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Group Wants Wi-Fi Banned, Citing Allergy

CmdrTaco posted more than 6 years ago | from the oh-you-gotta-be-kidding-me dept.

Wireless Networking 525

54mc writes "A small group in Santa Fe, New Mexico is claiming that the city is discriminating against them by having wireless networks in public buildings. How are these buildings discriminatory? Simple. These people are allergic to Wi-Fi. And they're suing the city." I've been trying to sue people for the streetlights that I'm allergic to as well.

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Three words... (5, Insightful)

msauve (701917) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527278)

"double blind test."

Allergic?, yeah sure you are.

Yes I'd like to see that (0, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23527468)

Personally, I have all kinds of allergies to detergents, and other artificial things in the environment, and it seems unfair to me that everyone dismisses this as crazy. We don't understand all of science. Why is it unreasonable that some parts of the electromagnetic spectrum are dangerous ? X-rays are for sure. And no one knows why cancer rates have increased so much in the last few years.

Re:Yes I'd like to see that (5, Insightful)

MagdJTK (1275470) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527546)

And no one knows why cancer rates have increased so much in the last few years.

We know full well why more people are getting cancer. Improvements in medicine have reduced the mortality rates of other diseases hugely and improvements in vacinations have vastly reduced the number of people who even get potentially deadly diseases like mumps and measles, so more people survive to get cancer.

Put another way, if we shot everyone at the age of 40, I can guarantee that cancer rates would plummet. If we irradicated every other type of disease (including old age) then everyone would get cancer eventually.

Re:Yes I'd like to see that (5, Insightful)

Dipsomaniac (1102131) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527588)

Part of it isn't even that people are necessarily getting more cancer. Doctors are finding more cancer. More testing and better testing will have that effect.

Re:Yes I'd like to see that (3, Insightful)

Chonnawonga (1025364) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527746)

No doubt that's a large part of it. But what about the fact that over the last few decades, we have been exposing ourselves to huge numbers of chemicals on a daily basis, the long-term health effects of which are often unknown? Do you really know what's in that fabric softener you've been putting on your clothes? What else is happening when you take a deep breath of that "new car smell"? I'm always a little skeptical when I watch the woman in the commercial sniffing up the aerosol Febreeze she's plastering her house with.

This may seem paranoid, but I choose to be both skeptical and cautious until we have proper, long-term studies of each and every chemical in these consumer products, and of what they do to us in combination.

Re:Yes I'd like to see that (2, Insightful)

Moofie (22272) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527644)

"dismisses this as crazy."

Crazy? No. Unfortunate? Certainly. Hypochondria? Possibly. Time to do some experiments.

It is unreasonable to assume that parts of the electromagnetic spectrum are dangerous absent empirical evidence of same. That's what "reasonable" means.

Re:Yes I'd like to see that (1, Interesting)

Ucklak (755284) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527672)

And no one knows why cancer rates have increased so much in the last few years.

More people???

Re:Yes I'd like to see that (2, Insightful)

Chonnawonga (1025364) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527702)

No, they said "rates" have increased, not "numbers".

Re:Yes I'd like to see that (5, Interesting)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527802)

No, they said "rates" have increased, not "numbers".

Who is this "they" person? from the US National Cancer Institute [cancer.gov] :

Overall cancer incidence rates (the rates at which new cancers are diagnosed) for both sexes and all races combined declined slightly from 1992 through 2004. Incidence rates for female breast cancer dropped substantially from 2001 through 2004.

The press release goes on to talk about possible reasons for various cancers. It actually gets pretty complicated when you try to make sweeping generalizations. It likely means very little biologically (the sweeping generalization statement).

The thesis that EMF from cell phones increases brain cancers has been researched exhaustively. The fact that no clear trend has emerged from numerous, large studies indicates that any effect, if any effect indeed exists, is tiny and inconsequential.

These folks are loons.

Re:Yes I'd like to see that (1)

Chonnawonga (1025364) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527870)

In this case, the "they" person is some AC whom I couldn't identify and didn't want to arbitrarily assign a gender to. Sadly, the English language has no real third-person, non-gendered pronoun suitable for people (as opposed to objects). That said, you're right, and the AC is wrong. Also, your quibbling with actual facts is more useful than my quibbling with phrasing or mathematical concepts.

