×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Post-Quake, China Cuts Access to Entertainment Web Sites

timothy posted more than 5 years ago | from the perhaps-a-good-thing dept.

Communications 334

thefickler writes "The Chinese Government has issued orders that all entertainment web sites and regular television programming be shut down completely for the next 3 days. Only web sites covering the recent tragic 7.8 magnitude earthquake and television stations broadcasting CCTV earthquake programming will be allowed to remain live." Can anyone with Web access in China confirm this report? From an AP story on the state of communications in the country right now, it appears at least that China is (despite ongoing monitoring) allowing freer than usual communications in the wake of the quake.

cancel ×
This is a preview of your comment

No Comment Title Entered

Anonymous Coward 1 minute ago

No Comment Entered

334 comments

Think it's a showcase? (2, Interesting)

Mal-2 (675116) | more than 5 years ago | (#23456862)

Do you think maybe the government feels they are doing such a great job there's no need to clamp down? From what I've seen, they are doing about as well as anyone could under the circumstances. Maybe they think that this will lead to good enough things being said (with a few bad ones for a "reality check") that they can pretend to be wide open and still come out of this looking good.

monitored is not free (0, Troll)

twitter (104583) | more than 5 years ago | (#23456874)

Punishment can come later. By closing off entertainment, they have less to watch. In the aftermath, they can take advantage of community spirit to purge dissenters of all stripes.

Re:monitored is not free (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23457044)

Any minute now the sockpuppets are going to come out of the woodwork to agree [slashdot.org] with this post.

Re:monitored is not free (2, Insightful)

Vectronic (1221470) | more than 5 years ago | (#23457140)

So?

Not that I agree with TwITter having multiple accounts, but 'it' does make valid comments fairly often. It may simply for the purpose of modding up his trolled accounts, or maybe just genuine comments, doesnt matter "why" it just matters what was said.

Mod down his trolls, and mod up his interesting/insightful/funny comments as you see fit, as you would anyone else.

Treating it differently just creates scepticism, more problems for the modding system. If everyone was wondering if the person had other accounts, and therefore was hesitant to moderate properly, or down-mods for the sake of spite, the system fails.

Re:monitored is not free (4, Interesting)

smilindog2000 (907665) | more than 5 years ago | (#23457302)

I'm going to do something dangerous, and quote my wife as a well informed person. According to her, right after the quake, the Chinese government banned all reporting in the effected areas. As usual, all the press backed off and went home. Except for two reporters from two papers. These two reporters rapidly reported on the actual situation, and the other newspapers and TV stations saw these competitors getting all the viewers and readers. Nationally, news organizations then defied the government order and reported on the situation openly.

So... the government is pissed, and is punishing the media organizations by sending them home for a while. I could be wrong, but that's more or less what I heard from my wife, and like in China, it's dangerous around here to disagree with the boss :-)

affected, dammit! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23457520)

"Affected", dammit, affected! arrrrhg!!!!!

Re:monitored is not free (5, Informative)

Christopher Neufeld (118052) | more than 5 years ago | (#23457784)

I'm in China right now. I was here (Beijing) the day the earthquake hit. At 6:00, I was having dinner in a restaurant, and the television was tuned to the national news service. I speak Chinese, and I understand it well. It was all-earthquake, all the time. Reporters were everywhere in Sichuan (they hadn't arrived in the worst-hit areas yet, it having been less than four hours). The premier was on TV talking about sending help. There were pictures of people carrying bodies and bandaged victims on their backs, footage of destroyed buildings, everything you would expect to see in a major disaster, with no conspicuous absences. It was the exact antithesis of news suppression.

In the days following the quake, I've turned on the television a couple of times. There is a lot of earthquake coverage, but I've also seen costume dramas, soap operas, musical variety shows, fund raisers, home-shopping-network style shows, and billiards tournaments.

I proxy my internet through an SSH tunnel, so I haven't noticed any changes to website availability, but I just fired up an unproxied konqueror, and I can get to the BBC, CBC, arstechnica, and slashdot through the national firewall. If somebody wants to post URLs they think are unreachable, I can give quickly determine whether they are reachable.

Re:monitored is not free (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23457872)

Ah, but GP said in the affected areas, meaning not Beijing.

Re:monitored is not free (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23457330)

Yeah. I can't believe they're just now getting Quake in China. Just wait till they get Quake 3 Arena...the government will really have to clamp down.

