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Moving Between Countries?

kdawson posted more than 6 years ago | from the lay-of-the-land dept.

Businesses 450

An anonymous reader writes "In six months' time, I am packing up and moving from Australia (Melbourne) to Canada (Vancouver). I'm a qualified network engineer. What I want to know is, what sort of quirks and tricks I am going to have to get used to in the Canadian job market? I'm used to Australian recruiters, and all the hoops you have to jump through, but Canada may have different hoops. I've tried contacting recruiters directly for information but they don't really give out much, as I am not actually in the country yet and therefore not worth their time. Is anyone willing to share their experiences on making the big move from country to country?"

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I work in Canada (5, Informative)

Anrego (830717) | more than 6 years ago | (#23615643)

.. as a programmer and havn`t moved between countries, so I can`t really provide a direct answer.

What I can say is that I`ve found Canadian companies want to see work samples rather than long lists of certifications. Not really sure what would constitute a work sample in your field though.

References are also very important here (and probably there as well). Generally employers want to talk to previous employers. Seeing as how that would be difficult due to timezones and long distance fees, having a few written letters of reference before you leave might be a good idea. Email might work as well.

Also there tends to be a defacto job posting site for every province, where most of the jobs in the area will be posted. Here in Nova Scotia, it is CareerBeacon. Finding out what your areas job posting site of choice is, is probably a good first step.

Re:I work in Canada (5, Informative)

jez9999 (618189) | more than 6 years ago | (#23615735)

References are also very important here (and probably there as well). Generally employers want to talk to previous employers.

Heh, that's interesting. In the UK, it's almost the opposite; an employer judges you based on CV, interview, previous work, and maybe qualifications; often, references aren't even followed up on, or they are checked after the job is offered to make sure you're not hiding some catastrophic thing. I think this is more sensible, too. A previous employer's reference is pretty worthless; they might make up nasty stuff because they didn't like you leaving, or make up good stuff to get you off their hands if they think you're crap.

Re:I work in Canada (5, Insightful)

Zemran (3101) | more than 6 years ago | (#23615753)

The reason why they are not supposed to take up references until after an offer is because you might not have told your boss you are looking until after you have a job to go to. It might ruin your job prospects of your boss finds out you are job hunting.

Re:I work in Canada (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23615929)

Also too much work to hunt down all the references for anyone apply for a job.

I usually try to get references for people I work with, but avoids manager's references for the current job simply because of conflict of interest.

Job references in the UK (5, Interesting)

Alain Williams (2972) | more than 6 years ago | (#23615765)

Many companies in the UK now give references of the form: ''he worked for us starting XXX until YYY.'' Nothing else. The reason is that someone sued because of a bad reference, so HR departments are now scared to say anything at all.

The sort of reason that we would do better with fewer lawyers in this world.

Re:Job references in the UK (4, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23615915)

There is another point of Law in the UK. (or so I was advised by a lawyer). If someone is dismissed because under performance or other such cause; then it must be disclosed in the reference or otherwise the company not so stating in the reference is liable for any costs the company asking for the reference incurs if the employee "re-offends".

Re:Job references in the UK (1)

pete23 (18547) | more than 6 years ago | (#23616035)

This is true for formal references, but if you work in quite a close-knit industry then people tend to know someone that they can tap for an informal word.

Hmmm... we've got all age and date related data off the CVs now, guess the name will be the next step.

Re:Job references (4, Funny)

Z00L00K (682162) | more than 6 years ago | (#23616093)

That's why your reference has to be read in a specific way:
  • X has been employed by us - X has been the cause for a disaster that we don't want to talk about and we have 'suggested' that he ended the employment.
  • X has been working for us during N years. - X has been the cause for several near disasters during the years he has been working for us.
  • X has been doing a good job - X is not a very remarkable person, neither good or bad. (average joe)
  • X has been doing a very good job - X doesn't produce disasters, and delivers a bit above average without any real surprises.
  • X has been doing an excellent job - We would recommend you to employ X, but don't pay him too much!
  • X has been doing an outstanding job - You are stupid if you don't employ X.
  • X has been a cornerstone in our company. - We are fu*d stupid to let him have reasons to leave us.
And in general - if an old employer gives incorrect references that can come back to bite them really hard, so that is very seldom a problem.

Re:Job references in the UK (1)

tolomea (1026104) | more than 6 years ago | (#23616149)

I never bother with references from the places I've worked, if the companies care they can find and call them themselves.
I do however provide references from people I've worked with, generally a mix of coworkers and immediate bosses.
I'm also a tad honest so I tend to choose them based on my opinion of their integrity and professional ability not based on what I think they may say about me.

Re:I work in Canada (5, Informative)

Threni (635302) | more than 6 years ago | (#23616051)

> A previous employer's reference is pretty worthless; they might make up nasty stuff because they didn't like you leaving, or make up good
> stuff to get you off their hands if they think you're crap.

In the UK references are usually just to confirm that you worked there, with perhaps a mention of how much time you were off sick. If an employer said anything bad about you - no matter how true - they would be liable for claims of libel. It's just not worth the hassle - you're leaving, so just draw a line under it and move on; it makes no difference to them if you get a job elsewhere or not. Ditto for saying very good things about an employee - if you are shit in your new job, your new employee could sue the old one for lying/exaggerating etc. Generally a new employer just wants to ensure you're not lying to cover up gaps in your employment history because they want someone who is up to speed, not someone who's done a little SQL 3 years ago but has forgotten the syntax etc.

Re:I work in Canada (1)

CrashNBrn (1143981) | more than 6 years ago | (#23615857)

It should be easier than the states, since Canada is part of the Commonwealth. Which I believe makes visa's et al much easier.

Re:I work in Canada (1)

nacturation (646836) | more than 6 years ago | (#23615891)

Seeing as how that would be difficult due to timezones and long distance fees, having a few written letters of reference before you leave might be a good idea.
If the prospective employer can wake up early or stay up late and their cashflow can manage the 6 cents a minute it costs to phone Australia, I think it might be a good idea to place that phone call before investing tens or hundreds of thousands of dollars in a new employee.
 

Re:I work in Canada (4, Insightful)

skrolle2 (844387) | more than 6 years ago | (#23615921)

long distance fees
No. Just.. No.

Recruiting the wrong person for a job is very, very costly, you'll end up paying a few months of salary before noticing the mistake, and then you have to re-do the entire hiring process again, which also costs money.

On that scale, five bucks for a phonecall is totally worth the money.

Re:I work in Canada (1)

Antique Geekmeister (740220) | more than 6 years ago | (#23615977)

Or $1.00 on a Skype call. VoIP is very handy for both telecommuting and for remote interviews, and familiarity with it would be helpful to a network engineer interview. I once purchased and sent an overseas business collaborator a good headphones for precisely this purpose, to ease our communications. It saved him a lot of money over the next year.

Huh? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23615645)

That's a very broad and vague question.

Re:Huh? (5, Funny)

mrbluze (1034940) | more than 6 years ago | (#23615709)

That's a very broad and vague question.
That's a very broad and vague comment.

Re:Huh? (4, Funny)

Vectronic (1221470) | more than 6 years ago | (#23615769)

This is a very vague comment about broads...

Re:Huh? Where are the broads? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23615963)

n/t;

Recruiters in Australia (5, Interesting)

daliman (626662) | more than 6 years ago | (#23615647)

Seeing as you know the Australian market, and I've recently arrived here - what are the hoops here? The biggest challenge I have is finding a technically competent recruiter; many I've spoken to are fine so long as you repeat buzz words, but if you try to explain anything more complex, their eyes glaze over...