Re:Three words... (0)

nickname29 (1240104) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527594)

"double blind test."

No don't go bringing blind people into this.

The plaintiff is not unknown (5, Interesting)

Dr. Cody (554864) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527622)

Arthur Firstenberg, a known Mathematics major, looks to have some previous experience with electromagnetic conspiracy, mostly with cellphones and x-rays. He's also the author of Microwaving our Planet [amazon.com] , published by his Cellular Phone Taskforce. Every once in a while he'll publish an article in non-scientific environmental periodicals.

Also, check out, Electromagnetic Fields (EMF): The Killing Fields [mindfully.org] , it's full of lol:

Today I am homeless. My money does not provide me shelter. My good health does not ensure my survival. My friends are unable to help me. I am being killed, but the law offers me no protection.
...
Having stumbled upon an obviously well-kept secret, I researched the world literature on bioelectromagnetics, (or the biological effects of electromagnetism), and made myself an expert. I learned that electro-cautery machines, used in every modern surgical operation to cut through tissue and to stop bleeding, expose surgeons to much higher levels of radio frequency radiation than is permitted for workers in any industry. I learned that there was a disease thoroughly described in the Russian and Eastern European medical literature called radiowave sickness, the existence of which was usually denied by western authorities. This description made me remember my `unknown illness', the one that had derailed my medical career. Bradycardia, or a slow heart rate, was said, in these texts, to be a grave sign.

Because there are virtually no workplaces without computers any more, I have not held a job since 1990. I had resigned myself to living on Social Security Disability, and learned, together with other members of a support group I had found, how best to live with my disability. This mostly meant learning to avoid exposure to electromagnetic fields. But in July 1996, to my dismay, I learned that an innovation was coming to my city, which threatened to make it impossible to avoid exposure any more.
...
The California Department of Health Services has concluded that, on the basis of a telephone survey, 120,000 Californians - and by implication one million Americans - have left their jobs because of electromagnetic pollution in the workplace. The people who have left their homes for such a reason are not being counted by anyone.

Re:Yes I'd like to see that (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23527754)

You're point will be argued strongly against here, with people claiming that the burden of proof is on you. Yet, the same slashdot readers that say this will also adopt viewpoints that I consider to be essentially equivalent logically. Most of them will buy organic food and worry about global warming, but logically, these beliefs are inconsistent with the fact that they will vehemently disagree with your post.

Re:Three words... (1, Interesting)

pkphilip (6861) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527852)

I wouldn't be so quick to dismiss any concerns about the negative effects of cellular phone usage or the microwave radiation.

There have been studies which have shown changes in the expression of proteins due to microwave radiation.

http://www.mobiledia.com/news/65142.html [mobiledia.com]

http://www.lef.org/magazine/mag2007/aug2007_report_cellphone_radiation_01.htm [lef.org]

Other studies have indicated that there is a link between increased microwave radiation and the dramatic decrease in the population of sparrows.
http://www.thehindubusinessline.com/bline/2003/12/01/stories/2003120100431400.htm/ [thehindubusinessline.com]

Re:Three words... (3, Insightful)

Screaming Cactus (1230848) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527936)

Of course they are allergic. They're allergic to all frequencies in the 2.4 - 5GHz range, 800 - 900 and 1800 - 1900 MHz, and excluding all others (ie, the aren't allergic to satellite radio, UHF TV, or GPS signals. Only cellphones and wi-fi. Also, they are miraculously not affected by the 2.45 GHz given off by their microwaves.

that's not all (4, Funny)

eneville (745111) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527282)

I'm alergic to car emissions but I can't sue every driver.

they need treatment... (5, Funny)

sxpert (139117) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527292)

send them to live in some remote caves in the mountains. as for me, I'm allergic to idiots

Re:they need treatment... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23527312)

So it would be win-win.

Re:they need treatment... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23527354)

Well, to get away from all idiots, you'd probably have to live in some remote caves in the mountains too.

Just make sure that they're different caves to what these guys will be living in.