Live From Beijing: Its Monday Morning. (5, Informative)

fotoflo (1018618) | more than 5 years ago | (#23457530)

and everything seems normal. A search for ææ or gaming on baidu returns a thousand similar sites: http://www.baidu.com/s?wd=%D3%CE%CF%B7 [baidu.com] , all of them working. Lesson to be learned: twitter isnt a great news source, and neither are twitter-derived news sites.

The big upcoming 2008 purge (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23457568)

So... entertainment being suspended as a means to create community spirit?

Months earlier,I read something about China not issuing visas that last after the ending ceremonies of the games

How likely is an upcoming "big Chinese purge" by the end of this year?

Most importantly, why would China need that???

Re:monitored is not free (1)

RiotingPacifist (1228016) | more than 5 years ago | (#23457664)

As much as i hate you for your sock puppet bullshit i have to give you credit i was wondering why they'd done this and your explanation is spot on even if you are a twat.

I do not have sock puppets (5, Funny)

twatt3r (1284850) | more than 5 years ago | (#23457746)

Help! Help! I have been a victim of unfair moderations!

As you can see from my previous posts [slashdot.org], I am generally a trolling idiot who has nothing constructive to say.

But, but! Someone moderated me to +4 Insightful! If math serves me correctly, 3 someones!

I ask you to stop this unfair moderation and return me to my target of "-1 hopeless."

Arigatou gozaimashita!

(Besides, I don't have "sock puppets." That accusation is unfair to the world's other sufferers of dissociative identity disorder, who function just fine in society.)

Re:Think it's a showcase? (3, Informative)

justicezyx (1160189) | more than 5 years ago | (#23457720)

I'm in Qingdao, Shandong Province now. I'm also watch Jackie Chan's Drunken Master clip on *youtube.com*. Actually, Chinese government issue a "3-day" mourning, like a public momorial activity that memorate the people die in this tragedy. It's vollentary, and all media is on their own way. Of course, there is mostly quake-related news, and this must be the mainstream now. As for web sites, I can access all sites that I accessed a few days ago, and everything is find. FYI, China's out-country net-access is limited by the service provides, i.e. China telecom, netcom, etc. Occasionally, you are unable to access some sites, it's because of the congestion in the bottleneck. Chinese government filter/block websits, and this is a open-secret. But, they do not act like a "censor-maina" or "fasicism"...

Re:Think it's a showcase? (3, Insightful)

Max Littlemore (1001285) | more than 5 years ago | (#23457864)

Do you think maybe the government feels they are doing such a great job there's no need to clamp down?

Yeah, I think it's a way to show the world that they are a lot better at handling a humanitarian crisis than totalitarian governments like Burma's junta after the cyclone or the USAs rebublicans after the hurricane. They are doing well with this and are keen to show it - as many governments on Earth would be.

But the real question is... (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23456866)

How is this going to affect the price of my chink made shoes?

Whats the point? (1, Insightful)

Redlazer (786403) | more than 5 years ago | (#23456868)

What the hell is it supposed to do?

I would think that after a tragedy, it would better to OPEN the internet as much as possible.

I'm really starting to hate China.

-Red

Closure of Channel BT. (1, Interesting)

scum-e-bag (211846) | more than 5 years ago | (#23457014)

Translation: close all torrent sites.

All non essentials, ie p2p, will be shut down. All resources are to go into humanitarian relief.

Be prepared to wait a while for your latest episodes via Channel BT.

I'm really starting to hate China.
This is no reason to hate China... What did the rest of the US do when Cyclone Katrina hit? Oh, thats right, they sat on their bums and continued to watch Channel BT as they didn't want to know about their fellow citizens people drowning.

Re:Closure of Channel BT. (4, Insightful)

SanityInAnarchy (655584) | more than 5 years ago | (#23457262)

This is no reason to hate China... What did the rest of the US do when Cyclone Katrina hit?
Whatever they wanted, which is the point.

didn't want to know about their fellow citizens people drowning.
Some did, some didn't. Why is it alright for the government to force everyone to know about it?

Re:Closure of Channel BT. (3, Informative)

TubeSteak (669689) | more than 5 years ago | (#23457706)

Some did, some didn't. Why is it alright for the government to force everyone to know about it?
Because the Chinese Government can

Because it's a national disaster and the Chinese Government will eventually use it for propaganda purposes. Something along the lines of 'there was a tragedy, we rebuilt, see how awesome the Communist Government & Chinese people are'.

