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Google to Offer Real-Time Stock Quotes

kdawson posted more than 6 years ago

Google 299

Apro+im writes "Today, Google announced that Google Finance will report real-time prices on NASDAQ-listed securities. While real-time stock quotes are not new, they have long encumbered with subscriptions, legal agreements, or pay software. This may be the first free source for real-time quotes."

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Simpsons already did it. (5, Informative)

X43B (577258) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634173)

Yahoo! does this already.

Re:Simpsons already did it. (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23634257)

Jesus, what fucktard mod labeled this "flamebait"?

holy cow (1, Offtopic)

unity100 (970058) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634667)

what turdface mod labeled this 'Offtopic' ?

Re:holy cow (1, Funny)

Ethanol-fueled (1125189) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634741)

What dumbfuck mod labelled this "Troll"?

Re:holy cow (2, Funny)

Starburnt (860851) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634743)

What dicksmoker didn't mod this at all?

Re:holy cow (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23634887)

Who just boarded the fail train to mod points?

Re:Simpsons already did it. (5, Informative)

lilfields (961485) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634285)

I don't know why this is flamebait, Yahoo did actually start doing this about a month ago, but got no Slashdot coverage. I'm glad to see it done, 15 minutes/20 minutes were the actual delay times, and were kind of annoying...not 3 hours as some people have already stated. Anyhow, most brokers give you real-time quotes for free, such as Scottrade...others are a bit more stingy about it...such as ING. Hopefully this will force brokerage firms to lighten up on their lower tier subscription fees.

Re:Simpsons already did it. (5, Informative)

UncleTogie (1004853) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634295)

Yahoo! does this already.

Are you sure? Read the fine print at the bottom of the Yahoo finance page next time:

Quotes are updated automatically, but will be turned off after 25 minutes of inactivity. Quote data delayed 15 minutes for Nasdaq, 20 minutes for NYSE and Amex. Real-Time continuous streaming quotes are available through our premium service.

Re:Simpsons already did it. (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23634489)

yahoo used to do it, then they had to stop... legal stuff, at least that's what they said.

For a while, they just removed the "realtime" button, but you could type in the extension manually to get realtime quotes. Then they disabled that. They probably still have a more sophisticated method, but the quick n dirty brute force version was disabled.

Yahoo users - don't be fooled (4, Interesting)

NotQuiteReal (608241) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634515)

Yahoo users - don't be fooled by simple "Web 2.0", and "AJAX" magic. It's just a bunch of javascripts refreshing your browswer... on a time delay.

On occasion, I have seen quotes for FDRXX (money market fund) report 123,000%+ on finance.yahoo.com, so you still have to think once in a while, as wonderful as the Internet is, it is not perfect.

And to be a bit off-topic and rambling, it will not be technical hurdles that "kill" the Internet, it will be lawyers and legislators, mark my words.

Re:Yahoo users - don't be fooled (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23634535)

Hey, I just did it - in FireFox 2.0.0.14 (Win XP), I went to http://finance.yahoo.com/ [yahoo.com] and typed fdrxx into the "get quotes" box and got 2.56% for a second, then it magically updated to 122,816.10% Wow! where do I invest!

Ctrl-r (0, Offtopic)

MushMouth (5650) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634661)

Just because they stop streaming after 25 minutes doesn't mean they aren't providing free real-time quotes. Because if you look at the top of a quote page during trading hours you get the realtime quote. Its been that way for at least a month. So the bit about google being the first free real-time quote is standard google fan boi on slashdot. As there have been FREE real-time quotes available for years (not just talking about yahoo, although they provided them years ago but were forced to discontinue them a few years ago

)

Re:Ctrl-r (4, Interesting)

UncleTogie (1004853) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634693)

Just because they stop streaming after 25 minutes doesn't mean they aren't providing free real-time quotes.

Guess you missed the end part where Yahoo said:

Quote data delayed 15 minutes for Nasdaq, 20 minutes for NYSE and Amex. Real-Time continuous streaming quotes are available through our premium service.