I've got a contract for the moment, but it's up in another month or so... Your experiences here would be useful.

Re:Recruiters in Australia (1)

ZenJabba1 (472792) | more than 6 years ago | (#23615671)

Which part of Australia... I have some good recruiters I use to look for people.

Re:Recruiters in Australia (1)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 6 years ago | (#23615679)

I work and have always lived in Melbourne. I have never met or heard of a technically competent recruiter. They don't exist.

The company I work for is always hiring. Qualified staff are very hard to find. The fact that so many of them have a hard time getting past the recruitment agency probably doesn't help.

Let me know if you want a job. I get a finders bonus as well.

Re:Recruiters in Australia (1)

DiSKiLLeR (17651) | more than 6 years ago | (#23615719)

ZOMG if I move to Melbourne get me a job :) Adelaide is such a hole, though I have a job I absolutely love.

Its more than likely I will be moving country to NZ, however... but who knows where I may end up.

Re:Recruiters in Australia (1)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 6 years ago | (#23615767)

Seriously. We have a big demand for people who can do real time java, C and Ada on *nix. Its in a central location in Melbourne.

We do get a lot of people coming over from Adelaide.

Ummm Okay slashdot@netapps.com.au

I can afford to have that address in the open for a while. I won't use it again.

Re:Recruiters in Australia (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23615687)

Mostly word of mouth and the job ads. Some recruiters are ex-technical people and understand the business but most don't. For the most part I avoid agents and apply direct. AU

Re:Recruiters in Australia (4, Informative)

thegrassyknowl (762218) | more than 6 years ago | (#23615961)

Some recruiters are ex-technical people and understand the business but most don't

I have found that no recruiters are ex-technical people. Some may have had lacky roles in technical companies before leaving but none I have ever dealt with, either as an employer or potential employee, knew more than the latest manager babble words.

In my last position I was tasked with finding qualified Unix engineers, programmers, sysadmins. We got zillions of resumes from people who were... well... useless. CVs full of "XP this and Vista that and Microsoft this and web2.0 that" came in but only two with any real skill. Half of the ones the recruiters sent in were basically non-computer people who filled in "I can use Microsoft blah" and got put in the "computer jobs" bin.

A resume full of buzzwords will get you through recruiters but it won't get you very far if the people looking are technical themselves.

The best advice that was ever given to me when considering an O/S job was to actually get on a plane and spend as much time there as you can. See the sights, the neighbourhoods and talk to the locals. Walk into recruiters and give them your resume; tell them you're thinking of moving to the area in the next 6 months; they'll get it out there because they get paid their cut. If you have the money and the leave at your current position do just that.

Also, try and get a decent job now. A lot of employers are happy about covering your moving costs if they think you're going to be a good long term hire. That's a two-edged sword. If you get a job that pays for you to move you might be contracted to stay there for a minimum period with a costly exit clause.

Re:Recruiters in Australia (1)

laptop006 (37721) | more than 6 years ago | (#23615693)

Depends where you are. Here in Melbourne there's plenty going, a lot of stuff is advertised on the major job sites (JobNet, Seek, MyCareer), and as for the rest you have to build up contacts. User groups are a quick way to do that (For the major lugs see http://linux.org.au/usergroups [linux.org.au] ).

And what you do. If you are willing to be a PHP programmer and have a decent resume you could have half a dozen (good!) offers within two days, the combination of Cisco and Windows seems to be the big one for sysadmin type stuff at the moment.

Re:Recruiters in Australia (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23615717)

1. June is quiet.

2. Often a single job is advertised 3-4 times with that many recruiters or web sites but with slight different wordings.

3. Some jobs do ask for citizenship and wont go to 'imports'

A qualified network engineer? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23615659)

You have an engineering degree? Or do you mean you know which boxes to check in Windows Server?

Boycottnovell & Groklaw : +5 Insightful (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23615677)

Boycottnovell [boycottnovell.com] is where I keep up-to-date with Microsoft's latest anti-free, anti-open source, anti-human actions.

Don't let the name of the site fool you, they do keep a close eye on Microsoft and Novell's pact and current actions, but it's so much more than that. I'm discovering BoycottNovell.com to have fresher and better Linux news and Microsoft watching news than almost any other news site on the web, with Groklaw being one exception.

I'm counting down the day until Novell's site turns into a 100% pro-Microsoft masturbatory piece devoid of any Linux mention, just as Corel.com became after Microsoft's money went into the Corel hiney. What happened to all of the Corel software ports to Linux? Go to Corel's site [corel.com] now and it's one big Microsoft Windows e-penis cum fest. Where's all the Linux ports? Ha, ha! Yet again you bend over for Microsoft and you get nothing but an eggy rectum full of Ballmer and Gates smiling and steaming orc sperm. The Orc sperm will take awhile to settle deep in Novell's e-anus, but when it sets, expect the Linux offerings to dry up like an old lady's forgotten and unloved cunt.

That Microsoft is allowed to still maintain anti-open source feelings in the face of overthrowing Corel Linux with money and returning to Corel Linux as it was rebranded as XandrOS and enter into a patent agreement, sign patent agreements with other companies involved with Linux, lie about interoperability and offer nothing than a few bent pubic hairs from Satan's ballsack by the name of Moonlight ("Ever dance with the Devil in the pale moonlight? I ask that of all my friends" - The Joker, Batman The Movie), tells me lady justice in America isn't just blind, she's also a rich, money grubbing whore who wouldn't know justice if all the jailed non-violent pot smokers (who are subjected to sodomy and forced oral sex by diseased gangland pensies), surrounded her and blew smoke in her face. Just as with the O.J. Simpson trial, the "glove never fits" because it's stuffed with money for lady justice.

In the "United States of Advertising" (Bill Hicks), Microsoft's egg sucking Ballmer runs free and we all suffer for it one way or another, with Bill Gates waiting in the wings to splash himself like an enema into American politics, so like the many curious remote exploits (backdoors) in WindowsXP, their biggest backdoor is yet to come. No project is safe so long as Microsoft is around, they will always find a way to inject their devil sperm into it, while their paid off cronies pump up anti-Google hype for the unwashed mashes to digest, while they are guilty of many of the same things, such as censorship in China, but the typical person, like the DOJ, always gives Microsoft a free ride.

Microsoft in 2008 is still ever the monopoly it was when it was convicted, if not much more so, especially with its filthy cock twisting and turning in the vulva of Linux and open source, the mysterious patent list looming.

When are the people of America and the rest of the world going to get together and hold Microsoft accountable for its crimes against humanity? DO NOT SETTLE for small checks in settlements, do not allow them to continue to get away with their vicious predatory behavior. Corporations should not be above the law, but people are scattered and apathetic and allow corporations like Microsoft to continue to fuck them and rape their country of tax dollars for their proprietary mafia software and services. It is clear the majority of people will bend over and take anything, like with the Sony Rootkit audio-CD event, where yet again a corporation gets away with anything they want, with a slap on the wrist.

Microsoft is not above the law, each individual is capable of bringing change that resonates across the globe, but the big media beamed into your house has convinced you otherwise. You have the power in you to change the world, do not think otherwise. Look inside yourself and see, believe, feel, and discover the truth.

If justice will not come to Microsoft, we must bring it ourselves.

