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Surgical Robot Removes Calgary Woman's Brain Tumor

timothy posted more than 5 years ago | from the and-yes-it-had-permission-to-do-so dept.

Medicine 107

Raver32 points out an article in the Victoria Times Colonist about an interesting advance in robotic surgery: "Calgary doctors have made surgical history, using a robot to remove a brain tumor from a 21-year-old woman. Doctors used remote controls and an imaging screen, similar to a video game, to guide the two-armed robot through Paige Nickason's brain during the nine-hour surgery Monday. Surgical instruments acting as the hands of the robot — called NeuroArm — provided surgeons with the tools needed to successfully remove the egg-shaped tumor."

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107 comments

This wasn't there first attempt... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23451106)

Let's just say the zombie brain surgeon didn't work out as well.

Re:This wasn't there first attempt... (1)

fractoid (1076465) | more than 5 years ago | (#23451416)

I hear they've had ninjas doing it for years but you never see it in the news because... they're ninjas. Duh.

Regardless, it's not a robot, it's a remote controlled McStabbyThing with a camera on it. Still cool though.

Obama's campaign anthem (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23451432)

Niggers out there makin' that dolla
I pulled up in my '64 Impala.
They greet me with a 40 and I start drinkin'
And from the 8-ball my breath starts stinkin.'

Oh noes! Ted Kennedy, the fat drunk who killed a woman and then won a Senate seat and spent his life trying to destroy America from within, had a seizure! What will we do without this corpulent sop to guide us?

Re:This wasn't there first attempt... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23451700)

My RSS feed in Firefox only goes as far as 'Surgical Robot Removes Calgary Woman's Brain'. I thought the revolution had come.

More Info. (5, Informative)

Overkill Nbuta (1035654) | more than 5 years ago | (#23451122)

You can find some more info on this at.
http://www.ucalgary.ca/news/may2008/neuroArm [ucalgary.ca]
I think it will be interesting if a doctor can have less fatigue and sit in a chair and do operations more quickly and more precisely with this.

I understand that there are some operations where you would want the doctor to be on site to help with complications. But some of them like removing a brain tumor where its a procedure that you just need to cut something out it might be able to help the limited supply of doctors in the world be better utilized.

Easy. Just cutting something out...of the brain. (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23451264)

But some of them like removing a brain tumor where its a procedure that you just need to cut something out...
Yeah, it's not brain surgery. I mean.. it's not rocket science.

Re:More Info. (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23451336)

I can't believe someone referring to BRAIN SURGERY as "a procedure that you just need to cut something out." And also stating that there are "some operations where you would want the doctor to be one site to help with complications" but acting like that would NOT be the case with a brain surgery!!! I just had brain surgery in March. It was VERY complicated and could have been fatal. There is NO WAY I would have allowed a robot to perform it. If that was the only case, I would expect the SAME amount of physicians in the operating room to take over if there was a problem. Brain surgery is VERY difficult and VERY important. Are you forgetting that obviously we only have ONE brain and we can't live or THINK without it??? I've been trying to sign up, also. But after three different times, I will have to have my password mailed to me, so this is unfortunately being posted as "Anonymous Coward."

Re:More Info. (1)

KGIII (973947) | more than 5 years ago | (#23451382)

I've been trying to sign up, also. But after three different times, I will have to have my password mailed to me, so this is unfortunately being posted as "Anonymous Coward."
So that didn't work then? *grins* (I couldn't resist.) Welcome to /. now go check your spam filters/boxes.

Re:More Info. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23451744)

I can't believe someone referring to BRAIN SURGERY

What is brain surgery? An operation of the brain. Since there are thousands of defects and problems one can have with the brain, there are thousands of different operation methods/operation targets. Some are just a PITA, others are straight forward.

as "a procedure that you just need to cut something out."

If you consider that some folks (I think mostly of Africans here, but this may apply to other indigen people elsewhere) did brain surgery without anesthetics, without sterile instrumentation, I'd say it really depends on the specific type operation.

Depending on the localization of a tumor, you will obstruct functionality (e. g., the patient will suffer from partly or complete loss of vision). Other times, just cut it out.

Disclaimer: I'm not a medical doctor, but I do work in the field of neuroanatomy.

Re:More Info. (2, Interesting)

mikael (484) | more than 5 years ago | (#23452884)

Researchers did a study on primitive surgical techniques. They found out that the caves used for these operations were as far back as possible, meaning that the air was dry and had no dust. Also, whenever a flintstone was used as a cutting instrument, a brand new stone was split, so there was no bacteria on the surfaces of the stone.

