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Google Assists In Arrest Of Indian Man

CmdrTaco posted more than 6 years ago | from the many-shades-of-evil dept.

Google 609

An anonymous reader writes "After a Google user posted a profane picture of the Hindu saint Shivaji, Indian authorities contacted Google to ask for his IP address. Google complied. He was arrested and is reported to have been beaten by a lathi and asked to use the same bowl to eat and to use in the toilet. Not surprisingly, Google is a keen to play this down as Yahoo is being hauled over the coals by US Congress for handing over IP addresses and emails to the Chinese Government which resulted in a Chinese democracy activist being jailed." Readers are noting that these are 2 unrelated cases — the latter is several months old.

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Wow... (5, Insightful)

CarAnalogy (1191053) | more than 6 years ago | (#23462502)

I don't usually complain about badly written summaries, but this one made my head explode.

Re:Wow... (1)

bsDaemon (87307) | more than 6 years ago | (#23462522)

Yes, the English leaves something to be desired, however I think that the message is relatively straight forward.

maybe its time I start thinking about ditching gmail and stuff...

Even the Post Title (4, Funny)

Jeremiah Cornelius (137) | more than 6 years ago | (#23462964)

"Indian Man"

Something awkward and comic about this description. Curiously vague, while simultaneously exhibiting a misplaced precision.

Re:Even the Post Title (4, Funny)

bsDaemon (87307) | more than 6 years ago | (#23463062)

I know... I thought they liked to be called Native Americans now.

Re:Wow... (5, Funny)

InvisblePinkUnicorn (1126837) | more than 6 years ago | (#23462556)

You's didn't thinked the summary's quality were as good you had likening?

Gnostech! (4, Funny)

ideonode (163753) | more than 6 years ago | (#23462506)

Hindu saints have IP addresses?

Teh Googel Is Teh Dunt Be Teh Evel!!11!! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23462774)

ZOMG!!! Teh Googel is teh dunt be teh evel!!11!! Cuz dey sez us soes!!11!

We noes teh MiKKKro$$$loth is teh evel, so teh Googel kant be teh evel!!11!! Dere be nun lefts!!11!

Dis be noes invezions of teh privasies, cuz teh KKKonservatards tells us ther no writes to teh privazies!!1!! Writes iz teh onlies for teh corpratuns, not teh peeples!!11! Stays teh curse!!11!~!

Re:Gnostech! (5, Funny)

hansraj (458504) | more than 6 years ago | (#23462962)

And while meditating their IP is 127.0.0.1 for "Truth lies within".

Do no evil doesnt stop 'aiding evil do bad things' (5, Insightful)

PC and Sony Fanboy (1248258) | more than 6 years ago | (#23462516)

Well, I'm glad that google abides by the law here in canada. Clearly their motto of 'do no evil' is region specific; on one hand, I applaud their help in stopping crime, on the other hand, I detest the violation of privacy.

I guess I'm safe so long as my government respects my rights (because google will only go as far as the government seems deem 'right')

Dont be evil (5, Insightful)

Brain-Fu (1274756) | more than 6 years ago | (#23462686)

The motto is not "do no evil," it is "don't be evil."

Not that it really matters, "evil" is a sloppy, ill-defined, and personally relativistic concept to begin with.

And of course, having an intent doesn't guarantee the ability to realize that intent, let alone to perpetually avoid any deviation.

And of course, loudly publishing such a motto doesn't actually mean that those at the top have any intention of living up to it. The perception of benevolence is what is really useful.

Sloppy Definition? maybe... (4, Insightful)

Holi (250190) | more than 6 years ago | (#23462788)

But, I would have to say, when you actions lead to someone being beaten, jailed, and forced to use the same dish to eat and shit, then you can be sure your action was evil.

What the hell is wrong with the world?

Re:Sloppy Definition? maybe... (4, Insightful)

Sancho (17056) | more than 6 years ago | (#23462868)

The problem is that the world can't agree on morality. The problem is that dictators (some of them democratically elected) don't believe in civil rights. The problem is that human beings abuse power (and even those who think that they never would tend to do so when given power.)

Re:Sloppy Definition? maybe... (2, Interesting)

wattrlz (1162603) | more than 6 years ago | (#23462922)

I dunno, I could think of a few people who I wouldn't have issue hearing were being beaten, jailed, etc. The difference here is that a man was put in that situation - by Google, who of all entities should know the consequences of their actions considering that their core competency is data mining and appropriate ad placement - over an image. Something the majority of google's product/customer base would take issue with and perhaps even consider, "evil". Most westerners (and probably other people too, but I can only speak about what I'm familliar with) believe that in a perfect world there would be nothing you could say that any of us would want you to be placed in an indian-fetish-dungeon over. Google, as an American company, should respect that.

Re:Dont be evil (5, Funny)

bryanp (160522) | more than 6 years ago | (#23462810)

.The motto is not "do no evil," it is "don't be evil.

Apparently they need to change it to

Do no evil*

*void where prohibited by law or the financial interests of our stockholders

Re:Do no evil doesnt stop 'aiding evil do bad thin (4, Insightful)

neuromancer23 (1122449) | more than 6 years ago | (#23462762)

>> Well, I'm glad that google abides by the law here in canada.