I expect some people will take exception to this, but you hear the exact same type of language surrounding the terrorist attacks of 9/11. The Chinese are already flying banners saying "fight the earthquake" [google.com].

Re:Closure of Channel BT. (1)

nbert (785663) | more than 5 years ago | (#23457416)

Translation: close all torrent sites.
That would be a fist timer - but maybe Comcast can provide some experience. The Chinese government is way more busy blocking public sources. It means that certain sites will be blocked by the great firewall (which can be circumvented by a simple proxy outside of China). From my ex-expat point of view that's nothing to worry about. If you really want to know you'll get the news regardless of censorship. In the TV domain it might be different, but I've seen many Chinese with dishes in Shanghai (providing CNN etc.) and I'm seriously in doubt that CCTV's coverage will be taken without a grain of salt. Even on the countryside I'm sure that most people see the difference between propaganda and actual news - they were trained on more than one occasion (great famine, Cuba missile crisis, breakdown of the SU and so on).

Re:Whats the point? (3, Insightful)

cyfer2000 (548592) | more than 5 years ago | (#23457040)

I hope you understand what "national mourning" means and at least understand what the title means.

Re:Whats the point? (1, Troll)

Handover Phist (932667) | more than 5 years ago | (#23457150)

Not to mention that the less people are able to sit and watch TV or surf the net, the more people are available to remove the rubble and rebuild homes and businesses. In at least that POV the decision actually makes sense!

Re:Whats the point? (2, Interesting)

Gavagai80 (1275204) | more than 5 years ago | (#23457258)

Because people thousands of miles away are really likely to come help if you take away their TV?

Re:Whats the point? (1)

Handover Phist (932667) | more than 5 years ago | (#23457308)

No, but people in the vicinity who don't have the choice of sitting down in front of a computer and surfing will work through the struggle instead of burying themselves in whatever the computer has to offer.

OK, I'm done playing devils advocate now.

Re:Whats the point? (5, Informative)

clragon (923326) | more than 5 years ago | (#23457048)

What the hell is it supposed to do?

I would think that after a tragedy, it would better to OPEN the internet as much as possible.

I think this is part of the 3 days of mourning [google.com] going on in China right now, to raise even more awareness of the quake.

Also, sites regarding the earthquake will stay up. So the websites created by people to track missing relatives, or to gather donations, will stay online. Was this absolutely necessary? probably not. But I don't think this move will hinder the rescue effort at all, but rather raise more awareness of it since earthquake related info is all the Chinese people will get in the next 3 days.

Re:Whats the point? (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23457172)

What the hell is it supposed to do?


I would think that after a tragedy, it would better to OPEN the internet as much as possible.


I'm really starting to hate China.


-Red

But China has been more open and receptive about this than they ever have. Look at their history.

If you want to see real government relief effort problems, look at Burma. China pales by comparison.

Re:Whats the point? (1)

ShieldW0lf (601553) | more than 5 years ago | (#23457202)

I'm really starting to like China

Re:Whats the point? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23457562)

That's because you're a worthless loser who wishes desperately he could force his preferences on everyone else.

And that's all you'll ever be.

Re:Whats the point? (3, Insightful)

name*censored* (884880) | more than 5 years ago | (#23457222)

It's possible that America isn't the only place with a Ted Stevens in high places, claiming that the information regarding relief effort and coordination "got tangled up with all these things going on the Internet commercially.". From there, it's a short logical (logic? hah!) bound to say that cutting off all unrelated content will speed the recovery effort up (although there might be a grain of truth to this thought, if you could prove that Chinese pirates are taxing the infrastructure to the limit, which I highly doubt).

Yes It's true (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23456886)

Me chinese, I cannot access Habbo Hotel. Me so solly ^_^

Over the top (4, Insightful)

tsa (15680) | more than 5 years ago | (#23456930)

I think this is a bit over the top. Many people lost relatives or friends in the quake. Some entertainment can help them get over the grief. Now they're constanty reminded of the quake by the media. That can't be good for them.

Re:Over the top (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23457028)

I don't know about you, but after losing friends and family I don't think I'd want "some entertainment", particularly not Internet kind. I would even despise people who would propose it. Hell, if one of my close friend lost a relative, I would even think it would be inappropriate to seek entertainment for myself while he's in grief. I think my duty would be to be quietly with him.