"No More" I say to you, fat sissy boy pig Ballmer who hides from the flying eggs, and Gates who will never be forgiven.

NO MORE!

Just do it (5, Insightful)

MantiX (64230) | more than 6 years ago | (#23615683)

Mate, things work pretty similar the world over for an engineer, the research you need to do is more so with visa and living arrangements.

In terms of your work, the situation is mostly the same, be it Canada, UK, Australia, in that you are expected to hold a professional attitude, and be good with your work. You will find Australians have strong work ethic reputations abroad, so you need to back that up.

Short of that, you merely need to be resourceful, and you don't necessarily need to go through recruiters. Get your resume up to speed, make sure it is within 2 pages so as not to waste others time, and advertise your skills and project work so as to give potential employment a good honest run down on your skillset.

Print it out 20-50 times, and go walk through the front door in professional attire and give it to reception, possibly ask to see if they are seeking help.

With a skills shortage of competent engineers, you will gain employment fast, and gain the margin a recruiter normally takes.

Every top 500 needs engineers, and google for the integration/IT comms companies in your city of settlement.

If you work with specialist sectors like network/comms, speak to the local distributors to find out what integrators work with those products.

Hope this helps.

MantiX
IT CEO.

Re:Just do it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23616039)

You will find Australians have strong work ethic reputations abroad

Australians may like to tell themselves that, but the *real* reputation of Australians overseas is as loudmouthed pissheads.

Depends on (-1, Offtopic)

LM741N (258038) | more than 6 years ago | (#23615689)

whether you are working for the OpenBSD project or something else.

I'm in Australia (Adelaide) Looking to move count (5, Insightful)

DiSKiLLeR (17651) | more than 6 years ago | (#23615691)

I'm in Australia (Adelaide) Looking to move countries too!

Canada and New Zealand are the two places I have been seriously considering, and it looks like Auckland, New Zealand has won me over. (I have a really close friend there for one, and NZ is a beautiful country.)

I'm a Software Engineer and Systems Administrator in my current role. Anyway, guess I should read what people post as that stuff my apply to me too ;).

I bet Americans are wondering why on earth we would want to leave Australia.....

Re:I'm in Australia (Adelaide) Looking to move cou (4, Funny)

felipekk (1007591) | more than 6 years ago | (#23615835)

I bet Americans are wondering why on earth we would want to leave Australia.....
I guess the kangaroos won?

Re:I'm in Australia (Adelaide) Looking to move cou (2, Funny)

mrbluze (1034940) | more than 6 years ago | (#23615847)

I guess the kangaroos won?
They haven't won a grand final in freakin' ages. Not likely!

Re:I'm in Australia (Adelaide) Looking to move cou (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23615865)

I bet Americans are wondering why on earth we would want to leave Australia.....
Not really, no. ;-)

Re:I'm in Australia (Adelaide) Looking to move cou (1)

definate (876684) | more than 6 years ago | (#23615969)

Lemme guess... It starts with K and ends in Rudd?

KRudd?

I know I am sick of living in Adelaide (The hills). It is too small and too little industry is here.

I'm looking to move to America. I imagine it will be like the movie Coming to America.

Re:I'm in Australia (Adelaide) Looking to move cou (3, Informative)

Fred_A (10934) | more than 6 years ago | (#23616031)

I'm looking to move to America. I imagine it will be like the movie Coming to America.
Which part of America are you considering, it's a large continent... The southern bit, Chile ? Equador ? The northern bit, Mexico ?

Re:I'm in Australia (Adelaide) Looking to move cou (1)

definate (876684) | more than 6 years ago | (#23616063)

LOL You're into specifics hey? In this case I was referencing North America, more specifically NY/California.

Re:I'm in Australia (Adelaide) Looking to move cou (4, Interesting)

MyForest (597329) | more than 6 years ago | (#23615983)

Yes, New Zealand is a beautiful place. Personally [myforest.com] I prefer the non-Auckland parts, but YMMV.

Without wishing to state the obvious, NZ/AUS is a long way from other places. The flight to the US isn't a killer, but you'll find you only see family once or twice a year. That's OK for a while but once you have kids you may find you want them to be with their relatives more often (or maybe not!) Moving to NZ will at least keep you near your (assumedly) AUS family.

Our friends from NZ just visited last week - we last saw them about three years ago and it'll be another five years before our kids are big enough for me to happily go from the UK to NZ. We miss those friends and I'd like them to be a bigger part of my kids lives.

As for moving countries, we found it quite easy because I was seconded from my UK company. The folks we know who seem to have had the best time are the ones who committed whole-heartedly to the move and got setup in the new country with the intention of staying. Having said that, one of my friends from the US is just about to move back as he can't sell his US house and can't afford to live in the UK anymore. It's a real shame as he was really getting settled in the UK.

My experience is that getting your foot in the door is the hardest part, but once you're in you can demonstrate your competence and all is well. Its time to use every friend, contact or professional organization you can - they can be surprisingly willing to help.

Re:I'm in Australia (Adelaide) Looking to move cou (1)

DJKaotica (596442) | more than 6 years ago | (#23616033)

I bet Americans are wondering why on earth we would want to leave Australia.....
Actually, I'm a Canadian wondering why you would want to leave Australia, as I recently began considering moving there myself...

Re:I'm in Australia (Adelaide) Looking to move cou (5, Interesting)

Anomolous Cowturd (190524) | more than 6 years ago | (#23616075)

I bet Americans are wondering why on earth we would want to leave Australia.....
There have been some recent unpleasant changes in Australian society. The Iraq war and anti-Islam propaganda has started turning the knuckle-draggers here into nationalists. Every day sees more crosstikas plastered on the rear windows of SUVs, and Aussie flags are cropping up in incongruous places. It used to be that Aussies were only nationalistic when it came to sports... now, I feel an ugly change coming.

Re:I'm in Australia (Adelaide) Looking to move cou (5, Insightful)

Tony Hoyle (11698) | more than 6 years ago | (#23616107)

The Iraq war and anti-Islam propaganda has started turning the knuckle-draggers here into nationalists.

And you want to move to *America* to avoid that???

#1: Beware of Moose (5, Funny)

dangitman (862676) | more than 6 years ago | (#23615699)

They are known to drop from the trees and surprise foreigners with deadly force.

Re:#1: Beware of Moose (1)

stonertom (831884) | more than 6 years ago | (#23615793)

#1: Beware of Moose (Score:5, Insightful) by dangitman (862676) Alter Relationship on Sunday June 01, @09:41AM (#23615699) They are known to drop from the trees and surprise foreigners with deadly force.
Looks like the mods today skipped biologyâ¦

Re:#1: Beware of Moose (4, Funny)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 6 years ago | (#23615803)

#1: Beware of Moose (Score:5, Insightful) by dangitman (862676) Alter Relationship on Sunday June 01, @09:41AM (#23615699) They are known to drop from the trees and surprise foreigners with deadly force.
Looks like the mods today skipped biology
Let me tell you about the Australian hoopsnake.

Re:#1: Beware of Moose (1)

Quinnie (1152605) | more than 6 years ago | (#23616089)

And the dropbear. Don't walk under trees in the bush!

Re:#1: Beware of Moose (5, Funny)

definate (876684) | more than 6 years ago | (#23615973)

You mean like drop bears? We know all about drop bears in Australia.

That's why when Yanks that aren't used to drop bears come to the forests out here, we make sure they wear a helmet.