...that doesn't strike me as free and real-time.

not just talking about yahoo, although they provided them years ago but were forced to discontinue them a few years ago.

"Forced" by whom, and how?

Re:Simpsons already did it. (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23634801)

Check during the day when the exchanges are open.

Not only do they have real time quotes for NASDAQ, they also have real time for NYSE. Google is NASDAQ only.

http://ycorpblog.com/2008/05/28/real-time-stock-quotes-on-the-house/

Re:Simpsons already did it. (5, Informative)

Wister285 (185087) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634325)

Assuming Google quotes NASDAQ directly, the difference is that Yahoo! quotes ECNs instead as the managing editor over at CNBC explains:

http://www.cnbc.com/id/24927068/site/14081545/ [cnbc.com]

This has a wide range of implications, mainly how exchanges charge for their data. This will probably help NASDAQ to continue to put more pressure on the NYSE. It may be a good step though as I'd like to see the futures exchanges allow for their data services to be more freely available.

It also helps to empower the individual investor as the gap between the institutions and in the individuals closes. This can have unintended consequences though in terms of volatility as the retail money may get more fidgety with this more timely data. Either way, it should be interesting to watch this develop.

Whoa, 2 Google stories in one day! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23634497)

(Begins wanking furiously)

Real time or delayed? (0, Redundant)

Whuffo (1043790) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634187)

Are these stock quotes actually real time, or are they delayed 3 hours? There's lots of places to get stock quotes but unless you're getting them directly from a broker or the stock exchange they're delayed.

Re:Real time or delayed? (5, Informative)

bucky0 (229117) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634205)

Looking back on the google finance blog, they apparently went to the SEC and asked to get a feed straight from the source. I think it's gonna be as real time as possible

Re:Real time or delayed? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23634789)

pity they wont show us the volume in DARK POOLS being traded.

Re:Real time or delayed? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23634901)

Eh. Nobody knows -that-. Until end of the day that is. At the end of the day, all trades must be cleared, and volume accounted for.

Re:Real time or delayed? (5, Funny)

Clover_Kicker (20761) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634209)

If only the article contained this information...

Re:Real time or delayed? (3, Funny)

nmb3000 (741169) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634397)

If only the article contained this information...

I think I can speak for everyone when I say that nobody who values their time RTFA, after all it's just superfluous details that aren't needed to post comments. In fact, based on a lot of the comments I read, I assume that many people are so busy they cannot even RTFS. This too is understandable to some extent since the summary is just a wordy version of the article title. This is, however, the first time I've met somebody who couldn't bother to RTFT.

Short version: RTFT.

Re:Real time or delayed? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23634537)

If only the article contained this information...
"Article"? What is this mysterious "article" you speak of?

Yeesh. (1)

tm2b (42473) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634215)

What part of "We're very excited to tell you that real-time quotes on NASDAQ securities are now available on Google Finance" was ambiguous?

Re:Real time or delayed? (1)

barzok (26681) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634241)

Where the hell are you seeing a 3-hour delay? Yahoo! Finance!, Google Finance and most others are a 20-minute delay, not 3 hours.

Re:Real time or delayed? (1)

lilfields (961485) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634317)

AMEX has 20 minutes delays and NYSE Euronext/Nasdaq have 15 minutes delays, the indices (NYSE/DJI/SPX/RUT/NAS) are always real time...You had to have just pulled 3 hours out of no where. There are some quoting services that are end-of-day quotes...but that's rare nowadays. I think Yahoo used to offer a .cvs feed that was end-of-day, but now they have their Yahoo widget that has a 15/20 minute delay.

Re:Real time or delayed? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23634383)

3 hours?

Did you time travel from 1930 or something?

15-20 minutes is the current delay (enforced by the agreements with exchange).

I got 'em in E*Trade readily enough. (5, Informative)

FooAtWFU (699187) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634203)

I got free real-time quotes with my E*Trade account readily enough. You do need to open an account and log in each time, and you do need to accept a legal agreement, but I don't think you need to actually pay for them.

The legal agreement was mostly "you can't sue us, or NASDAQ, or the NYSE or anybody, for giving you these quotes... and you can't, like, republish these to other people". It didn't seem excessive.