Well they abide by the law in India and China too which is why they put people in prison.

Re:Do no evil doesnt stop 'aiding evil do bad thin (5, Insightful)

morgan_greywolf (835522) | more than 6 years ago | (#23462778)

I applaud their help in stopping crime


Crime? You sure you want to word it that way?

What this man was convicted of may have been a crime in his country, but in the United States, Europe, Canada and most other places in the free world what he did would be protected under freedom of speech.

He was arrested for nothing more than saying something like "Fuck George Bush" or "Hillary Clinton is a stupid cunt licker" or "Barack Obama can go fuck himself" or "John McCain is an asshole." (There, equal opportunity. :)

Tastelss? Perhaps. Illegal? Not where I live.

Re:Do no evil doesnt stop 'aiding evil do bad thin (4, Insightful)

Applekid (993327) | more than 6 years ago | (#23462798)

I applaud their help in stopping crime...
Juicy tidbits from TFA:

22-year-old IT professional Rahul Krishnakumar Vaid. His crime was writing in an orkut community named "I hate Sonia Gandhi." Sonia Gandhi is a prominent politician in India . . . he created a profile and then posted content in vulgar language about Sonia Gandhi in the community.

. . . If he's convicted, he can be imprisoned for up to five years and may have to pay a fine up to Rs one lakh.
Still applaud that? This isn't Google catching a thief or embezzler or rapist. This is Google turning in someone who said something that someone else who is powerful doesn't like.

Re:Do no evil doesnt stop 'aiding evil do bad thin (1)

maxume (22995) | more than 6 years ago | (#23462846)

Their only other choice is to essentially stop doing business in India.

Are you India free? I sure as hell am not, of the last 5 times I have called in to companies that I do business with, at least 3 of the operators were in India.

Re:Do no evil doesnt stop 'aiding evil do bad thin (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23462928)

on one hand, I applaud their help in stopping crime
According to that second article, they arrested the wrong person because his ISP screwed up the IP address search. So not only was this man arrested and tortured, he wasn't even the person that offended his government.

Nice going Google.

compliance, not judges (5, Insightful)

caffeinemessiah (918089) | more than 6 years ago | (#23462540)

What happened to this man is despicable. However, we need to remember that Google is a company, not a judge in a court of law. It is not their place to decide if a court-issued subpoena is "worth" complying with or not, especially not in a democratic country (eat trolls, eat!). The big question is if they were responding to a court order in the first place, or the lean of some jackass in the government.

Re:compliance, not judges (5, Insightful)

bryanp (160522) | more than 6 years ago | (#23462718)

If they're not going to try and make a judgement call about what is evil then they should drop their (now obviously) hypocritical slogan.

Re:compliance, not judges (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23462826)

If they're not going to try and make a judgement call about what is evil then they should drop their (now obviously) hypocritical slogan.

What the hell is it with people like you? Are you so trapped in an idealistic, geek fantasy world that you don't realize that a company slogan is not legally binding? Do you not understand that when a company goes public, it is responsible to its shareholders, not to its slogan? You're basically saying that your outrage is because of their slogan, not because of the allegedly dubious activities that they take part in. So if they changed their slogan to "Make more money!" and continued ratting out foreigners to their governments, you'd be perfectly happy?

You're either an idiot, or 16 years old.

Re:compliance, not judges (1)

Sancho (17056) | more than 6 years ago | (#23462904)

Evil is relative, and Google is a multinational company. It's quite possible that in China, the government would consider Google "evil" for not helping them to censor their people into submission.

Re:compliance, not judges (4, Informative)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 6 years ago | (#23462988)

Evil is relative, and Google is a multinational company.

Actually, Evil isn't relative - it's subjective. Totally different. The former implies that there is a single standard of evil which is the same for all people but which varies based upon circumstances. The truth however is that Evil is defined differently for each person.

In other words, it's a stupid, disingenuous slogan, and Google should drop it for that reason alone. But given that Google is originally a US company, founded by Norteamericanos and with a slogan written in English, then I postulate that it can reasonably be measured by the standards of the USA - and one of our basic cultural values is the right to believe (and say!) whatever you want. By that measurement, this action is evil and since you can only be judged by your actions, then Google is evil.

It's quite possible that in China, the government would consider Google "evil" for not helping them to censor their people into submission.

I have a similar issue at home; we have a cat named "Evil Kitty". Actually, where they had her before they first named her that (she has a sister named "Good" who was more friendly in the past) they tried to rename her Tibet, but I thought that was a stupid name for a cat, and she is evil to the mice so it's back to Evil. However, what the people of China believe due to large-scale brainwashing is really not that interesting to the subject of Evil, because of its very subjectivity. The very fact of the cultural brainwashing that instructs the Chinese to do as they are told is Evil by our standards in the Western world, where we value individuality and choice.

Re:compliance, not judges (1)

Sancho (17056) | more than 6 years ago | (#23463158)

Actually, Evil isn't relative - it's subjective.
That's what I meant. I just haven't had my coffee this morning.

