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First Space Lawyer Graduates

ScuttleMonkey posted more than 5 years ago | from the great-more-lawyers dept.

Space 188

PHPNerd writes "Over at space.com is an interesting article about the first space lawyer. He graduated from the University of Mississippi. 'Any future space lawyer might have to deal with issues ranging from the fallout over satellite shoot-downs to legal disputes between astronauts onboard the International Space Station. The expanding privatization of the space sector may also pose new legal challenges [...] "We are particularly proud to be offering these space law certificates for the first time, since ours is the only program of its kind in the U.S. and only one of two in North America," said Samuel Davis, law dean at the University of Mississippi.'"

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just what we need (5, Funny)

crazybit (918023) | more than 5 years ago | (#23383986)

a new breed of lawyers

Isn't maritime law enough? (4, Insightful)

EmbeddedJanitor (597831) | more than 5 years ago | (#23384078)

It seems that maritime law is very similar if we can discount aliens.

Disputes between citizens of different countries are already resolved on the high seas by maritime law. Dumping too.

Space law just sounds like a degree cooked up by one of those internet universities that send you a pdf degree.

Re:Isn't maritime law enough? (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23384148)

I was under the impression outer space != the sea.

Maritime law is similar but there are a whole range of other issues involved in space law. Plus the outer space treaty really has no bearing for a maritime lawyer.

Re:Isn't maritime law enough? (3, Funny)

somersault (912633) | more than 5 years ago | (#23384318)

Plus the outer space treaty really has no bearing for a maritime lawyer.
Ba-doom-tish! *groan from the audience*

Re:just what we need (5, Funny)

CowboyNealOption (1262194) | more than 5 years ago | (#23384452)

And here I was hoping space would be one place to someday finally have a lawyer-free haven.

Re:just what we need (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23384640)

Maybe, if we work hard enough, *every* place can be a lawyer-free haven.

Re:just what we need (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23384468)

Space Lawyers belong in the sun.

Re:just what we need (2, Insightful)

srmalloy (263556) | more than 5 years ago | (#23384532)

In virtually all the SF I've read, 'space lawyer' carried a degree of denigration over and above that of a simple lawyer, however.

Re:just what we need (1)

TubeSteak (669689) | more than 5 years ago | (#23384866)

In virtually all the SF I've read, 'space lawyer' carried a degree of denigration over and above that of a simple lawyer, however.
In SF, they're usually using it in the same way the Navy uses the expression "sea lawyer" and the Army uses the expression "barracks lawyer".

Re:just what we need (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23384628)

Darn, here I was hoping it was a new graduation technique, by spacing all the lawyers and watching them burn up in atmospheric reentry. Those who manage to survive deserves their law degree.

Re:just what we need (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23384886)

We need space ambulances that this new breed of Lawyer could chase through the galaxy. Looking for class action where no lawsuit has gone before.

Speaking of space ambulances... I'm surprised that we haven't seen a higher demand for Space Firefighters lately...

Re:just what we need (1)

camperslo (704715) | more than 5 years ago | (#23384974)

Space Lawyers, what a wonderful idea

The first thing that came to mind was banner ads in space made by dropping them out the airlock at just the right interval...

Most states don't recognize specialization... (5, Informative)

Anonymous Freak (16973) | more than 5 years ago | (#23383994)

In the states I've looked up, "specializing" as a lawyer means nothing. Every lawyer is on 100% equal footing with regard to the law. The "family law" lawyer has exactly the same legal standing as a "criminal defense attorney", wether the trial is a messy divorce or a murder trial.

While I suppose it's good to have specialized training in law for a specific field, this just seems silly. I mean, I'm sure there have been lawyers before (working for NASA, Lockheed, Boeing, etc,) that have "specialized" in space law. Who cares if the diploma lists "space law", really?

Nor do they with doctors . . . (5, Interesting)

Tanman (90298) | more than 5 years ago | (#23384060)

Specialization has, for most professions, been a way for the industry to differentiate between its own members. It is not a government-recognized title. For example, a medical doctor can legally perform brain surgery without the 7 year neurosurgery residency. More than that, someone who has completed the 7-year training and *fails* the neurosurgery boards can legally perform brain surgery.