Ancient Brain Surgery [scientificblogging.com]

I need trepanning like a hole in the head.

More to the point... (4, Interesting)

jd (1658) | more than 5 years ago | (#23451494)

...there may be some categories of "inoperable" brain tumours that are inoperable because humans have too low a level of precision. Such tumours would be removable by such a method. There have been many advances in tele-surgery since early work in the early 1990s (Surgeons in Russia operated on patients in America, for example) but this is definitely a lot further forward than might have been expected from the pioneering efforts.

Re:More to the point... (1)

nospam007 (722110) | more than 5 years ago | (#23451962)

There have been many advances in tele-surgery since early work in the early 1990s (Surgeons in Russia operated on patients in America, for example)...

It's to allow surgeons to operate from home, to save gas and scrubs and they also don't need to wash their hands.

Re:More to the point... (1)

ceoyoyo (59147) | more than 5 years ago | (#23456504)

That's one of the ideas. When I was involved with the project the robot was also designed to be MRI compatible, so it could do image guided biopsies in the bore of the magnet. Calgary is also the site of the first 1.5T mobile intraoperative MRI (developed by this same surgeon). It can also scale down a surgeon's movements and cancel out any tremor.

They've also proposed to develop molecular probes that the robot can use to chemically feel out which tissue is likely to be tumor and which is not.

Re:More Info. (3, Interesting)

August_zero (654282) | more than 5 years ago | (#23451994)

I have done a surgical rotation at a facility that uses a DaVinci robot to conduct some of its gynecological/urological procedures. The surgeon still has to work at it, and for those not familiar with the system, the surgeries can take 3 times longer and are more arduous than doing it the old fashioned way. In the hands of a practiced surgeon though, it's really a sight to behold in action, almost like a giant metal spider clipping and cutting.

Re:More Info. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23453894)

"There's plenty of room at the bottom."

Re:More Info. (1)

Hotawa Hawk-eye (976755) | more than 5 years ago | (#23455630)

Also keep in mind that the doctor can simulate the surgery using the patient's own data and use that simulation to program the robot to perform the operation ahead of time. If the program fails the simulation, the doctor can tweak the program until it performs exactly as he or she wants. At that point, the doctor's responsibility during the actual operation is to monitor the program to make sure it's performing exactly as it did during the simulation and that nothing goes wrong. Even if something does go wrong, depending on how accurate and thorough the simulation was, the program may have been trained to be able to handle the situation.

Re:More Info. (1)

ceoyoyo (59147) | more than 5 years ago | (#23456368)

You're right about less fatigue, but not more quickly. The robot lets the surgeon scale down his movements to operate more finely though, so there is a payoff.

Re:More Info. (1)

recharged95 (782975) | more than 5 years ago | (#23458750)

I like the picture they use: "In fact, it is rocket science."

Hence I guess it's trivial technology. We already know how to fly to Mars... Trival. Really!

I thought building it would be more like Astrophysics.

You see now, Doctor Who? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23451126)

Daleks are our friends. The EXTERMINATE part is them wanting to cure us. Of all ills.

EXTERMINAAATE!

did they tell her? (1)

electrosoccertux (874415) | more than 5 years ago | (#23451154)

I wonder if they tell you before you go in that they won't be doing it by hand themselves...

At the end of the day, hopefully this means cheap healthcare.

Re:did they tell her? (3, Funny)

peipas (809350) | more than 5 years ago | (#23451172)

I dig. If I accidentally bought a bottle of wine whose grapes were mechanically squeezed I'd still rather assume a half dozen feet did the job.

Re:did they tell her? (5, Funny)

sodul (833177) | more than 5 years ago | (#23451840)

I remember a video on the french news (maybe 15 years ago) about wine making: there was a guy *totally* naked (it's french TV it was not censored) jumping into the grapes to squeeze them. I don't know if the idea was to not get his underwear stained or if the 'all natural' method.

Needless to say I'm a beer drinker (belgian beers).

Re:did they tell her? (1)

Kavorkian_scarf (1272422) | more than 5 years ago | (#23451184)

I would prefer safer procedures with a higher probability of success rather than cheap. Then again i don't pay for health care.

Re:did they tell her? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23451566)

Yes, you do. In taxes.