Re:they need treatment... (4, Funny)

tristian_was_here (865394) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527362)

I hope I haven't set off your allergies

Re:they need treatment... (1)

edalytical (671270) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527660)

I'm allergic to idiots
I'm allergic to litigation.

Re:they need treatment... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23527716)

They are probably not idiots. If you experience problems, like pain, in certain situations, you will form an association between the two. It's a subtle and very persuasive phenomenon and it has little to do with intelligence.

Smart people are just as susceptible to placebos, for example.

The brain is a pattern matching machine, and all your sensory experiences are influenced by all sensory input as well as what you have stored in your brain already.

For example, can you look at one of the words in this text, without reading it? Unless you have worked extensively with layout or something where you learned to see "text as form" chances are that the meaning of each of these words pops into your head as soon as you look at them.

Does that make you an idiot? You are doing sub-conscious pattern matching, aren't you? Just like they are.

You may happen to be on the right side of certain social conventions as to what patters are correct, but understand that this is arbitrary.

In my book, you are the idiot.

Allergy (5, Informative)

Bazman (4849) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527302)

I'm allergic to stupidity. Can we ban these people?

Are they allergic? Let's not let data get in the way of a good argument: No [badscience.net] they're [wellingtongrey.net] not. [wikipedia.org]

Wow, even Wikipedia agrees.

Re:Allergy (5, Funny)

hansamurai (907719) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527384)

Wow, even Wikipedia agrees.
Not for long...

Re:Allergy (2, Funny)

bcat24 (914105) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527952)

Did you know that the number of confirmed cases of this problem tripled in the past year?

At least they're not fat (1, Interesting)

OMNIpotusCOM (1230884) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527544)

So this story comes out and people are all like "let them die, the bastards, they're stupid," but a story about fat people causing global warming [slashdot.org] comes out and everyone's like "lose some weight, fatty!" How's that work?

Re:At least they're not fat (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23527570)

because one is just being stupid and the others are just going to end up killing us or our kids?

Re:At least they're not fat (2, Funny)

OMNIpotusCOM (1230884) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527600)

You and your kids are allergic to Wi-Fi as well?

Oh yes they are. (2, Insightful)

conureman (748753) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527608)

Some of my old neighbors were like these people. The (very) few who weren't obese, looked anorexic.

Re:Oh yes they are. (1)

Jeremy Erwin (2054) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527776)

The (very) few who weren't obese, looked anorexic.
Are you sure you want to be judging people's cardiovascular health by looking at their somatotype, filtering it through decades of cultural biases and comparing it to an self selected ideal?

Re:Allergy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23527550)

I'm allergic to stupidity and bright light.

Both give me headaches.

(I have photophobia caused by a sleep disorder, which means I get an instant headache in light bright enough.)

(And whenever I meet idiots like this I get a headache from their stupidity too.)

Can we ban the sun, idiots and streetlights? And oh, I can hear some CRTs, can we ban low quality CRTs as well?

Re:Allergy (1)

awarrenfells (1289658) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527766)

Damn, you beat me to it.

Let me get my tin foil hat (4, Informative)

AtomicDevice (926814) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527306)

They're spacin me out with all their "electro-waves" I wonder if they know they've been bombarded with electro-waves their whole life. Or maybe they haven't heard of the sun.

Re:Let me get my tin foil hat (5, Funny)

Sponge Bath (413667) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527626)

maybe they haven't heard of the sun

Yes they have, but they call it the day-star and it burns them.
Apparently they are allergic to it as well.

Turnabout (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23527310)

I'm allergic to stupid. Can we sue these people right out of existence? Pretty please?

Insightfulness (4, Insightful)

pacroon (846604) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527314)

I'm desperately trying to find something meaningful to say to this issue, that would rate me insightful. So I'm gonna go ahead and ponder over the fact, that their allergic reactions are probably an effect of solar gamma-radiation than it is your local Starbucks.

Re:Insightfulness (0, Troll)

momerath2003 (606823) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527760)

I'm desperately trying to find something meaningful to say to this issue, that would rate me insightful.
Too bad you couldn't. But nice karma whoring.