Re:Over the top (5, Informative)

Beijing Monster (969610) | more than 5 years ago | (#23457406)

I think this is a bit over the top. Many people lost relatives or friends in the quake. Some entertainment can help them get over the grief. Now they're constanty reminded of the quake by the media. That can't be good for them.
I live in Beijing. Such sentiments as above sound so selfish and self-indulgent. Great shows of national mourning are not unusual, even in our own western countries (or at least they used to be). I am no apologist for China but, on this, please cut the Chinese a bit of slack. You have no idea how this tragedy has affected people in China and while three days of mourning might seem excessive it is not necessarily so here. Moreover, it helps focus the national mind on what has to be done next: no more hope for rescue, the need for rebuilding, fund raising, etc. BTW, I have so far not been affected in my access to the internet or TV, etc.

Re:Over the top (4, Insightful)

digitalunity (19107) | more than 5 years ago | (#23457548)

Just to put this into perspective, look at the raw unmitigated loss of life.

In the span of 1 minute, more people in China died than all the american lives lost in the "War on Terror" during the last 7 years.

Add it up and I dare anyone bashing China right now to respond saying this mourning isn't a natural and healthy response.

Re:Over the top (3, Interesting)

Beijing Monster (969610) | more than 5 years ago | (#23457670)

Agreed. That said, to put the GWOT example in perspective: the number of Chinese dead does not yet exceed the number of Iraqi dead since 2003 and America's war of aggression upon Iraq.

Re:Over the top (3, Insightful)

RiotingPacifist (1228016) | more than 5 years ago | (#23457648)

I live in Beijing. Such sentiments as above sound so selfish and self-indulgent. Great shows of national mourning are not unusual, even in our own western countries (or at least they used to be). I am no apologist for China but, on this, please cut the Chinese a bit of slack. You have no idea how this tragedy has affected people in China and while three days of mourning might seem excessive it is not necessarily so here. Moreover, it helps focus the national mind on what has to be done next: no more hope for rescue, the need for rebuilding, fund raising, etc.

BTW, I have so far not been affected in my access to the internet or TV, etc.
Mourning should be optional, it should not be used by any goverment to 'focus' a 'national mind', and distract it from other atrocities ( Read human rights, tibet, etc). The fact you even use the phrase 'national mind' just re-enfoces how well the patriot re-education act has worked.

p.s assuming your not brain-dead enough to think everything i write are western lies, stop to consider for a second how you can put a percentage correctness on philosophical writings? Mao would hate the Chinese government more than I do.

Slashdot misses the point as usual (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23456946)

They declared 3 days of mourning.

Re:Slashdot misses the point as usual (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23456980)

Which is a useful cover for all sorts of things. As the US has demonstrated with the rampant nationalism that followed 9/11, all sorts of things can get pushed through that normally would not happen. So it is now with China. Any Chinese citizen that objects to the impeding atrocities will branded "unChinese" and dealt with accordingly, to the cheers of his neighbours.

The real reason (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23456950)

No, it is a three days national mourning to honour victims in the earthquake. China is not only suspending entertainment websites, but also suspending everything from public entertainment to olympic torch relay and all Chinese flags will be flown at half-mast. There will also be a 3-minute silence everywhere in China at 2:28pm China time today.

Check out:
http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2008/olympics/05/18/bc.as.gen.china.earthquake.olympic.ap/

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/asia/china/1982617/China-earthquake-Rescue-teams-overwhelmed-by-disaster.html

Re:The real reason (1)

drivel (229435) | more than 5 years ago | (#23457454)

I think they are suspending all entertainment facilities, such as karoke, clubs etc, but I have not heard about suspension of entertainment websites.

Re:The real reason (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23457642)

From what I have heard this measure on suspension of Entertainment media actually came after outcry from Chinese BBS communities ,such as Tianya and Mop, condemning the insensitivity of various entertainment channel after the quake. It is an interesting example of how China government responds to the Chinese people, though the measure it adopts still seems rather heavy handed.

China can't read slashdot (2, Insightful)

fractalVisionz (989785) | more than 5 years ago | (#23456960)

Can anyone with Web access in China confirm this report?

No they can't, since this is an entertainment website.

Re:China can't read slashdot (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23456976)

reading slashdot here in shenzhen right now.

Re:China can't read slashdot (2, Funny)

saitoh (589746) | more than 5 years ago | (#23457212)

Well, see, they haven't blocked all the crap on the internet yet.

Re:China can't read slashdot (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23457398)

>reading slashdot here in shenzhen right now.

And I know of Chinese families with three and four kids.

