Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Using Magnets To Turn Off the Brain's Speech Center

Soulskill posted more than 6 years ago | from the bzzt-ow-bzzt-ow-bzzzzzzzt-owwwwwww dept.

Biotech 269

An editor for the Telegraph, Roger Highfield, recently volunteered to allow a UK researcher to shut off the speech center of his brain with a high-powered magnetic pulse. Regular speech is controlled by a section of the brain called Broca's area. Once the precise location is determined in the subject, a magnetic pulse can temporarily disrupt speech without impairing other cognitive functions. The link contains a video in which you can watch Highfield stutter and twitch while attempting to recite a nursery rhyme. A later test shows that he's able to sing the rhyme without difficulty, since singing is controlled in a different part of the brain (as you may remember from Scott Adams' speech disorder). Researchers believe that the ability to stimulate or quell activity in specific areas of the brain may help in treating conditions like epilepsy and migraine headaches.

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

My wife (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23452872)

needs a zappie!

Re:My wife (5, Funny)

Deadfyre_Deadsoul (1193759) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453056)

Next, they will make a super big magnet in space and be able to make an entire continent shut up....

Re:My wife (5, Funny)

omeomi (675045) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453302)

Next, they will make a super big magnet in space and be able to make an entire continent shut up....

Then I won't look so silly in my tin-foil hat, now will I?

Re:My wife (1)

Instine (963303) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453638)

Actually the edicurrents induced in the foil would probably melt the aluminium into your scull. So a bit silly ;)

Re:My wife (1)

kdemetter (965669) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453668)

not if you ground the tinfoil , like you should we every faraday cage .

Make sure your ground it with a wire of less then 30 ohm

Re:My wife (1)

NeverVotedBush (1041088) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453844)

I don't think grounding makes a difference.

Re:My wife (5, Funny)

Sponge Bath (413667) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453858)

...ground it with a wire

I now have a mental image of a paranoid nerd tethered to a point like a dog in a yard. Instead of barking at passers by, he babbles about faked moon landings and Monty Python sketches.

Re:My wife (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23453256)

Well, every man has a special tool to turn off the speech center of a woman's face. Works like a key. Just insert and voila. Instant peace and quiet.

Re:My wife (1)

NeverVotedBush (1041088) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453864)

You must be referring to an empty credit card!

Re:My wife (2, Funny)

Original Replica (908688) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453868)

You stick your credit card in your wife's mouth? ... That's just weird.

Re:My wife (1)

cayenne8 (626475) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453514)

This would be perfect to install on the TV remote, that way you can turn the game up and turn her down at the same time, and never have to leave the comfy chair.

Why is it that women ALWAYS seem to want to have (what they think is) an 'important' conversation right in the middle of a good football or basketball game? Do they do that intentionally to piss us off?

Re:My wife (2, Funny)

gbjbaanb (229885) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453742)

nope, its because as soon as you start watching the football, she discovers how incredibly boring it is, and turns the the first thing she finds most interesting: how you 'feel'.

Similarly, when you and your wife find yourselves with a spare moment, and she starts to talk about your relationship, you find it incredibly boring and turn to the thing you find most interesting: what's on the TV.

Re:My wife (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453846)

Why is it that women ALWAYS seem to want to have (what they think is) an 'important' conversation right in the middle of a good football or basketball game?
Because they own TiVo stock and they want you to buy a TiVo DVR. One workaround is to ask the woman to write it down, promising that you'll read it at the next commercial break.

OK, guys. This needs to be explained (5, Funny)

hey! (33014) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453712)

You're making the classic engineering mistake: mis-defining the problem.

Disrupting the speech centers of the brain does not preempt attempts at communications. And you need communication; it's just that men, left to themselves, would communicate by passing terse status messages: "I'm hungry"; "I'm angry"; "I'm going to sleep"; "I want sex."

Women send the same status messages, but they seem to gain satisfaction out of the process itself. Therefore they send messages in steganographic form: the basis status messages are there, wrapped all kinds of other data which do not require your immediate action. It pays to pay at least some attention; she may start an "I want sex" status message by telling you that her sister's neighbor's aunt is going in for a gall stone operation.