I guess Google will be more convenient than these, but it's not a huge deal. Besides, if you actually care about a 15-minute delay, you'll have your brokerage account open anyway.

Re:I got 'em in E*Trade readily enough. (1)

Wister285 (185087) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634361)

This does have at least one good facet though. It's going to be easier (and less obvious to your employer) to monitor the market at work!

This is a big deal... (3, Insightful)

seanadams.com (463190) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634207)

tons of subscription services will lose most of their user base overnight - not just the ones charging for real time quotes, but also all the free sites that only offer delayed quotes. It could even have implications for market as a whole, because a whole lot more amateur investors will be getting involved in watching real-time activity. Evil though they may be, it's hard to deny that google gets their product offerings dead-on nearly all the time.

Re:This is a big deal... (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23634375)

"tons" of subscription services will not lose most of their user base overnight as "tons" of subscription services offer more services than just "real-time quotes." Including research/reports, customer service, stock trading, etc... This is a non-issue.

Maybe to some, not to me. (5, Interesting)

Gordo_1 (256312) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634483)

The vast majority of investors should ignore the minute by minute blows of the market. At this time scale the market is literally a big roulette wheel. Virtually all day traders and every amateur who thinks they can reliably extract disproportionate gains out of the market long-term (i.e. more than they would by say, holding an appropriate mix of diversified indexes) are fooling themselves into making predictions on what essentially amounts to sheer randomness. Think I'm crazy? Do yourself a favor and read A Random Walk Down Wall Street [amazon.com] and save yourself the decade it took me to figure out how the market works. You're welcome.

Re:Maybe to some, not to me. (1)

aaarrrgggh (9205) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634669)

I don't disagree with the "truth about real-time quotes," but it often tells you a lot about how the market is reacting to news which can have some interesting implications.

As to the other subscription services, i was surprised that the WSJ is starting to go to real-time quotes as well. The more the merrier-- greater transparency for all.

Re:Maybe to some, not to me. (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23634783)

do yourself a favor and read "a non random walk down wall street" and don't give up on a topic that has been the most misunderstood among timeseries predictions ever. Trading live for 3 years and making more than my day job(MSc comp science, top paying dev job). I am not alone. sorry for the formatting, on mobile.

Re:This is a big deal... (1)

ocirs (1180669) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634511)

What subscription services? Those that offer similar services are usually brokers that provide research and real time quotes as long as you have a couple hundred in the account, without monthly fees. I don't see why anyone would actually pay for subscriptions to independent sites, since those who are interested in this type of information are looking to utilize it to trade stocks.

Re:This is a big deal... (3, Insightful)

joocemann (1273720) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634637)

It is a big deal, and it is a good one. Long story short, people charging to repeat information to you will be shafted by a company like Google that can do that simple task for free. Very cool. Hell, why should we be paying subscriptions for someone to tell me public info?

Re:This is a big deal... (1)

protohiro1 (590732) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634763)

Why didn't they lose their user base last week when yahoo started doing this?

Re:This is a big deal... (1)

Doorjam (770005) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634851)

Google will be disseminating quotes realtime but won't be a datafeed that will compete with other market datafeed competitors like Esignal. Traders need feeds that stream directly into charting and other trading analysis programs either directly or via an api. This is a move to compete with yahoo and marketwatch etc. Exchanges used to execute transactions in seconds, then milliseconds, and lately has been moving to microsecond status, which is another reason why Google isn't a competitor for quote dissemination among the serious quote watchers.

Who needs real time stock quotes? (5, Funny)

ForestGrump (644805) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634221)

First it was "15 minutes delayed" stock quotes being all the rage.

Now people are getting excited over "real time"? bah!

Give me "In 10 Minutes" stock quotes and I'll pay for that!

Re:Who needs real time stock quotes? (5, Funny)

grub (11606) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634243)


Give me "In 10 Minutes" stock quotes and I'll pay for that!

I just bought several hundred thousand shares of some stocks that are supposed to go through the roof next week. Many emails from good friends who's names I don't recognize recommended them!