A counterexample does NOT settle such discussions, especially not in a place as large as China.

Re:China can't read slashdot (1)

aaronlwe (1291712) | more than 5 years ago | (#23457584)

I read slashdot everyday in shanghai and I don't see any more block to the web than usual.

Re:China can't read slashdot (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23457788)

Whoosh!

It's true (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23456966)

that youtube and other sites than were available just a few days ago, are now blocked again (to just answer the question of the poster).

Re:It's true (1)

grainofsand (548591) | more than 5 years ago | (#23457016)

youtube.com is currently accessible in both Shanghai and Beijing. The previous blocking of uk.youtube.com has also been lifted in the last few days.

Re:It's true (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23457840)

not from CNC in Beijing. U should check information before denying...

Re:It's true (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23457862)

Youtube works, but it's so slow as to be basically unwatchable. Most foreigners here just wait for the fansubs on Tudou (the most popular domestic alternative) and ignore the subtitles.

To add to what sjb2016 said, the "user generated" content on Tudou is still available, but all the front page content is about the earthquake, mostly official announcements.

Recent restrictions (4, Informative)

grainofsand (548591) | more than 5 years ago | (#23456970)

I live and work in Shanghai. The leading (popular) domestic websites are all still accessible but are dominated by earthquake-related news and stories, including calls for donations.

TV stations are the same, and again, programming is dominated by earthquake news.

I noticed over the weekend that craigslist.org is no longer accessible from mainland.

Re:Recent restrictions (1)

beaverbrother (586749) | more than 5 years ago | (#23457046)

The great firewall doesn't block slashdot?

Re:Recent restrictions (1)

grainofsand (548591) | more than 5 years ago | (#23457088)

I recall /. being blocked in China for a few months back in 2005, but not since then.

Re:Recent restrictions (1)

fliptout (9217) | more than 5 years ago | (#23457774)

I was in China in Fall 2004 and from Aug 2005 until August 2006, and it was not blocked during that time. At least not where I was, mostly in Beijing.

Re:Recent restrictions (1)

mea_culpa (145339) | more than 5 years ago | (#23457260)

It could be that Shanghai is a SEZ [wikipedia.org] city. I've been there 3 times since 2005 and there wasn't any websites blocked that I could find. Could also be the hotel, and the western company I visited didn't have those restrictions.
I was also able to watch my Slingbox, and bring my Vonage adapter and make local calls back to the states.
YMMV

 

Re:Recent restrictions (1)

RiotingPacifist (1228016) | more than 5 years ago | (#23457500)

No need the firewall has done its job, now everything anti-Chinese is instantly written off as western lies. The government have managed to get the firewall into peoples heads, the actual firewall isn't needed any more.

This sounds like a bit of a push to get the nation even more indoctrinated. my friends lived in the UK his whole life and since the Tibet thing, he suddenly thinks all western media is bull.

Filter news for young children.. (4, Informative)

binaryspiral (784263) | more than 5 years ago | (#23456994)

When 9/11 occured in the states, we had 24/7 coverage and news on just about every channel. Mr. Rogers came on PBS and said that these are aweful times, but please limit what small children are being exposed to - it could be very scary and detrimental.

Parents should act like a filter for the world - especially the hype and circus that is today's news reporting.

Other than that - what is the usefulness of an order like this? I would think having something for kids and adults alike to watch other than death and destruction would help.

Re:Filter news for young children.. (0)

noidentity (188756) | more than 5 years ago | (#23457236)

The best filter is to unplug the antenna and cancel your cable service. You'll hardly miss a thing.

Only douchebags on Slashdot (0, Troll)

smitingpurpleemu (951712) | more than 5 years ago | (#23457004)

would worry about internet censorship in China at a time like this.

People are still crushed under rubble, entire towns are flattened, and all you fools can worry about is whether Chinese get their cheap entertainment and whether their Internet is monitored? There is a reason why your point of view is irrelevant and you're demonstrating why right now.

Re:Only douchebags on Slashdot (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23457116)

Governments should not respond opportunistically to crises by reducing civil liberties, just because they know there are too many people like you who will say, "oh, who cares, there are people dying. That's more important". Yeah, it's more important, but not important enough that we should spend all our waking hours doing nothing but thinking about it. That creates too much room for governments to walk all over us.