The wise man knows that he should celebrate the differences between the sexes if he wants to celebrate the difference between the sexes.

Therefore, it is best to cultivate the skill of appearing mildly interested and engaged, making reflexive, non-committal listening responses, and paying just enough attention to pick out any cues that indicate something that requires immediate action. It's a lot like driving, actually. You get that sixth sense for when somebody is going to cut you off, or roll into an intersection without coming to a stop. It's not magic, it's practice.

seen the video... (5, Funny)

zr-rifle (677585) | more than 6 years ago | (#23452900)

pff... real networks have been doing this stuttering thing since 1995.

Re:seen the video... (1)

dfedfe (980539) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453020)

Actually transcranial magnetic stimulation has been around since the mid 1980s.

But I bet that TMS has a similar effect on computers...

Re:seen the video... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23453034)

hey, if everyone was zapped like this, you'd have to sing anything you want to say.

That would turn the whole world into a musical! BUHAHAHAHA!

tribute to that buffy episode.

AMOS Professional, what an oxymoron that was :) (3, Funny)

Dogtanian (588974) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453064)

I code in AMOS!!!
The research also showed that magnets- such as inappropriately placed subwoofers on PC systems- could also suppress the part of the brain responsible for programming skills.

Re:AMOS Professional, what an oxymoron that was :) (1)

Sentry21 (8183) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453804)

Or the parts of the brain responsible for posting well thought-out, insightful, and complimentary comments while playing games like Counterstrike.

Thank god for the 1st amendment (3, Insightful)

arse maker (1058608) | more than 6 years ago | (#23452920)

You can imagine govememnts using it matrix style "What good is a phone call if you can't speak, mr anderson?"

Re:Thank god for the 1st amendment (1)

gbjbaanb (229885) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453758)

What good is a phone call if you can't speak, mr anderson?"

thank goodness for the anti government-mind-control properties of texting, video messages, IM and email!

I'm speechle..... (0)

Pikoro (844299) | more than 6 years ago | (#23452926)

Great...

Imagine being able to use this at Gitmo:

"Sir, we've zapped him twice, and he still refuses to talk."

"Isn't that the point private?"

"He must be guilty. Lethal injection time."

So its magnets.... (5, Funny)

coren2000 (788204) | more than 6 years ago | (#23452932)

... that take away my speech centers when I meet a pretty girl.

Re:So its magnets.... (5, Funny)

CrazedWalrus (901897) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453172)

Perhaps she has a magnetic personality, then?

Re:So its magnets.... (1)

thePowerOfGrayskull (905905) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453310)

A most compelling argument...

Re:So its magnets.... (1)

ben0207 (845105) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453738)

Only if she's really attractive.

I don't get a similar effect from the repulsive girls.

Re:So its magnets.... (1)

Calydor (739835) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453176)

Well, you lose the ability of speech if you're attracted to her, right? Myth confirmed!

Re:So its magnets.... (4, Funny)

Jesus_666 (702802) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453234)

Try singing; that should work.

Re:So its magnets.... (1)

Dr. Cody (554864) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453646)

Works for Indian guys.

Re:So its magnets.... (1)

sa1lnr (669048) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453304)

That's sexual magnetism for you. ;)

Re:So its magnets.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23453364)


That makes perfect sense. Boobies are magnets. Not only am I attracted to them but I'm rendered speechless when I see them...

Re:So its magnets.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23453520)

Nah - that's just because the blood-flow to your brain has been diverted elsewhere.

Courage... (2, Informative)

camg188 (932324) | more than 6 years ago | (#23452940)

That test subject had a lot of courage. No way is my brain getting zapped.

Re:Courage... (5, Funny)

maxume (22995) | more than 6 years ago | (#23452994)

What makes you think they will hear your objections?

Re:Courage... (1)

serialdogma (883470) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453166)

He was singing them to the tune of The Clash's Pressure Drop.

Re:Courage... (1)

maxwell demon (590494) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453198)

But DRM features in the microphone made sure his song wasn't transmitted due to copyright violation on the music.