Many HMO clinics/etc, as a cost-cutting measure, will actually hire 'radiologists' and other specialists who have been unable to pass their boards. This is because, while they are legally allowed to practice whatever medicine they want (assuming they have their state license to practice medicine), they will work cheap 'cause anyone who checks their credentials will likely turn them away.

On another note, always check your physicians credentials :)

But Nurse Practitioners do (1)

Bryansix (761547) | more than 5 years ago | (#23384462)

There are actually different typed of Nurse Practitioners certificates like FNP or ANP.

Re:Nor do they with doctors . . . (3, Insightful)

MMC Monster (602931) | more than 5 years ago | (#23385054)

In the medical profession, some of the subspecialty boards are more of a money-grab by the professional societies rather than any indication of the abilities of the practitioners.

In the field of cardiology, there are a number of subspecialty board examinations. Some of them are necessary (ie: Interventional Cardiology, Electrophysiology), and some of them are simple money grabs (Echocardiography, Nuclear Medicine, Peripheral Vascular Disease).

Unfortunately, it all sounds impressive when you are a patient. :-(

Re:Most states don't recognize specialization... (1, Offtopic)

explosivejared (1186049) | more than 5 years ago | (#23384106)

Dodge's interest in space law grew from an early fascination with space exploration that was based mostly on science and history.

Most kids interested in space want to be astronauts. When you think about it, space is this massive unexplored frontier full of adventure and wonder. Juxtapose that against the minutia sifting and pedantry of the field of law, and that tells me one thing; this kid must be really bitter.

Re:Most states don't recognize specialization... (2, Funny)

easyTree (1042254) | more than 5 years ago | (#23384404)

When you think about it, space is this massive unexplored frontier full of adventure and wonder.

I'm with you... let's find the natives, kill them, then start building the first space-McBurgerJoint!

Re:Most states don't recognize specialization... (5, Informative)

IP_Troll (1097511) | more than 5 years ago | (#23384208)

Exceptions! Patent Attorneys and Maritime Attorneys. Attorneys are not allowed to use those prefixes in a description of their profession unless they have passed special Federal bars, which are seperate from state bars. Although many IP attorneys say they litigate patents, a Patent Attorney is the only one that can secure a patent from the patent office. Similarly a Maritime Attorney is the only type of attorney that can litigate in Maritime law tribunals. From the article it sounds like this is just a novelty concentration for law school and nothing more.

...nor do they need to. (1)

Radon360 (951529) | more than 5 years ago | (#23384220)

I hope you're trolling.

Yes, every lawyer is on equal footing with the law, but the field of law is so vast and complex that it requires specialization. If you think that a family law lawyer expertly knows what he's (she's) doing with patent law, or tort law, I encourage you to go try it. The smart attorney will refer you to someone who specializes in the repective law. The dumb (or maybe adventurous) one might try to handle it themselves.

You don't have a civil engineer designing cell phones just as you don't have a electrical engineer writing out structural member specifications for a bridge design...yet they're both in the field engineering, just different specializations. Where do you learn these specializations? Probably the place that gave you your sheepskin. I can't say that I've heard of many institutions giving out a degree in just "engineering" lately, either.

-

Re:...nor do they need to. (1)

Anonymous Freak (16973) | more than 5 years ago | (#23384852)

No, I was not trolling. And it's not that I don't recognize that specialization is a good thing in a lawyer. (I have a "family law" lawyer for my family law issues, a "corporate law" for my business issues, and a "trademark attorney" for my trademark issues.)

It's the fact that the college is making a big deal out of this. Again, I'm SURE that there have been "space law" specialists in the past. The fact that this college decided to start offering it doesn't mean that this guy is the FIRST "space lawyer", it just means he's the first guy to graduate from THIS COLLEGE with THIS DEGREE.

Re:...nor do they need to. (1)

AshtangiMan (684031) | more than 5 years ago | (#23384864)

In engineering school you do learn the specialization in school. In Law you might get some exposure to the specializations in school, or you might not. But you learn the specialization in practice.

Weird (1, Troll)

untouchable (615727) | more than 5 years ago | (#23384002)

Why the University of Mississppi? Isn't that like studying oceanography in Colorado? Wouldn't it be more prudent to study in Florida, Texas? Hell, even Alabama is a better choice.

