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141 comments

Title is misleading (5, Informative)

N3TW4LK3R (841526) | more than 6 years ago | (#23791519)

From TFA: "Two redundant LAN switches, developed by the European Aeronautic Defence and Space Company (EADS) Astrium, already operate in the ISS network core and now have been joined by HP's ProCurve 2524 switch"

I sent this in an e-mail to Taco when the article was still in the 'mysterious future' but that message must have been stopped by his spam filter or something.

Yeah yeah, I must be new here ;)

Re:Title is misleading (1)

ggvaidya (747058) | more than 6 years ago | (#23793023)

Did you try the on-duty editor, at - I think - daddypants at slashdot.org? I e-mailed there once, and they fixed the problem that time pretty fast, although of course perhaps my e-mail vanished into the ether and somebody else with the correct e-mail address got in. Still, it's something to do, I suppose.

I doubt they'll change this, though, "Another switch in space" doesn't have the same ring to it, and neither will the ringing of their cash machine with titles like that.

Re:Title is misleading (1)

N3TW4LK3R (841526) | more than 6 years ago | (#23793729)

Yes, I mailed it to the daddypants address...

The correct action to take after reading my message would be to prevent the story from reaching the front page, since it's really a non-story if it's not the _first_ switch in space. Maybe it's the cash machine :) or perhaps the e-mail just got lost.

Re:Title is misleading (1)

ta bu shi da yu (687699) | more than 6 years ago | (#23793959)

Yeah, this isn't really news. This was announced months ago!

Is slashdot losing it's way on cutting edge stuff?

Re:Title is misleading (1)

MadnessASAP (1052274) | more than 6 years ago | (#23795433)

I guess a better title would have been "First off the shelf switch in space" but hey we've never let the facts bother us before, damned if we're gonna start now.

Fortunately, (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23791535)

they aren't using Linksys routers as well. Password: defaultshuttle

Connect to the first router? (2, Informative)

comm3c (670264) | more than 6 years ago | (#23791559)

I wonder if they'll connect it to the router in space?

http://www.space.com/spacenews/archive04/ciscoarch_042104.html

Resale value (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23791561)

Excellent, that should triple the resale value of my Procurve 2512 switch. Any offers?

And this is interesting because? (2, Insightful)

cheebie (459397) | more than 6 years ago | (#23791565)

Is there some reason why a router in orbit would behave differently in any way from a router sitting in a rack in the server room? (Other than floating, etc.)

Re:And this is interesting because? (5, Informative)

thomasdz (178114) | more than 6 years ago | (#23791591)

Extended G-forces during launch might be a good test of how well solder joints, connectors, and other components are made.

Brown.... (5, Funny)

mikelieman (35628) | more than 6 years ago | (#23792113)

You ever ship anything UPS? If it survive *them*, launching into orbit should be a no-brainer.

Re:And this is interesting because? (3, Funny)

tbischel (862773) | more than 6 years ago | (#23792131)

Extended G-forces during launch might be a good test of how well solder joints, connectors, and other components are made.

Hmm... sounds like an expensive test plan. How about just testing g-forces in the lab? ;-)

Re:And this is interesting because? (4, Informative)

Ellis D. Tripp (755736) | more than 6 years ago | (#23791597)

Semiconductors generally don't like high-radiation environments, such as outer space. Hence the normal use of specially made high-$$$ "rad-hard" components in space systems.

Re:And this is interesting because? (1)

Poorcku (831174) | more than 6 years ago | (#23791813)

Job satisfacton correlates only mildly with job performance, so it must be something other than what they like or what not. :)

Re:And this is interesting because? (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23791983)

I hope for the sake of the ISS crew that it's "low rad" in the ISS.

The radiation the semiconductors don't like are heavy particles like neutrons which are extremely harmful to humans too.

Re:And this is interesting because? (5, Insightful)

N3TW4LK3R (841526) | more than 6 years ago | (#23791611)

In space, it's exposed to all kinds of radiation that normally gets blocked by the earth's atmosphere.
This is one of the reasons we try to limit the complexity of electronics sent out to space. (and additionally, shield the hell out of everything)
I believe the shuttle uses a computer comparable to a 386, for this reason.