Re:Only douchebags on Slashdot (1)

Handover Phist (932667) | more than 5 years ago | (#23457206)

Hey sport, douchebagorama here. Someone mentioned 9/11 as that's how they relate to huge catastrophes. During that time I owned and ran an Internet Cafe. I implemented a 30 minute maximum on computer usage and cut prices in half because there was a lineup around the block of people who communicated through IM and e-mail to their relatives in the zone of destruction.

Communication is a GOOD THING! The Internet is a GOOD THING, and plenty of the folks here help run it, so shaddap. We play our roles and kick ass when it comes to facilitation of communication with those who, through Gods, Allah's or who/whatevers grace, still walk this ball of dirt we call home.

Re:Only douchebags in the Chinese government (0, Troll)

RiotingPacifist (1228016) | more than 5 years ago | (#23457518)

would worry about internet censorship in China at a time like this.

People are still crushed under rubble, entire towns are flattened, and all you fools can worry about is whether Chinese get their cheap entertainment and whether their Internet is monitored? There is a reason why your point of view is irrelevant and you're demonstrating why right now.

fixed

Re:Only douchebags in the Chinese government (0, Flamebait)

RiotingPacifist (1228016) | more than 5 years ago | (#23457680)

Dear moderators please do not confuse unpopular opinions See above to comments, with trolling, this is trolling you fucking douche bags, learn how to moderate!

Access in China (2, Informative)

Auldclootie (1131129) | more than 5 years ago | (#23457090)

There are more problems than normal accessing sites after the quake (from Beijing), but this may be infra-structure damage similar to that experienced last year after the Taiwan quake. I'm having trouble getting Youtube and Hotmail, but the vast majority of my usual feeds are up and running - speeds are a little slower than usual.

Coming this fall... (1)

Sentry21 (8183) | more than 5 years ago | (#23457154)

It's QuakeTV! Live, unedited, uncensored footage from earthquakes all over the world! This is the quake lover's dream channel!

See earthquakes from exotic, foreign lands like Peru and Canada on our premiere programming, QuakeWatch! Or, tune in Thursday nights for a special episode of Classic Quakes, featuring a different home-grown American quake every week!

Tune in for the best documentaries about earthquakes, the latest quake news and reviews, and more! QuakeTV is the only channel a quake-watcher will ever need.

Call your cable company today to order QuakeTV, and see what's shakin' tonight!

Fascism idiocy (1)

unity100 (970058) | more than 5 years ago | (#23457160)

thats the way with fascism. they move on perceived necessities. not realities. cutting access to entertainment RIGHT at the time when their country totally needs it. only happens in fascist governments.

someone would have listened to a song from a website that someone s/he lost liked very much, and remember, and find some solace in good remembrance or similar.

but no. not happening with cold war derelict dinosaurs and a fascist party at the government.

Re:Fascism idiocy (3, Interesting)

arthdo (1291694) | more than 5 years ago | (#23457214)

You got it wrong. It's the cutural differences hat shocked you. In Chinese culture, "mourning" is a serious process that few people would even think of seeking "entertainment". It is to show the deep respect for the dead and the families that are suffering. The government is simply suggesting to stop recreational activities during national days of mourning. Internet is certainly not being cracked down ...

Re:Fascism idiocy (1)

Moridineas (213502) | more than 5 years ago | (#23457290)

First posts huh? A shill for the Chinese government? I didn't realize they were so desperate...

Anywhere, your attempted argument is nonsense, it's got nothing to do with "culture shock." You actually defeat your own argument--if "few people" would even think of seeking entertainment now, why does the Communist Party have to crack down? That doesn't make any sense, you need to consider motives when actions don't make sense based on your assumptions. Mourning is good and solidarity is good. Is enforced mourning meaningful?

The question is, what kind of free society can exist when the Government ORDERS (not "suggests" as you incorrectly type) mandatory shutdowns of websites. (If you have any evidence to the contrary, please post it!)

Imagine if you will if the US government had ordered all websites and TV channels off for 3 days after 9/11. Despite it's flaws, the US is a free society, and people would have been PISSED. Same for Europe, and many other countries.

The conclusion is, despite strides the people have made in China against the yoke of their government, they remain unfree. Let us hope for their sake this can one day be remedied.