Re:Weird (3, Interesting)

WatersOfOblivion (1215490) | more than 5 years ago | (#23384158)

Except that John C. Stennis, as in the John C. Stennis Space Center, is from there (I actually met him by chance at a nursing home in Madison near the end of his life). And Fred Haies on Apollo 13 was from Biloxi, Mississippi. So it's not _totally_ unprecedented for someone to from Mississippi to be associated with space...

Re:Weird (1)

Svet-Am (413146) | more than 5 years ago | (#23384284)

except that John C. Stennis graduated from my alma mater, Mississippi State University -- NOT University of Mississippi (Ole Miss). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_C._Stennis

Re:Weird (1)

untouchable (615727) | more than 5 years ago | (#23384300)

But there is no official NASA business in Mississippi. As far as I know, FAA does not have any extra offices in Mississippi. So why station the first 'space' law school in Mississippi?

Re:Weird (1)

Otter Popinski (1166533) | more than 5 years ago | (#23384528)

But there is no official NASA business in Mississippi.
I'm not sure what you mean by that, since GP specifically mentions the Stennis Space Center, which is very much in Mississippi and is definitely used by NASA last I checked. Explain?

Re:Weird (1, Interesting)

sabre86 (730704) | more than 5 years ago | (#23384946)

1) As several people have already mentioned, Stennis Space Center is on the coast. That's nowhere near Oxford, where Ole Miss actually is, of course.

2) Ole Miss is a Space Grant [wikipedia.org] school. Why it's Ole Miss and not Mississippi State, where the Aerospace Engineering program is, I'll never understand. But that's how it is. There are several lines of space related research going on at both schools, though.

3)I'm not sure what you mean by "Extra [FAA] offices." What are you talking about?

4) "Like studying Oceanography in Colorado." I can't but feel insulted. What would make Texas a better choice than Mississippi? Is it somehow more on the border to space? Space access is hard, no matter where you are at, unlike ocean access. In fact, it's pretty much equally inaccessible to every college program in the country. The Florida schools might have a slight advantage, FIT did launch a rocket [fit.edu] a couple years back for the Pioneer Cup. Experts on the matters (space, space law, launch vehicles) are scattered across the country -- and this includes Mississippi. I suspect that the program is at Ole Miss because that's where (at least some) experts in space law happen to work. There is a law school there, you know.



"Even Alabama would be better." God, I hope you're trolling, because you've got the prejudiced asshole act down. Neither Mississippi nor Alabama is perfect, but they are American states in the 21st century. Like pretty much anywhere, there are plenty of poor people, stupid people, ignorant people and prejudiced people (your act could help you fit in). They may even have a larger proportion of such people than other places, but that doesn't preclude them from having plenty of knowledgable, intelligent, reasonable people who can practice space law or build rockets or speak intelligently about nearly anything else.

--sabre86

I, for one . . . (5, Funny)

Tanman (90298) | more than 5 years ago | (#23384006)

[comment deleted due to space copyright]
-Space Lawyer

Re:I, for one . . . (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23384960)

Space, the final frontier to plunder
These are the lawyers of the law firm Dewey Cheatem 'n' Space
Their continuing mission to sue,
Where no lawyer has sued before...

title of the next b-movie: (1)

RelliK (4466) | more than 5 years ago | (#23384016)

Attack of the space-lawyers!

Re:title of the next b-movie: (1)

jonadab (583620) | more than 5 years ago | (#23384324)

> Attack of the space-lawyers!

Not weird enough, and not really redundant enough either, for a B-movie title.

I suggest Attack of the Mutant Killer Space Lawyers!

Muppets (1)

HiggsBison (678319) | more than 5 years ago | (#23384636)

Attack of the space-lawyers!

Not weird enough, and not really redundant enough either, for a B-movie title.

I was thinking more along the lines of "Lawyers In Spaaaaaace!"

Ooo! Just had a scary thought: Shatner. [shivers]

Not much workload (2, Funny)

Teresita (982888) | more than 5 years ago | (#23384032)

I suppose if a woman spends six months with two guys on the International Space Station, and three months after she lands on Earth she gives birth, a Space Lawyer could help determine paternity. Also if a Russian pilot dings the body work on the International Space Station with his Soyuz and denies it on the collision report, a Space Lawyer would come in handy there too.