I'm a long-term investor (1)

davidwr (791652) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634739)

Tell me what the prices will be in 10-20 years.

ja1217 (1)

ja1217 (1266082) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634239)

Alright, time to use an idea from Ghost In the Shell 1. Create software that analyzes, buys and sells stocks. 2. Let it run. 3. Profit! I've always thought something like this would be a good idea, and the fact that I haven't heard of anyone doing it makes me wonder if there are some legal issues with it. Then again, I'm completely new to the stock market.

Re:ja1217 (1)

Delwin (599872) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634263)

Probably the fact that it can't be done...

I beg to differ (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23634731)

Except that it is done on a regular basis by a lot of people. Technical analysis is basically the field of automated stock trading techniques. Granted, many technical traders don't have a program do the buying and selling, but many do.

Unless you meant that it can't be done in a way that guarantees a profit ... in which case you are still wrong. Arbitrage trades exist in many markets, but you'd better make sure you have the lowest latency connection to the exchange.

For the most part, market makers have to be daft to not make money. And there are computerized market makers.

Re:ja1217 (1)

daenris (892027) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634273)

Well, I don't know that I'd want the program actually doing the purchasing directly without human interaction, but many/most professional investors certainly use forecasting software to help them decide what stocks to pick. The forecasting is the difficult part, adding functionality to buy/sell electronically I'm sure is fairly trivial.

Re:ja1217 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23634793)

...adding functionality to buy/sell electronically I'm sure is fairly trivial.
Yeah, if your broker offers a web interface for buying / selling, you can simply write a perl/python/ruby script.

Some brokers offer programmable interfaces. As far as forecasting, there are several common technical indicators that are generally built in to such systems. You probably won't make money just sticking with one of the common indicators, though (that, or your trading will be so sparse that you'll make more money other ways).

Re:ja1217 (0, Flamebait)

Umuri (897961) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634281)

No one's done anything that is both efficient, accurate, and smart enough that it makes money.

The minute you can make a program that can do it, you have, essentially, a "forumla" for the stock market.

While the formula may be hugely complex, if such a formula exists, it's kinda self destroying, because the stock market exists in a way because there is no formula.

The best you can do is make a psuedo-ai that can make guesses based on data. And again, no one's made a computer good enough at guessing that it makes money.

Re:ja1217 (4, Informative)

pyite (140350) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634347)

The best you can do is make a psuedo-ai that can make guesses based on data. And again, no one's made a computer good enough at guessing that it makes money.

Hahahahahahahahahaha. PLEASE keep thinking that. How do you think companies like D.E. Shaw & Co. [deshaw.com] exist? Not to mention Goldman Sachs [gs.com] , etc.

The reason I get a paycheck twice is month, in part, is because you can create efficient algorithms to make money in financial markets. But please don't let that dissuade you from your obviously very informed opinion.

Re:ja1217 (1)

alexander_686 (957440) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634459)

I will second ja1217. Yes, there are computers out there that trade automatically and they make a ton of money. Sometimes it is called picking up pennies in front of a steamroller. Sometime it is called drive 60 mph down Wall Street chasing nickels before they go down the storm drain. It costs a lot to hire the computer and brain power to make it work. And then somebody will develop something a tinny bit better they your money machine and you are no longer making those dollars. It is a bit of a arms race.

Prediction systems (5, Interesting)

Animats (122034) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634471)

While the formula may be hugely complex, if such a formula exists, it's kinda self destroying, because the stock market exists in a way because there is no formula.

That's the only part of the above posting that's true. There have been successful technical analysis systems over the years. The trouble is that once someone finds a working strategy for beating the market and uses it on a large scale, others notice and replicate it, and it becomes the market. There's also a failure mode where structured investment vehicles are constructed in such a way that they have a high probability of a continual small gain coupled with a small probability of a big loss, for a negative expectation overall. (See "Long Term Capital Management".)

So much programmed trading activity is going on that it's most of the market now. That's why the number of transactions has become so high.

