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141 comments

I don't get it... (4, Insightful)

ivan256 (17499) | more than 5 years ago | (#23479828)

It's in "Your Rights Online", so clearly kdawson wants us to be outraged... Is it because he thinks the idea is dumb, or that the patent is dumb? It's hard to tell in this case, since it seems to be a reasonable idea, and a reasonable patent...

Re:I don't get it... (4, Insightful)

Timothy Brownawell (627747) | more than 5 years ago | (#23480132)

it seems to be a reasonable idea, and a reasonable patent...
Well, it depends on what effect patents are supposed to have. If you think they're supposed to encourage people to publish what they'd otherwise try to keep as trade secrets, then patenting something which is very obvious when inspected isn't reasonable. If you think they're supposed to let people hold progress hostage by recording their daydreams, it's very reasonable.

Re:I don't get it... (4, Insightful)

reebmmm (939463) | more than 5 years ago | (#23481090)

NOTE*

publish what they'd otherwise try to keep as trade secrets

Not everything that is patentable (or ought to be patentable) must also be trade secret. This is a perfect example (actually most any mechanical invention is a good example). Once it's sold, used, displayed, demoed, described, photograph, etc. it would lose any and all protection.

Now, arguably, one of the purposes of patents is to encourage people to disclose EARLIER rather than later. Here, you probably see this disclosure before you've actually seen it sold, used, displayed, demoed, described, photograph, etc.

obvious when inspected
Just about EVERYTHING seems obvious once you see it. That's the whole reason why the patent law painstakingly tries to AVOID doing your above analysis.

hold progress hostage by recording their daydreams

I don't know what this means. Patents have been around for 200 years and progress hasn't slowed by anyone's account.

Moreover, this is hardly a "daydream" which seems to imply fanciful idea. There's probably almost NOTHING stopping them from implementing it right now. There are probably lots of real estate agents, contractors, etc. that would love to have a laptop that they could hold and show when there is not a table nearby.

Finally, nothing stopped someone from introducing this idea (without patent protection) before this patent. So as far as I can tell, to the extent this moves progress forward and giving other people ideas, the publication of the patent has done it's job.

* Like a good slashdotter, I have not actually looked at the patent or RTFA.

Re:I don't get it... (2, Interesting)

Timothy Brownawell (627747) | more than 5 years ago | (#23482050)

Not everything that is patentable (or ought to be patentable) must also be trade secret. This is a perfect example (actually most any mechanical invention is a good example). Once it's sold, used, displayed, demoed, described, photograph, etc. it would lose any and all protection.
The protection isn't (supposed to be) the point. The societal benefit received in exchange for the sacrifice of granting that protection is the point.

Now, arguably, one of the purposes of patents is to encourage people to disclose EARLIER rather than later. Here, you probably see this disclosure before you've actually seen it sold, used, displayed, demoed, described, photograph, etc.
But this is a much lesser disclosure, in that there are heavy restrictions on what you can do with it.

Just about EVERYTHING seems obvious once you see it.
So patents ONLY provide a benefit when the patented thing would otherwise never be invented (or at least not be invented for another several years).

Re:I don't get it... (4, Insightful)

skarphace (812333) | more than 5 years ago | (#23482122)

I don't know what this means. Patents have been around for 200 years and progress hasn't slowed by anyone's account.
How could you possibly know this? Industrialization is younger then 200 years and normal 'inventionalism'(yeah, I pulled that out of my butt) never really started until then. There were the occasionally blacksmiths but nothing really all that interesting.

How could you possibly know that progress isn't moving slower because of patent law?

I may even like to bring up the booming asian bootleg market. Their level of innovation is skyrocketing by leaping off of other people's patentable ideas and improving them. That alone may be a good argument that patents are not helping innovation.

Re:I don't get it... (1)

mea37 (1201159) | more than 5 years ago | (#23481260)

Aaaaand... for those of us who know that neither of those is the purpose of a patent?

Re:I don't get it... (2, Insightful)

Timothy Brownawell (627747) | more than 5 years ago | (#23481570)

Patents are supposed to promote progress, by imposing restrictions for a couple decades. This only makes sense if what's being restricted would have been restricted for longer/forever (trade secrets), or wouldn't have existed at all. Given that people like to invent things just for fun, and that there was plenty of innovation before patents were invented, I suspect that that second category is close to empty.