That and it is funny.

Re:#1: Beware of Moose (4, Funny)

dangitman (862676) | more than 6 years ago | (#23615985)

You mean like drop bears? We know all about drop bears in Australia.

Sure, Australians know about drop bears, but these are Moose! Much heavier.

Re:#1: Beware of Moose (1)

Eudial (590661) | more than 6 years ago | (#23616101)

You mean like drop bears? We know all about drop bears in Australia.

Sure, Australians know about drop bears, but these are Moose! Much heavier.

Not to mention they have sharp antlers!

Re:#1: They can't be any worse than dropbears! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23615991)


Bunyip.

Re:#1: Beware of Moose (2, Funny)

Fred_A (10934) | more than 6 years ago | (#23616043)

They are known to drop from the trees and surprise foreigners with deadly force.
A Møøse once bit my sister...

Re:#1: Beware of Moose (2, Funny)

MortenMW (968289) | more than 6 years ago | (#23616061)

That's nothing compared to the Norwegian blue parrot! It's always so calm that it's scary

My experience (2, Interesting)

jmv (93421) | more than 6 years ago | (#23615707)

I'm a Canadian who spent three years in Australia and I'm returning to Canada next month. I actually found a job back in Canada by applying online and doing interviews over the phone. I don't really know much about any "hoops" you have to go through in Australia, but can't think of anything really important to know when applying in Canada (OK, can't say for anything other than Montreal). I've pretty much dealt directly with companies, so I don't know how it is with recruiters.

always, Always, ALWAYS, talk to a lawyer... (3, Insightful)

trims (10010) | more than 6 years ago | (#23615723)

Moving to another country, you need to familiarize yourself with the important laws and assumptions that are being made there. So, go direct to the source: find a reputable lawyer to talk to, and swallow the few $100 it will cost for several hours of his time. And, that's a LAWYER IN THE COUNTRY YOU ARE MOVING TO.

There are a variety of different topics you will want to discuss, so you might need to talk to more than one lawyer. BUT DO IT. You are no longer a visitor, so you need to understand the ins and outs of the local legal system.

Here's some topics that are important:

  • Work rules and labor laws. What exactly are the conditions of your visa, how much can you work, what is expected, what can be negotiated, etc. This varies even by state here in the US, so don't assume you know anything.
  • Housing regulations. What are renter protections and responsibilities? Does and Don'ts of your landlord? And general property law.
  • Free Speech Regulations. What can (and can't) be said, whether out loud, in front of your boss, or on-line.
  • Liability. How is liability handled?
  • Local court system. How does the criminal justice system work, and what are your rights under it (particularly, as a foreigner)? How does the civil system work?
  • Family Law. Can you marry? What if you already are? Divorce? How are your kids required to behave?

These are but the most important I can cite off the top of my head. It's more than worth the cost of a short lawyer consultation, and you might even be able to get a good conversation out of one on the cheap (like, offer to pay for a good dinner and drinks out, since there's not going to be any paperwork or case, it's just a consultation).

Knowing the lay of the land is by far the most important thing to find out. Getting the inside scoop from an expert is the fastest, best way to do it.

-Erik

Re:always, Always, ALWAYS, talk to a lawyer... (4, Insightful)

KillerLoop (202131) | more than 6 years ago | (#23615759)

One of the creepiest comments I've read in a long time...

Re:always, Always, ALWAYS, talk to a lawyer... (5, Funny)

Vectronic (1221470) | more than 6 years ago | (#23615781)

He's probably a lawyer, looking for work.

Re:always, Always, ALWAYS, talk to a lawyer... (2, Funny)

martin-boundary (547041) | more than 6 years ago | (#23616065)

He's probably a lawyer, looking for work.
The local regulations on Slashdot prohibit soliciting work for any member of the legal profession. This is clearly laid out in Regulation 47(b), Section 12, Paragraph 2, as amended in Appendix 14, Section 7, Paragraph 1 of the Slashdot Code Of Conduct Manual, Third Revised Edition of 2007. There are plenty of slashdot members who could have informed him of that for $100-$200.

Re:always, Always, ALWAYS, talk to a lawyer... (5, Informative)

WarwickRyan (780794) | more than 6 years ago | (#23615771)

>$100 it will cost for several hours of his time.

You're missing a 0 from that.

For the record, I've moved countries, and I found all the information that was needed by talking to my destination's embassy in my own country.

They were happy to help, send everything via email and also answered my questions via email.

For more general information, and social stuff I found http://www.expatica.com/ [expatica.com] to be a good resource. Googling for country-specific forums also found a place to find information which wasn't so obvious - like good local plumbers and flat shares.

My move was UK to Netherlands so it was easier as far as visas were confirmed (don't need one), but harder because of the language difference (which I've now solved by learning).

Better talk to foreigners living there (3, Informative)

Krischi (61667) | more than 6 years ago | (#23615833)

This is assuming that the embassy staff actually is up to speed with respect to the rules and regulations, and that there is a halfway sane bureaucracy in the destination country.

Speaking from bitter experience, I have received more than a bit of misleading, and sometimes patently false, information from the Greek embassy. Still, somewhat in the embassy staff's defense, no one in the twisted bureaucracy here in Greece actually knows for certain what the rules and regulations are for various areas of public life. All I am saying is that it is better to go to the source and talk to foreigners who actually have experience living in the country in question.

Also, do not underestimate the execution of the actual move. Packing, shipping, selling stuff, deciding what to keep, making sure that all the formalities with respect to visas, pets (if any), etc. are followed, is a real nightmare, even with the best of planning. Whatever you do, make sure that you have a place to stay and people to help you in the destination country before you move.
   

Re:always, Always, ALWAYS, talk to a lawyer... (1)

trims (10010) | more than 6 years ago | (#23615839)

The embassy (or consulate) in your original country is a great place to start, and indeed should cover a wide swath of general things. I should have suggested that, too.

However, talking to a lawyer to get the important details is, well, important. I've never found a consulate that really was useful for anything more than tourist-style advice. Even embassies are not geared toward the kind of detailed info you really should have as a private citizen. Sure, if you're interested in investing (or starting a company), then an embassy is going to be really helpful. But their resources are limited, and getting the kind of info I'm referring to is something they don't have immediately on-hand. And, generally, they aren't going to care enough about 1 visitor to make the extra mile effort.

And, no, despite what everyone likes to say, a good standard lawyer will cost you $100 per hour or so, especially if you look around. Remember, it's the high-end of the lawyer profession that gets the big bucks and attention. I've consulted lawyers here in Silicon Valley, for rates under $100/hour. My parents in rural America can get rates at $50/hour or less.

Remember, you are not asking for help on a case or problem. You're just asking for a summary of local laws. It's relatively quick and simple for a lawyer to do so, and, like I said, it's often easy to get them talking over dinner.

-Erik

Re:always, Always, ALWAYS, talk to a lawyer... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23615911)


I've moved countries too, a couple of times. I've found the best technique is to arm yourself with a good sense of humour then stumble your way into the country making snap decisions as you go. I mean c'mon! You wanna suck all the fun out of it??

Oh, get a local girlfriend as quick as you can, that usually clears up any minor details you missed on your first pass.

Bonne chance!

Re:always, Always, ALWAYS, talk to a lawyer... (1)

SpzToid (869795) | more than 6 years ago | (#23616121)

My move was UK to Netherlands so it was easier as far as visas were confirmed (don't need one), but harder because of the language difference (which I've now solved by learning).
But isn't finding a place to actually live, in the densely populated Netherlands difficult? How did you manage *that* hurdle, which you have failed to mention? (And I wonder how it compares to the UK?)