Re:Courage... (1)

serialdogma (883470) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453280)

I personally would think that considering the length of his protest (that was cut short by the insertion of a gag), it would qualify for fair use.

Re:Courage... (5, Insightful)

kylemonger (686302) | more than 6 years ago | (#23452996)

That test subject had a lot of stupidity. No way is my brain getting zapped.

There, I fixed that sentence for you. What I wondered was what else these guys were zapping while they were finding the subject's Broca area. Maybe they convinced him it was safe, but they'd have to do a whole lot of talking to convince me.

Re:Courage... (1)

ShiningSomething (1097589) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453658)

Plus, I wonder how they decided that there would be no long-term side effects.

I wonder... (5, Interesting)

The Bringer (653232) | more than 6 years ago | (#23452974)

I wonder what would happen if the magnetic pulses were applied to more important sections of the brain, such as the area that controls autonomous bodily functions, like the heart. I suppose, if it is capable of knocking out the area of the brain that controls speech, it should be capable of knocking out the section of the brain that controls other, critical bodily functions. Is it only me, or do you see a potential weapons application for this in the future?

Re:I wonder... (5, Funny)

Free_Meson (706323) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453018)

Is it only me, or do you see a potential weapons application for this in the future?
If your goal is to indiscriminately impair critical brain functions, a gun would be much more cost-effective.

Re:I wonder... (1)

The Bringer (653232) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453142)

Is it only me, or do you see a potential weapons application for this in the future?
If your goal is to indiscriminately impair critical brain functions, a gun would be much more cost-effective.
But definitely not nearly as cool.

Re:I wonder... (5, Insightful)

CrazedWalrus (901897) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453210)

I'd have to think that forensics units would have a harder time tracking down the person who fired an EM pulse. They've gotten pretty good at matching bullets to guns.

Re:I wonder... (3, Funny)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453472)

I'd have to think that forensics units would have a harder time tracking down the person who fired an EM pulse. They've gotten pretty good at matching bullets to guns.

I would have to think that it would not take much in the way of forensic aptitude to track down the person(s) manipulating the giant magnetic coil next to the guys head.

And does anyone think that there is something a bit odd about the assistant's name being "Muggleton"?

Re:I wonder... (1)

kdemetter (965669) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453704)

So an EMP will not only fry electronics , it will also shut people up ?

I for one welcome our new MPW Overlords (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23453462)

That's Magnetic Pulse Weapon Overlords. It has a nice ring to it, and on regards to your use a gun proposition, there are many benefits for an MPW.
1) Silent, so you could take out a number of people one after the other, without the possibility of being detected using normal techniques.
2) It could be used to take out a number of people before anyone would realize they are under attack.
3) It probably would have better range than a bullet. Of course one downside here is the range may be an issue. It may be hard to create one powerful enough to get any real range out of it. Although I could see a possibility for a MP bomb
4) Once the brain is sufficiently mapped, key target areas would be easy to focus on. But that being said, who says a MPW needs to be discriminating. Why not create one powerful enough to get the target area and some other areas too, just to account for possible aiming errors and target movement?

Of course it would make a great security device. "Get your new Magnetic Pulse Window now, before they're all sold out. Guaranteed to stop even the most determined burglar, or we'll pay double your losses. Just remember, once you install one of these don't attempt to get back in the house through the window when you lock yourself out. Also stops those pesky teenagers from sneaking out at night when they're grounded. *Disclaimer: We are not responsible for injury or loss of life resulting from falling out of windows due to this device."

Also, the airport security personnel would probably love to incorporate these into they're arsenal. It would make selective screening so much easier. No more disgruntled passengers, although they'll probably have to do something about all the drooling, shuffling passengers.

Re:I wonder... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23453070)

Hrm... no. I don't know of any way to get a "beam" of magnetic radiation except inside a coil of wire... which means that you'd have to convince the person you wanted to kill to put on a helmet with huge electromagnets on it, or climb into an MRI machine. And then participate in a barrage of cognitive tests while you probed their brain. Why not just shoot them? Or if they trust you that much, poison them. And if you can afford the equipment you need for this, you can afford a poison nobody will find.