In other words, it's a stupid, disingenuous slogan
And that's pretty much the point. It's a slogan with which Google simply cannot reasonably comply, as a multinational company.

Google should drop it for that reason alone.
Well, there are lots of stupid slogans out there. Where do you want to go today? Whatever it is, you can get it on eBay? None of these make any more sense or are any more true.

A slogan, while meaning to be representative of a company, should not be considered a restriction on the company. It's all marketing.

But given that Google is originally a US company, founded by Norteamericanos
Was Sergey Brin nationalized before he founded it? Even if he were, that wouldn't necessarily mean that all of his values are that of Americans.

Hell, not all Americans have the same values. The free speech you're so fond of doesn't extend to video games, according to 51% of the people (citation [wired.com] ) and a whopping 70% thought that the government should be allowed to censor the media in times of war (citation [newsflavor.com] .)

By that measurement, this action is evil and since you can only be judged by your actions, then Google is evil.
I don't think we have enough of the story to know. What are the laws in this country? Did Google know why they were being asked to reveal the IP address of this user? Did Google have a reasonable expectation of the outcome of revealing the IP address? Did an employee at Google make a mistake in revealing the IP address (i.e. did someone violate corporate policy?)

Re:compliance, not judges (2, Informative)

roystgnr (4015) | more than 6 years ago | (#23462732)

It is not their place to decide if a court-issued subpoena is "worth" complying with or not, especially not in a democratic country (eat trolls, eat!).

Actually, a "troll" is usually defined as someone who posts something inflammatory to elicit responses; the people who respond (like myself right now) are just called "suckers".

At least I'm in good company. Somewhere, up in heaven, Harriet Tubman is flipping you off.

Re:compliance, not judges (1)

hesiod (111176) | more than 6 years ago | (#23463204)

> Actually, a "troll" is usually defined as someone who posts something inflammatory to elicit responses

I thought that was flamebait, whereas a troll was more along the lines of a Goatse/Tubgirl post or other such nonsense... which is intended to scar a person for life.

Re:compliance, not judges (2, Insightful)

zappepcs (820751) | more than 6 years ago | (#23462764)

This is the best question to ask for both the Google and Yahoo issues. While some information is known, even in North America, companies are expected to play by the rules of the law. When the judge says give up the info, you are supposed to do so, not ask what they are going to do with it.

Now, that can have bad consequences in some countries, and that is painfully clear. I would like to see the detailed information about what was asked of who, exactly, and how it was asked and by whom. Those details could clearly wash away the cloudiness of who did evil.

Re:compliance, not judges (2, Insightful)

pluther (647209) | more than 6 years ago | (#23463098)

... even in North America, companies are expected to play by the rules of the law. When the judge says give up the info, you are supposed to do so, not ask what they are going to do with it.

And that's a scary, scary thought.

"What are they going to do with it?" should be exactly the question asked when anyone is asked to give up personal information.

And when the answer is "we're going to imprison him and mistreat him for speaking an opinion we don't like", the response should be "No."

Yes, this would cause problems with China. They might threaten to fine them, or even to kick them out of the country. And Google can respond by threatening to close their data centers in China or to leave the country.

Sure, fighting back's not the easiest route, nor the most profitable, to take, but certainly the only one in keeping with their slogan of Don't Be Evil, which is now being shown to be increasingly meaningless.

And, as for "...even in North America..." I don't know the law in Canada, but in the US and Mexico there is a great deal of law and legal procedure that can be used to protect people in cases like this. In the US especially, mindless obedience to authority goes against the most important founding principles of the country.

Re:compliance, not judges (2, Insightful)

Quixote (154172) | more than 6 years ago | (#23462890)

Wow.. when Yahoo did this (respond to a court-issued subpoena), everyone here was all up in arms.

And when Google does the same thing, everyone nods approvingly.

What a bunch of brainwashed people.

Here are some highly-rated comments on Yahoo's story, to refresh everyone's memory: 1 [slashdot.org] , 2 [slashdot.org] , 3 [slashdot.org] .

Keep drinking that "don't be evil" koolaid!

Re:compliance, not judges (1)

thePowerOfGrayskull (905905) | more than 6 years ago | (#23463000)

You have a strange definition of "everyone"...

Re:compliance, not judges (2, Insightful)

Ostien (893052) | more than 6 years ago | (#23463088)

Judges are overrated in my opinion. One should disobey a law that they know to be unjust. Laws can be wrong, just as easily as humans can be wrong, and just because something is written does not make it fact, and certainly does not mean it should be followed.

Re:compliance, not judges (1, Insightful)

BlackSabbath (118110) | more than 6 years ago | (#23463120)

The fact that German companies complied with Nazi government decrees and laws was not a shield to prosecution at Nuremburg.

Which US firm will be the first I.G.Farben?