Re:Not much workload (1)

corsec67 (627446) | more than 5 years ago | (#23384344)

I suppose if a woman spends six months with two guys on the International Space Station, and three months after she lands on Earth she gives birth, a Space Lawyer could help determine paternity.


I think that someone trained to give a paternity test [wikipedia.org] would be a better choice than a "space lawyer." An issue that might need a space lawyer would be nationality, but that would probably be very similar to a cruise boat in that regard, and probably would be more dependent on where the child is born, not conceived.

Re:Not much workload (1)

somersault (912633) | more than 5 years ago | (#23384716)

Could also be handy if one of the astronauts inadvertently breaks the speed of light on re-entry - "The Known Universe vs Major Richtenbacher"

Puts a whole new perspective... (4, Insightful)

bagboy (630125) | more than 5 years ago | (#23384046)

on Jedi mind tricks.....

Re:Puts a whole new perspective... (1)

StarfishOne (756076) | more than 5 years ago | (#23384202)

The ability to destroy a planet is insignificant compared to the power of a space lawyer!

Re:Puts a whole new perspective... (1)

bagboy (630125) | more than 5 years ago | (#23384270)

This is not the defendant you are looking for. These mp3's are not the ones shared on the internet.

I know I shouldn't be dissapointed. (2, Funny)

Chris Burke (6130) | more than 5 years ago | (#23384068)

I shouldn't be, but I am. I know that you refer to a lawyer by their specialty, i.e. a "patent lawyer" is a lawyer who specializes in patents, not a lawyer who themselves is patented or was created by a patent.

But is it really all that much to ask that the world's first "space lawyer" actually be from space? Or live there now? I don't care what they specialize in, they just have to have a law degree and either hail from or emigrate to outer space.

I'll be writing my congressman about this.

Re:I know I shouldn't be dissapointed. (2, Funny)

SBacks (1286786) | more than 5 years ago | (#23384142)

Not just that, but the term "Space Lawyer" seems rather lame, like he's in charge of a big warehouse or something.

"Interstellar Lawyer" or "Galactic Lawyer" or something like that seems a much better job title.

Re:I know I shouldn't be dissapointed. (2, Funny)

Chris Burke (6130) | more than 5 years ago | (#23384370)

Not just that, but the term "Space Lawyer" seems rather lame, like he's in charge of a big warehouse or something.

Hey, it worked for Space Ghost. Nobody was like "so, do you haunt a warehouse or something?"

So maybe Space Lawyer just needs to hang out with Space Ghost, and then nobody will question him like that.

Re:I know I shouldn't be dissapointed. (1)

somersault (912633) | more than 5 years ago | (#23384812)

Haha.. I hadn't thought of that other meaning of space to be honest. How about Lawyer of the Great Integalactic Void? Space Lawyer does have a nice ring to it.

Zorak: I'm a Space Baby!!!

Quick... (4, Funny)

Dusty101 (765661) | more than 5 years ago | (#23384082)

... kill it now before it breeds! I say we take off & nuke the site from orbit. It's the only way to be sure.

A good start ... (4, Funny)

ianare (1132971) | more than 5 years ago | (#23384098)

but when are they going to send all the other lawyers in space?

No. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23384312)

but when are they going to send all the other lawyers in space?

When all the lawyers go into space, I want to be on the last transport. Because, unlike popular opinion shaped by the famous assholes, many lawyers actually believe [bbc.co.uk] in what they do. One example I always love to tell about a lawyer here in the US is one who volunteered for the ACLU. He was given the assignment of a KKK member who was wrongfully imprisoned (folks who didn't like the KKK so they used the "law" to shut him up. It's not just for white hicks ya know.). TO make a long story short, the KKK guy saw a black man (The lawyer) walk in. The black lawyer put aside his dislike for the KKK guy because he believed in the Constitution of the United States of America more than he believed in his or his clients bigotry. I remember that whenever I want to start using lawyers for shark bait.