They can't ban WiFi (4, Funny)

Hoplite3 (671379) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527318)

They can't ban WiFi because I'm allergic to stupid.

Now how will we decide whose needs trump whose?

Re:They can't ban WiFi (4, Insightful)

MrNaz (730548) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527866)

Easy. The adversarial legal system: We find out who can afford to hire a bigger team of lawyers.

It's all in the mind. (5, Insightful)

Jeremy Erwin (2054) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527322)

Phone mast allergy 'in the mind' [bbc.co.uk]

However, when tests were carried out in which neither the experimenter or participant knew if the mast was on or off, the number of symptoms reported was not related to whether a signal was being emitted or not.
Two of the 44 sensitive individuals correctly judged if it was on or off in all six tests, as did five out of 114 control participants.
So, perhaps a few double blind tests are in order.

Re:It's all in the mind. (1, Interesting)

glueball (232492) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527440)

Yes, test, test, test. I believe that there are people who may have a susceptibility. When I walk through a hospital or lab I can "feel" the MRI/NMR machines, but it doesn't mean I'm feeling the earth's mag field. It's an odd sensation. The nearest thing I can explain is it's like I have the sensation of being watched.

Does this mean I'm allergic to magnetic fields? No, I don't think I've started an immune response to magnetic fields. Sensitive? Yes.

Re:It's all in the mind. (3, Insightful)

bcmm (768152) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527474)

Doesn't an MRI machine produce vibrations as well?

Might these not be detectable subconciously before you are aware of them?

Re:It's all in the mind. (1)

conureman (748753) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527568)

Just what I was thinking. Those inaudible hums give me the creeps as well.

Re:It's all in the mind. (1)

glueball (232492) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527664)

Anyone can feel or hear the gradients (that's the pulsing).

I'm talking about when the machine is quiet--no scanning. It's just a giant magnet at that point in time.

Re:It's all in the mind. (3, Insightful)

hughk (248126) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527726)

With an NMR machine, it is a very strong field, i.e., 1 Tesla or more. It is quite likely this will have some effect on you, and it has already been shown that the brain is sensitive to high magnetic fields.

Re:It's all in the mind. (1)

BlueParrot (965239) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527888)

When I walk through a hospital or lab I can "feel" the MRI/NMR machines, but it doesn't mean I'm feeling the earth's mag field.


Considering the fields in them are strong enough to propel a paper clip to lethal speeds over a distance of a few meters, while the earth's magnetic field can barely turn a compass needle, I dunno what this is supposed to prove. Having said that, I very much doubt it is the magnetic field you feel. MRI machines are more than merely a magnet and for all we know you might just be reacting to sound,vibrations,the ventilation system etc...

Re:It's all in the mind. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23527556)

Nice job selectively cutting and pasting. Here is the next sentence:

"This proportion is what is expected by chance," the researchers said.

Re:It's all in the mind. (1)

conureman (748753) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527692)

I thought he meant that MORE of these double-blind studies would confirm our assumption that this is codswallop. It was roughly the same ratio of random accuracy for both groups. It all seems so foolish I that I think perhaps a disproportionate amount of the research may have been performed by pyramid/crystal energy scientists and guess who gets quoted in the tabloids?

Uh.. (2, Insightful)

msauve (701917) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527662)

2 (on/off) ^6 (tests) = 64, so 1/64 would be expected to be correct with purely random guesses. I'm sure someone who knows statistics better than I will jump in, but 2/44 or 5/114 "correct" (even though better than chance) no doubt has little significance, given the small sample size.

It's unamerican! (3, Insightful)

youthoftoday (975074) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527340)

From TFA:

... violation of the Americans with Disabilities Act.
Does everything have to be patriotic over there? Even your disability laws?

Re:It's unamerican! (1)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527674)

Does everything have to be patriotic over there? Even your disability laws?

That's right. We don't give the north bound end of south bound rat about Englishmen with disabilities. Or French. Or Chinese.

Well, maybe we care a little about the Chinese, we owe then so much.

But it's basically about US. Always has been. And until we can improve our geography education such that more than a tiny minority of this great country's inhabitants can find any other country on a map - it likely always will be.

