that I a few thousand GB right here on my desk, I'm guessing that they already ship way way more than a billion.

New prefixes (4, Insightful)

CSMatt (1175471) | more than 6 years ago | (#23323946)

At this rate, we'll need to start defining new prefixes before 2020.

Re:New prefixes (4, Interesting)

VeNoM0619 (1058216) | more than 6 years ago | (#23324150)

No kidding, looking at how we got the prefixes [jamesshuggins.com] in the first place we may run out of greek/latin words.

Hopefully it will come down to unobyte, dosbyte, or something with a number convention, otherwise we might be hearing "crazybyte" or "uberbyte".

ooooooo... (1)

grikdog (697841) | more than 6 years ago | (#23323966)

That's a LOT of Bill Clinton excuses!

Um, so how much is it? (1)

kabocox (199019) | more than 6 years ago | (#23324010)

O.k. I've gotten one thing by glancing at the slashdot comments. No one really knows how much a yottabyte of storage will be!

Can some one show me how many kilobytes are in yottabyte?

Will this be unit of measure just for companies like Google or MS only or are we talking about yottabyte flash drives?

I think (1)

Joseph Hayes (982018) | more than 6 years ago | (#23324024)

They better start rolling out porn in 1080p format or the only thing that sized drive will be viable for is storing the "citizen surveillance" data at the Department of Homeland Security.

Re:I think (1)

chuckymonkey (1059244) | more than 6 years ago | (#23324088)

Little Brother by Cory Doctorow, read it.

A better metric (1)

TripleEvilFish (882394) | more than 6 years ago | (#23324046)

More importantly, how many MP3s can I store?!

Re:A better metric (1)

curmudgeous (710771) | more than 6 years ago | (#23324128)

None if you listen to RIAA.

Re:A better metric (1)

Nimsoft (858559) | more than 6 years ago | (#23324318)

One really really really long one.

A list for your edification (4, Informative)

Ralph Spoilsport (673134) | more than 6 years ago | (#23324108)

I emailed the "onduty editor" before the article went live on the error of their calc on what a yotta is. So much for slashdot error prevention...

Anyway, I emailed them this link to the terms [techtarget.com] in question, and post it here, for your edification. I have a post-it note on my bookcase with these terms - I think that as time goes on, knowing EXACTLY what each one is will be of some use. Until the oil runs out and we are shivering in the cold, anyway...

;-)

Here's their names, abreviations and their power of ten, so you know how big/small it is.

yocto- y 10^-24
zepto- z 10^-21
atto- a 10^-18
femto- f 10^-15
pico- p 10^-12
nano- n 10^-9
micro- m 10^-6
milli- m 10^-3
centi- c 10^-2
deci- d 10^-1
(none) -- --
deka- D 10^1
hecto- H 10^2
kilo- K 10^3
mega- M 10^6
giga- G 10^9
tera- T 10^12
peta- P 10^15
exa- E 10^18
zetta- Z 10^21
yotta- Y 10^24

RS

Re:A list for your edification (2, Funny)

stoofa (524247) | more than 6 years ago | (#23324178)

So...

we now know a yottapede has A LOT of legs...

but we're left wondering what a yoctopus would look like.

Re:A list for your edification (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23324248)

You forgot Planck time- t_p(10^-44) and its inverse, 'forever and a day'.

How much is currently being shipped annually? (2, Interesting)

kaos07 (1113443) | more than 6 years ago | (#23324136)

Considering the fact that I'm just a regular user who doesn't run a server or data centre or anything particular storage intensive (relatively speaking) and I bought a 1TB (1000GB) last year, I'm wondering whether this claim is as "WOW!" as it appears to be on the surface. Surely there's at least 1 million users (1 million x 1 thousand = 1 billion GB, or 1 yottabyte) who've bought a 1TB hard drive? Or even 10 million who've bought 100GB hard drives. And this is just home users mind you. There must be thousands, if not millions, of companies around the world with servers and data centres with plenty of gigabytes of storage being purchased every year.

New High in Misleading Stories (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23324140)

Do the math.

A "Yottabyte" exceeds the information stored on all computers today *COMBINED*.

It's marketing hype and nonsense. Read the fine print.

If it isn't sinking in, try to divide a yottabyte by the transfer rate of a single SATA drive. Figure out how long you'll be dead once the formatting finishes.

Mama Mia! (1)

weyesone (1216104) | more than 6 years ago | (#23324160)

That's a yottabytes!

That's a yotta porn (1)

gozar (39392) | more than 6 years ago | (#23324170)

n/t

It's still not enough (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23324176)

I would like to go on the record as saying that we will need more space than this...

Re:It's still not enough (3, Funny)

m.ducharme (1082683) | more than 6 years ago | (#23324392)

Oh come on, 640 yottabytes should be enough for anybody....

Why... (1)

Astadar (591470) | more than 6 years ago | (#23324208)

iOughttaByte? WhyNottaYouByte?

Seinfeld in the IT Field? (1)

The Assistant (1162547) | more than 6 years ago | (#23324258)

Oh, sorry!!! I thought you said Yadabytes!!!!

Yada, Yada, Yada!!!!

Yatta? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23324262)

Yatta! [google.com]

Bigger, Not Faster (2, Informative)

Doc Ruby (173196) | more than 6 years ago | (#23324304)

Server drives with high density need to be faster (seek and transfer times) to support more multiple users accessing different sequences of the disk's storage addresses in rapid interleaved succession.

But personal drives don't need as high speeds for one person's use, especially when the high capacity is for large media content objects that are stored unfragmented. We don't need to spend the money on transfer speeds so much faster than our playback speeds that it's never used. Large builtin caches are useful for real random-access data in small chunks, like programs or numerical datasets, not media.

Blu-Ray's max transfer speed is 54Mbps [wikipedia.org] , though that's for recording - 48Mbps is max playback. 3x for buffering during FWD/REV scanning playback would be 144Mbps, 2.25MBps. Big drives currently recommended for personal use, like Seagate's 1TB Barracuda ES.2 [storagereview.com] , get at least 53MBps transfer, over 23x as fast as the fastest it will ever really be asked to deliver. If it weren't so unnecessarily fast, maybe it would cost less, and an array of them for the same hundreds of dollars would hold more content.

With 50GB Blu-Ray HD titles to store, getting more sets of 20 titles in each HD in a RAID is a lot more important than getting them faster than they can be played.

Prefixes (1)

Aram Fingal (576822) | more than 6 years ago | (#23324316)

Here are a couple of sources on those prefixes which TFA seems to have confused. They agree with each other:
SearchStorage Definitions [techtarget.com]
Extreme prefixes [lewrockwell.com]

This last one mentions even higher prefixes like vendeka (10^33).

that's ALOT of pron (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23324362)

Meh, Still not enough to hold my porn!

To Quell the Confusion on the Size of this Term... (1)

molotovjester (1273662) | more than 6 years ago | (#23324406)

...we shall refer to this unit as 'ALotabytes'
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