As tough as learning Dutch is, housing is a tough nut to crack, in Holland.

Re:always, Always, ALWAYS, talk to a lawyer... (4, Informative)

OAB_X (818333) | more than 6 years ago | (#23615799)

Canada is basically identical to Australia in terms of laws (British Common Law Countries), and most of the laws are federal ones that deal with all the major issues (the criminal and civil codes are all federal, except Quebec).

Minor varriations in realestate rules exist, but those are both provincial and municipal level things, so just any lawyer wouldn't do. The federal government has education programs and resources online as well, however those would mostly be of help from someone not from a Common Law country.

@OP: There is no Work Choices legislation in Canada. Oh, and learn the slang. No-one calls it a 'ute' here, it's a pickup.

Re:always, Always, ALWAYS, talk to a lawyer... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23615965)


Criminal and civil codes are most certainly not "all federal". There is federal law, and there is provincial law. Provinces tend to handle most (if not all) of civil code, and the Feds handle all criminal law.

As for "common law", that is true for federally passed laws. However, Quebec was allowed to keep the "napoleonic code", which is basically the French equivalent of English common law. Quebec civil code is essentially different, but in most cases ended up with close to the same result as common law did for english speaking countries.

Re:always, Always, ALWAYS, talk to a lawyer... (1)

Albert Sandberg (315235) | more than 6 years ago | (#23615867)

Free Speech Regulations. What can (and can't) be said, whether out loud, in front of your boss, or on-line.

That scares me the most.

Re:always, Always, ALWAYS, talk to a lawyer... (2, Insightful)

thegrassyknowl (762218) | more than 6 years ago | (#23615913)

Why not find their local embassy in your home country and ask all the questions there? Yes, this goes for anyone anywhere.

If the country you're moving to has an embassy (most of the bigger ones whose names you already know have one) then you should be able to find it.

They are cheaper than a lawyer and they'll probably give you more user friendly advice. Lawyers tend to use a lot of costly words.

Re:always, Always, ALWAYS, talk to a lawyer... (1)

skrolle2 (844387) | more than 6 years ago | (#23615943)

You forgot this point:

Knowing the culture of the country you are moving to, for example how lawyers are viewed and what they are used for there.

To me, the advice of getting a lawyer seems completely overkill, everything you need to know is on a number of government websites anyway?

Re:always, Always, ALWAYS, talk to a lawyer... (1)

indigest (974861) | more than 6 years ago | (#23615949)

Let me guess...you're a lawyer!

Re:always, Always, ALWAYS, talk to a lawyer... (1)

aaaaaaargh! (1150173) | more than 6 years ago | (#23616021)

Indeed a strange comment. (Can you mary? Oh c'mon...) You can look up the regulations from the web pages and make a dossier of the things you need to do. In some countries, there is also some free or low-fee migration help by non-profit organizations.

Re:always, Always, ALWAYS, talk to a lawyer... (2, Interesting)

owlnation (858981) | more than 6 years ago | (#23616025)

Spoken like a true lawyer. And it's nonsense too.

I've moved countries several times -- not just to English speaking ones. Most western laws are basically similar. Assuming you are not going to be doing anything unethical, pay your bills, and generally behave reasonably, you've no need to talk to a lawyer -- ever. Though you'll probably find that most countries (except the UK and Ireland) don't binge-drink as much alcohol as the average Australian, and have much less tolerance for drunken behavior -- that might get you into trouble.

Also never underestimate the power of the "stupid foreigner" card. You can get away with a lot using that, more so in non-English speaking countries.

If your going by way of America... (0, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23615729)

Don't forget to encrypt your data and load it up on a server. Wipe your drives seven times over... no wait, better yet just send them cleaned via post so when they try to jack your hardware it's pointless. They'll likely still take your devices just to be dicks but they'll be hard pressed to have a reason to keep them very long. ;)

u need to prepare now (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23615739)

I'm assuming you have a valid visa. if not, get one before you go.

I would look for a job now on the job boards, pursuing *any* job over there. It will help you land on your feet over there.

also do research on the neighbourhoods, rental prices. I would get a account at citibank & amex in australia now. It will help with you establishing credit over there (which you will need to get a local bank account, credit card, and for rental applications)

Be Canadian first. (5, Informative)

William Robinson (875390) | more than 6 years ago | (#23615777)

I immigrated to Canada, and finally decided to leave Canada after few years. During those days, I was invited by social workers to give presentations to new immigrants to Canada.

Canadian work culture is different, and was more or less of shock to me. If you could say that I am wearing Canadian underwear, the probability of getting job is better than if you say, I have designed supercomputers in Australia. I know I am exaggerating, but it is not too far from reality.

One of the best way is to start is applying directly to companies, instead of recruiting agents, as they would consider you less marketable lacking Canadian experience (god knows WTF it is.) You will wasting too much of your time if you believe that agents can help you.

Second important thing is to start working and build your credibility, which could come from working somewhere either voluntarily or accepting job that was not your profession in Australia. You will need to be patient to get job what exactly you are looking for.

Third suggestion is to start acquiring some academic qualification or certifications in Canada. It helps.

Fourth suggestion is to start looking for social services network of your own community. Surprisingly, Canada has pretty good social network of helpful people. They would guide you a lot better than anybody else.

I used to tell a lot of jokes to new immigrants, and would love to share with you. Hang on.

Re:Be Canadian first. (1)

S3D (745318) | more than 6 years ago | (#23616045)

Second important thing is to start working and build your credibility, which could come from working somewhere either voluntarily or accepting job that was not your profession in Australia.

Wow, that sounds really unattractive. Canada have overabundance of IT workers ?
Here in Israel a dog can work as programmer if he/she could prove he have some coding skill and have work permit. Don't have to know Hebrew either, if English is fluent enough. Of cause the pay is about half of that in US and the summer is really hot. Oh, and security checkpoints in the supermarkets.

The jokes I used to tell new Immigrants (2, Funny)

William Robinson (875390) | more than 6 years ago | (#23616131)

The new immigrants in Canada are called "Landed Immigrants". FYI.

Richard dies and his soul is met by St. Peter at the Pearly Gates. "Welcome Richard," says St. Peter. "Before you settle in, it seems there is a problem. We are not able to dig information related to you and we don't seem to know what to do with you. Why not go around and have a look at heaven and hell both, before we find about you."

So Richard decides to have a look at heaven. It is whitish, full of saintly decent people, talking about all good and nice things. Richard got bored very fast.

He decides to have a look at hell, and to his surprise, hell is full of beaches, nice beautiful chicks in bikini moving around, Malls, restaurants, flyovers, gardens, maple trees...it almost looked like Canada.

Richard comes back and before he could spell his choice, St Peter says, "You have been brought here by mistake. You still have 7 days of life to enjoy on earth."

Richard goes back happily on earth and returns after 7 days. St Peter welcomes him and says, "You have been pretty decent guy on earth. You have choice to make. Where would you like to go? Heaven or hell?" Without hesitation, Richard chooses hell.

St. Peter decides to check on Richard after 6 months. He found Richard in shock and misery. St Peter wants to know what happened with him. Richard looks deep in space and says "I am jobless, and have no credit cards. I got some temporary job but paid heavy taxes. Nobody would give me credit cards. I can see chicks but can't touch them. Last 6 months I have found myself frustrated beyond you could imagine.".