Re:And this is interesting because? (4, Informative)

networkBoy (774728) | more than 6 years ago | (#23792145)

Shuttle flight computer uses the 386 double sigma.
here are some other notes:
http://klabs.org/DEI/Processor/shuttle/ [klabs.org]

Re:And this is interesting because? (4, Informative)

cyclone96 (129449) | more than 6 years ago | (#23792219)

Actually it's the US segment of ISS that uses the 386 based machines (although a couple may go to Pentiums in a few years).

The Orbiter uses the AP-101S, which was also used in military aircraft. NASA has a great deal of published history online regarding Shuttle Avionics here. [klabs.org]

Re:And this is interesting because? (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23791687)

Heat is not removed from components by airflow because warm air doesn't rise in zero gravity. This means forced convection has to reach more places.

Re:And this is interesting because? (5, Funny)

Dogtanian (588974) | more than 6 years ago | (#23791731)

Is there some reason why a router in orbit would behave differently in any way from a router sitting in a rack in the server room?
I suspect there may be some timeout issues due to the network cable connecting them to ground control slightly exceeding the Ethernet spec's maximum length.

Re:And this is interesting because? (1)

MadnessASAP (1052274) | more than 6 years ago | (#23795457)

Fool, they would obviously use Cat 7 cabling.

Re:And this is interesting because? (5, Insightful)

muffel (42979) | more than 6 years ago | (#23791747)

  • Cooling: No 'natural' convection
  • G-Forces, Vibration
  • Radiation

Re:And this is interesting because? (1)

whoda (569082) | more than 6 years ago | (#23791903)

  • Cooling: No 'natural' convection
  • G-Forces, Vibration
  • Radiation
Gee, all the same things that the equipment HP designed for the military in the 70's and 80's was required to have.

Re:And this is interesting because? (3, Informative)

Fizzlewhiff (256410) | more than 6 years ago | (#23792369)

Heat. Things have to run cooler as there's no convection in space.

Re:And this is interesting because? (2, Informative)

joggle (594025) | more than 6 years ago | (#23793977)

That's true but probably misleading. They almost certainly have the router in an accessible area so it is exposed to air so it can use convection to cool itself. Ultimately the space station can only get rid of excess heat via radiation but this particular component doesn't need to be designed differently because of thermal issues.

Re:And this is interesting because? (1)

aix tom (902140) | more than 6 years ago | (#23794345)

But there is no convection, since the heated air doesn't move "upward" like it does on earth. It hangs around the heated part without moving off, unless there is some sort of active ventilation.

Re:And this is interesting because? (2, Interesting)

rossdee (243626) | more than 6 years ago | (#23792619)

Radiation could be a problem (cosmic rays, solar storms).

Then there is cooling - even in the ISS you can't use convection since there is no up for the hot air to rise to.

Re:And this is interesting because? (2, Interesting)

NMerriam (15122) | more than 6 years ago | (#23793063)

One thing other folks haven't mentioned is the lower atmospheric pressure. I know when we've used laptops in high altitude situations, the LCD displays would sometimes crap out because they are essentially laminates, and separated when the environmental expectation for ambient pressure were not met.

Of course that specific problem won't affect a switch, but there may be some other unexpected way in which atmospheric pressure is involved. It isn't necessarily easily tested in a high-altitude chamber, since (as with many things) the effect can be cumulative and depend on other factors like being jostled during use.

Re:And this is interesting because? (2, Interesting)

cyclone96 (129449) | more than 6 years ago | (#23794767)

Actually, the atmospheric pressure of ISS is maintained between 14.1 and 14.9 psi or so, for just that reason. Only the airlocks and some storage volumes are taken below that. Critical equipment is certified to go to low pressures (in case a module depress occurs) but a lot of the non-critical and/or commercial equipment isn't held to that standard (since it could be replaced).

Apollo flew with about 5 psi of pressure, and Shuttle would sometimes depress the cabin to 10.2 psi in prep for spacewalks, but ISS maintains an earthlike atmosphere.