Perhaps not what they meant the label to represent (2, Interesting)

zunger (17731) | more than 5 years ago | (#23384110)

I'm sorry, this just reminds me of Heinlein's use of the phrase "space lawyer" as the SF generalization of "latrine lawyer."

Re:Perhaps not what they meant the label to repres (2, Interesting)

AHumbleOpinion (546848) | more than 5 years ago | (#23384982)

I'm sorry, this just reminds me of Heinlein's use of the phrase "space lawyer" as the SF generalization of "latrine lawyer."

Heinlein, a former naval officer, was expanding on the navy slang "sea lawyer". A derogatory term referring to someone who tries to use rules and regulations to shirk responsibilities and/or make excuses for their failures. They are generally not the most popular of shipmates.

Come on, they can do better than that. (1)

ScentCone (795499) | more than 5 years ago | (#23384144)

Counselnaut? Astrolawyer? Orbital Mouthpiece? Defender (get it)? Prosecutron? Baikonur Barrister? Still, I guess this isn't any different than those lawyers that specialize in oddball maritime issues.

I'm sorry (1)

Kingrames (858416) | more than 5 years ago | (#23384154)

I didn't catch that. What kind of lawyer did you say he was?
I couldn't hear over all the people laughing.

Students who want to take these courses... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23384160)

...must present certificate of ownership of at least 1 square mile of moon surface.

Hello, beautiful... (2, Funny)

DeadPanDan (1165901) | more than 5 years ago | (#23384162)

"Hello, beautiful. I'm a space lawyer." There's no way a tax attorney could compete with that.

At the High School Reunion (1)

Rinisari (521266) | more than 5 years ago | (#23384180)

Classmate: "So what have you been doing these past 10 years?"

Hero: "Well, I'm a space lawyer."

Classmate: "Do you, like, work on lawsuits about zoning or something?"

Hero: "No, I handle laws based on outer space."

Classmates, in unison: "Hahahahahaha."

Hero: "I'm in the employ of several governments. I could buy all of your houses and probably enslave all of you, and by enslave, I mean pay you a living wage to fan me and bring me drinks."

Classmates, in unison: *cricket* *cricket* "So where did you go to school and what's the entry requirements?"

Mississippi (1, Funny)

BrainInAJar (584756) | more than 5 years ago | (#23384198)

They believe in space in Mississippi? Has nobody told their wonderfully enlightened pastors about this widespread heathen encroachment on freedom of religion?

Actually, I think he will be in high demand... (5, Funny)

Essron (231281) | more than 5 years ago | (#23384206)

because everyone who bought "property" on the moon will need to sue their real estate agent.

Hmmm... (3, Funny)

Puffy Director Pants (1242492) | more than 5 years ago | (#23384210)

How do you get a process server to the ISS?

Re:Hmmm... (1)

Digestromath (1190577) | more than 5 years ago | (#23384416)

More importantly, where is the space judge going to hold court? Do you even know the cost involved in getting 12 jurors AND alternates into a near earth orbit? You thought costs for a trial were astronomical on earth...

Re:Hmmm... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23384638)

I'm not sure I understand the question, but I think you should start by opening the Control Panel, then selecting "Internet Information Services" from the "Administrative Tools" folder. Then open the "Web Sites" folder for your local PC and...

Oh... nevermind.

No more lawyer jokes (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23384260)

That puts an end to the "Layers are really good people 10 feet down under" jokes!

no, really (1)

superwiz (655733) | more than 5 years ago | (#23384280)

First things first. Especially in space. Law is a set of rules established to maintain a civilized society. When it is obvious that a society is already governed by a set of rules (such as chain of command that necessarily exists with all space travel), imposing a set of artificial and necessarily arbitrary extra rules only makes for an extra burden, and therefore, danger in the situation. If any lawyers think their contribution to the set of behaviors in space is warranted, they are playing with people's lives in order to make their livelihoods. That's reckless irresponsible at best and malicious at worst. In either case, to make space travel safer, first thing you do is kill all the lawyers.

I was wondering (1)

DnemoniX (31461) | more than 5 years ago | (#23384304)

Sweet! I was wondering how I was going to handle the closing on that Mars property I have had my eye on!