Re:compliance, not judges (2, Insightful)

Frosty Piss (770223) | more than 6 years ago | (#23463148)

However, we need to remember that Google is a company, not a judge in a court of law.
Was that the case as well for the manufacturers of Zyklon [wikipedia.org] ? Do you feel the same about "defense contractors" involved in the production of Nuclear Bombs? If it where still illegal for blacks and whites to marry, would you be OK with rounding 'em all up because after all, "it's the law"?

Businesses should not be free to ignore moral and ethical issues simply because something is the law where they do business. This is not to the benefit of society as a whole. If a company does not benefit society, they must go.

WHat's the big deal? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23463186)

He was reportedly beaten by a latte. As long as it wasn't too hot, I can't get worked up about this.

Oohhhhh, a lathi. Nevermind.

Mixup (5, Informative)

hansraj (458504) | more than 6 years ago | (#23462552)

The summary mixes up two different stories. The first (techcrunch.com) link points to a story involving a guy posting "obscene" comments about Sonia Gandhi and Mahatma Gandhi, while the later link (techgoss.com) points to the story that appears in the summary (involving Shivaji). Sonia Gandhi [wikipedia.org] is an Italian born Indian politician and the leader of the ruling Congress Party. Shivaji [wikipedia.org] was a ruler of Maratha Empire.

Also, the Shivaji story involves a goof up by the telecom provider Airtel that provided the details of the wrong person (not using the IP in question) whereas in the other story the ISP provided the details of the actual person involved. In both stories Google revealed the IP used by the "culprit".

Re:Mixup (3, Funny)

arktemplar (1060050) | more than 6 years ago | (#23462812)

Not sure I get this, why would me saying "Obscene" things about Sonia Gandhi get me in jail ? I thought that India had some of the better free speech laws out there, it's only the people like Shiv Sena etc. who mess around with this stuff. Also For the information of most of the people here - Shivaji wasn't a saint as such, just a highly respected king, so sumamry isn't quite correct about that bit.

I mean what was the situation (TFA has not got too many details)

Police : I CAN HAZ HIZ IP ?
Google : Of course, you want email access with that ? should we supersize the order ?

Reason of Arrest (3, Interesting)

hansraj (458504) | more than 6 years ago | (#23463130)

The guy in the Sonia Gandhi case was booked under Section 67 of the The Information Technology Act, 2000 [naavi.org] . (Check the section titled "Information Technology Act, 2000".

Apparently "being obscene" is a crime in India and the IT act takes it to the internet. So posting "obscene" stuff is punishable by an imprisonment of upto 5 years. So the crucial part was "obscene comment" not "targeted to Sonia Gandhi". Of course the person filing the complaint with the police was a member of the Congress Party (whose leader is Mrs. Gandhi).

India has many laws that are rooted in the prude thinking that is pretty much common there. This law is just an example that aims to turn "a behavior that maybe not be noble" into "a criminal act". The same law makes pornography illegal even though you can find pornography pretty easily.

Meanwhile, back at the ranch... (4, Insightful)

OglinTatas (710589) | more than 6 years ago | (#23462554)

US Telecoms are demanding immunity for assisting unlawful federal wiretaps.

Re:Meanwhile, back at the ranch... (5, Insightful)

adpsimpson (956630) | more than 6 years ago | (#23462740)

This really gets to me.

Of all the British citizens sent to Guatanamo Bay, those sent back to Britain to handle have been released with no charges. There is very good evidence to say that many, if not most, held there are entirely innocent. None have yet received any form of trial, with some having been held for 6 years.

On top of this, the PATRIOT act (which has everything to do with undermining the constitution and nothing to do with true patriotism) now makes it possible to send US citizens to Gitmo.

On top of this, nearly all US phone companies are implicated in spying on US citizens illegally, allowing the FBI/CIA etc who-knows-what access to every phone call handled.

On top of this, the president wants to grant these telecoms retroactive immunity from prosecution, since he asked them to do it.

And on top of all this, Americans have the nerve to get their knickers in a twist when another American company Obeys the laws of a country in which they do business?

By all means campaign to change the attitudes of those in power in repressive countries. Please, do. But remember Google was (presumably) obeying a court order.

Re:Meanwhile, back at the ranch... (3, Insightful)

adpsimpson (956630) | more than 6 years ago | (#23462780)

Dang, hit 'Submit' instead of 'Continue editing'...

My point (not very well made) was that Google are caught between a rock and a hard place by obeying repressive laws in the countries where they do business, while in the US most telecoms and the government simply ignore the laws designed to protect people in order to be every bit as oppressive.

Pot, meet Black Kettle.

Re:Meanwhile, back at the ranch... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23462992)

People in America have about as much pull with their politicians as people in China do with their government. Oh, sure, it looks like we have choices. We get to choose between two power-hungry parties, either of whom would sell out the American People for some silver. The politicians don't listen to the people--they listen to the corporations. If they listened to the people, Bush's record low approval ratings would make the government realize that the nation is on the wrong track, and they'd seek to correct it.

So please, keep calling us hypocrites. Most of the people you're talking to probably also think that Gitmo is a huge human rights violation, and they're almost certainly powerless to do anything about it.

On second thought, no, don't keep calling us hypocrites. Just shut the hell up, you self-righteous asshole.