Penalty for f-ing up (1)

wsanders (114993) | more than 6 years ago | (#23793245)

I've ordered equipment I didn't like and had to replace. The ISS doesn't really have such extraordinary environmental requirements as much as the price up screwing up is so much higher. At about $10K per pound, that's about 2000X as expensive as UPS for "shipping and handling".

http://www.futron.com/pdf/resource_center/white_papers/FutronLaunchCostWP.pdf [futron.com]

Re:And this is interesting because? (1)

Perf (14203) | more than 6 years ago | (#23794699)

The Apollo computer had to deal with high humidity.
I would think the ISS would have similar issues.
If not from normal usage, but also resistance to failure when some machine in the room leaks water bubbles.

Cool test methodology (5, Interesting)

dreamchaser (49529) | more than 6 years ago | (#23791581)

Despite the misleading title (should probably say first OFF THE SHELF switch in orbit), it's pretty cool how they tested these. From TFA:

Switches from Cisco, D-Link, Avaya, 3Com, NetGear and Hewlett Packard were exposed to extreme levels of radiation in a particle accelerator in Villigen, Switzerland under conditions similar to space.


Makes one think more about all the radiation crewmembers get exposed to as well, even within the protective embrace of the Earth's magnetic field. That's one of the big hurdles to travel to Mars of course; long term exposure to varying levels of radiation (mostly from the Sun).

I just think it's geeky-cool that they put them in a particle accellerator for testing though.

Re:Cool test methodology (4, Funny)

Joe Jay Bee (1151309) | more than 6 years ago | (#23791689)

They did try to test a Belkin one, but that one failed even before they'd subjected it to the particle accelerator.

Re:Cool test methodology (5, Funny)

brunokummel (664267) | more than 6 years ago | (#23791707)

Despite the misleading title (should probably say first OFF THE SHELF switch in orbit)...

not necessarily, since It must be really hard to keep something ON THE SHELF in outer space.. =)
*drum rolls

Re:Cool test methodology (2, Informative)

ocdude (932504) | more than 6 years ago | (#23792647)

I think you need this [instantrimshot.com]

Re:Cool test methodology (1)

pcgabe (712924) | more than 6 years ago | (#23792969)

*drum rolls
**eyes roll

What? (0, Offtopic)

Barryke (772876) | more than 6 years ago | (#23791605)

No this is all wrong in so many ways..

I Can't Wait (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23791607)



For the botnets.

Re:I Can't Wait (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23792197)

Astronaut/Cosmonaut botnets or nautbotnets (nautbot) for short. But not notbotnets.

well.... (5, Funny)

KozmoKramer (1117173) | more than 6 years ago | (#23791609)

I see a job opportunity for a network engineer, or at the very least a network cabling repair guy. Imagine that help desk ticket @ NASA.......

Re:well.... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23791683)

Yeah, I get paid 55 cents a kilometer for service calls. I definitely want this job, although my Honda Civic might have a tough time getting to orbit.

Re:well.... (1)

JustOK (667959) | more than 6 years ago | (#23792209)

Some sorta hybrid might be what you need.

Re:well.... (1)

TooMuchToDo (882796) | more than 6 years ago | (#23794063)

As long as you don't mind your Civic at the end of this:

http://www.boeing.com/defense-space/space/delta/delta4/delta4.htm [boeing.com]

Delta IV vehicles can launch payloads weighing from 4,300 kg (9,480 lb) to 12,980 kg (28,620 lb) to GTO, and can lift over 23,000 kg (50,000 lbs.) to LEO.

I have not doubt a Delta IV Heavy Lifter can get your Civic to the ISS =)

Re:well.... (3, Funny)

ggvaidya (747058) | more than 6 years ago | (#23793055)

First a plumber, and now an IT helpdesk guy. NASA's really trying to reach out to the common man.

Rebecca! Save yourself!! (5, Funny)

th0mas.sixbit.org (780570) | more than 6 years ago | (#23791623)

He's a nerd! Save yourself Rebecca!

(before you mod OT look at submission again ;) )

Re:Rebecca! Save yourself!! (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23791915)

This is /. He's a nerd. He needs all the relationship help he can get, and you're scaring her off?