Re:I wonder... (1)

fbjon (692006) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453106)

AFAIK, the heart has it's own bundle of nerves that give regular pulses.

Re:I wonder... (0, Troll)

gowen (141411) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453286)

Indeed. In fact, if a body function is controlled by the brain, its not really autonomous is it?

Re:I wonder... (1)

Metasquares (555685) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453326)

A wire here is a wire there. The difference between autonomous and voluntary functions, IMO, is conscious control and nothing more.

Re:I wonder... (1)

supabeast! (84658) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453224)

Is it only me, or do you see a potential weapons application for this in the future?
If you're close enough to precisely target a brain with a magnetic pulse, and your target is still enough to let you do so, why not just stab him? It would cost a lot less.

Re:I wonder... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23453294)

Because then the person's obviously been murdered, as opposed to having had a heart attack. Less tracable than a load of polonium.

I'm sure the CIA and the KGB will both be investing heavily into this stuff, they're big into the whole assassination thing last I heard.

Re:I wonder... (1)

supabeast! (84658) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453330)

Except that when the CIA or FSB assassinate someone, they usually make it pretty obvious. One uses unmanned drones fitted with Hellfire missiles, the other uses, well, polonium.

Re:I wonder... (2, Insightful)

thePowerOfGrayskull (905905) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453334)

"No matter how powerful the wizard, a knife in the back will severely cramp his style" - Vladimir Taltos

Re:I wonder... (3, Interesting)

zwei2stein (782480) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453388)

"Natural death" is quite usefull if you want to kill someone popular but undesirable ... No blades, no blame.

But even worse is ... you dont have to kill him at all! Death of mind is good enough and someone with dead mind can be reused ... especially if he is popular with undesirable kind of people.

Just imagine how much can specialist at ministry of do with this kind of stuff. Selectivelly disable parts of someone mind ... with memory and/or inteligence gone, you have obedient tabula rasa person.

Re:I wonder... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23453594)

Just imagine how much can specialist at ministry of do with this kind of stuff. Selectivelly disable parts of someone mind ...
Like the proofreading section, for instance.

Re:I wonder... (1)

Chabil Ha' (875116) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453624)

The area responsible for involuntary mechanisms such the heart and breathing are controlled by the brain stem. Disabling the brain stem, however would have even more devastating effects because it is the conduit through which all motor activities take place such as walking, touch senses, and yes, even talking.

If you wanted to really screw someone up, the brain stem is where you want to do the damage.

..........? (silence) (5, Funny)

freeasinrealale (928218) | more than 6 years ago | (#23452986)

shouldn't it be from the bzzt-ow-bzzt-ow-bzzzzzzzt-........ dept?

Cell Phones (1)

grassy_knoll (412409) | more than 6 years ago | (#23452988)

Ok, so the proof of concept is done.

Now, how do we build this into cell phones?

caller: Like OMG! Theres PONIEZ!!
device: *BZZZT*
caller: Like OMG! Theres PONIEZ!!

Ok, so in some cases drooling and twitching occur naturally... ;-)

Yes (4, Funny)

antifoidulus (807088) | more than 6 years ago | (#23452990)

but can they make you sing folk songs?

Re:Yes (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23453298)

You know, this just might explain Friday's episode of Battlestar Galactica...

"turn-off" vs. disrupt (4, Informative)

G4from128k (686170) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453002)

The notion that this pulse "turns-off" the targeted segment of the brain isn't correct. The pulse does NOT remove power from the brain or suppress neuronal firing. Instead, it disrupts coordinated firing of the neurons by inducing a spurious current in the neurons. Thus it is more like randomly applying a signal to the pins of a CPU than to cutting power or clipping pins.

I can't imagine that this pulse is very good for neuronal tissue in the short-term or long-term.

Re:"turn-off" vs. disrupt (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23453408)

Wrong. It would help if you weren't talking out of your ass and imagining how this device works. There are studies describing this technique which basically depolarizes neurons and depresses action potentials. In other words, it turns that area of the brain off by suppressing neurons from firing. Please do us all a favor and know exactly what you're talking about before chiming in.