Remember, there is no such thing as "Free health care" or "Free education". Thinking like that leads to arguments like "Well, it's not that good but I can't complain as it's free.". You are paying for it every time you pay taxes.

This naturally assuming you aren't circumventing your taxes some way or are posting from prison where you don't pay taxes but get health care or something like that. ;)

Re:did they tell her? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23452856)

"Then again i don't pay for health care."

I'm assuming the government pays for your healthcare then. Where does the government get the money for your healthcare?

Taxes you say? better rethink that statement you made previously.

Re:did they tell her? (2, Informative)

Kavorkian_scarf (1272422) | more than 5 years ago | (#23453084)

You need to pay for health insurance in Alberta, and my health care is subsidized, so i do not in fact, pay for my health care.

Re:did they tell her? (1)

Beryllium Sphere(tm) (193358) | more than 5 years ago | (#23451224)

Believe so, at least that's the most economical interpretation of

"It was scary at first," said Nickason of the idea of being operated on by a robot.

"But I really trust my doctors and know they would keep me safe."

from the article.

Re:did they tell her? (1)

value_added (719364) | more than 5 years ago | (#23451282)

At the end of the day, hopefully this means cheap healthcare.

Do you mean "have the effect of lowering healthcare costs in Canada", or "the use of robots will make the concept of universal healthcare appealing to citizens of the United States and South Africa"?

Sorry, couldn't resist. ;-)

Re:did they tell her? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23454956)

She specifically volunteered for the procedure.

Damn (1)

Strange Ranger (454494) | more than 5 years ago | (#23451170)

I'd like to see QA on that software.

Re:Damn (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23451256)

I don't know about the software, I built the control cabinet. The first thing the engineer told me was the drawings were just a 'suggestion'. Trust me, I don't think they took a second look at the drawings before they sent them...

Yup (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23451174)

Socialized medicine is just terrible.

Oblig. (4, Funny)

esrobinson (1028500) | more than 5 years ago | (#23451196)

I, for one, welcome our new brain surgeon robot overlords.

Re:Oblig. (1)

santiam (1279644) | more than 5 years ago | (#23451296)

I didn't see the complete title at first. I read: " Surgical Robot Removes Calgary Woman's Brain." I couldn't figure out why she would want that to happen.

Re:Oblig. (2, Funny)

mikael (484) | more than 5 years ago | (#23453316)

When my step-father was in hospital from a amoebic infection of the blood stream, he once called home, still a bit woozy and told us, "The doctors have removed my brain, they told me I don't need it any more". The doctor went on the line and explained he meant drain.

Re:Oblig. (4, Funny)

pcgabe (712924) | more than 5 years ago | (#23451524)

No! No! We must fight them! Brain surgeon robot overlords? Are you MAD? They could... they could re-program our VERY MINDS!

This is TOO FAR! We =must= take a stand! This far, no further!

In fact, I'm going to go give these overlords a piece of my mind in person! BRB

Re:Oblig. (4, Funny)

pcgabe (712924) | more than 5 years ago | (#23451538)

DISREGARD THAT, I SUCK COCKS.

I, too, WELCOME our BRAIN-surgeon ROBOT overlords.

All GLORY to THE brain-SURGEON robot OVERLORDS!

Now there's something you don't see every day... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23451706)

..a post moderated +funny that actually is funny. Kudos, pcgabe.

Re:Oblig. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23451894)

And it only took 6 minutes!

Re:Oblig. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23455780)

these robot overlords you speak of are terribly efficient it seems...it only took them 6 minutes :D

Victoria Times Colonist (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23451232)

Colonist, now theres an interesting line of work....

It's Not a Robot (5, Informative)

juancnuno (946732) | more than 5 years ago | (#23451242)

This is great and all, but I feel the term "robot" is overly misused. To me, robot implies a computerized autonomy. If the doctor controlled the thing, then to me that's no robot.

... It's a Waldo (4, Interesting)

Fallen Andy (795676) | more than 5 years ago | (#23451286)

Annoys me as well, but many "industrial robots" are really remote manipulators. I always remember the first one I saw at Rolls Royce Aerospace (Bristol UK) (early 80's). So darn dangerous it had it's own room . Needed it too - they were cutting turbine blades. One oops, and it's hypersonic ninja dices and slices time... See here [wikipedia.org]

(I just noticed the Waldo story reference has something which prefigures Feynmann's "Plenty of Room at the Bottom" . Wonder if he got that idea from Heinlein?

