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Olympic Tickets Contain Microchip With Your Data

kdawson posted more than 5 years ago | from the what-has-identity-to-do-with-intent dept.

Privacy 254

OMNIpotusCOM writes "Tickets to the Olympic opening and closing ceremonies will contain a microchip with information about the ticket holder, including a photograph, passport details, addresses, e-mail, and telephone numbers. The stated intent is to keep troublemakers out of the 91,000-seat National Stadium so that they cannot cause disruptions while China is on world-wide television, but it brings up serious concerns for privacy and identity theft."

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254 comments

Well That's It (4, Funny)

camperdave (969942) | more than 5 years ago | (#23566171)

Well, that's it then. I'm not going.

Re:Well That's It (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23566337)

For those of you who still plan on attending: If you do happen to be seated next to a trouble maker, run like hell cause he's about to get a tank dropped on him. Ker-Splat!

Re:Well That's It (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23566525)

any of you geeks want to fuck? $500 and you can dip your cock in my pussy. $1000 of you want to go bareback or anal. Kathleen/Holland Michigan area.

Re:Well That's It (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23566733)

Mom? Is that you? If so, do I get a discount?

Re:Well That's It (-1, Troll)

a11 (716827) | more than 5 years ago | (#23566849)

I'll give you $2k if I can fuck my Doberman in the ass while he's licking your pussy. Then I'll bring your father over for the same thing. I'll be fucking my Doberman while he's licking your dad's pussy. then I'll chop you up into little pieces and force feed it to your dad while you watch (I'll start with the toes). Then I'll wait till he shits out a baby nigger, freeze the turd and deep throat it. wanna play little girl?

Re:Well That's It (0, Flamebait)

Agent__Smith (168715) | more than 5 years ago | (#23567131)

Hey man, this is CHINA we are taliking about... They would NEVER EVER EVER do anything untoward or untrustworthy with that information... They CARE about people as individuals and are bulwarks of integrity when it comes to things like this...

What could you POSSIBLY be concerned about?!?
(cough)Tienamen Square(cough)

Oh the irony. (5, Insightful)

mrbluze (1034940) | more than 5 years ago | (#23566173)

.. it brings up serious concerns for privacy and identity theft.
Coming from a nation that brings up serious concerns for pretty much every other human right I can think of, this comes as no surprise.

Re:Oh the irony. (4, Insightful)

Brian Gordon (987471) | more than 5 years ago | (#23566269)

How is this irony? How can you possibly go to China and not expect these sort of massive privacy/rights violations?

Re:Oh the irony. (5, Insightful)

mrbluze (1034940) | more than 5 years ago | (#23566295)

ow can you possibly go to China and not expect these sort of massive privacy/rights violations?
Because for a second people might be thinking China might at least try to be nice for a change, at least to foreigners with whom they might want to do business.

Re:Oh the irony. (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23566375)

Anyone who thinks that hasn't paid any attention to China for decades.

China does not have to be nice. (5, Insightful)

arthurpaliden (939626) | more than 5 years ago | (#23566497)

So long as everyone wants to buy cheap stuff at WalMart, the foreigners will not care about the human rights record of China only that they saved 'all this money' buying stuff they do not need with money they do not have.

Re:China does not have to be nice. (5, Interesting)

bm_luethke (253362) | more than 5 years ago | (#23567033)

If you think it is only cheap stuff at wal-mart you may want to start checking your labels again.

There are many high dollar products crappily made in China and sold at whatever your favorite retail outlet happens to be.

I don't find wal-mart to be particularly worse than the vast majority of stores in terms of amount of crappy Chinese goods. The others, for whatever reason, make people feel good for paying more for the same crap they could have gotten for 20% less (and a different brand stuck on said products coming off the same assembly line with the same materials).

To find non-crap you not only have to be lucky enough to have a store locally that sales such items but also know enough about whatever you are purchasing to know what is and isn't crap.

In the end people purchasing crappy products made in china at a high price contribute more than people purchasing cheaply made items at a cheap price. The profit margin there is HUGE even when you take into account the extra money spent on advertisement to get people to hate the less expensive place to purchase it.

And, to note, one can very much find some quality items made in China - I have some cookware and cutlery that is quite good (and yes, I have several good kitchen knives - a few Henckel "s" grades and a Shun - but it is really hard to beat a Chinese high carbon steel cleaver and the hammered carbon steel woks are great).