Re:I don't get it... (5, Funny)

dreamchaser (49529) | more than 5 years ago | (#23480154)

I agree. IBM deserves a hand for this. I'm sure it will leave a lasting impression on the laptop market.

Re:I don't get it... Hand-wringing bullshit (1)

davidsyes (765062) | more than 5 years ago | (#23480608)

Hands down, this has got to be the most hands-wringing bullshit to come out of the USPTO if this is/were only about putting hands on a laptop. If it is, i'm going to get hot wax, palm my lappy, and make lasting impressions upon it.

No patent will lay hands on ME or my lappy!

Re:I don't get it... (2, Informative)

cerelib (903469) | more than 5 years ago | (#23480354)

I have to agree. This is a pretty straight forward improvement to an invention patent. The patent seems to be specific on many details of implementation. It is also specific enough that it probably can't rule out any possible use of a hand impression on a portable device. While it may not be the most novel and innovative idea, it is a far cry from the software/process patents that usually appear in the "Your Rights Online" section.

Re:I don't get it... (0, Troll)

farker haiku (883529) | more than 5 years ago | (#23480484)

But... it's a patent... about computers!! Clearly if you aren't outraged you don't belong here.

Re:I don't get it... (1)

ivan256 (17499) | more than 5 years ago | (#23482440)

Most of the outrage around here (and in the world in general) seems to fall into the "Too busy being outraged to pay attention" category.

just another take... (3, Insightful)

bsDaemon (87307) | more than 5 years ago | (#23479836)

How is this anything more than just another take on ergonomic grips on other products -- for instance the finger grooves on the grip of a pistol?

Not that I can say I've had a problem performing this task WITHOUT their little patent, but interesting IBM would want it, seeing as how they've sold their laptop-making division already anyway.

Re:just another take... (1)

lymond01 (314120) | more than 5 years ago | (#23479920)

You don't need to create a product to license a patent. If anyone decides to make laptops with brushed chrome (or whatever the hell the iPhone is made of), I'd welcome anything that helps me keep a grip on the things. I swear, a cold iPhone is like trying to hold onto jello...

YRO might be because of the handprint which may, or may not, include fingerprints (to the previous poster).

Re:just another take... (5, Insightful)

getto man d (619850) | more than 5 years ago | (#23479924)

FTA:
"A hand impression is disposed on a bottom surface of the chassis base unit.

Though this begs the question of how many people actually use a laptop in this fashion. I myself cannot see it entirely useful (e.g. typing) or comfortable.

Re:just another take... (1, Offtopic)

electrosoccertux (874415) | more than 5 years ago | (#23479990)

feh. It brings up a question which is begging for an answer. It does not beg the question.

Re:just another take... (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23480308)

What if I really, really want a question? Pretty please with sugar on top?

Re:just another take... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23480666)

No. That would be begging the questioner

When you see the follwing line:

"How are you today?"

Ask it for five dollars profusely. THAT would be begging the question.

Re:just another take... (1)

raehl (609729) | more than 5 years ago | (#23482294)

No, that would be begging for a question. The begee only becomes the questioner if they actually ask you a question.

Re:just another take... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23480350)

feh. It brings up a question which is begging for an answer. It does not beg the question.

Neither does the mistranslated latin phrase (petito principii: seeking the principle, which is what the logical fallacy described is about, which never matched any meaning of "beg" ever used in English. Nor was any "question" ever involved) that you are currently referring to.

Let it die already.

Re:just another take... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23481468)

question in this context means "the logical proposition to be proved", not an interrogative.

the proximity of beg and petition are too obvious to need explanation.

Re:just another take... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23480586)

SHUT UP! For the love of FSM, don't EVER say that again. You sound like a complete utter fucking TOOL when you try to make people think that "begging the question" has ANYTHING to do with an old latin logical fallacy. That was NOT the context the phrase was used in, and that was NOT the intended meaning of the words. For that matter, "to beg the question" NEVER made sense as a translation of the original latin phrase. People trying to make others think that it means that really need to just STFU, as they make themselves look stupider every time they open their mouths.