Re:Fascism idiocy (1)

arthdo (1291694) | more than 5 years ago | (#23457380)

I'm in the states. I visit slashdot very often but never commented on anything. And I certainly have nothing to do with the goervnment. So dont draw a harsh conclusion by your own bias. I just wanted to help you understand whay maybe happening. From what I saw in Chinese websites, it was certainly not a "order". A order would mean legal actions toward any violations. I think somebody needs a better translator. I'm not sure how do you understand the word "Shutdown". I think the best thing now is to wait for others to comment from mainland China, and see what is really happening with the "shutdown", see if anyone or any website would get punished if they keep running any entertainment stuff. But certainly, most of Chinese are in deep sorrow right now, the mourning process is spontaneous...

Re:Fascism idiocy (1)

RiotingPacifist (1228016) | more than 5 years ago | (#23457590)

While i agree with you point after 9/11 the major broadcasters did sensor
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_songs_deemed_inappropriate_by_Clear_Channel_following_the_September_11%2C_2001_attacks [wikipedia.org]
(pretty much any anti wto song + any thing to do with planes + anything by RATM)

fortunately it wasn't government forced tho

Re:Fascism idiocy (1)

Moridineas (213502) | more than 5 years ago | (#23457660)

You make a good point, though I do believe there's a huge difference between a broadcaster selectively choosing not to broadcast some songs (as well as many, many sites such as Penny Arcade doing something "different") from the government forcing it to happen.

Re:Fascism idiocy (1)

briskr (1291698) | more than 5 years ago | (#23457360)

No one is stopping us from listening to any songs!

Re:Fascism idiocy (1)

unity100 (970058) | more than 5 years ago | (#23457410)

what does 'entertainment' word mean in china if not songs.

Re:Fascism idiocy (1)

arthdo (1291694) | more than 5 years ago | (#23457444)

seriously, the government did simply "suggest" to stop any recreational activities activities during the three days of mourning. even they dont do so, most people would not have any mood to have fun these days because of all the concerns about the thousands of victims. "entertainment" certainly includes songs in my personal opinion. but how could the goverment stop people listening to songs? How effectively would three days of "shutdown" do to limit people's freedom? The whole purpose is to mourn, not to restrict communications...

Re:Fascism idiocy (1)

briskr (1291698) | more than 5 years ago | (#23457460)

We stops parties, football games etc., to express our condolence over the victims. That's the way we express our grief

No change (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23457170)

posting from within china now. all TV channels available and net access remains. where did this piece of news come from?

"National Mourning Days" they say (5, Informative)

prof.nemo (1291686) | more than 5 years ago | (#23457176)

I am in Hong Kong, all I heard from the the official news from mainland is that there will be 3 days of "mourning for the victims of earthquake". All entertainment facilities (casino, clubs etc.) in mainland are supposedly to be closed for these 3 days, and all mainland citizens are supposed to dress "less colorfully" as well. Didn't realize that includes entertainment websites though. Of course over here in Hong Kong we find it a bit strange and obviously the local government won't follow suit. Most Hong Kong locals don't understand the logic too, but maybe it's kind of cultural difference thing again.

Re:"National Mourning Days" they say (1)

arthdo (1291694) | more than 5 years ago | (#23457246)

I dont think anyone ever imposed a dress code, although many people would like to wear more of black and white by themselves to show respect for the dead.

Re:"National Mourning Days" they say (1)

prof.nemo (1291686) | more than 5 years ago | (#23457718)

Ah sorry for the typo, it's gambling (lotteries), not casino, because Macau is operating as usual. Flags will also be flying half-staff for 3 days too btw, for the victims of the earthquake.

I Am In China (1)

Lorean (756656) | more than 5 years ago | (#23457250)

Well, I can get this on China's youtube clone: http://v.youku.com/v_playlist/cd00f1006247o9p0.html [youku.com] But the front page is covered with earthquake stuff. At the moment, every CCTV channel (Except for CCTV 11 + the English CCTV channel) is broadcasting the same news program. Youtube was harmonized (blocked) starting two days ago.

I'm in China (4, Informative)

sjb2016 (514986) | more than 5 years ago | (#23457324)

I'm in China, have been for a few years. I can confirm that there doesn't seem to be much shutting down of websites. I can still go to the websites I normally go to view the latest episodes of Lost (hosted inside China, they stream rather well). As far as television, last night (Sunday night Shanghai time) I was watching the only not completely state run English station. The content was complete shit, but not earthquake related. I don't watch Chinese language stuff as it is shit propaganda or shit period soap operas or a cheap knock of "The Price is Right". Can still access all the websites I normally do, except for wikipedia, which is always hit or miss. Will keep things updated as I can.