Walmart is a tiny blib and does better than most (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23567077)

You might want to check where that "Made in the USA" crap is actually made. Some of the embedded products I work with are made in China but assembled here. Then it can be incorporated into other products, also mostly made in China, and those can be called MITUSA as well.

If it's made using a process that might peak the interests of the EPA it's probably made in someone else's toxic waste dump.

BTW there are things we cannot buy in the US unless we geared up to make them. We can't gear up to make them because the EPA would eviscerate us. It does not matter if we could do the job legally or not. It's not about slave labor but government regulation.

Re:Oh the irony. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23566559)

And the question still remains, how is that irony?

Re:Oh the irony. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23566767)

well, it's kinda like rain on your wedding day...

Re:Oh the irony. (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23566437)

How is this irony? How can you possibly go to China and not expect these sort of massive privacy/rights violations?
Alanis Morissette [youtube.com] has basically destroyed the meaning of that word.

Canada sucks.

Re:Oh the irony. (1)

Ethanol-fueled (1125189) | more than 5 years ago | (#23566485)

But which nation are you referring to, China or the US/UK? I kid, I kid,

...but other govermnents already know a "good idea" when they see it. People are still trying to develop and legalize ubiquitous, biometric ID schemes. Imagine having to carry your biometric passport with you everywhere you go because it's required to board a domestic flight or to go to a rock concert. Ze paperz pleez.

Re:Oh the irony. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23567229)

Coming from a nation that brings up serious concerns for pretty much every other human right I can think of, this comes as no surprise.

You're speaking of the US, I assume.

Once the motherfucker Bush decided the Constitution was nothing but asswipe, we haven't been a hell of a lot better. Rendition, black prisons, Guantanamo and other places filled with people picked up on the word of neighbors looking to settle a score, the bastard commander-in-thief attempting to collapse the three Constitutionally-defined branches into one person -- himself, lying the nation into an unjust and immoral war, and on and on. We're no better than the bastard butchers of Beijing. Fuck the son of a bitch to the lowest, hottest pit of hell.

Scalpers? (5, Funny)

mrbluze (1034940) | more than 5 years ago | (#23566205)

Chinese authorities initially considered tying all 6.8 million tickets to individuals
.. and then it says..

The plan [tried once in Germany] was aimed at deterring scalpers...
Why don't they just attach them to people's scalps. Scalpers can then go about their business in the traditional fashion, possibly as was once practiced at the original Olympics thousands of years ago.

Re:Scalpers? (1)

OMNIpotusCOM (1230884) | more than 5 years ago | (#23566253)

They were going to suggest this, but everyone feels bad enough for what happened in Munich that they didn't want to use the term scalper and Germany in the same sentence. They were close to Godwin'ing themselves anyway, just leave them alone already! =)

Re:Scalpers? (1)

mrbluze (1034940) | more than 5 years ago | (#23566469)

They were close to Godwin'ing themselves anyway, just leave them alone already! =)
What, we shouldn't give China a gold-star award?

Just wait this is only the first (5, Insightful)

arthurpaliden (939626) | more than 5 years ago | (#23566239)

Actually the real scarry thing is that if it works there then we are sure to see it used in other venues where security is a consern such as the World Cup (Soccer).

Re:Just wait this is only the first (1)

Vectronic (1221470) | more than 5 years ago | (#23566315)

Indeed, its not so much this act unto itself, but the consequences of it, especially if successful (whatever that may mean).

I wouldnt be surprised if it didnt trickle down to even the major games in Footbal, Soccer, Baseball etc...

My immediate reaction was "how bad do they expect it to be"... I can understand name, passport info, and picture (although shouldnt any non-citizens already have their passport which contains all this info?), But telephone number and street address etc? are they expecting some giant explosion and will need to identify and ship back body parts?...[/conspiracy_theory]

Re:Just wait this is only the first (3, Funny)

iminplaya (723125) | more than 5 years ago | (#23566377)

I wouldnt be surprised if it didnt trickle down to even the major games in Footbal, Soccer, Baseball etc...

It will trickle down much further than that. Soon you will need one of these cards to unlock the door to your house... from the inside.