Re:Meanwhile, back at the ranch... (1)

wattrlz (1162603) | more than 6 years ago | (#23463060)

...

Pot, meet Black Kettle.

Takes one to know one. Next you'll tell me the AIDs sufferer who came to my high school had no right to warn us of the dangers of wanton promiscuity and intravenous drug use?

Re:Meanwhile, back at the ranch... (1)

skywire (469351) | more than 6 years ago | (#23463080)

It is not fair to confuse the state and its subjects. For all you know, the individuals you are accusing of hypocrisy may be ardent opponents of the improprieties of the state in whose territory they reside.

Re:Meanwhile, back at the ranch... (1)

adpsimpson (956630) | more than 6 years ago | (#23463152)

You're right, I should have worded my post more carefully. Much of the opposition to the GWB era of democracy comes from within the USA - about 48% opposed at last count, slightly over 50% at the previous count (argument for another day, right? ;) ).

However, the same can be said for India (and maybe for Google?). The actions of those in power are easy to interpret as the actions of the country as a whole, especially when the country has the level of influence on the world that the US enjoys.

One big difference (4, Interesting)

quanticle (843097) | more than 6 years ago | (#23462576)

India is a Democracy. China is not.

Re:One big difference (3, Interesting)

iminplaya (723125) | more than 6 years ago | (#23462820)

Nonsense. They have elections in China. And the one party similarities between China and the US are more extensive than they appear.

Re:One big difference (1)

celle (906675) | more than 6 years ago | (#23462830)

Unethical behavior is bad regardless of political system.

Re:One big difference (1)

Freeside1 (1140901) | more than 6 years ago | (#23462918)

Millions of people can't be wrong!

Hypocrites (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23462586)

So when the FBI can demand personal information from places like libraries, and arrest anybody who even discloses that such a disclosure has taken place; and when the NSA can perform warrantless wiretaps on the USAmerican public; and when telecom corporations get retroactive immunity for aiding in those wiretaps... I don't think the USA is in any position to call Google evil for this. Get your own house in order first.

Re:Hypocrites (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23462706)

Unfortunately, at the moment, we have a president who seems to think he can become president for life just by signature statements. He and his chronies appear to be busy trying to dismantle the current government and usurp all of the powers of congress and the supreme court to the executive branch.

We'll get back to you after his attempts fail... If they fail...

Re:Hypocrites (2, Insightful)

Dekortage (697532) | more than 6 years ago | (#23463034)

If American history is any indication, they will fail eventually even if it involves gunfire.

On the other hand, we didn't have television during any of the internal battles over our nation and its states... we might all rather sit on our butts and vote for the next American Idol instead.

Re:Hypocrites (2)

macbeth66 (204889) | more than 6 years ago | (#23462758)


What makes you think that the OP was from someone in the States or is an American? And, even if he is, what difference does that make? I am an American and complain about these practices ( oppression ) regardless of where they might occur. I just holler louder when it happens in a democracy ( US, India ) as opposed to a slave state ( China, Iran ) because it isn't *supposed* to happen.

Re:Hypocrites (2, Insightful)

hansraj (458504) | more than 6 years ago | (#23462760)

I don't think the USA is calling Google Evil. It is just a reporter who doesn't represent the official stand of the US. Also, even though the majority of Slashdotters might be from USA (I have no idea), it has a pretty international reader base.

The whole world and everything under the sun does not revolve around the US. Stop talking about US all the freaking time!!

I suppose the focus of the story should have been "Rights in India" as opposed to "Google is Evil". Anyway, no harm still focusing on India and leaving US out of something that doesn't involve it.

PS: I am an Indian national.

Re:Hypocrites (1)

thePowerOfGrayskull (905905) | more than 6 years ago | (#23463042)

Oh, a real Indian! Yeah, sorry we took that land from you when we moved into your continent...

(Yes. This was a joke.)

Re:Hypocrites (4, Funny)

hansraj (458504) | more than 6 years ago | (#23463168)

Hah! If real Indians lived in that continent you wouldn't have been able to even come close. All we would have needed to do was to add a few more spices to our favorite curry and gas you all invaders.

PS: The British managed to stay that long in India because they very cleverly stole all our spices and exported them out of the country!

Re:Hypocrites (3, Insightful)

adpsimpson (956630) | more than 6 years ago | (#23462880)

You forgot to mention the torture metted out in Guatanamo Bay and prisons in Iraq (Abu Graib amongst others), kidnapping, rendition and transfer of prisoners for torture in Eastern Europe, North Africa or the Middle East. All of which can now also be applied to US citizens.

It's not the contrast between the application of corrupt laws in India or China and the corruption of the law in the US that is the most shocking, it's the fact that both end in the same abuse and, frequently in the US and China's cases (I'm not up to spead on India), execution or death under torture.