Re:just another take... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23481028)

Like you say, there's no value in trying to preserve the original meaning of words and phrases. Why? I'll tell you why. Cream cheese fart superman gublook.

Re:just another take... (2, Insightful)

gnick (1211984) | more than 5 years ago | (#23481172)

feh. It brings up a question which is begging for an answer. It does not beg the question.
This seems like a petty peve. It seems obvious enough that by:

this begs the question of how many people actually use a laptop in this fashion.
the esteemed "getto man d" meant:

This begets the question, "How many people actually use a laptop in this fashion?"
Double feh.

Re:just another take... (1)

Dancindan84 (1056246) | more than 5 years ago | (#23480646)

I tend to agree. Leg grooves to make it easier to balance on my lap would be more beneficial for my off-desk use. Mind you I also have an old, heavy, widescreen laptop. Using it while balanced on one hand would be more a feat of strength than dexterity in my case. Even still I can't imagine using a light laptop in that way.

Re:just another take... (2, Interesting)

webrunner (108849) | more than 5 years ago | (#23481684)

They try to downplay actual lap-top use (in case of another burn lawsuit) to the point that they almost say "do not use this on your legs"

Notice how companies never actually call them "laptops"? They'll call them either "notebook computer" or "labtop" (as in: put on the counter of a research lab).

Releasing one with leg grooves would be rather strange, given that.

Re:just another take... (1)

reebmmm (939463) | more than 5 years ago | (#23481254)

It's easy. Try being on a site someplace with a laptop that you're trying to show a virtual representation of the end result. For that matter, any time you're in a place where you cannot sit and there is no table.

Also, I can think of a number of very small computers, iphones, blackberries or things of slightly larger size which is necessarily held in one hand.

Re:just another take... (1)

samkass (174571) | more than 5 years ago | (#23481374)

Though this begs the question of how many people actually use a laptop in this fashion. I myself cannot see it entirely useful (e.g. typing) or comfortable.

I'm not even going to ask what body part YOU would have suggested making an impression of...

Re:just another take... A work around... (1)

davidsyes (765062) | more than 5 years ago | (#23481528)

An injection molding company can catalog the popular laptop form factors, or it can custom-make rubber bases with a Play-dough-like hand area. Insert hand, hang on to laptop.

If this doesn't exist, and it is copied, i still reserve the right to at a later date implement my idea, whether or not a patent is out there. Don't like it, TOUGH!

Exactly (2, Funny)

JonTurner (178845) | more than 5 years ago | (#23480084)

Makes me want to patent an impression of my boot in the rear end of the reviewer who approved this patent.

Re:just another take... (1)

CaptainPatent (1087643) | more than 5 years ago | (#23480104)

How is this anything more than just another take on ergonomic grips on other products -- for instance the finger grooves on the grip of a pistol?
This is directly from the claimed language in the independent claims of the application:

"and a sensor disposed in the hand impression, responsive to contact by a user, for enabling or disabling a processing unit in the data processing system"
I'd say that's very different than ergonomic gripping as it's able to enable and disable the processor itself. I'm not saying it should or shouldn't be patentable, I'm just saying you're way off with your assertion there.

Re:just another take... (1)

bsDaemon (87307) | more than 5 years ago | (#23480184)

So, that's saying that if I put my hand on the bottom of the laptop that its going to turn the computer on?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smartgun [wikipedia.org] -- kinda like that.

So, I'm not really "way off," just differently right that this is not really a ground-breaking idea.

Re:just another take... (1)

Slacksoft (1066064) | more than 5 years ago | (#23480418)

I have to agree. I wonder if I could make the case that my seven year old Toshiba laptop shows precedence in that I've used it so much my hand print is literally worn into the plastic shell. Do you think I could claim IP rights?

Re:just another take... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23482468)

A little correction: IBM did sell their PC laptop/desktop division and the deal was very specific about PC & PC laptops.
If IBM want to make a PowerPC/Cell (or anything else except I386) based laptop/desktop they are free to do it.

Really, that's interesting because (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23479860)

CmdrTaco put his handprint on my cock. Is he liable for treble damages due to this willful patent violation?