Re:Just wait this is only the first (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23566327)

Actually the real scarry thing is that if it works there then we are sure to see it used in other venues where security is a consern such as the World Cup (Soccer).
So... stop buying tickets?

Re:Just wait this is only the first (1, Funny)

JCSoRocks (1142053) | more than 5 years ago | (#23566425)

If security were *really* a concern at soccer games they wouldn't let *anyone* in. Those soccer hooligans are fierce!!

Re:Just wait this is only the first (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23566441)

Actually the real scarry thing is that if it works there...

Define "works". That's so wide open to interpretation that you're definitely going to see it elsewhere, everywhere.

Really worse than the last one? (4, Interesting)

EmbeddedJanitor (597831) | more than 5 years ago | (#23566467)

Where Visa was a sponsor and you could only use a Visa card to buy tickets.

If they wanted to, they could have very easily tracked card number, and thereby person buying, with ticket info.

I don't see the problem (4, Insightful)

Phantombrain (964010) | more than 5 years ago | (#23566263)

I don't see the problem with this. It's not like China has ever has taken advantage of technology to control people there. There aren't any stories of people being arrested just for disagreeing with the government. There aren't any human rights issues in China.</sarcasm>

Tibet (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23566267)

>> so that they cannot cause disruptions while China is on world-wide television

So much for free Tibet... with every purchase.

cruise (4, Interesting)

overcaffein8d (1101951) | more than 5 years ago | (#23566271)

i went on a cruise and having photos seems quite regular for regulating getting on and off the boat. i can understand China's point of view of trying to keep out bad people. though it raises moral concerns, don't forget that there's a big chance for terrorism--especially with the protests to china. i'm not saying that it's a good thing; i'm just playing the devil's advocate-- i don't want big brother either, unless it's in the hands that i voted for.

Re:cruise (2, Insightful)

geekoid (135745) | more than 5 years ago | (#23566905)

explain how having personal information would prevent any trouble makers, or terrorists?

Call me a skeptic, but (3, Insightful)

Prisoner's Dilemma (1268306) | more than 5 years ago | (#23566275)

Call me a skeptic, but I don't see how having my email address embedded in a ticket would keep out troublemakers.

Maybe they feel there's a correlation between someone who doesn't want to share personal information and troublemaker.

Inevitable (1, Flamebait)

jasonmanley (921037) | more than 5 years ago | (#23566335)

Look guys, certain things are inevitable. They will eventually clone a human - somewhere in the world - regardless of laws. We will eventually have computer chips embedded under our skin - it will start with a way to track children, then a way to expedite purchases, then a way to hold critical medical info and so on. And so on and so on ... All we can do is educate ourselves, stay informed and be alert.

Re:Inevitable (4, Insightful)

mrbluze (1034940) | more than 5 years ago | (#23566389)

So, while the natives are doing their sacrificial dance around the flame and we sit in the big cauldron, we should remain informed and alert, fully aware of what's happening as the hairy guy in the funny hat puts the flaming torch at the base and we start enjoying a terminal hot bath, knowing full well that Tarzan will come and save us?

Life's no Hollywood movie. People DO get boiled in cauldrons and we ARE screwed unless we act. Being alert and informed isn't enough.

Re:Inevitable (5, Interesting)

MsGeek (162936) | more than 5 years ago | (#23566429)

Look guys, certain things are inevitable.

I don't buy this.

They will eventually clone a human - somewhere in the world - regardless of laws.

Arguably this has already taken place. If you mean clone a human and implant the clone in a human womb, or else have some sort of artificial womb technology to bring the cloned embryo to term...that may take a while.

We will eventually have computer chips embedded under our skin - it will start with a way to track children, then a way to expedite purchases, then a way to hold critical medical info and so on.

Do this in the US and you will have a million zillion Christians up in arms. Literally. The "Left Behind" book series was a huge-ass bestseller in a country where most people don't read if they don't have to. This might happen elsewhere, like the PRC, Vladimir Putin's Russian Federation, Japan...in fact, my prediction is that it will happen first in Japan and it will be promoted as a youth trend. It will never happen in the US. It will probably not happen in Alberta, Canada. It will probably not happen in certain Central and South American countries. It will probably not happen in South Korea, which is almost as Christian-centric as the US is.

Nothing is inevitable except death and taxes. Period.

Re:Inevitable (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 5 years ago | (#23566901)

Yeah, that's why they will boild the frog.