Re:Hypocrites (2, Interesting)

Locklear93 (1285700) | more than 6 years ago | (#23462984)

Quite a lot of us would very much like to get our houses in order, so to speak. However, individually, I am not able to alter United States government beyond the one vote I'm allotted (and any sort of letter writing to senators and the like, which I've been known to do). As a private citizen more than happy to draw attention to the insanity that's passing for legislation and law enforcement these days, I don't feel the slightest bit hypocritical in condemning other such abuses. Now, if congressmen who voted for the Patriot Act slammed Google over this, then I'd be handing you a megaphone to call them hypocrites.

Shivaji was a warrior not a saint. (4, Informative)

140Mandak262Jamuna (970587) | more than 6 years ago | (#23462588)

Shivaji was a Hindu king of Maharashtra who fought the (last powerful) Mogul emperor Aurangzeb and gave him run for his money. He is greatly revered by most desi patriots. But no desi calls him a saint!

Re:Shivaji was a warrior not a saint. (1)

bsDaemon (87307) | more than 6 years ago | (#23462642)

Never let the truth get in the way of a good story... or Slashdot summary.

Re:Shivaji was a warrior not a saint. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23462954)

desi = person from Indian sub-continent

Re:Shivaji was a warrior not a saint. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23463108)

(Unfortunately) Shiv Sena might disagree with you.

Re:Shivaji was a warrior not a saint. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23463218)

Not all desi's revere him. Most of us consider him to be the poster-child for Maharashtra's inferiority complex. Just about everything is named Shivaji-this and Shivaji-that.

Worthless! (4, Funny)

Dread_ed (260158) | more than 6 years ago | (#23462636)

This story is worthless without said profane pictures. Otherwise how can I acurately judge whether or not this person deserves to eat his own excrement. I need pictures dammit!! (Preferrably linked through Google images for the sake of almighty Irony.)

Re:Worthless! (1)

MillionthMonkey (240664) | more than 6 years ago | (#23462698)

Yeah... Does anyone have a link to the profane image the guy got punished for?

Surely it must be in Google's index somewhere.

Re:Worthless! (2, Funny)

Farmer Tim (530755) | more than 6 years ago | (#23462934)

If the punishment fits the crime, my guess is the picture is something like 2girls1cup...

a word of warning (1)

unity100 (970058) | more than 6 years ago | (#23462644)

a few more similar occurrences such as this, and google, you'll be outta favor.

Nice! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23462666)

I sent three emails to Taco telling he is not a "saint" and you didn't make the correction. What next? Calling Osama "muslim saint"? I mean, ok, this is a tech site and such minor details are not the main point - but how hard it is to have correct information?

On topic now, I think Google did a terrible thing. But I don't think they had much choice, since "Sonia Gandhi" is currently the de-facto leader of India.

Fuck, here [indiatimes.com] it says:

Shinde said that the police had first asked Google to provide the IP address of the person who posted the message. They learnt that the accused was connected to the net through Bharati Airtel and Sify Internet in Chennai.

It was also learnt that the message was circulated through the email address'rahulvaidindia@gmail.com'. The police then sought information about the user of this email address from the internet service provider and learnt that it was the address of Rahul Vaid, a resident of Chakarpur in Gurgaon.


Correction, they didn't just comply - they complied all the way through.

What I did not know, is such a stupid law exists that makes childish acts like this "illegal".

India is slowly losing my respect (-1, Troll)

mi (197448) | more than 6 years ago | (#23462668)

For years I was rooting for the country as a rising Democracy and a counter-balance to the rising Communist dictatorship of China.

And then, boom-boom-boom came the disappointments of their refusal to join us in Iraq [globalsecurity.org] , to support Tibetans [meyul.com] , to censure Iran [bbc.co.uk] , and now this...

Maybe, the USSR-created Communist infestation [indymedia.org] has something to do with it...

Re:India is slowly losing my respect (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23462876)

"And then, boom-boom-boom came the disappointments of their refusal to join us in Iraq [globalsecurity.org], to support Tibetans [meyul.com], to censure Iran [bbc.co.uk]"

I'm sorry, were you trying to talk us into dis-liking India, here? Because you're putting up very poor examples if that's the case.

I really can't tell if you're joking. (4, Insightful)

Fross (83754) | more than 6 years ago | (#23462882)

They refuse to join the US in Iraq. You really think that's a bad idea? Pretty much every country involved in that "peacekeeping" operation now wishes they'd never got involved. Including the UK, and even the US. They hold a rally supporting the oppressed people who've been subjected to an invasion, abduction of their spiritual leder, systematic destruction of their culture and history. This is a BAD thing? And in your third link, to quote "...Delhi's insistence on using diplomacy to resolve the Iranian nuclear controversy". Heaven forbid we do something other than run in, kill a million of them and destroy their country. Topping it off with "everything's a commie plot". Nice one. You're either a very good tongue in cheek troll, or the type of american I'm most scared of.

Re:I really can't tell if you're joking. (1)

adpsimpson (956630) | more than 6 years ago | (#23463022)

I was about to reply with a tongue-in-cheek comment congratulating the GP on one of the most original trolls I've seen in a while. After all, it must be a joke, right?

Then I clicked on his sig link... So either the whole account is just for trolling, or he really is serious.