Cool I am moving there asap (5, Funny)

infonography (566403) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527360)

I have some designs for tin foil hats, I just could never find the proper market.

Looks like I am gonna be rich!!!!

Re:Cool I am moving there asap (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23527418)

you've been on slashdot for how long? you should have sold 100,000 units by now at the very least.

Re:Cool I am moving there asap (1)

trolltalk.com (1108067) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527456)

I have some designs for tin foil hats, I just could never find the proper market.

Looks like I am gonna be rich!!!!

How much you want to bet they suddenly become allergic to tin foil and sue you too?

Re:Cool I am moving there asap (3, Insightful)

Hankapobe (1290722) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527564)

How much you want to bet they suddenly become allergic to tin foil and sue you too?

That's when I come in with a special pill (Spuriousol [Placebo HCL]) and liner (Fiberal) for those tin foil hats. And I'll sell it for $$$!

You see, the profit potential among those people is endless. Am I a bad person? You can't reason with people like that. They'll insist that there's "scientific evidence" (they got it from some "new age" type of magazine). So, I say, if they want to live in fantasy land, then why not take their money. It makes them happy, after all. Cosmetics companies do it - they give women hope that they'll be as beautiful as the model in the ad. Car companies do it - buy this expensive car and you too will be as cool and handsome as the model in the photo. And you need it to drive in today's traffic after all - nod nod wink wink.

Supplement companies do it.

All of these companies and more sell to folks who refuse to verify their claims and want to be deceived.

My response (0, Redundant)

FoolsGold (1139759) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527364)

I'm allergic to idiots, can I have them banned too?

Re:My response (1)

what about (730877) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527490)

This is borderline to humor, but hey, we are allowed some joking no ?

It is easier to define "be allergic to a 2.4Ghz radiowave" than "be allergic to idiots"
After all I have doubts that we will ever be able to define (and agree upon) what an Idiot is.. :-)

P.S. The definition of idiot I like is: A person that while doing something hurts him and the others

But where else is the WiFi? (1)

camperslo (704715) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527372)

Fortunately the mental hospitals don't have Wi-Fi, just good old shock therapy.

So... (2, Interesting)

Tangamandapiano (1087091) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527376)

Should everyone with respiratory problems sue their cities due to pollution?

Re:So... (1)

YrWrstNtmr (564987) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527476)

Should everyone with respiratory problems sue their cities due to pollution?
Already in the works
"Some Seoul residents [cleanairnet.org] with respiratory ailments such as asthma are planning to sue Korea's central government, the Seoul metropolitan government and automobile makers for damages from air pollution."

and

"California [msn.com] filed suit against the world's largest carmakers on Wednesday, charging that greenhouse gases from their vehicles have cost the state millions of dollars."

Yes (2, Insightful)

argent (18001) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527540)

Passing the cost of pollution back to polluters instead of letting it be carried by the commons would allow the market to solve the pollution problem. Let the invisible hand do the dirty work.

Why do we assume it isn't possible? (-1)

Manip (656104) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527388)

Why are we so offended by the concept that someone might be irritated by WiFi signals?

I mean shouldn't we figure out, using a scientific methodology, if they can in fact detect Wifi rather than assuming they can't?

Although we believe it isn't possible to hear this part of the spectrum we also know that birds and other animals can detect it without the use of their hearing and thus it could be part of some humans (or the next step of human evolution).

Just saying, don't be so offended and dismissive. You sound like a bunch of cavemen.

Re:Why do we assume it isn't possible? (4, Insightful)

AaronLawrence (600990) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527404)

Because many, many studies have been done on many variations of radio waves and their effect on humans and have all concluded there is no danger so long as the safety limits already set, are adhered too.

Re:Why do we assume it isn't possible? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23527624)

Dude, why are you assuming they are humans? That's discriminatory.

This is in New Mexico, after all.

Re:Why do we assume it isn't possible? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23527744)

Because many, many studies have been done on many variations of radio waves and their effect on humans and have all concluded there is no danger so long as the safety limits already set, are adhered too.

Because many, many studies have been done on many variations of radio waves and their effect on humans and have all concluded there is no danger so long as the safety limits already set, are adhered too.