Start by putting them in phones. once all hthe old naysayers drop off, give the option of implanting them, since your shone is implanted anyways...

I wonder where the best place to implant a phone..of yeah, back of the wrist.

Of course, all that is just crap, and I wouldn't mind being chipped if we had guarantee of freedoms~

Re:Inevitable (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23566917)

As someone living in Japan the only way they will get implanted chips is when the chips contain cell phones. Right now they just link everything to your cell phone and, with the proper setup, you can ride the train, make purchases, etc with your phone. Furthermore when children pass through a train station the parents can be automatically notified or they can just track their children by the location of the cell phone.

For medical uses it is another story though. The national health insurance of Japan could make it a policy then everyone would have to get a chip. The problem with this is that most medical visits are for what Americans consider to be minor things. For example, if you have a cold you goto the local clinic and the doctor prescribes you cold medicine, over the counter medicine is not really popular or available here. This means that there are thousands upon thousands of small clinics that the government would have to upgrade for the chips, which is not economically feasible at this time.

Personally I think the UK will be the first with chips in everyone to go along with their CCTV networks and such.

Wrong Order (3, Insightful)

camperdave (969942) | more than 5 years ago | (#23566455)

We will eventually have computer chips embedded under our skin - it will start with a way to track children, then a way to expedite purchases, then a way to hold critical medical info and so on.

I think you've got some things out of order. We've already started by chipping pets and certain researchers. I think the next thing would be chipping soldiers as a replacement/supplement to dog tags. Once there, it will be a small step to chipping the elderly and ill, especially Alzheimer's and those who tend to wander off and forget things. Next will be children. Then, last of all, joe consumer. After all, Joe can carry a paypass RFID keyfob, or an RFID credit card. So why get it implanted?

Oh, and prisoners. They'll wind up getting chipped at some point as well.

Re:Inevitable (1)

phantomfive (622387) | more than 5 years ago | (#23566661)

Look kid, to paraphrase someone who may or may not have liked to be paraphrased this way, they can embed computer chips into my body when they can pry my permission OUT OF MY COLD DEAD HANDS.

Amen.

Re:Inevitable (1)

Ihmhi (1206036) | more than 5 years ago | (#23567127)

That doesn't sound nearly as awesome unless you're talking about guns. In Charlton Heston's voice. And you're Charlton Heston.

Re:Inevitable (2, Insightful)

networkzombie (921324) | more than 5 years ago | (#23566703)

There is a huge difference between voluntary and mandatory. This is the Union. You're thinking of Britain. Try that mandatory shit here and hundreds of Michigan militias, California cults, and Utah polygamists will forcibly remove every senator and congressmen and throw them into the Boston Harbor. It will be the Boston RFID Rave of the century. China can do what it wants... for now.

The home of the free? (3, Insightful)

thesupraman (179040) | more than 5 years ago | (#23566783)

ROTFL

Yes, thats why we see the good ole US of A protecting its citizens rights so very very well these days.

Tell people that it will stop the terrorism, drug problems, and help them buy new Hummers, and people will be voting FOR it, not against.

After all, pretty quickly the majority will see that this would be a great way to accurately identify those 'troublemakers' you mentioned, and keep them out of their nice safe middle-class lives.

I estimate that if you chipped the soldiers overseas, at least 20% of the US population would get chips just to show their support!

Re:The home of the free? (2, Funny)

Archangel Michael (180766) | more than 5 years ago | (#23567023)

I estimate that if you chipped the soldiers overseas, at least 20% of the US population would get chips just to show their support!
You'll also get all the uber-chrisitans and the uber-leftist/anarchists together for the first time, proving that politics makes strange bedfellows.

Wow, that would be an interesting protest.

would this be unreasonable for a business? (4, Interesting)

VoidEngineer (633446) | more than 5 years ago | (#23566393)

Going on the premise that China is the worlds first mature fascist government, would these tickets be considered unreasonable if the Olympics were being sponsored by a corporation? What if ExxonMobil hosted the Olympics? Or Walmart? Or HSBC? Or General Electric? If any of these companies hosted a sporting event, would it be unreasonable for them, as a business, to track this data within the tickets? My thinking is that China is simply becoming more of a corporate entity than a nation (albeit, a corporation with a billion employees). It seems like these tickets reflect that concept. Agree? Disagree?