Andy

Re:... It's a Waldo (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23453588)

It's sort-of a cross actually. The robot/waldo can have no-cut zones programmed into it before surgery. This prevents the operator from moving the attached tools into a sensitive area not related to the surgery. I.e. eliminates 'whoops I slipped!' accidents. I do agree that it's mostly a waldo, but it does have some 'assistant' functions built in that are definitely robot-like.

Im a doctor not a video gamer! (3, Insightful)

Aranykai (1053846) | more than 5 years ago | (#23451404)

And while on the subject, why do they insist on likening anything with a display and controls to playing a video game? Its not an Atari, its a complex medical machine.

Re:Im a doctor not a video gamer! (1)

JAppi (853260) | more than 5 years ago | (#23454394)

by the same logic you could say that photoshop and Microsoft Office were video games.

Re:Im a doctor not a video gamer! (1)

ceoyoyo (59147) | more than 5 years ago | (#23456400)

Actually, they did at least one study where they looked at video gamer performance using Neuroarm (the poster is hanging just out the door in the hallway).

I can't remember the details offhand, but IIRC they tested gamers, experienced surgeons and trainees on a simulated surgery. The gamers did very well.

Because video games help with this. (1)

Dire Bonobo (812883) | more than 5 years ago | (#23457030)

why do they insist on likening anything with a display and controls to playing a video game?
Perhaps because playing video games has been found [msn.com] to [shortnews.com] help [engadget.com] surgeons [wired.com] perform surgery better.

Re:It's Not a Robot (1)

Enleth (947766) | more than 5 years ago | (#23451656)

Well, that depends on the level of autonomy this device has. Maybe it's just a manipulator that turns the movements of a joystick directly into the movements of a scalpel or something, but it could as well receive orders like "cut this piece of tissue" and proceed by itself with exact, self-calculated movements of the blade. I'd say this counts as a form of a robot.

Re:It's Not a Robot (1)

ceoyoyo (59147) | more than 5 years ago | (#23456414)

It has that capability, but it's not being used that way yet. The plan was to be able to record movements and replay them. Like "suture that vessel."

Re:It's Not a Robot (1)

SeaFox (739806) | more than 5 years ago | (#23451738)

If the doctor controlled the thing, then to me that's no robot.

Yeah! it's a space-age station for Oncology! And the doctor shoots first.

Re:It's Not a Robot (1)

Twitch42 (91037) | more than 5 years ago | (#23453060)

Soon the misuse will become part of the definition, like "beg the question" [worldwidewords.org]. I understand that language needs to be pliant and change, but I wish it wasn't so susceptible to laziness. This isn't out of any snobbery about purity; it's a practical matter. As words lose their distinctions and become more generic, the English language becomes diluted and loses its ability to be succinct. So now "robot" is losing its automation and is becoming just another remote-controlled device.

Which has more advantages? (1)

Valthezeh (870251) | more than 5 years ago | (#23451250)

They were pretty sketchy about this issue of whether a robot is "better" than a human doctor. They emphasized the robot's advantages, but then go on to say that humans have "more dexterity" which to me implies that it is still safer to have a human perform the operation. I'm pretty curious as to how much information this woman was given before the surgery - she seems very trusting of her doctors, and I hope they didn't take advantage of that to turn her into an experiment.

Re:Which has more advantages? (1)

timmarhy (659436) | more than 5 years ago | (#23451298)

you do realise somewhere along the line someone has to be the experimental patient, right?

Re:Which has more advantages? (2, Interesting)

somersault (912633) | more than 5 years ago | (#23451482)

More dexterity but probably less stability and more chance of being nervous, or getting pumped up on adrenaline and shaking? That kind of thing.

Bacon? (1)

master5o1 (1068594) | more than 5 years ago | (#23451348)

Did the robot lick the brain and think it was a pig?

Oh wait. The operation was successful. If it thought the patient was bacon then it would use more vet techniques.

Yeah, but wait until she gets the bill... (5, Funny)

Jafafa Hots (580169) | more than 5 years ago | (#23451372)

...oh yeah, I forgot... it's Canada.

Sure, she gets a free, first-ever, tumor removing robot surgery for free... but she probably had to wait for it, right Rush?

Re:Yeah, but wait until she gets the bill... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23451446)

If you chose not to decide, you still have made a choice.