FOR EVERY EXPERT THERE IS AN IDIOT TRYING TO OUT WIT THE EXPERT -NY2DALLAS

Re:Why do we assume it isn't possible? (0)

pkphilip (6861) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527874)

There have been many studies which have shown the exact opposite. What makes the study complex is the fact these cellphone towers have not been around for such a long time and brain tumors take a long time to develop - and so any study on this must take at least a decade or so.

Re:Why do we assume it isn't possible? (1)

Leonard Fedorov (1139357) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527478)

I think the various stats, articles, and studies linked elsewhere in the discussion give good reason to be dismissive. Whether the jaded offensiveness is justified is another quesion.

Re:Why do we assume it isn't possible? (4, Insightful)

moderatorrater (1095745) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527762)

To reiterate what an earlier poster said, there have been studies, and none have shown this to be a real issue.

Furthermore, it's not up to the people who want to disprove these people to provide the evidence, it's up to them to provide the evidence, which I guarantee they won't. They'll have some pseudo-scientist walk in there, he'll talk about the effects that these poor souls have to live through constantly, and then go home and continue writing on his webpage about how science has been stealing the future from us by suppressing the discovery of his perpetual motion machine!

And this would be fine as long as judges and juries knew how to read science and recognize its value compared to pseudo science, but most people can't. The patent office, at least as of a few years ago, patented multiple perpetual motion machines every year, either because they didn't read the application or because they didn't know that it was physically impossible. So, as long as they can put some crackpot up there who knows enough science-sounding gibberish to fool someone who doesn't know better, they actually have a chance of winning.

Is it possible that these people are actually allergic to wifi signals? Absolutely. It wouldn't even be a contender for strangest thing ever. The reason there's such a backlash against it is because there have been so many times that people have made similar allegations and ignored, lied, and suppressed actual science showing that they were wrong. Tempers are already flared over this issue, and it looks like these people are going to do the exact same thing that's been done before.

Cage 'em (5, Funny)

clang_jangle (975789) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527408)

I say we quarantine them all in a nice Faraday Cage.

This is the new trend today (3, Insightful)

Avian visitor (257765) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527414)

Everyone wants to have a mobile phone that works everywhere, broadband internet, cheap electricity in their homes and produce tons of garbage but they will go to streets with pitchforks if you want to build a cell tower, Wi-Fi access point, nuclear powerplant or waste disposal facility in their neighborhood.

People got so used to having all the modern technology available to them that they simply forgot what makes such things possible.

Allergic to Wi-Fi? Fine! I can understand that. I'll turn off my access point as soon as you get rid of your Wi-Fi and Bluetooth enabled computer, cell phone and your microwave oven.

Wiology (1)

iosq (1084989) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527422)

Can't you see that WiFi signals are bad for all of us? WiFi was actually created by the Ultra-Evil lord Cheenu 100 Billion years ago to suppress the "WiTans" - the evil beings that inhabit all of us creating misery war and famine on earth. Quickly! Grab the nearest hard object and take to the streets! WiFi must end. (This is what Wiologists actually believe)

Get used to suffering. (5, Insightful)

pla (258480) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527426)

FTA: Arthur Firstenberg says he is highly sensitive to certain types of electric fields, including wireless Internet and cell phones. "I get chest pain and it doesn't go away right away," he said

Well then, looks like you'd better move to the middle of nowhere, rather than trying to live in a fairly large city.

Even If:
1) A physiological basis existed for having an autoimmune response to RF,
2) Only the 2.4GHz range of frequencies triggers it (since we literally live in a sea of RF, including from natural sources),
3) The 9th circuit accepts "electrosensitivity" as a valid "disability", and
4) The city backs down on this...

Well, given all that - What do you plan to do about the 50,000 nonmunicipal WAPs in your area? The FAA, NOAA, and military radar installations scattered around the country? Or for that matter, the microwave ovens found in every home and restauraunt in the country?


And even if you have a legitimate complaint - Welcome to the real world, where no one cares about your pitiful psychosomatic response to spoooooooky radio waves. Get a shrink, get used to chest pain, or move to Afghanistan.