Re:would this be unreasonable for a business? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23566895)

"Going on the premise that China is the worlds first mature fascist government,"

And the others were only immature fascists?

I

Re:would this be unreasonable for a business? (1)

Bonobo_Unknown (925651) | more than 5 years ago | (#23566939)

The Olympics has already been sponsored by a fascist government... 1936. I tend to agree with your sentiment though... China the worst of totalitarianism and corporatism in the same bucket.

Those pesky troublemakers, eh? (5, Insightful)

Attaturk (695988) | more than 5 years ago | (#23566397)

The stated intent is to keep troublemakers out of the 91,000-seat National Statdium so that they cannot cause disruptions while China is on world-wide television, but it brings up serious concerns for privacy and identity theft.

I'd say it also brings up pretty serious concerns about the various definitions and interpretations of the word "troublemaker". Perspective is a wonderful thing - until they take it from you. ;)

Re:Those pesky troublemakers, eh? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23566591)

It's China. Who the hell cares about privacy matters? What the hell do you expect when you go there? And frankly, if you're willing to shrug off all the trappings of the Chinese government just so you can watch some idiot run really fast around a giant oval, then you deserve whatever comes to you.

Re:Those pesky troublemakers, eh? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23566655)

Thats a cynical statement belieing a true fact that its all up to intpretation. As a mind in the US inudated with us "propaganda" all your life you probably impling that china "troublemakers" aren't really "troublemakers". In this sense "troublemaker" is an interpreted form as "insurgent" in Iraq. Other see them as patriots defending the country the disconnected from its people leadership in the US label them as "troublemakers/terrorist/insurgents". Each gov't can decide who they view as a troublemaker. Its not up to you to decide? Why do you think you have the right to judge another country gov't? The cynicism just befuddles me.

Re:Those pesky troublemakers, eh? (1)

Attaturk (695988) | more than 5 years ago | (#23566883)

Mate, actually I'm British. My own government is rapidly descending further into its own privacy-blind Orwellian nightmare. I haven't got much nice to say about them either. As it happens, I really wasn't casting any aspersion on China. I was merely trying to point out the nonsense of the broader "catch the troublemakers" justification itself. I'd be no happier if the London 2012 Olympics tickets feature chips containing such a broad range of personal data either - in fact I'll probably be even more perturbed if only because it's that much closer to home. That'll be one to watch.

All that having been said, and regardless of whether or not I've been subjected to the propagandist nature of American media, which I don't deny exists by the way, I'd have reason to be a little cynical I'm afraid. People on the outside of a closed system do, inevitably and quite naturally, tend to regard that system with an element of cynicism and indeed concern.

If the Chinese system were more open then I'm sure more people outside China would be inclined to dismiss the propaganda and/or be in a position to actively refute it. And as a result, Chinese people would be less likely to jump to the conclusion that anyone criticising any Chinese decision must be basing that criticism on prejudice or brainwashing rather than independent analysis of the decision itself.

Trouble makers are all the same (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 5 years ago | (#23566885)

People doing stuff other people don't like, regardless of what it is.

The question is, how big of a trouble makers can you be before you go to jail?

Uhm... Why? (5, Informative)

MaliciousSmurf (960366) | more than 5 years ago | (#23566445)

If it's for one event, it strikes me that they could have a unique ID number for each ticket, and then just cross-reference that number with an external database. Methinks that'd take care of a lot of problems.

So What? (4, Interesting)

IchBinEinPenguin (589252) | more than 5 years ago | (#23566481)

Most of the visitors will already have an RFID passport on them.

Re:So What? (1)

Repton (60818) | more than 5 years ago | (#23567109)

People know that they have to look after their passport. Will they realise that if they lose (or throw away) their ticket, it could become a vector for someone to steal their identity?

Privacy and identity theft? (1)

The Fanta Menace (607612) | more than 5 years ago | (#23566483)

Since when did the Chinese government care about privacy and identity theft? They don't even care about human rights. You'd probably get a bullet for even mentioning the issue, in China.

Why bother with photos? (4, Funny)

BluBrick (1924) | more than 5 years ago | (#23566517)

Westerners all look the same, anyway.


What's that? Ohh, you round-eyes got no sense of humour!