Re:Prediction systems (1)

aeschenkarnos (517917) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634751)

The trouble is that once someone finds a working strategy for beating the market and uses it on a large scale, others notice and replicate it, and it becomes the market.

The current example is, "investing in real estate".

Re:ja1217 (1)

elmedico27 (931070) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634509)

The minute you can make a program that can do it, you have, essentially, a "forumla" for the stock market.
Richard Peterson has done exactly that. Check out this article on MarketPsy Capital [popsci.com] . He's come up with software that psychoanalyzes the market and provides a pretty significant ROI. So there really is a computer good enough at guessing to make money.

Re:ja1217 (3, Informative)

TubeSteak (669689) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634555)

No one's done anything that is both efficient, accurate, and smart enough that it makes money.

The minute you can make a program that can do it, you have, essentially, a "forumla" for the stock market.
Uhhhh... invest in a financial instrument that is made up of S&P 500 or Fortune 500 stocks and you're guaranteed to make money in the long term. That's why everyone compares their rate of return to the S&P 500.

The only reason you would lose money in the stock market is if the entire stock market is tanking or if you've put most of your eggs in one (poorly performing) basket.

Re:ja1217 (1)

sirambrose (919153) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634563)

While this is true in general, it was possible during the dot com bubble to exploit other people's limited view of the market to make money. Some times the prices for a particular stock are different on different exchanges. If someone on Island is offering to sell for 25 1/4 and someone is offering to buy at 25 1/2 on Instinet, then it would be possible to make money by programming a computer to buy at 25 1/4 and immediately sell at 25 1/2. This sort of thing only happens during extended hours trading, but it did happen fairly frequently.

Pulling this off would require a very low latency connection to the exchanges. I believe that it is also be a violation of the contracts for the exchange data feeds. Of course that just means that you disconnect the splitter box from the green screen terminals before the vendor sends a technician out.

Re:ja1217 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23634403)

I don't think there is any chance of doing this by just using a stock feed. Maybe if you added many and many other sources like real time news.

What you can probably do is creating some kind of safety watch that warns you if the stock start to fall too fast or rise too fast.

Re:ja1217 (1)

nick79au (791048) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634437)

Tried that in 1987 [wikipedia.org] . It didn't work out too well. (I know, it's only one theory)

Re:ja1217 (1)

thebear05 (916315) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634485)

The idea of a program that analyzes buys and sells is part of any brokerages program. i.e limit buy/sell orders but the problem is who creates the parameters of when to buy/sell ends in the same result as what we have now, though the machine may be better at following the established rule. but then again i think that is what the problem with the W.O.P.R was

Re:ja1217 (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23634545)

Any such process is inherently self-limiting. If you find an algorithm to make effective profit, people will take notice, and start emulating your trades. This eventually leads to a decrease in liquidity. There are always short-term models available with profit-generating potential. The problem is not finding these models, but exploiting them before market forces change the balance to obviate your model. If you are smart, and willing to make a concerted effort, you can profit this way. But far greater profits have been gained through random chance, than through any sort of trading model.

There are true patterns in the stock market. These can be exploited, and it's exciting to do so. The problem is that the patterns shift like sand in the wind. You can keep up, but it is exhausting from mental and capital standpoints. The best strategy to profit from the stock market, IMHO, is to possess a keen understanding of world affairs and economics, and to recognize global or national trends before most others. You can always get lucky and get a cookie. But perseverence and a stock of cash to weather the rough times are the true components of success.

Re:ja1217 (2, Interesting)

nelsonal (549144) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634575)

You're just a little late to the party, brokers call theirs program trading, and hedge funds call theirs black box/anylitical trading. It's probably 60-80% of the shares traded on any given day.

To late (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23634685)

um...
1. Become a TradeStation customer
2. Learn EasyLanguage
3. Do what you said

Or, look up "Quant." A lot of people use automated trading.

This is a NASDAQ story, not a Google story (5, Informative)

nodwick (716348) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634245)

While I know Google makes for good news, this story is in fact more about the exchanges loosening their grip on quote restrictions than it is a feel-good Google story.