Re:Yeah, but wait until she gets the bill... (1)

kkazakov (857677) | more than 5 years ago | (#23452122)

But if you're in the US, you might never get to this, or it would cost something you cannot afford. You should not make jokes with this story. I'm pretty sure she doesn't find it funny.

Re:Yeah, but wait until she gets the bill... (1)

Jafafa Hots (580169) | more than 5 years ago | (#23455226)

I'm pretty sure she's not reading this. But she might find it funny if she did, because the target of the joke is not her, it's the U.S. medical system.

Re: waiting lists (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23453904)

Re: waiting lists (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23455512)

Well my company has an office in Canada, and I know a receptionist who waited *6 months* just to have an *appointment* with a specialist for a painful back problem, so laugh at the US medical system all you want, I'll take it.

The people who tout Canada's healthcare the most are often young people have never had the need to use it (yet, of course).

Re: waiting lists (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23456610)

So? I'm an American and I had to wait even longer to see a dermatologist a few years back about a problem I had. What's your point, that we get to pay more for the same stuff?

Re:Yeah, but wait until she gets the bill... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23453988)

No, but everyone after her will.

Re:Yeah, but wait until she gets the bill... (1)

ceoyoyo (59147) | more than 5 years ago | (#23456442)

There are no waiting lists for time-sensitive surgery. You get it when you need it.

Waiting lists are for elective procedures, like getting your hip replaced. Sure, it would be NICE to have a new hip in time for golf season, but missing a few tee times won't kill you.

Re:Yeah, but wait until she gets the bill... (1)

Jerry Rivers (881171) | more than 5 years ago | (#23458994)

While I appreciate your humor, I hasten to point that NOTHING is ever free when it comes to health care. Even in Canada. In Alberta, families pay premiums, which for a family can be anywhere from one to two thousand a year. Though I believe those over 65 are exempt. A similar scheme exists in British Columbia. In Ontario, I believe employers pay all health care premiums.

The point is that health care is NOT free in Canada. This is a popular misconception (or lie as some would argue) perpetuated by some in the U.S.. Somebody always has to pay.

Skewed Title? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23451500)

When this story was the top item on the home page (in Safari for Mac), the ad box forced the title to wrap, such that "Surgical Robot Removes Calgary Woman's Brain" appears on the first line, followed by "Tumor" by itself on the second line. And I immediately imagined a page full of comments like "if you let a beowulf cluster of these loose in Redmond/Congress/The White House, would we notice a difference?" and "if we could get Linux to run on this thing instead of Windows CE, maybe it could remove tumors instead of the whole brain."
 
I have always argued that when a publication allows its advertisers to skew the messages conveyed by its stories, bad things will happen. Now I have proof!

Sick bunny (5, Funny)

DarkWicked (988343) | more than 5 years ago | (#23451514)

provided surgeons with the tools needed to successfully remove the egg-shaped tumour.
That's one SICK easter bunny they have over there.

...Robot? (1)

Ethan Allison (904983) | more than 5 years ago | (#23451562)

How is this any more of a robot than construction equipment? They're both "this joystick controls how this part of the machine moves"

awesome (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23451572)

I'm stoked that we have made our first step towards robotic surgery in such a technical field.

This is great news.

I'm really happy science is starting to pan out for us poor. Soon we can be on a honda assembly line which fixes our broken assets with less risk of infection and better results.

Let's just hope we don't succumb to some DRM scheme that requires us to plug into the internet to validate our certificates or DIE!

btw - the latter parts a joke, I grok the significance I really do :-P

Re:awesome (2, Informative)

glueball (232492) | more than 5 years ago | (#23452668)


Soon we can be on a honda assembly line


The Soviets did this for eye surgery decades ago. They would have patients on a carousel with surgeons each applying one step of the surgery. Then the entire patient carousel would shift with the next surgeons applying their one step to the next patient.

This is great (5, Interesting)

melted (227442) | more than 5 years ago | (#23451668)

Just think how much of a boon this is for microsurgeons - folks who stitch together nerves, small blood vessels, etc. Hand tremor and even its inherent precision is no longer an issue. Plus, you can have more than two "hands". This will only get better, and eventually we'll probably see minor surgeries performed without any human intervention.

Re:This is great (1)

dbcad7 (771464) | more than 5 years ago | (#23452034)

But there was human intervention in this case.. a human was operating the controls of the robot arm.