Re:Why bother with photos? (2, Funny)

mrbluze (1034940) | more than 5 years ago | (#23566547)

What's that? Ohh, you round-eyes got no sense of humour!
I've got square eyes, you insensitive clod!

Re:Why bother with photos? (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23566957)

Canadians all look the same: Beady little eyes and flapping heads.

Useless (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23566555)

Cannot understand why they need to embed some many info there. A single ID is enough to look up all information already saved on the server.

Why are we putting up with this? (3, Funny)

Crayboff (1296193) | more than 5 years ago | (#23566563)

This should not be tolerated! Our president must take a stand! President Bush should be willing to have America boycott the opening ceremony, just as the French President is willing to do, if China does not stop this nonsense-ical human rights violations.

Re:Why are we putting up with this? (3, Interesting)

corsec67 (627446) | more than 5 years ago | (#23566683)

What do you mean Bush should oppose what China is doing?

He is probably taking notes, like "Hmm, that is a good idea, that is a tad bit too far for now, that another good idea"

We already have RFID chips in our passports. The government is engaging in warrantless wiretaps, the National Security Letter [wikipedia.org] is a blatant violation of the first amendment, Gitmo, War on Drugs, etc...

You don't need to look further than Washington to see "nonsense-ical human rights violations"

Re:Why are we putting up with this? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23566697)

Put down the crack pipe & step away, sparky.

I'm not going to defend china, but putting an RFID chips in a ticket is NOT a human rights violation. I'm sorry, but it's just not.

Re:Why are we putting up with this? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23566701)

This should not be tolerated! Our president must take a stand! President Bush should be willing to have America boycott the opening ceremony, just as the French President is willing to do, if China does not stop this nonsense-ical human rights violations.
go wash your vagina...

Re:Why are we putting up with this? (1)

pha7boy (1242512) | more than 5 years ago | (#23566717)

Agreed!

oh, wait... we're fingerprinting and photographing people at the border when they come in just to visit. ummmmm.... well..... nevermind...

Note to self..... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23566659)

Bring magnet.

Online? Or Offline? (1)

LuYu (519260) | more than 5 years ago | (#23566747)

Is this not more like "Your Rights Offline"?

Seriously, though, way back in the Stone Age when I attended the Olympics, things were a lot different. The volunteers were given unsold tickets for the events, and they basically had tickets for any event that was not sold out. I got to be friends with them and got a lot of free tickets.

So, what would stop somebody from using somebody else's ticket? Are they seriously thinking of carding everybody at the door to every event? That would have been impossible when I went. Just checking the tickets was almost too much for the volunteers. This is especially true since it is unlikely that the volunteer's tickets will contain that information and since the volunteers are the ones checking the tickets.

Then again, this is China we are talking about, so they could literally have hired everybody who will work the Games. That certainly was not possible in any of the previous host countries.

The really disturbing part of all this is not the tickets but the fact that the very same information has very probably already been shared with every corporate sponsor of the Games.

Big Brother Is Watching Your Wallet!

Big Whoopdy-doo! (0, Flamebait)

BigAssRat (724675) | more than 5 years ago | (#23566927)

OMG, you mean that during your VOLUNTARY attendance of a HUGE international event they have some way of tracking you?? God forbid! This is NOT such a big freakin' deal that all of you paranoid folk on Slashdot like to make it out to be. If you are so worried about being tracked then don't buy a ticket and don't attend.

False logic (1)

pythonist (1289628) | more than 5 years ago | (#23566993)

This post shows how easily the poster lose his/her reasoning capabilities. Do you really think it's necessary to contain all data in the tickets? Wouldn't it be more efficiency just containing an ID but storing all info in background DB? Besides, not everything from your brain to your dick's size is necessary for identifying you as a terrorist. And, do you really think going to attend a easily-terrorist-targeted event like opening ceromony should be as anonymous as you can bash China on slashdot? Tell me why every time I need to take off my waist belt/shoes to US airport SA before boarding? and every time I have to leave my palm print scanned when entering US! The logic of China keeping-troublemake-away using eticket is simply false. Who do you think will make more trouble? a tiny pixel with ticket in ten thousands of seets or athelitics in the ground without tickets?