Re:Get used to suffering. (1)

LoverOfJoy (820058) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527630)

He's probably hoping to sue for enough that he can retire and move to the middle of nowhere...or Afghanistan.

whos your daddy (1)

cynagh0st (1287842) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527482)

This is pseudo hysteria stirred up by that report about wifi radiation and before that probably RIAA dollars to demonize the tech.

Its just the internets ma'am. NEDM.

Bezerkeley Retirees? (1)

conureman (748753) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527486)

I used to live near some people like this. A strange and humor-impaired bunch. Like the filthy-speech movement, this IMHO is good to see, e.g. We live in a society where one can apply for redress in court for ANYTHING. OTOH it also serves to piss off the ignorant masses who will soon demand that this sort of "abuse" of the legal system be outlawed. They'll probably say it is necessary to conserve resources for the War On Terror.

Re:Bezerkeley Retirees? (1)

EQ (28372) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527780)

How about going to the UK system of torts: Loser pays.

Re:Bezerkeley Retirees? (1)

conureman (748753) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527958)

That practice has a certain appeal. I've given this a lot of thought in the past, and decided that I fear the abusers of that type of system far more than I fear the frivolous/lunatic fringe. YMMV. Say if you, for instance, were wronged by Microsoft. After they destroyed the market for your product and ran you out of business, then you sued them and they spent $14 million kicking your ass in court, what would you say then?

easy fix (5, Funny)

machine of god (569301) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527506)

Lets just glue some crystals and magnets together, hand them out, and say the block the harmful energy.

Re:easy fix (5, Funny)

conureman (748753) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527822)

Did you think that you were joking? I've seen those for sale.

ban away (2)

TheSHAD0W (258774) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527528)

I'm going to side with them and say wifi should definitely be banned in public buildings. Not because of the allergy, but because wifi is a huge security hole if it isn't handled properly, and one shouldn't assume public institutions are capable of handling ANYTHING properly.

Actually... (1)

Nathrael (1251426) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527562)

Actually, even IF say, 10 people were allergic to Wi-Fi, would that justify to slow down progress and lower the quality of life of more than enough other people just for them?

Re:Actually... (1)

Sancho (17056) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527912)

Well, yeah. I mean, it's at least in line with other ADA requirements. When I go to the grocery store, I almost always see empty handicapped spaces. They're unused a huge percentage of the time--and they could be used for other people (it's particularly bad when there is no other parking.)

I'm not saying that it's right or wrong, I'm just saying that it's consistent with other laws.

You insensitive cLod!? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23527576)

Wonder how many of these people (1)

LM741N (258038) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527596)

use microwave ovens? They operate on the same band of frequencies, along with many other consumer devices. The ovens are shielded pretty well, but nothing is perfect. The radiation leakage is measurable and can overload a close by WiFi receiver.

Also, the Sun puts out quite a bit of microwave radiation. People found that out in the early satellite dish days. Aiming your dish towards the sun would cause a lot of noise.

Re:Wonder how many of these people (2, Funny)

Sancho (17056) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527892)

use microwave ovens? They operate on the same band of frequencies, along with many other consumer devices. The ovens are shielded pretty well, but nothing is perfect. The radiation leakage is measurable and can overload a close by WiFi receiver.
Does it matter? The difference between always-on wifi and on-for-3-minutes microwaves is pretty big, I'd say.

If I put myself through excruciating pain in order to cook my meals, that's one thing. That's my choice. I'm allergic to dogs, but I still pet them. But if the city says that I have to go through excruciating pain in order to renew my driver's licen... oh, wait.

Hay fever (2, Interesting)

warlorddagaz (1242518) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527602)

For those who have hellish hay fever, can they get flowering plants banned during the summer, or sue those who grow them? And for those who are allergic to cats and dogs, can they get furry animals banned, or sue their owners? I'm allergic to washing, but that doesn't stop people shouting at me to have a bath whenever I sit next to them on the train!

Re:Hay fever (3, Insightful)

Sancho (17056) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527940)

That's the difference between the city doing something that sparks an allergic reaction and a private individual doing the same. I can choose to avoid going near houses which have allergen-flowering plants. I can't avoid going to city hall if I need to do something there. I have to renew my license periodically (and only every other year can you do it online, here), for example.