Re:Rebecca! Save yourself!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23791967)

Damn it, I went to all the trouble trying to find an article and she reads right over it!
And now it's 2 AM in the morning and by the time she wakes up to check Slashdot this will be at the bottom of the feed.
Bah, not only do people not RTFA they don't RTFS!
I don't know what I see in her :P

Re:Rebecca! Save yourself!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23792167)

This guy is sick (2, Informative)

kju (327) | more than 6 years ago | (#23792325)

> http://formyrebecca.blogspot.com/ [blogspot.com]

When i read this, i felt the need to puke. This guy says he is together with his girlfriend for two years and want to marry her but yet he does still not know what she likes. And in order to find out he shows a total lack of integrity and installs a keylogger on her machine! This is a cruel break of trust. I really hope she finds out and tosses him. This is imho absolutely sick behaviour. And whats even worse that he apparently is even proud of his act of dishonesty and blogs about it.

Re:This guy is sick (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23793167)

His blog has since been removed.

Re:This guy is sick (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23793205)

Blog dead. Mirror?

Re:Rebecca! Save yourself!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23792531)

If he has to ask through slashdot, I'm pretty sure the answer is no.

is anyone paying attention? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23791657)

HP are bottom-of-the-barrel outsourcers now. Trusting HP to provide networking equipment for the space station would be a scaling up of trusting me, an amateur electronics geek, to build radio receivers for emergency workers. I know I can build working kit and I'm fairly cheap, but I've never had to begin contemplating the construction of gear that needs to be so reliable that great efforts will be wasted and people will probably die if I get it wrong. Neither AC's Shack nor HP Procurve switches are designed to "people will die if you fuck up" spec - that's what military spec is for, and that's why people pay extra for it.

A strong tutting to the Europeans for once again demonstrating that they're no less willing to compromise if a company in desperate need of good PR is willing to slip them a few pennies.

Re:is anyone paying attention? (4, Informative)

cyclone96 (129449) | more than 6 years ago | (#23793637)

You are absolutely correct, which is why nothing on these networks is something on which life depends.

I'm going to greatly simplify this, but there are basically three networks onboard the space station. One is mostly off the shelf laptops and networking equipment that runs Windows and is used for crew support (email, procedures, timelines, photos, and such). It frequently needs maintenance, but it does the job. It's also (relatively) easy to certify and plug new hardware into it, so it can be updated frequently as commercial technology advances (for example, later this year the Thinkpad A31p laptops will be swapped out for newer models).

The second is a payload ethernet network that is used by the payload system to collect and downlink high volume data through the USOS Ku-band system. Failure of this network only impacts science collection and some support activities. These switches are part of this network. The standards are more stringent, but not to the level of stuff on which safety or mission success depends.

The third network is the core computer system, which is all custom built hardware/software wired up with MIL-STD 1553 data bus. This is the network which runs the core vehicle systems (life support, attitude control, what have you). The hardware and software are developed to a much more rigorous standard than the first two networks (and it obviously costs a lot more and is slower to update because the the long pole of certification and testing). Some of the machines on this network have been chugging along for nearly a decade without failure.

Re:is anyone paying attention? (1)

sjf (3790) | more than 6 years ago | (#23795381)

I'm sorry, but isn't this simply racism ? If a product is outsourced (which we know is a euphemism for "made in China") do we have to assume that it is crap ?
The damn thing sat in a particle accelerator for three years and presumably still worked. Perhaps the Chinese can actually build these things ?

You point about MIL-SPEC is taken, however, presumably if HP were claiming it was MIL-SPEC they would have done the certification themselves.
They didn't and NASA did some certification themselves. I don't doubt for a minute that with sufficient financial incentive HP would be perfectly happy to deliver MIL_SPEC switches hand built by union workers in the Good 'Ol USA. Except of course the only unionized workers for HP, as for Walmart, live in China.

obligatory (5, Funny)

Lost Penguin (636359) | more than 6 years ago | (#23791661)

In space, no one can hear the NIC scream.

Re:obligatory jabber (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23791853)

NICs don't scream. They jabber.

Re:obligatory jabber (2, Funny)

dreamchaser (49529) | more than 6 years ago | (#23792031)

Unless they suffer from congestion.

How will the RIAA/MPAA be able to sue them? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23791691)

Do they have a mailing address?