If you are not a Chinese citizen... (4, Interesting)

vigmeister (1112659) | more than 5 years ago | (#23567053)

I do not see why you would have a problem with this. As someone who entered the United States from a different country, when I paid to attend college, all my information is tracked by the government (through my college). Other privacy issues involve my phone calls being freely tapped into. In fact, something that inconveniences me (not a privacy issue) is people not being able to transfer money into my bank account online which marks me as a non-resident alien.

As an alien in this country, I am subjected to intrusion of privacy by a multitude of institutions that I do business with - The only way to avoid that is to "go under" and become an illegal immigrant.

I perfectly understand the need for this. I am an immigrant to the USA and if the society here (which has been nice enough to tolerate me) feels safer by having my life glimpsed at, I am OK with it. I strongly dislike it, but atleast they let me stay here eh?

What my college does with my privacy and what the Olympics committee of China does with a tourist's is not all that different.

I would however be mighty pissed if I were a Chinese citizen and subjected to this treatment. I truly feel sorry for them.

I am just pointing out that aliens in a country having their privacy violated is not unusual and as an alien I am not particularly bothered by China doing it to tourists.

Note: This is NOT an "I have nothing to hide" issue. It's more of "Thanks for letting me be in your house, you can watch me and I will be on my best behaviour"

Cheers!

Re:If you are not a Chinese citizen... (5, Insightful)

pythonist (1289628) | more than 5 years ago | (#23567123)

You tell the foreign side of story. I will tell you from the Chinese side. As a Chinese, I don't see any problem neither. As long as I buy tickets using my credit card, my info is already there. Ticket contain my name in DB is not a problem at all. We can tolerate some level of privacy violation for safty reason, just as Americans can tolerate tight security check in airport. Check in Chinese airpot is like a joke before recently for Olympics but we dont' think it has anything to do with freedom. We simply don't need such security level before Olympics. Foreigners simply don't understand the way Chinese people do things --- we don't deem personal freedom in No.1 priority and there are many things more important to our value system such as family and social harmonious. PS. I'm new to writing here so If someone tell me how to paragraphing I will appreciate much.

Re:If you are not a Chinese citizen... (1)

vigmeister (1112659) | more than 5 years ago | (#23567201)

You tell the foreign side of story. I will tell you from the Chinese side. As a Chinese, I don't see any problem neither
There you have it. Everyone's happy!

A lot of things that the occidentals assume is best for the world are things whose importance varies by culture. While I am a huge fan of freedom of speech, it is not something you necessarily take for granted in countries like Singapore, India and Indonesia (where I've lived). Propaganda on the other hand is something that I have been somewhat 'culture shocked' by in the US because in India where I grew up, urban dwellers with a good education are not targeted by propaganda other than is history classes. As we speak slashdot China is bitching about how appalling the 'media coffin' the US is trapped in is. Neither one is right about the other. The culture in both countries accept certain things and are relatively happy with their societies.

-end of rant-

P.S. Choose "Plain Old Text" in the drop down menu below the textbox to make paragraphs using the return key. Or use HTML newline tags.

Cheers!

I laugh at all anti-China comments (1)

humaniverse (838580) | more than 5 years ago | (#23567197)

First, how many of you really went to China to see what is happening over there? Or just read/watch "Western Media"? Second, how many of you really talked to normal Chinese people instead of those overseas? Please note: You are in the middle of the most rapid and the largest scale development in human history. Don't see this wave in US or Europe? Of cause not, cause it's in China. I'm Chinese. Even myself can't believe my it even though I go back China every year. I'm proud of that. Yes, we have problems. But everybody has. The key is China is progressing, growing and improving. And what I see, at least in US, is shrinking. Hmm. You can condemn China cause it has problem. But I don't think any average Chinese people care cause they are too busy on making money and enjoying their life. China was never influenced by foreign country from its history. It has its own pace. You can only watch. Wake up!

Re:I laugh at all anti-China comments (2, Insightful)

vigmeister (1112659) | more than 5 years ago | (#23567221)

While your point about ignorance causing the anti-Chinese sentiment is something I agree with, your disparaging comments about the US and Europe not changing/progressing rapidly and shrinking instead seems to be just as ill informed.

Cheers!

who cares? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23567205)

Look, you're going to a International Event Where there are going to be a LOT of rich, influential people. Security is going to be tight, it has to be.

They aren't even storing anything out of the ordinary on the chip for an event of this caliber.

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