Uniform? (2, Funny)

Kenshin (43036) | more than 5 years ago | (#23384306)

I just have to wonder... what does the Space Lawyer uniform look like? Was it designed by Zapp Brannigan?

what we really need (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23384336)

is some good moon lawyers. maybe a saturn lawyer. sun lawyers. this is silly.

Considering my Experiences in Mississippi (1)

Khyber (864651) | more than 5 years ago | (#23384376)

I'd be willing to bet there's nothing but space in the lawyers' heads as well.

fees (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23384380)

I bet this guy's hourly fees will be astronomical!

"First" now redefined to mean "first in the US"? (1)

Pahalial (580781) | more than 5 years ago | (#23384418)

I know the summary mentions the program is one of two of its kind in North America, but the tagline is still a little too disingenuous when you consider that the program's canadian counterpart - the McGill Institute of Air & Space Law [mcgill.ca] recently celebrated its fiftieth anniversary. Even if American law is all you want to count, someone must certainly have graduated from the IASL and gone on to pass an American Bar exam..

I can see how this would happen... (1)

Irish_Samurai (224931) | more than 5 years ago | (#23384474)

This really might not just be a gimmick. Let's look at some scenarios:

<ol>
<li>A satellite from Russia is launched 10 years ago and has a failure of some sort knocking it out of its intended orbit. A space mission from Country X miscalculates, or is unaware of, its current trajectory. The instant they notice, Country X takes action that diverts the satellite from space to a trajectory that doesn't hit their mission but diverts the satellite again. Who is responsible if the satellite hits a third parties exploration team? What if the satellite is diverted into orbit and burns up while the Russians were still gathering data? What if the Russian satellite falls through orbit and hits a poor Indonesian families roof, who is responsible?</li>
<li>An American weapons satellite discharges its payload, targeted at lets say Guam (I know, I know), while over India. Now, is this a case of the US unlawfully using Indian airspace? Does the UN or NATO get involved? What if the a non NATO entity launches from NATO ally airspace? Is this an act of aggression?</li>
<li>The definition of space salvage is what? What can private space salvage operations legally go after?</li>
<li>How do you define international space? How do you enforce, or recognize such boundaries?</li>
</ol>
We may have previous cases that you can draw from to begin argument in these areas, but they won't be fully adequate. Just give this kid credit for seeing a giant opportunity.

licensed by state? (1)

petes_PoV (912422) | more than 5 years ago | (#23384662)

Somehow I had got the impression that a lawyer had to be licensed by each state that he/she practised in (anyone?).

If that's so, then wouldn't this guy only be able to take cases that were applicable to Misssiisssiiissiipppii (or however it's spelt).

Personally, I can't see him geting a lot of business - unless of course it's merely a novelty act and he gets a proper job doing divorces or whatever they have out there.

coming soon: a suit against the law of gravity (1)

petes_PoV (912422) | more than 5 years ago | (#23384504)

Ahhh space lawyers.

Rather than design new propulsion systems to make space travel more efficient, let's just sue Issac Newton, get the law repealed and go there for free.

I wonder if his couse even considered the possibilty that there are natural laws and manmade laws. I'd love to see this in a courtroom. Sadly, given the state of the educational & legsal systems, I might.

Reminds me of an Allo Allo scene (1)

Daimanta (1140543) | more than 5 years ago | (#23384610)

In that scene 2 German airmen are on a mission and they deem themselves alone high in the sky. They start making jokes about German leaders only see 2 members of the Gestapo in front of their windshield while the airmen are exclaiming that you are never save from the grasp of the Gestapo.

I guess the astronauts must have the same fears now. Nobody can escape spacelawyers!

bzzt (5, Informative)

delong (125205) | more than 5 years ago | (#23384616)

Inaccurate. This is not the first "space lawyer." It is the first "space law certificate" from a law school to a graduating law student. There are a multitude of "space lawyers" already.

And just to be nitpicky, just because this person graduates from law school with this certificate doesn't make them a "space lawyer." Graduating from law school doesn't make you a lawyer. Passing the bar makes you a lawyer, and the certificate doesn't mean a damn.

Not the first.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23384928)

Just the first from that school. IANASL.

Men are from Mars, Women are from Venus (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23384950)

Space Lawyers are from Uranus.
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