After gaining some control of himself, Richard looks at St Peter, and asks "When I came here first, I wished I was here forever. Why am I frustrated now?". St Peter smiles and says, "That time you were on visitor visa. Now you are landed immigrant."

One more - The Ant and the Grasshopper (0)

William Robinson (875390) | more than 6 years ago | (#23616155)

The Ant and the Grasshopper --classic and Canadian versions

CLASSIC VERSION:

The ant works hard in the withering heat all summer long,building his house and laying up supplies for the winter.

The grasshopper thinks ant is a fool, and laughs and dances and plays the summer away.

Come winter, the ant is warm and well fed.

The shivering grasshopper has no food or shelter so he dies out in the cold.

THE END

THE CANADIAN VERSION:

The ant works hard in the withering heat all summer long,building his house and laying up supplies for the winter.

The grasshopper thinks ant is a fool,and laughs and dances and plays the summer away.

Come winter, the ant is warm and well fed. The shivering grasshopper calls a press conference and demands to know why the ant should be allowed to be warm and well fed while others less fortunate, like him, are cold and starving.

The CBC shows up to provide live coverage of the shivering grasshopper,with cuts to a video of the ant in his comfortable warm home with a table laden with food.

Canadians are stunned that in a country of such wealth, this poor grasshopper is allowed to suffer so while others have plenty.

The NDP, the CAW and the Coalition Against Poverty demonstrate in front of the ant's house. The CBC, interrupting an Inuit cultural festival special from Nunavut with breaking news, broadcasts them singing "We Shall Overcome." Sven Robinson rants in an interview with Pamela Wallin that the ant has gotten rich off the backs of grasshoppers, and calls for an immediate taxhike on the ant to make him pay his "fair share".

In response to polls, the Liberal Government drafts the Economic Equity and Grasshopper Anti-Discrimination Act, retroactive to the beginning of the summer.

The ant's taxes are reassessed, and he is also fined for failing to hire grasshoppers as helpers.

Without enough money to pay both the fine and his newly imposed retroactive taxes, his home is confiscated by the government.

The ant moves to the US, and starts a successful agribiz company.

The CBC later shows the now fat grasshopper finishing up the last of the ant's food, though Spring is still months away, while the government house he is in, which just happens to be the ant's old house, crumbles around him because he hasn't bothered to maintain it. Inadequate government funding is blamed, Roy Romanow is appointed to head a commission of enquiry that will cost $10,000,000. The grasshopper is soon dead of a drug overdose, the Toronto Star blames it on the obvious failure of government to address the root causes of despair arising from social inequity.

Universities (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23615783)

Try checking "Careers Service" websites from universities in Canada. They might have useful information.

Why bother? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23615785)

If you want $250k pa stay in Australia. If unless you want to be a robot in a Canadian 2nd-rate software factory, don't even bother.

But if, on the other hand, you lack talent and are hoping to find some rich clueless country that will pay you more dollars than you are worth ... it might be worth a try.

Been there (Melb), done that (relocated) (5, Informative)

nyquist_theorem (262542) | more than 6 years ago | (#23615805)

Hi, I can't find how to send you a message or email privately, so here goes... I lived in Melbourne for 4.5 years (Carlton and Kew) and am now a recruiter in Canada. I work for Hays in Calgary. Shoot me an email at matthew at area709 dot com - I've been through the whole gamut (brought my Aussie gf with me, got her PR, found her a job, etc etc) and work in recruitment so can probably steer you in the right direction in exchange for a pack of tim-tams on your arrival. :)

Re:Been there (Melb), done that (relocated) (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23615953)

Sorry mate - Tim-tams are now a prohibited export from Australia, because customs agencies in other countries caught onto this http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tim_Tam_Slam

Re:Been there (Melb), done that (relocated) (1)

definate (876684) | more than 6 years ago | (#23615975)

You lived in Carlton? I'm so, so, sorry.

Re:Been there (Melb), done that (relocated) (1)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 6 years ago | (#23616047)

You lived in Carlton? I'm so, so, sorry.

Ummm Why?

I have lived in:

  • East Doncaster
  • Hawthorn
  • Kew
  • Glen Iris
  • Mount Waverley
  • South Croydon
  • Williamstown
  • East Brunswick

...and the last, just up the road from Carlton is by far the best place I have found to live in Melbourne. I am just glad I can afford it now.

The inner north of Melbourne actually does have a good balance between ultra low density car dependant suburbia (Croydon) and ultra high density living (St Kilda). I don't know why you think Carlton is a bad place to live.

It was a lot harder than I thought (4, Informative)

Sandcastle (563801) | more than 6 years ago | (#23615809)

Although it may prove to be a walk in the park for you, in wasn't for me.

Went from Adelaide (Australia) to Toronto (Canada). British citizen, work visa, Masters Degree, years of work history -> not a fricken response to my resume for months.

The friends we made while there explained that they don't trust a foreigner to understand what it's like to work in Canada until you already have... makes it tricky ;-) Also seems weird, Toronto is the most multicultural place in the world by some counts. Australia and Canada are both english speaking, multicultural, Commonwealth countries - there are so many similarities but they didn't want to take the risk. So my advice, go straight to a professional recruiter or pay for a similar service to rework your resume and take whatever you can.

An Australian resume is like a brief bio in some ways, educational and work history, what you're now looking for etc. etc. Mine was often 3 pages long here and worked well. In Canada it's a 1 page resume or it's straight to the round filing cabinet. Yes, they'll barely know anything about you, but this way you have a better chance of getting to an interview, where they'll spend the first 10 minutes asking the sort of questions your Australian resume would have answered!

Once you've got the first job, the rest is easy. I started back at level 1 help desk, but jumped 5 levels of management to Director in 2 years. The O/S experience sure as hell helped once back in Australia too. I've tripled the salary I earned before I left Oz only 5 years ago now.

Oh, and socially they'll love ya. Us Aussie's rock, especially in Canada.

Cheers.

Re:It was a lot harder than I thought (3, Informative)

Sandcastle (563801) | more than 6 years ago | (#23615853)

Oh yeah... Even if it feels like being a freshly minted graduate again, go to trade shows / job fairs etc.

Getting even 2 minutes of face time with an employer (doesn't even have to be the hiring / HR person or the prospective manager) will give them a chance to realise that even Canadians can in fact speak/understand "Australian", and we don't all wear Akubras and shark's teeth around our necks.

Cheers.

Re:It was a lot harder than I thought (1)

thetoadwarrior (1268702) | more than 6 years ago | (#23615959)

we don't all wear Akubras and shark's teeth around our necks. Cheers.
That's a disappointment but as long as you live in a post war wasteland fighting over oil then all is forgiven.

Car insurance (1)

Krneki (1192201) | more than 6 years ago | (#23615821)

I have just moved from my country to Canary Islands. Try to find as much companies as you can over the internet and send them your CV. One thing, don't forget to bring your car insurance history or you will have to pay as an new car owner.

in Canada, you're not a network engineer... (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23615861)

Here you might not want to refer yourself as a network "engineer", unless you are licensed by the proper provincial authority - in this case the APEGBC. It is illegal to practice professional engineering without a license. The use of term "engineer" is contested - as it has been suggested that the term should always refer to professional engineering. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Controversies_over_the_term_Engineer

Typically to be licensed, you will have had to study engineering at the post-secondary level and pass an ethics exam. See the APEGBC website for more information: http://www.apeg.bc.ca/

Eh? (1)

flyingfsck (986395) | more than 6 years ago | (#23615901)

I think you would find Vancouver almost as different as Sydney and Perth, so relax and enjoy it.