Re:Really, that's interesting because (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23481544)

Nah, it will never stand up in court.

Cool: No fingerprints (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23479862)

Does this mean IBM will sue the idiot who left fingerprints on my shiny new MacBook?

Re:Cool: No fingerprints (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23479928)

wow i know this is slashdot.... but come on now, the summary is only a few lines long.

Re:Cool: No fingerprints (1)

Uncle Focker (1277658) | more than 5 years ago | (#23480424)

There's a summary? I thought we were just supposed to read the title and make up all our assumptions from that?

Re:Cool: No fingerprints (1)

gnick (1211984) | more than 5 years ago | (#23481620)

You read the whole title? I got as far as "IBM Patents..." and came in here to start complaining.

Too bad Lenovo you missed out... (1)

ArIck (203) | more than 5 years ago | (#23479910)

If only they had bought the laptop division from IBM right now they cudve enjoyed this uber cool patent guaranteed to you impress your friends when you are juggling your laptop with a finger!

More like... (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23479912)

...you best not do the same on a laptop, [and then produce it for sale to other people] lest you infringe on IBM's new patent for the Portable Computer with a Hand Impression, ...

Patents don't stop you from doing things, they stop you from making money for doing said things.

Re:More like... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23481060)

IANAPL Technically, it legally does stop you from doing things even for free (as in beer).

It's another biometrics toy. (4, Informative)

Sierran (155611) | more than 5 years ago | (#23479916)

The handprint is there, claims the patent, in order to facilitate the 'proper carrying' of the 'computing device.' However, I don't think I've ever carried my laptop balanced like a waiter's tray, or held it to my side while closed without wrapping the carrying hand around the edge underneath it for support. What they do say, buried in the patent, is that the patent also covers the use of 'biometric devices' inside the handprint, presumably for identity verification. If so, I"m not sure how this any better than a fingerprint port, unless they plan to have biometrics cover the entire print or even all five fingers - which will be more expensive for dubious additional security.

Re:It's another biometrics toy. (3, Informative)

Dachannien (617929) | more than 5 years ago | (#23479978)

It's not really "buried in the patent". It's mentioned right up front in claim 1, and the headline for this article seems oblivious to that point.

Re:It's another biometrics toy. (1)

Paul Slocum (598127) | more than 5 years ago | (#23481088)

If you have to do any work like click through to the article or search for patent summary, it's buried as far as we're concerned.

Re:It's another biometrics toy. (1)

Belial6 (794905) | more than 5 years ago | (#23481136)

"which will be more expensive for dubious additional security."

No kidding. Does IBM think it is significantly harder to cut off a persons hand than it is to takeoff their finger?

Re:It's another biometrics toy. (1)

msgtomatt (1147195) | more than 5 years ago | (#23481344)

without wrapping the carrying hand around the edge underneath it for support
The patent also covers "grips" on the edges.

Re:It's another biometrics toy. (1)

skiflyer (716312) | more than 5 years ago | (#23481832)

I wouldn't mind one on my X60 tablet... in fact I currently use the extended life battery just for the sake of getting a better grip. I'd appreciate being able to use my smaller battery and still keep a handle on the thing.

Re:It's another biometrics toy. (1)

forgotten_my_nick (802929) | more than 5 years ago | (#23481988)

I know loads of people who carry the laptop like this. Much to the annoyance of the IT department. However with the new tablet PCs and the hard drive air bag it is much easier to carry a laptop around. Also I find I use the keyboard less and less, for example this slashdot entry was written using the speech recognition system in Vista.

This is a great idea (3, Funny)

Lostlander (1219708) | more than 5 years ago | (#23479918)

I think I'm going to patent a process by which a footprint is left in a SiO2 water suspension and used for tracing the location of an individual.

Re:This is a great idea (1)

sm62704 (957197) | more than 5 years ago | (#23480116)

It would be a pretty useless patent, as sand prints usually don't last long. However, you could patent filling the footprints with plaster for the purposes of identifying an individual, animal, plant, of fossil if the method hadn't already been used forever.

Looks at his Laptop... (3, Funny)

hyperz69 (1226464) | more than 5 years ago | (#23479966)

Sees handprints all over it's exterior.