Not putting it down.. much nicer to tell the arm to start a cut at point A and a specific depth and end at point B.. I had some repair work done on my knee, and I have an extremely long scar.. did he start at the wrong place and just keep going till he found what he was looking for ?? don't really know, and better I don't think about it too much...

As I have done some CAD/CAM work before this is interesting stuff to me.. I wonder if they modeled her head in 3d and created reference points to know where they were.. or if this is just a case of moving the arm along x,y,z coordinates based on what they were seeing visually (or with camera) which would be more like manual machining than CAM.. As it took 9 hours, I kind of suspect this was more of a manual operation.

Re:This is great (1)

simplerThanPossible (1056682) | more than 5 years ago | (#23461698)

It's a boon for microsurgery. But is it for microsurgeons, if their special talents become valued less?

Next thing, it will be offshored - then automated. That is, unless the "surgeon unions" have something to say about it...

See? (3, Funny)

Godji (957148) | more than 5 years ago | (#23451820)

Doctors used remote controls and an imaging screen, similar to a video game, to guide the two-armed robot through Paige Nickason's brain
See, Jack Thompson was right all along. COMPUTER GAMES CAN MESS WITH YOUR BRAIN!!!

(The captcha for this post happens to be "lawful". COINCIDENCE?! I think not!)

VNS files - How do you view them? (1)

myspace-cn (1094627) | more than 5 years ago | (#23452084)

X-ray.vns How can you view such a file.
(they come from dentist office x-rays)

the header looks like this:

00000000 4C 45 41 44 00 00 20 64 00 64 00 00 00 00 00 00 LEADÂÂ dÂdÂÂÂÂÂÂ

Is it a DICOM file? Digital Imaging Communications?
By the way -- Iclone didn't open it.

Video games for Doctors (2, Funny)

lewko (195646) | more than 5 years ago | (#23452334)

Doctors used remote controls and an imaging screen, similar to a video game

Doctor: Dammnit nurse! Guide me over to the Health bonus

Nurse: There's no time Doctor! We're losing the patient.

Doctor: Okay. We have to cheat death. Press up-up-left-left-up-up-down-select.

Nurse: It's working! The patient has full health!

Doctor: Tumour P3wnd!

Re:Video games for Doctors (1)

JoCat (1291368) | more than 5 years ago | (#23455680)

Nurse: "P3wned? Doctor, I believe you mean Pwn3d"

Doctor: "Damnit Nurse, I'm a doctor not a script kiddie."

Nurse: "^&*(^#$&*(^^&*(Y&*(#@T&*C(TYC&*#(Y@&#(^AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA"

Doctor: "root@localhost"

I would never want a robot operating on me. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23452472)

I have had eleven brain surgeries for my brain cyst and hydrocephalus--the ida of a robot which could very easily stop working, operating on my open brain, freaks me out.

BTW I am not an "anonymous coward", I just can't be bothered to fill in another application form.

Sincerely,
Ida
http://www.theidaexpress.com

Re:I would never want a robot operating on me. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23453406)

I am not "anonymous coward" either. I am Santa Claus.

Unfortunate title clipping (1)

AC-x (735297) | more than 5 years ago | (#23452842)

My RSS reader just printed this story as "Surgical Robot Removes Calgary Woman's Brain ..."

FUCKER (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23452910)

gainsq market sha8e of Jordan Hubbard

Where are all ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23453494)

the BENDER jokes?

Headline Correction (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23454068)

Surgical Robot Removes Calgary Woman's Brain

There. Fixed it for you.

Typical, summary doesn't explain story propertly.. (1)

dogdick (1290032) | more than 5 years ago | (#23454624)

Doctors used remote controls and an imaging screen, similar to a video game, to guide the two-armed robot through Paige Nickason's brain during the nine-hour surgery Monday

Immediately afterwards the doctors ran outside, carjacked an old lady, jumped a ramp and fired an uzi into crowds.

It's not a robot, it's a waldo (1)

cellocgw (617879) | more than 5 years ago | (#23456536)

What, you guys don't read Heinlein?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Waldo_(short_story) [wikipedia.org]

BTW, I read somewhere (and naturally forgot all about it until now) that one of the features being implemented in surgical waldoes is a low-pass filter, which removes any tremor or shaking in the surgeon's hand from the final instrument's movement. Sounds like a win to me.

I leave my entire estate... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23459890)

"I leave my entire estate to the people of Calgary, so that they can move someplace decent."
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