The biggest changes are driving on the wrong side of the road and turning right on a red light.

Oh, and there are some funny politicians in Ottawa, but since they are thousands of kilometers away, nobody in the west cares about them. Saskatchewan, Alberta and BC are practically independent countries. Oh, and Yukon - nobody cares about Yukon. The power of the central government doesn't seem to extend much beyond Ontario and Quebec.

I immigrated myself 3 years ago ... (from Brazil) (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23615905)

Immigration experience here in Canada will depend where you came from. I'm sure you will have less problems as you a are coming from a wealthy country and your mother tongue is 'English'.

The well known 'Canadian Experience' is an excuse to not hire someone you don't want to for reasons that are not technical ... (yeah, undercover racism!!)
If you're caucasian, you will not have much problem with this ...

Anyways, IT professions are not regulated and there are a lot of opportunities. Create a resume as expected by Canadians recruiters (Google it) and you will do pretty well.

As for laws and living, I have a couple of friends that immigrated from Brazil to Australia and I think that both country are pretty similar in a lot of aspects ... Except the f* winter ...

same move 3 months ago (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23615925)

I moved from Victoria (the AU one) to BC myself 3 months ago. It was definitely an easy move to make, both personally and work wise. Canadians are kind of like more friendly Australians, it's really nice.

Most important things though

1. Get your qualifications recognised. I'm currently still undergoing getting my accounting qualifications recognised, it's a lengthy process. I have my accounting degree done by these guys - http://www.bcit.ca/ices/ however I'm waiting upon the chartered accountancy guys to do their end to continue my studying. They requested a ICES recognition (they being the chartered accounting institute of BC), so it seems a good place to start.

2. Work visa, I am currently on a 2 year working holiday that has very few restrictions and was rather easy to get (took all of 3 days). All acquired via post and online at here - http://www.whpcanada.org.au/ Took me forever to get through customs in Canada, my stuff was stamped off straight away once I got to the front of the line, but I came in just after a couple of plane loads of Chinese Immigrants. So don't trust the "express" check-in

3. I had a few issues with a stopover flight into the US. Basically I needed to get a US visa for the entire time I'm in Canada just to enter the country (which was for a 2 hour stopover where I had no intention of leaving the airport). It involved meeting the US consulate for an interview and I wound up just changing my flight to fly via Auckland (air kiwi fly direct from Auckland, air canada now fly direct from Sydney). If you fly air kiwi, I highly recommend the lamb :)

4. As an accountant, I probably had more work issues in some regards (different laws), less in others (demand for accountants). Definitely apply directly to employers, I got stuff all help from employment agencies. Applying to companies I got a lot of "get back to us when you're in the country" replies, however I found work before I actually arrived in the country anyway (however, it was through someone I already knew here who worked at an accounting firm). I think you shouldn't have too much hassle, maybe you will finding the exact job you want, but demand for skilled employment (especially in business and IT) is high, there's plenty of work around and large employers are smart enough not to worry about where you come from, just the skills you have.

5. Check out the work laws, as mentioned. You don't get public holidays in your first 30 days with an employer (I didn't work Good Friday, fortunately my overtime I'd been working covered it), you only get 2 weeks annual leave, 5 days sick leave, etc, etc.

6. Get setup when you get here. Go to a bank and get a bank account (take your passport and any other kind of ID you have, Aussie stuff worked for me). http://www.hsbc.ca/1/2/en/personal/international-services/arriving-in-canada - HSBC have quite a range of services for new-comers and non-residents. Get a Social Insurance Number, go to Service Canada (they have a zillion offices, like Centrelink, basically) and you get it on the spot. You need one to work anywhere. Get a phone too, getting a prepaid one is easy. Getting anything on credit can be more difficult, but I haven't really gotten into that

7. And a whole heap of small things. Finding vegemite is a bitch. Most things you buy have a price on them that is BEFORE tax and you'll always wind up with a tonne of change. People are wrong about it being hard to drive on the opposite side of the road. It rains really, really hard in Vancouver sometimes, however they have the sky train, which is cool. It's as pretty as hell here as well.

8. Shit I forgot, get an international drivers licence before you leave, you can get it from RACV, takes 5 minutes and costs $20 or something. I'm not entirely sure on the legality of it though, it's meant to be 1 year, but I've heard since getting here it's only 3 months for residents. Look at getting a drivers licence here eventually, I've never been pulled over to really find out. Don't buy American cars, Mazda and Toyota are the way to go (or Subaru). Get some cash to have on you, however my Australian credit cards work (if you have a Wizard one, there's no transaction fees). Just remember to tell your bank before you leave that you're going overseas. The tax year is Jan 1 to Dec 31 too and your taxes must be lodged by April 30. Maybe see your accountant and figure out where your income will be for each year and what withholding tax needs to be taken off. Get health insurance, because even though Canada has universal healthcare, it's only for the universe that contains Canadians, not non-resident workers. I did it through Medibank before leaving, however my employer provides health and dental for me.

That's about it, sorry for the rambling of it, it's almost 4am

From US to UK (1)

thetoadwarrior (1268702) | more than 6 years ago | (#23615945)

My experience of recruiters in general is that they suck if you're looking for a job that's technical. They are rarely experts in their field of recruiting. If they were they would would for a tech company rather than some horrible commission based job.

I had to apply for my work permit in the UK so I had to save money and then come over and sit about while waiting for my work visa. So once I could work I just took a retail job literally on the same day as receiving my visa. I held that for about two weeks before moving onto something better which wasn't nice but I rather be a bit rude and have money than starve and have dignity.

Because of the gap without work, I obviously took my CV to as many companies and recruiters as possible to get something quick. The recruiters seem just look for buzzwords and try to match you up with stuff that way without even reading the actual CV to get some context on that buzzword. Some even assume that programming is just programming and despite no mention of C++ on my CV, I was asked to interview for jobs that required it.

Imo, it's a complete waste of time. You'd be better looking at specific companies and applying directly unless Canada has some weird obsession with recruiters and you have to go through them.

Credit without a history (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23615997)

One thing that may trip up immigrants is lack of credit history. Whatever history you had at home usually won't matter in the new country. Records are not exchanged across borders. This may make it hard to rent a place to live or to get a car on credit, not to mention opening up bank accounts and such.

Obviously there ARE ways to do these things, else the illegal immigrants wouldn't be able to open accounts, get cars, and rent flats.