Either way, a +5 Funny rating seems to be the only way to go. ;)

Re:India is slowly losing my respect (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23462886)

I don't really see the relationship between a "rising Democracy" and "join us in Iraq."

Can you please explain how invading a sovereign country without international agreement is democratic?

Cheers,

Re:India is slowly losing my respect (2, Insightful)

Dog-Cow (21281) | more than 6 years ago | (#23462944)

Ah, you must be a Bush supporter. Democracy is great! As long as you vote my way.

Re:India is slowly losing my respect (3, Insightful)

ZwJGR (1014973) | more than 6 years ago | (#23462966)

Why should India waste their time, money and resources, and degrade themselves in the eyes of their people and other countries by supporting US/Western (I'm assuming that's what us refers to) foreign policy on Iraq, Iran and China?

The USA started the Iraq war, they can finish it themselves, it was a fucking disaster from day 1, and should never have been allowed to happen, India would be be imbeciles to join the US's failure.
Tibet is (currently) past of China, not part of India, not India's problem. The linked article is frankly irrelevant, few genuinely care if a handful of folks get in trouble over a minor march before the Olympic one, and the march or lack of it makes 0 impact overall.
Iran has nothing to do with India whatsoever, and saying that the fact that they are not especially bothered about a military solution to Iran is indicative of undemocratic tendencies is laughable. The story linked states that they prefer diplomacy to useless handwaving in the UN security council/US military interference, which is eminently sensible. Pacifism and discussion is better than killing of innocents, even if you don't personally approve of their government or society, etc.

Furthermore if you really think that Iran is going to make nuclear bombs and start trying to toss them at the US, then you need to turn the TV off. The leaders of Iran are *not* idiots.

Re:India is slowly losing my respect (0, Troll)

pizza_milkshake (580452) | more than 6 years ago | (#23463078)

Wow, I had no idea. These examples demonstrate an Indian foreign policy that favors peace, human rights and diplomacy -- values clearly in conflict with current U.S. foreign policy.

google better not do this at the Olympic Games to (2, Funny)

Joe The Dragon (967727) | more than 6 years ago | (#23462672)

Google better not do this at the Olympic Games to people from the usa and people from the us should set up a script to endlessly Google stuff about Tibet.

India is to blame (4, Insightful)

esocid (946821) | more than 6 years ago | (#23462678)

For having an outrageous law like the one this man was arrested for. Google owned or ran the site in question so they had to comply with the local law. I'm not saying I like it, but the blame should be shifted to India for having a law on the books that allows them to toss anyone in jail for posting in "vulgar language" about some politician. Democracy my ass.

Is today crappy article day? (2)

Eg0Death (1282452) | more than 6 years ago | (#23462682)

CmdrTaco, what's up with the crappy article? Are readers of /. the unsuspecting subjects of your evil experiment?

7 proxies. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23462702)

Get behind 'em.

Captcha: sneaking

asked? (5, Funny)

Paradise Pete (33184) | more than 6 years ago | (#23462712)

and asked to use the same bowl to eat and to use in the toilet.

He was asked? Does that mean it was optional? I don't know about this guy, but I'd lean towards "No."

Re:asked? (1)

tgd (2822) | more than 6 years ago | (#23462936)

Eh, I know people who dislike Indian food enough they might lean towards "Yes".

Re:asked? (1)

adpsimpson (956630) | more than 6 years ago | (#23463054)

No, you're mis reading it. It says he wanted to use the same bowl:

He was arrested and... asked to use the same bowl to eat and to use in the toilet.

Please... (0, Offtopic)

Sobieski (1032500) | more than 6 years ago | (#23462756)

Having just read two books taking place in India by Indian authors, I am extremely tired of the mixing of Indian words with English. Please, call it a cane, most people know what that is... a lathi, not so many.

typical, say one thing to sell, then do otherwise (2, Insightful)

evolutionary (933064) | more than 6 years ago | (#23462772)

As much as Google may toot the phrase "Do no harm" every business seems to have a sales pitch, then break it when convenient. Whether India is a "Democracy" (and this terms gets used misued) or not, the idea of contributing to someone's arrest and torture for doing nothing more than saying something the government doesn't like is against our definition of democracy is supposed to protect different opinions. (Although under Bush its questionable that it exists in the US anymore). Who would have thought MS would be the only major search engine to hold up a Google slogan. Yahoo, now Google. Regardless of the country you expand into, if you believe in something you defend it. Google, clearly doesn't. At least Yahoo and MS never made the claim.

Nothing to see here... move along. (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23462784)

Really. Nothing to see here... move along.

All the moral relativists here on /. should have absolutely no complaints about this case.

Just because being beaten with a long cane and being forced to eat from your toilet bucket (or wear it on your head, a common practice in parts of India, yeah really) seems cruel and unusual doesn't mean that it is. Viewing it as such is cultural imperialism as we attempt to judge another culture using our own value system. And that would be wrong.

In addition, viewing Google's actions against our own cultural mores would likewise be incorrect. Instead we must attempt to see their actions from the point of view of the offended parties. From that vantage point it is clear that Google has rightfully done its civic duty by helping see to it that a miscreant who insulted a saint was brought to justice and properly punished for his blasphemous ways.