Historically the exchanges have required anyone offering free quotes to delay them 15-20 minutes [cnn.com] since a big part of their revenue stream derived from charging brokerages for real-time quotes. (Brokerages in turn only offered this service to their customers.) NASDAQ announced a deal to allow Google, the Wall Street Journal, and CNBC [cnet.com] to show real-time quotes for free. Yahoo Finance announced a similar deal with a different group (BATS Trading) to phase free real-time quotes throughout its site also.

Looks like the internet continues to bring down barriers to information.

Re:This is a NASDAQ story, not a Google story (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23634391)

To be fair though, Google did spend a lot of effort lobbying the SEC to do this. I read a while back their argument to the SEC and it was well done. Its a good example of a corporation using Washington lobbying to help the public while also helping themselves. Also the opening of this is not (as far as I know) limited to just Google. They have argued for an agreement that would make this information available to all, not just Google finance. Either way as a person who follows stocks I'm delighted to be able to get realtime pricing from Google or from any other site.

Re:This is a NASDAQ story, not a Google story (1)

DesignFlaw (1300861) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634475)

Lobbying that hasn't fully paid off yet. Nasdaq is running this as a trial to get around requiring SEC approval. Also - this story says they worked with the SEC and NYSE while the feed that went live on major financial news sites today is provided by Nasdaq. The slashdot article is wrong as well. The real time quotes aren't limited to Nasdaq-listed securities - they're on all securities traded on the Nasdaq exchange.

Re:This is a NASDAQ story, not a Google story (3, Informative)

DesignFlaw (1300861) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634433)

Very True. This is actually a new feed from Nasdaq called NLS (Nasdaq Last Sale). They have been working on it for quite some time and most major financial news sites went live with it today. AOL, MarketWatch, Google, WSJ and Yahoo are using this feed.

Big deal (1)

Arthur B. (806360) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634261)

Anyone can access real time quotes. Call me when Google offers accurate intraday historical data. Now *that* would be huge.

Re:Big deal (2, Informative)

greg1104 (461138) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634341)

Have you tried http://www.opentick.com/ [opentick.com] ? It's not always free, but it's so cheap it's close.

Welp (5, Funny)

Ritontor (244585) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634291)

I feel a great disturbance on the Internet. As if millions of tenuous business models suddenly cried out in terror, and were suddenly silenced.

First Free Real Time? No. (1)

pyite (140350) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634305)

This may be the first free source for real-time quotes.

No. There you are. [level2quotes.com]

Re:First Free Real Time? No. (0, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23634359)

finance.yahoo.com started real-time quotes a couple of weeks ago.

I'm curious about the bandwidth (1)

kiehlster (844523) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634307)

I saw this early this morning, and of course it was before it showed up on the google blog. Just viewing the site, the numbers tick constantly and it makes me wonder how soon Companies are going to block the site thanks to high traffic from all these streaming numbers. Just leave it open with your huge portfolio and watch as the admins see these constant streams appearing.

Re:I'm curious about the bandwidth (4, Insightful)

espiesp (1251084) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634405)

A few numbers vs. high resolution video...

We're talking about two entirely different beasts.

Screw Stock Quotes (2, Funny)

Joebert (946227) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634351)

Screw real time stock quotes, I want real time feeds to video cameras in the 50th floor offices of investment bankers when the US economy completely tanks.

Bill: $50 says he jumps.
Johnny: You're on !

How would they open a window? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23634635)

Aren't the windows sealed after a certain level? I mean how would they even open a window to jump in the first place? And the glass is pretty tough as well so breaking it wouldn't be too easy.

Re:How would they open a window? (2, Funny)

Joebert (946227) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634771)

Aren't the windows sealed after a certain level? I mean how would they even open a window to jump in the first place? And the glass is pretty tough as well so breaking it wouldn't be too easy.

I laughed for two days when the dog I adopted from the shelter ran fullspeed into the fullsize window next to the sliding glass door on our way out.

The stock quotes could be win or lose, but a video feed will always be entertaining.