Oh crap, I hope IBM will lease the technology to me cheaply ;\

Not their only patent! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23479994)

IBM secretly also received a patent for "IBM Executive with a Head-in-Ass Impression", an 'invention' that makes sticking one's head up one's own ass easier.

And they're "fighting" for patent reform.

Yah, sure!

what next? (1)

slydmin (1209456) | more than 5 years ago | (#23479996)

ergonomic digit imprints on one's dick? less tiring for the girl, improves quality of life!

Re:what next? (4, Funny)

db32 (862117) | more than 5 years ago | (#23480088)

I think if you are putting digit imprints you probably don't have a girl to worry about as that particular body part is already shaped correctly for it's corresponding girl part. The digit imprints would clearly be for those who lack access to the corresponding girl part.

Isn't that one of the KDM login animations? :-) (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23480014)

I remember finding this in the set that came with the distro I was using at the time, I think it was OpenSuSE. It impressed the heck out of someone on a train journey, because he really thought the screen edge camera did the job.

Oh, well, I do what I can to make people happy .

I call right hands (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23480044)

Their picture shows an impression of a left hand, I want to claim rights to an impression of a right hand.

better idea (1)

ILuvRamen (1026668) | more than 5 years ago | (#23480086)

I thought this was a security thing. Like nobody would steal a laptop with your unique fingerprints and entire handprint. Why hasn't anyone done that before?

Re:better idea (1)

randyest (589159) | more than 5 years ago | (#23481664)

Because it's a stupid idea that would stop no one from stealing a laptop and would give the thief a way to make a replica of your hand-print to use to frame you for any number of crimes?

Didn't IBM say they were going to do this? (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23480096)

I seem to recall an article on slashdot about IBM saying they were going to try and get as many ridiculous patents as they could and offering them for free?

http://www.nytimes.com/2005/04/11/technology/11ibm.html

Not obvious? (2, Informative)

Bombula (670389) | more than 5 years ago | (#23480110)

Unless I'm mistaken, only non-obvious inventions can be protected by patents. Even if something is novel, useful, or a new combination of existing ideas, it must still be non-obvious to be patentable.

Re:Not obvious? (4, Insightful)

Uncle Focker (1277658) | more than 5 years ago | (#23480170)

This is the USPTO we are talking about right? Since when has the obviousness of an invention stopped them from granting a patent?

Re:Not obvious? (1)

bws111 (1216812) | more than 5 years ago | (#23481170)

If it is so obvious, why has no-one else done it in the last 20 or so years that laptops have been available? Either it was not obvious, or it is not a good idea. If it is not a good idea, what does it matter if it is patented?

The next big invention... (4, Funny)

imyy4u3 (1290108) | more than 5 years ago | (#23480148)

...a biometric laptop that is "ergonomically designed" for being "carried" on your "lap" while looking at porn. It is called the Magnum Laptop for the big boys, and the Tiny Laptop in China.

How about a lap impression? (1)

Liz99 (1291588) | more than 5 years ago | (#23480278)

I have the impression that this will be a generic hand impression, not unique to the computer owner so how useful will this be? And if I balance a laptop, it's on my lap, not on my hand...I mean, if you balanced a laptop on your hand, how could you use the touchpad and keyboard?!

Re:How about a lap impression? (3, Funny)

realisticradical (969181) | more than 5 years ago | (#23480336)

Daddy, why is there a hole in your laptop?

Re:How about a lap impression? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23480342)

My thoughts exactly on the hand sizing.
Will I have to order this laptop in "chassis sizes?"
will they make a petite version for my tiny little White Collar hands?
holding a laptop like that is a disaster after you've had a Valium or three

If so... I'm going to patent (1)

zukinux (1094199) | more than 5 years ago | (#23480314)

Handprint, on cars...
It would be just the same idea but on different product...