How does Wi-Fi do this: (3, Insightful)

Hankapobe (1290722) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527658)

An allergen is a nonparasitic antigen capable of stimulating a type-I hypersensitivity reaction in atopic individuals. From: Allergen [wikipedia.org]

Re:How does Wi-Fi do this: (1)

Sancho (17056) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527964)

It's an unfortunate watering down of the language. They meant sensitivity, not allergy.

Radiation! (3, Funny)

dalmiroy2k (768278) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527666)

Maybe they are also allergic to the greatest source of radiation: THE SUN!
We should ban it like Mr Burns wanted.

Can you be allergic to others supidity? (1)

JohnnyGTO (102952) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527668)

Cause I'm getting hives!

Of course, (4, Funny)

kirbysuperstar (1198939) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527714)

The easiest way to fix this would be for this group to start wearing tin-foil hats. And if they already are, they need thicker ones.

First, they came... (3, Insightful)

sarysa (1089739) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527740)

First they came for the bees, and I did not speak out because I was not a bee.
Then they came for the electro-sensitive, and I did not speak out because I was not electro-sensitive.
Then they came for the ethernet cables, and I did not speak out because I stopped using ethernet cables.
Then they came for me, and I enjoyed worldwide wireless coverage on my laptop. Woohoo!

I'm allergic to radio waves (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23527854)

I break out in song.

*ducks*

Bullshit Job Creation (2)

pipingguy (566974) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527862)

I've had allergies all my life, ranging from skin conditions to breathing problems to third arms growing out of my back (OK, so that last one was a bit of an exaggeration - could have been handy, though).

I resent people that purport to "help everyone" because of the health problems of a few. Screw you! I can either survive in a "normal" environment or I cannot, let's see what happens. It really, really pisses me off when crusaders take it upon themselves to speak or legislate on my behalf.

I suppose it's pretty obvious that said "crusaders" almost invariably are employed by an organization whose mandate is to interfere with normal people's lives just to "help" us cripples.

Fuck off already!

Let's ban electricity (1)

gelfling (6534) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527864)

running water, medicine and any food you don't grow yourself.

Someplace Else? (0, Flamebait)

His Shadow (689816) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527880)

Is there a planet or a moon to which we can send these people to be with their Luddite kind? Or has another planet already done this to us?

RF energy damage is debatable (0, Flamebait)

o1d5ch001 (648087) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527902)

Ok, Lets talk about the science of RF and cancer rates.

What we know, without a cause being understood:
* Cancer rates are sky rocketing.
* Natural systems are failing (Bees)
* RF energy at certain levels does cause soft-tissue damage
* We are in a sea of RF energy:
            * RF energy is naturally occurring and is partly responsible for mutations (evolution)
            * Man made RF is at an all-time high.
            * It is not well understood how combinations of RF can cause damage.

Italian electromagnetic fields three times other areas and Vatican Cardinals jailed:
http://www.epicentro.iss.it/ben/precedenti/ottobre/1_en.htm [epicentro.iss.it]

Ok, so we have _some_ evidence that RF causes real damage. Its documented.
We have some people who claim sensitivity to RF energy (Do you _like) florescent lights?, Those transformers are noisy!! Both audible range and RF wise)

What I hear most people saying on Slashdot is that people who suffer from real RF exposure should just suck it up! So what if you never smoked and you get cancer! Too bad! We still get to enjoy all that high speed porn.

What is it about Slashdot that it becomes an empathy free zone. What happened to Science? We have someone stating that they have an observed phenomenon, we have weak epidemiological evidence that long-term exposure to RF causes real problems. Talk about your junk science!!

I bet $1,000 the group is funded by Sprint/MCI/AT& (1)

freedom_india (780002) | more than 6 years ago | (#23527910)

I seriously bet $1,000 that the group is like the Swift Boat Veterans for Truth: Funded by telecom corporates.
Dig deeper into this group by "recommending" they be sent to a psychiatric ward in Gitmo, and you will see the truth spilling out.
God, i wish the Gestapo were around today. They would so get the truth out of these jokers and they don't even break your teeth.
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