Re:Nothing to see here... move along. (1)

thePowerOfGrayskull (905905) | more than 6 years ago | (#23463094)

Viewing it as such is cultural imperialism as we attempt to judge another culture using our own value system
What does a value system have to do with the basic fact that it's unsanitary and can lead to illness?

Google needs to remember Rule 1 (1)

barfy (256323) | more than 6 years ago | (#23462786)

First, do no evil.

Re:Google needs to remember Rule 1 (1)

kellyb9 (954229) | more than 6 years ago | (#23463172)

You're forgetting one thing- Google has a responsibility to shareholders. That makes rule number 1. make money. Blaming Google is like blaming a person being held at gunpoint for getting robbed.

Just in case.... (1)

bugnuts (94678) | more than 6 years ago | (#23462816)

Here's the Google cache [google.com]

Muhahahahahahhaha!!@1!!

Google gave IP address. Police bungled it (5, Interesting)

140Mandak262Jamuna (970587) | more than 6 years ago | (#23462836)

Looks like, Google provided the IP address of someone who posted derogatory images of Shivaji to the Indian authorities. They contacted the ISP and they fingered a wrong party. May be they fingered the current holder of that IP address instead of the user at the time of posting.

They got the wrong party and roughly treated the arrested man. The idea is to send the message loud and clear, "we will get the IP address and catch you and mess you up. May this time we messed up the wrong guy, but next time, watch out." That is the logic of the Indian police who think this will reduce such incidents in the future. But what trips them up is that a savvy criminal will know how to hide his tracks, and it will always be the wrong guy who gets nabbed. But it allows the police to pretend they did something. (You might argue defacing Shivaji's picture is not criminal. But given the reaction you typically get from Muslims for defacing images of Mohammad, this reaction by the desis is quite tame. And this is a different argument anyway, nothing concerning Google)

If google had not promised anonymity to Orkut users, then it can't be held accountable. There are bigger villains in the story, the desi police, incompetent desi ISP, desi politics and the desi population in general that accepts this all.

Profit-seeking animals (3, Insightful)

barocco (1168573) | more than 6 years ago | (#23462850)

Corporations are profit-seeking animals. If you expect any level of morality from them, you will find it near the stockholders' buy/sell margin or on accountants' govt tax deduction page.

Corporations... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23462900)

Regardless of any "don't be evil" statements in your prospectus, once any corporation goes public, their only interest is making money, no matter who they screw over. They will make the most money by complying with any government who rules its customers, so its no surprise to me. Accept the nature of corporations as greedy citizens without a conscience and nothing surprises you.

Time for a new Mission Statement... (1)

hyperz69 (1226464) | more than 6 years ago | (#23462902)

How about, "Do no evil, unless we think we can get away with it."

Saint Shivaji? (4, Informative)

Moridineas (213502) | more than 6 years ago | (#23462914)

I hadn't heard Shivaji referred to as a saint before, somewhat interesting usage of the term.

Shivaji is an interesting character. Perhaps best known for killing one of his Mughal enemies with a concealed weapon called a tiger's claw. Also well known as a defender of Hinduism who fought long and hard against the Muslim-ruled Mughal empire.

Church of Local Trade (1)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 6 years ago | (#23462942)

Free trade is against my religion. I demand that anybody who acts like or mentions H1B's be arrested immediately!

Beaten and imprisoned based on an IP address... (4, Insightful)

RandoX (828285) | more than 6 years ago | (#23462974)

This is why I refuse to be an exit node.

What a Lathi is... (1)

UberHoser (868520) | more than 6 years ago | (#23463178)

From Wikipedia.

"Lathi (Devanagari: ) is an ancient armed martial art of India. It also refers to the weapon used in this martial art. The word lathi, in Hindi, means cane. A lathi is basically a 6 to 8 foot long cane tipped with a metal blunt. It is used by swinging it back and forth like a sword. The metal blunt is an optional part for a lathi. It is the Indian Police's most used crowd control device. When referring to the weapon itself, a lathi could be considered the world's oldest weapon."

So basically he got his ass beat by a cane... probably made of bamboo....

Gotta love the justice system in other contries.

Indian Man (1, Insightful)

priyank_bolia (1024411) | more than 6 years ago | (#23463182)

I think this is irrelevant post, and there is no analogy between China & India. As a Indian this is my opinion. India is a fully democratic, secular and sovereign state, and people should not mix democracy supporters in China & Myanmar with anti social elements profaning about religious goods and creating communal tensions. People should understand that India have a large number of Muslims and christens and such incidents can create communal tensions, and is a danger for the whole country peace and harmony. We are already suffering from heavy terrorism from neighboring countries.

He posted under his (almost) real name (2, Interesting)

vpaul (473197) | more than 6 years ago | (#23463194)

Did anybody notice he circulated the message
under an email address that contains his name
("It was known that the vulgar message about Sonia Gandhi was circulated through an email address â" Rahulvaidindia@gmail.com").
Does someone want to stay anonymous if he
uses such an email address?
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