Re:"turn-off" vs. disrupt (1)

zopf (897522) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453502)

Indeed. It would be very interesting to see whether this technology could be used to disrupt hippocampal memory formation. Sort of a short-term version of that MIB flasher...

Re:"turn-off" vs. disrupt (1)

value_added (719364) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453726)

Disrupting? I prefer to think of it as shaping.

Re:"turn-off" vs. disrupt (1)

hey! (33014) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453766)

I wonder if this technology couldn't be used to induce creativity by disrupting habitual thought patterns temporarily.

If you could map the patterns of neuron firing during problem solving, you could turn off inhibitory patterns, allowing wild, crazy, unconventional ideas a little more time to form. Most of the result would be garbage, of course, but sometimes creativity requires letting a not-quite-right idea a little temporary leeway.

You wouldn't want to use this all the time, only after you'd put a significant amount of work into a problem and had fallen into a rut.

Mmm torture (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23453010)

If we could use brain stimulation for interrogation purposes (such as disabling parts of the brain which are used to forge lies, or to inhibit actions), it would eliminate the need for torture as well as its pitfalls. It would also open up a huge ethical/privacy/human rights can of worms, which is another plus ;-p.

Re:Mmm torture (1)

maxwell demon (590494) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453178)

Well, the question which crosses my mind is: What else could you selectively disable this way? Imagine you would disable the part of the brain responsible to remember new things. Then you could interrogate someone without him even remembering afterwards (OTOH it might prove counterproductive, if he can't remember your question long enough to answer it :-)). Or is there a region responsible to control that you don't tell certain things? Then disabling that part of the brain would cause that you'd not be able to keep your secrets.

Another thought: If someone applied that to some part of your brain controlling vital functions, you'd surely die from that. But would there be a chance to detect it afterwards? Or would that be actually a device for perfect murder?

Transcranial magnetic stimulation (3, Informative)

moonbender (547943) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453022)

The technology to do this is (apparently) called transcranial magnetic stimulation [wikipedia.org] . And even though it looks really freaky in the video with the twitching and everything, it appears to be safe as long as you don't suffer from epileps; in fact it's routinely done for therapeutic and diagnostic purposes.

I guess you still shouldn't try it at home, though.

Needed for Hecklers! (0)

ColdBoot (89397) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453050)

Heck, this is perfect! I'm sure this will get massive government funding. Hecklers be quiet!

Can we use this... (1)

RogueWarrior65 (678876) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453054)

to target politicians? Ack, that could be worse. Singing politicians?! Makes my brain hurt. Oh, wait, we really want to target the bullsh*t centers of the brain. Then again, when it comes to politicians, the target is HUGE. Like shooting fish in a barrel.

Re:Can we use this... (1)

FudRucker (866063) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453214)

just think if instead of just disrupting speech they could use this to disrupt the ability to tell lies, that would sure make it tough for anyone in court or in any sort of hearing...

If you want a party trick... (1)

itsdapead (734413) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453082)

Just put headphones on the victim and feed their voice back to them with a 1-second delay for instant speech impediment fun and frolics. No danger of erasing your victims credit card or being sued 10 years later when they blame you for giving them a brain tumor.

(I guess people who work in the TV and radio industry or who spend long periods talking on echoey long-distance phone calls will have developed immunity, though).

Obviously doesn't have the same neurological implications as the zapper - but that's not to say its not interesting.

Too late..... (3, Funny)

Stanislav_J (947290) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453100)

If only this had been developed 20 years ago, I'd still be married. (I'd have ordered two right off the bat -- one for her and one for her mother.....)

Re:Too late..... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23453762)

With that attitude, I'm guessing the only way this would have helped keep you married is if you used it on yourself.

Only a matter of time... (1, Troll)

Strake (982081) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453102)

before the USA makes laws restricting the export of strong magnets.

This is called Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23453108)

This technology is called Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation [wikipedia.org] (or TMS).

How about an anvil? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23453136)

You could use its weak magnetic field to turn off the entire brain. Getting an anvil on the second floor is the hard part though.

Next up: Pianos have magnetic fields too (you insensitive clod).