Google vs Bloomberg (4, Insightful)

TibbonZero (571809) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634377)

As some of you may or may not know, Bloomberg provides huge amounts of financial data to investment banks/firms via "Bloomberg Terminals" that Bloomberg offers. These terminals are very expensive to the firms. Yet all they offer is information. Information is something that Google excels at. I've used these Bloomberg terminals and they aren't exactly technology that you'd think of as cutting edge for 2008. Data is often inaccurate and researching things on them is an art.

I've wondered if Google might just enter the financial data market strongly. Google knows how to deal with large amount of data better than many places that are somewhat stuck in the past.

Even better would be... (1)

Twinbee (767046) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634395)

It's good, but I'd rather have a system to stream the data to my HD in CSV format, or even historical tick data for all stocks. That would be tasty.

Re:Even better would be... (1)

Firehed (942385) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634589)

Presumably you could write a little bot that scrapes the page (or uses their API if they provide one) every 30 seconds or so. It's not perfect but it should get the job done well enough.

How will Google make money? (1)

bogaboga (793279) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634399)

I'd like to know how Google will make its money on this particular service. How? Are the data feeds on prices free and a middleman has always ripped us off all this time?

Re:How will Google make money? (5, Insightful)

chromatic (9471) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634421)

I'd like to know how Google will make its money on this particular service. How?

How does Google make money at anything? They'll sell your eyeballs to advertisers.

Re:How will Google make money? (1)

Joebert (946227) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634447)

Advertisements.

Re:How will Google make money? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23634529)

Google is FOSS, they don't need money.

Not just Google. (4, Informative)

LargeMythicalReptile (531143) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634415)

It's not just Google that's doing this. CNBC [cnbc.com] and the Wall Street Journal [wsj.com] also started providing free real-time quotes today. MSN Money [msn.com] has been doing this for a while.

Granted, some of these require a subscription (MSN, WSJ)--a point noted by the submitter--but all of these services appear to be free-as-in-beer. I don't think a subscription is that big a deal; YMMV.

From what I can tell, CNBC doesn't mention either a subscription or a daily/monthly limit; I admit I haven't looked at their service in detail though.

Not new, just different (1)

pinqkandi (189618) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634445)

Free real time quotes are not new. What is new is a major player doing it, and publicizing it well. I remember there was a good free real-time quotes (even live listings of trades) in the early 2000s. I believe it may have been stockquotes.com? (Now a parked domain). If I remember correctly, they simply ran out of funding.

Anyway, glad to see a free real-time quotes provider that may stick around a while!

Yawn...free real time at eTrade since 1996 (4, Informative)

BrianCarlstrom (717058) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634501)

eTrade has had free real time quotes with a free account for over a decade. For those that really want/need this information, it was not hard to get.

It is good if you can avoid an account, even a free one, to get this information now, but this seems a little over hyped to be on /.

Exchange Rate Feeds? (1)

Sneeka2 (782894) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634507)

I'll use this opportunity to ask if anybody has a good source for daily exchange rates. I'm building an open source app (geek cred?) that needs to pull daily exchange rates. I have only found a tab delimited file from the International Monetary Fund so far. That works okay, but does anybody know of other/better APIs/feeds for exchange rates?

Not Realtime (4, Interesting)

Doc Ruby (173196) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634571)

I used to produce infosystems for traders and equities researchers/promoters on Wall Street (and in Toronto) during the 1990s Bubble. When those brokers say "realtime", they are talking about delays that are under 1 second. They're talking about WANs, LANs and apps at both client and server that have next to no latency. Because for their hottest traders, the software that makes them $billions a day, any edge in faster info means beating the competition.

The time to hit a Google page of "realtime" quotes is going to be at least a couple seconds, to say nothing of how long Google takes to get them from the market infosystems (which could be under 1s, because Google is rich and smart). That's not the realtime that real brokers pay for. It's better than 15-minute delayed quotes, which is what you usually get for free. But let's not call something realtime that isn't, even if it's free. That's the kind of BS that made the 1990s Bubble such a catastrophe, despite the best infosystems to deliver it that money could buy.

Re:Not Realtime (1)

wass (72082) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634835)

But let's not call something realtime that isn't, even if it's free.