China is opening (4, Insightful)

religious freak (1005821) | more than 5 years ago | (#23457332)

China is opening, and I think it's apparent by the way they are covering the quake. No, they will not be a fully functioning democracy tomorrow, but this coverage of the quake is big news.

To the Chinese natural disasters were, in the past, covered up and silenced. They are embracing not only independent local coverage, but independent FOREIGN coverage as well (foreign access is truly amazing).

I think despite some obvious failings even today, China is truly moving forward into a more open society. Give credit where credit is due...

-------
-1 nonconforming opinion

re (1)

electronixtar (1042742) | more than 5 years ago | (#23457342)

WTF another Chinese government evil? How about I tell ya that all sites could be accessed normally? Stop all entertanment for the thousands dead, what's wrong with it?

Disinformaton (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23457594)

I'm in China. There is no "shutting down" of entertainment websites as of Monday 9:30 am. It is possible there were orders as such, but enforcement is another thing.....

Its regional (5, Interesting)

Demonicat (1291710) | more than 5 years ago | (#23457620)

Before I launch into opinion, let me first state the facts jack. China's Internet censorship (the great firewall part of golden shield) is regionally based. Similar to the US radio having locality based censorship. In February for example, the university I teach at(Inner Mongolia Uni of Tech/science), could not access wikipedia- but could access flickr. In Beijing, it was the opposite- its locality based and gladder for firefox kills it anyway. That said, I still have full internet. Yesterday the DNS kept crashing out, but internet is rolling along fine and dandy...or as close as we get here at 100kbs on a pppoe. All sites are behaving normally. Now opinion. While I am a firm believer and activist for Freedom of Information, in this case I believe shutting down a bit of commuications may be needed. Many people in China are a bit on edge currently, with the olympics, the protests, the whole t1b3t thing- and the earthquake moved them right to the edge. Rumours are circulating around the country here about radiation dangers, the government not acting, the goverment causing the earthquake like some kind of James Bond Villian...lots of BS. The end result of this is that people are too panicked and nervous to help out with reconstruction or aiding survivors- not good. The limiting of information until the area is secure and survivors helped is very important at this time.

Most Chinese TV down in Shanghai (4, Informative)

Mr Europe (657225) | more than 5 years ago | (#23457626)

This morgning here in Shanghai I noticed that the hotel TV did send western channels such as CNN but almost all Chinese channels were down. Abt three channels showed quake clearings. Somewhat leaned towards showing heroic soldiers in clean suit saving people. And the president himself directing the work. But at least this time the TV has shown a lot of quake damages.
Death toll now 33000 verified. Will rise above 40000 since now 9500 verified to be beried under rubble. 220000 injured.

HBO and Cinemax went dark at my hotel (2, Interesting)

Ixitar (153040) | more than 5 years ago | (#23457632)

I am in Beijing and HBO and Cinemax channels at my hotel are not available today. CNN is available.

I have not found any websites blocked other than the usual ones.

major website will got their ways around this (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23457738)

but tv can't.
all foreign channel is banned here, possibly for a 3-day period.
pretty much ALL domestic channel is broadcasting the same programme from CCTV, our state run television network.

posting from shenzhen.

I'm also in China (1)

topnob (1195249) | more than 5 years ago | (#23457780)

I'm also in China, Shanghai as well and my understanding is that all KTV(karaoke in a private room), bars and all shops relating to physical entertainment related will be shut. Not the internet, and what I saw about this entertainment ban, its for morning for 3 days, and they said nothing about the TV, but its been pretty much 24/7 quake coverage on every channel the last few nights.

It is just part of the Chinese Culture ... (1)

dadman (576569) | more than 5 years ago | (#23457818)

that when people close to one dies, it is consider impolite for one to be engaged in anything that bring happiness to oneself, at least until after the grieving period is over.

So, even if the Government didn't raise the "order" of this 3 days shut down, you would expect to see much less activities over these channels anyway.

Having said that, being "ordered" to do something which should be done self-willingly and out of empathy is still a bad habit that the Chinese should learn to get rid of.

How gullible can you get? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23457828)

For crying out loud, how gullible can you get? I've been living in China for the last 5 years, and call bullshit on the entire article. All websites are just as accessible as normal, including the video-sharing site tudou.com which was referenced in the article. Yes, there is a 3 day period of national mourning, but no closures of anything that I can see. I know it's a regular meme to lambast the editors for not being diligent enough with checking submissions, but really.... *rolls eyes*
Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Sign up for Slashdot Newsletters
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...