If you ever plan to go back home, it might be wise to keep your bank accounts open to help keep your history active.

moving between 'realities' (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23616009)

there's only one version of the truth, & it's usually not a long story. it hurts the effectivity of their pr firm hypenosys. the lights are coming up all over now. conspiracy theorists are being vindicated. some might choose a tin umbrella to go with their hats. the illusionary fairytail is winding DOWn now. let your conscience be yOUR guide. you can be more helpful than you might have imagined. there are still some choices. if they do not suit you, consider the likely results of continuing to follow the corepirate nazi hypenosys story LIEn, whereas anything of relevance is replaced almost instantly with pr ?firm? scriptdead mindphuking propaganda or 'celebrity' trivia 'foam'. meanwhile; don't forget to get a little more oxygen on yOUR brain, & look up in the sky from time to time, starting early in the day. there's lots going on up there.

http://news.google.com/?ncl=1216734813&hl=en&topic=n
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/12/31/opinion/31mon1.html?em&ex=1199336400&en=c4b5414371631707&ei=5087%0A
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/05/29/world/29amnesty.html?hp

is it time to get real yet? A LOT of energy is being squandered in attempts to keep US in the dark. in the end (give or take a few 1000 years), the creators will prevail (world without end, etc...), as it has always been. the process of gaining yOUR release from the current hostage situation may not be what you might think it is. butt of course, most of US don't know, or care what a precarious/fatal situation we're in. for example; the insidious attempts by the felonious corepirate nazi execrable to block the suns' light, interfering with a requirement (sunlight) for us to stay healthy/alive. it's likely not good for yOUR health/memories 'else they'd be bragging about it? we're intending for the whoreabully deceptive (they'll do ANYTHING for a bit more monIE/power) felons to give up/fail even further, in attempting to control the 'weather', as well as a # of other things/events.

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=weather+manipulation&btnG=Search
http://video.google.com/videosearch?hl=en&q=video+cloud+spraying

dictator style micro management has never worked (for very long). it's an illness. tie that with life0cidal aggression & softwar gangster style bullying, & what do we have? a greed/fear/ego based recipe for disaster. meanwhile, you can help to stop the bleeding (loss of life & limb);

http://www.cnn.com/2007/POLITICS/12/28/vermont.banning.bush.ap/index.html

the bleeding must be stopped before any healing can begin. jailing a couple of corepirate nazi hired goons would send a clear message to the rest of the world from US. any truthful look at the 'scorecard' would reveal that we are a society in decline/deep doo-doo, despite all of the scriptdead pr ?firm? generated drum beating & flag waving propaganda that we are constantly bombarded with. is it time to get real yet? please consider carefully ALL of yOUR other 'options'. the creators will prevail. as it has always been.

corepirate nazi execrable costs outweigh benefits
(Score:-)mynuts won, the king is a fink)
by ourselves on everyday 24/7

as there are no benefits, just more&more death/debt & disruption. fortunately there's an 'army' of light bringers, coming yOUR way. the little ones/innocents must/will be protected. after the big flash, ALL of yOUR imaginary 'borders' may blur a bit? for each of the creators' innocents harmed in any way, there is a debt that must/will be repaid by you/us, as the perpetrators/minions of unprecedented evile, will not be available. 'vote' with (what's left in) yOUR wallet, & by your behaviors. help bring an end to unprecedented evile's manifestation through yOUR owned felonious corepirate nazi glowbull warmongering execrable. some of US should consider ourselves somewhat fortunate to be among those scheduled to survive after the big flash/implementation of the creators' wwwildly popular planet/population rescue initiative/mandate. it's right in the manual, 'world without end', etc.... as we all ?know?, change is inevitable, & denying/ignoring gravity, logic, morality, etc..., is only possible, on a temporary basis. concern about the course of events that will occur should the life0cidal execrable fail to be intervened upon is in order. 'do not be dismayed' (also from the manual). however, it's ok/recommended, to not attempt to live under/accept, fauxking nazi felon greed/fear/ego based pr ?firm? scriptdead mindphuking hypenosys.

consult with/trust in yOUR creators. providing more than enough of everything for everyone (without any distracting/spiritdead personal gain motives), whilst badtolling unprecedented evile, using an unlimited supply of newclear power, since/until forever. see you there?

"If my people, which are called by my name, shall humble themselves, and pray, and seek my face, and turn from their wicked ways; then will I hear from heaven, and will forgive their sin, and will heal their land."

meanwhile, the life0cidal philistines continue on their path of death, debt, & disruption for most of US. gov. bush denies health care for the little ones;

http://www.cnn.com/2007/POLITICS/10/03/bush.veto/index.html

whilst demanding/extorting billions to paint more targets on the bigger kids;

http://www.cnn.com/2007/POLITICS/12/12/bush.war.funding/index.html

& pretending that it isn't happening here;

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/world/us_and_americas/article3086937.ece
all is not lost/forgotten/forgiven

(yOUR elected) president al gore (deciding not to wait for the much anticipated 'lonesome al answers yOUR questions' interview here on /.) continues to attempt to shed some light on yOUR foibles. talk about reverse polarity;

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/environment/article3046116.ece

For one thing.. (1)

phagstrom (451510) | more than 6 years ago | (#23616019)

..your savings jar is now a "looney" bin.

Headhunter motivation (1)

smartin (942) | more than 6 years ago | (#23616079)

This is probably not unique to Canada but one thing you should always remember is that head hunters do not work for you and they are not on your side. They get paid by the company that hires you and hope to get return business from them and therefore are more concerned with making sure that the company gets the best deal. What you will find is that they usually misrepresent the compensation up front and when it comes down to the final salary negotiations, don't be afraid to call them out on it or even go as far as demanding that they (the headhunter) give you a cut of their fee. Depending on the circumstances they will give you a "signing bonus".

I moved from the US to Canada (3, Interesting)

MichaelCrawford (610140) | more than 6 years ago | (#23616087)

I'm back in the US now, but I applied awhile back for Canadian permanent residency. Eventually I'll go back to stay, and plan to become a Canadian citizen when the time comes. I'm married to a Canadian, who is sponsoring my immigration.

I used to be self-employed as a software consultant, working out of my home in Truro, Nova Scotia. But when I grew weary of it, I found that there wasn't much in the way of programming jobs anywhere in Atlantic Canada, and what little there was paid very poorly.

So I used all the Canadian job boards - particularly Craig's List [craigslist.org] - to look for coding jobs anywhere in the country. The job I found was in Vancouver.

I've blogged about it extensively:

I kept blogging there even after I moved back to California, because I intend to return someday. Vancouver is a really wonderful place, or at least it is for some people:

It's also the location of the Downtown Eastside, the poorest neighborhood in the whole nation. My job in Gastown was just a couple blocks from there. Many of my diaries are about my encounters with Vancouver's homeless, many of whom were mentally ill.

I was advised never to give money to panhandlers, lest they spend it on drugs. Crystal Meth abuse is widespread there. But I wanted to do something to help, so I often bought them meals.

Often I found that it made their day simply to ask their name and to shake their hand. Folks like that don't get paid that kind of respect very often.

Welcome.. (1)

infernalman7 (1144421) | more than 6 years ago | (#23616117)

Welcome to the world of unlimited internet.

Line Up Interviews Before you Leave (1)

wharfrat (90464) | more than 6 years ago | (#23616123)

Six months ago I moved from the US to Ireland as a programmer. One of the things I was able to do that you wont, was fly over here for four days to do interviews, except an offer, fly back and resign from my current job.

But what you can do is put your resume (just rename your 'CV' to 'resume') and put it up on some Canadian Job sights. As you get closer to the move, try and get some phone interviews lined up so that when you get there you can do the face to face interviews right away.

Oh - and in Canada you cannot call yourself an engineer unless you have an engineering license. I am serious. Call yourself a Network Technician or Network Manager.

What is this, bizarro Slashdot? (0, Offtopic)

reidconti (219106) | more than 6 years ago | (#23616127)

An Ask Slashdot question where the person in question actually contacted experts directly to try to get his questions answered BEFORE asking slashdot?

(this time posted in the correct thread.. after i got kicked out last time trying to post, then ended up posting to the Pringles can thread)
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