Tell me about it. I'm still miffed that my "realtime" quotes suffer latency due to the finite speed of light.

Level II (1)

shawn.fox (461873) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634593)

What good is a real time quote without the ability to click on the quote and make a trade? Anyone that cares about real time stock quotes already has a brokerage account that gives this to them free anyway. Most brokerages do charge for level II quotes though.

Now when Google gives me free stock trades and free real time quotes they will have my business! Not sure how they will make money off of it though.

Call me when they provide ... (1)

OneSmartFellow (716217) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634595)

... a real time price data feed.

No offense Google, but I've had free real time quotes for years. Give me a stream of prices and I might sit up and notice. Having to continuously request the latest price is dumb, let me subscribe to the latest price and then provide me a continuously updating stream. Hell, I'd pay a reasonable fee ($1.00/day/symbol for DJIA constituents) for that service - as long as I don't have to pay the prices Reuters, Bloomberg, or the others charge (not to mention having to code to their idiotic API's.!

I don't think real-time feed == real-time market (2, Interesting)

stypica (307173) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634607)

I thought the whole point of the delay was so that we don't reproduce the crash that happened in what? '87? Which was exacerbated by real time software being triggered to sell in a downward spiral after the stock market had dropped a certain amount.

I need to confirm that, but is that only the rule for NYSE, or US exchanges as a whole?

Re:I don't think real-time feed == real-time marke (2, Interesting)

stypica (307173) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634753)

hate to reply to my own post - after digging through 570,000 ads for ticker software (what the hell?) I find that I was misinformed.

The NYSE has "breakers" in place that close the markets after certain percentage drops so that auto-trading won't continue the downward spiral.

external link to definition of "Rule 80b" [thefreedictionary.com]

Free Realtime streaming quotes (1)

2ndRateSoul (473341) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634705)

For the curious, we just released the 9.0.1 version of our windows based portfolio manager/charting/trading platform app called Personal Stock Streamer [personalst...reamer.com] , which now provides free streaming realtime quotes to non-professionals for up to 600 tickers when used with supported brokerage accounts.

from reuters (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23634713)

The Nasdaq arrangements will begin as a six-month pilot project, while Nasdaq waits for definitive approval from the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission for the right to sell market data to the sites for a fee. It hopes to get the approval within a year. The move comes at a time when the major exchanges are trying to squeeze as much revenue as possible from market data, which now makes up a larger share of revenue than equities trading. At Nasdaq, market data generates 20 percent of revenue, while at the NYSE, the figure is 14 percent. Nasdaq says the exchange's high trading volumes make its data more accurate, allowing it to charge a fee for a service that BATS is providing free to Yahoo. Nasdaq handles about four times the equity trading volumes that BATS does. A NYSE spokesman declined to say whether the exchange had similar projects in the pipeline. The project will generate only modest revenues, said Adena Friedman, an executive vice president at Nasdaq OMX. http://www.reuters.com/article/ousiv/idUSN0227850020080603 [reuters.com]

Please fix the typo. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23634791)

they have long encumbered with ...
probably should be "they have long been encumbered with ..."

Thanks.

Opentick.com (1)

Doorjam (770005) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634797)

Opentick.com is a free quote datafeed that provides unlimited realtime streaming quotes for a variety of 3rd party software interfaces (some free as well) and only charges exchange fees, i.e. nyse is $1 (which gets paid to the exchange.)

Great! Now how's about Forex? (1)

delirium28 (641609) | more than 6 years ago | (#23634803)

This is definitely excellent news for most traders, but I trade on the forex (Foreign Exchange) market. Now my broker has his/her own live feed and you often have to worry about the pip-spread between brokers and such, but if you just want to make a nice stand-alone web-base trading information tool (wink, wink, nudge, nudge) then you quickly find that feeds get pricey pretty quick for a good quality one. I'd love to see something similar come out for the forex market.

One of the problems of course is the fact that there isn't a single body like the SEC (well, the IMF is I suppose) like there is for the NASDAQ and the like, so Google might have a harder time of it.

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