One Application... (1)

FurtiveGlancer (1274746) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453152)

For monastic orders with vows of silence and problem monks.

Phrenology?! (1)

Kensai7 (1005287) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453188)

It's eerie how these transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) techniques are similar to theories near the defunct concepts of Phrenology [wikipedia.org] . I hope that this search for unique centers in the brain doesn't underestimate its abilities to integrate information, important in global processes such as music creation.

Re:Phrenology?! (1)

gimpeh (1209722) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453246)

Cut out the middle man, get yourself the personality you've always wanted: Retrophrenology [lspace.org]

Wow! (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23453196)

I'm speechless!

Re:Wow! (1)

maxwell demon (590494) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453254)

I for one would welcome our new speech-destroying overlords, if I just managed to say it ...

What good is a phone call (1)

dkarma (985926) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453236)

if you can't speak? Anyone else creeped out by the implications of this study?

TV magnets (2, Funny)

dargaud (518470) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453244)

And the magnets prevent in TVs can take the entire brain out. What a surprise !

Brain Hacking (4, Interesting)

Zarf (5735) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453268)

This is very exciting as it could point to a future where you can literally hack your own brain. So far it looks like he can only temporarily disrupt parts of a person's brain... what about enhancement? What about non-invasive brain I/O?

What I think could also be very interesting is what kinds of background effects do things like the Aurora have on people's brains? I lived in far-north Alaska for many years and I remember that anecdotally everyone talked about strange dreams when the Aurora was active. It could have been merely a sub-conscious suggestion that active Aurora leads to altered dream states or ... now I think after seeing this video ... perhaps it had a grain of truth? Hopefully someone will conduct some experiments.

Re:Brain Hacking (1)

barry99705 (895337) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453640)

I never notices any difference in dreams. I don't think there's enough magnetic power in them to really effect people.

Sweet! (1)

hampton (209113) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453300)

How soon until they install them into movie theatres?

Social Engineering...? (5, Funny)

jxliv7 (512531) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453308)

So here I was, speedreading through /., and the scientific suggestion of

"Using Maggots To Turn Off The Brain's Speech Center"

snatched my Sunday morning mind's attention like a zombie. Litereally. So, is there something here I'm missing? Like how does one direct those blood suckers to the speech center of a brain, assuming it's not major surgery to introduce them? And why...? Is DARPA going over to the dark side in the fight against terrorists?
 
Alas, after 15 second of grimacing and beweilderment I realized my sleep-hazed eyes were misreading.
 
Dang, I hope I didn't give some royalty fee collection company another bad idea to file a patent for...

Jack Thompson soultion (1)

Coraon (1080675) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453366)

So I say we implant the device in Jack's brain and rig up a long lasting power source, scientists get their research, and we can to make him shut up.

This may work for some... (1)

hyperz69 (1226464) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453390)

but I find nothing replaces a good Olde Timey Pimp Slap to shut someone up. :)

can we use this for... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23453430)

politicians...?

I can't do this all on my own. (1)

revxul (463513) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453464)

Hey its like the musical episode of Scrubs!

Mr. Anderson... (3, Funny)

slimjim8094 (941042) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453530)

what use is a phone call if you are ... unable ... to ... speak?

And tell me... (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23453536)

_Mr._ Anderson, what good is a phone call... if you are
unable to speak.

Hooray (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23453540)

i need one of these to shut up my wife

Perfect (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23453590)

We just need these magnets installed in every school.

Re:Perfect (1)

bsDaemon (87307) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453752)

But then the teachers would actually have to wear tinfoil hats?!

Then again, they may be the biggest part of the problem anyway.

In other news... (3, Funny)

Arcanlaw (929183) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453810)

In other news, it was revealed President Bush has been wearing a toupe for years to hide an area of partial baldness. "I love it!" Mr. Bush exclaimed. "I found this great place that uses rare earth magnets to keep 'em on your head. Real convenient like."

pleasure center (1)

nguy (1207026) | more than 6 years ago | (#23453828)

Wouldn't it be more fun to turn on the pleasure center than to turn off the speech center?
Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?