Obligatory Response (0, Offtopic)

kenp2002 (545495) | more than 5 years ago | (#23480432)

Old Man: IT'S A CULT AND I DON'T CARE WHAT OR WHO THEY THINK THEY ARE!
Kid: WHO?
Old Man: I CAN'T SAY OR THEY'LL SUE ME FOR DEFAMATION!
Kid: AREN'T YOU ENTITLED TO YOUR OPINION?
Old Man: ONLY WHEN PEOPLE WITH MONEY AGREE WITH IT!
Kid: WHAT ABOUT FREE SPEECH?
Old Man: FREEDOM ISN'T FREE. THOSE WITH MONEY HAVE MORE FREEDOM THEN THOSE WITHOUT IT
Kid: WHAT ABOUT INNOCENT UNTIL PROVEN GUILTY?
Old Man: ONLY IN CRIMINAL CASES KID. IN CIVIL CASES YOUR ARE POOCHED UNTIL YOU ARE BROKE THEN YOU LOSE.
Kid: SO WHAT IS FREE?
Old Man: A PRISON SENTENCE, DON'T COST THE DEFENDANT A DIME
Kid: HOW DO I GET ONE?
Old Man:

Who does that, anyway? (1)

Minwee (522556) | more than 5 years ago | (#23480534)

Really, unless you were a hand model posing for a notebook computer advertisement, why would you hold a computer like that? It may look pretty, but the slightest sideways impact is going to send the whole thing tumbling to the ground no matter how neatly your fingertips line up with the spots on the case.

Re:Who does that, anyway? (1)

DaveV1.0 (203135) | more than 5 years ago | (#23480664)

Actually, I see it occasionally, especially when people are in conference rooms or going to and from same.

And, I did it last night. I was in my car in a parking lot of Kinkos' and started to download something. Decided to go in when it said it would be 10 min.

Derivative patents? (1)

hanshotfirst (851936) | more than 5 years ago | (#23480542)

1) do I have to order my laptop as right-or-left-handed now?

2) Is it to late to get a design patent of the position of certain fingers in the hand impression? "...In one manifestation of the invention, all but the central digit are retracted..."

Usability (1)

thewiz (24994) | more than 5 years ago | (#23480562)

I'm wondering how well a laptop with a palm print on its bottom will handle when you put it on a table and try to type/mouse/etc. Seems to me like a very bad idea as the laptop would wobble as you try to type unless they're planning on putting legs on it.

Re:Usability (1)

randyest (589159) | more than 5 years ago | (#23481756)

Why would it wobble? The print is indented into the laptop. It creates a hand shaped void, around which is a perfectly level surface in every direction. It's not a protruding handprint.

Re:Usability (1)

droopycom (470921) | more than 5 years ago | (#23482048)

Clearly, your comment demonstrate that the idea is not that obvious, hence the patent is valid....

IBM thanks you....

Previous Art? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23480590)

Isn't that how Schwarzenegger started the Martian reactor in Total Recall?

Defensive use? (1)

Nexus7 (2919) | more than 5 years ago | (#23480594)

The patent appears be specific (as it should be) and the same idea implemented with a different configuration (place palm in a different location) might be construed not to infringe. Perhaps then they filed it for defensive purposes; they're famous for that.

Just put the handprint on upside-down (1)

smellsofbikes (890263) | more than 5 years ago | (#23480692)

You could call it Rot180 and get your own patent, and they'd be legally prevented from decrypting it to see if it infringed upon their patent.

If I can only get a liscense (1)

g0bshiTe (596213) | more than 5 years ago | (#23480976)

I can resell it back to any restaurant establishment and prosper. Waiters and waitresses the world over will sing my praises.

Re:If I can only get a liscense (1)

HikingStick (878216) | more than 5 years ago | (#23481542)

You wouldn't need a license, since the application is in a different sector for a differnt technology (unless IBM wants to argue that laptops should now also be used as serving trays).

The plan... (1)

flydude18 (839328) | more than 5 years ago | (#23481348)

1) Balance laptop on hands with assistance of IBM's new technology.
2) Drop laptop.
3) ???
4) Profit!

Wait. Wait, that's it! I've just figured out what the "???" step is. It's "sue"! Of course! It's so obvious now. How could we have been so blind!? The gnomes are to blame for today's flood of frivolous lawsuits. THE GNOMES RUN THE RIAA!

It's my laptop... (1)

Unanimous Cow (1292812) | more than 5 years ago | (#23481602)

It's my laptop, I'll do whatever the hell I want with it. IBm has enough money so this patent better only affect other large corporate industries.
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