The "HAM" sats did it a decade ago (5, Informative)

mbone (558574) | more than 6 years ago | (#23791709)

The Amateur Radio satellites [amsat.org] went to an Ethernet backbone some time ago - over a decade IIRC.

Re:The "HAM" sats did it a decade ago (1)

ScrewMaster (602015) | more than 6 years ago | (#23791785)

Orbiting HAMs ... brings new meaning to the phrase "High And Mighty".

Am I the only one... (2, Funny)

jpellino (202698) | more than 6 years ago | (#23791773)

... that was relieved and surprised it wasn't "hub" and "10Base2"?

Re:Am I the only one... (2, Informative)

seanadams.com (463190) | more than 6 years ago | (#23792477)

... that was relieved and surprised it wasn't "hub" and "10Base2"?

I'm not sure if you realize this, but 10base2 (aka thin net) doesn't use hubs. It's a shared 50 ohm coax with tees at each device and terminator plugs on each end. It uses CS/MACD like a hub, but the electronics and physical topology are totally different.

Re:Am I the only one... (1)

tabrisnet (722816) | more than 6 years ago | (#23793339)

I dunno, the old spec did allow for repeaters on a thinnet network.

vulnerability (0, Troll)

Iamthecheese (1264298) | more than 6 years ago | (#23791879)

Relevent. [securityfocus.com]

Re:vulnerability (0, Offtopic)

darkpixel2k (623900) | more than 6 years ago | (#23792739)

Off topic, but I'm confused as hell by your sig:

Child pornography: Thought crime. Terrorism: Your government wants you to be afraid.

Child pornography is a thought crime? Are you serious?
Taking someone who is not mentally or physically ready for sexual intercourse and forcing it upon them without consent is a thought crime? Spend a night in jail with "bubba" and tell me it's a thought crime.

Re:vulnerability (3, Funny)

The End Of Days (1243248) | more than 6 years ago | (#23794405)

Won't someone think of the child molesters?

Re:vulnerability (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23795219)

I am sure the OP's implication is not that "creating child pornography by taking photographs or videos of children being abused" is a thought crime. The thought crime occurs when one is punished merely for possessing such images, on the assumption that he or she is aroused. Possessing a photograph or video of a non-sexual physical assault, or a murder, is not against the law.

Another thought crime occurs in the UK when a scene depicting sexual activity with a child is created without actually involving any children - e.g. 3d rendering or adult actresses with youthful features. This is illegal, and the only "offence" as such is in fantasising that some real abuse has occurred. Possessing a film in which a physical assault, or a murder, is acted out, or drawing a picture of such activity, is not against the law.

By targeting those who abuse children or, as a second priority, those who actually pay for the products of abuse, children are helped. But targeting those who merely possess images - real, acted or sketched - is helping child abusers, by occupying resources that should be used to track, arrest and lock up the abusers, and rehabilitate the victims. It is also perpetuating a broken system of rights, in which a man is punished for having a sequence of bits in a particular order on his hard drive; it misdiagnoses paedophilia as a crime rather than a disorder, making it harder to deal with paedophiles; it perpetuates the myth that child abusers are likely to be men lurking in the shady corners of the Internet, when an abused child is almost always abused by a family member or close family friend.

Put another way, to pursue the mere possession of child pornography will inevitably result in a society where child abuse is more likely to go unchecked, and where freedoms in general are curtailed. Thousands of paedophiles right now are thinking about violating children like your young son or daughter, but just as millions of heterosexual men fantasise about adult women every day without raping them, so too are your children safe from fantasy; they're also safe from people half way around the world who are masturbating furiously over a photoshopping of a pic you put up on .mac of little Gemma in her first bathing costume. But they're not safe from Uncle Jim.

And I'm sorry for going off on a rant, but "how do you deal with child porn" is pretty much the ultimate question for testing someone's scope of rationality and freedom. I'm from Spain, which hasn't even reached the stage of understanding why I should be allowed to carry a gun and my neighbor is allowed to describe me by combining simple sounds denoted by letters s,p,i,c without being locked in a cell.

Cylon Attack (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23791893)

And thus the downfall of mankind is assured. We've networked computers in space. Has no one learned anything from Battlestar Galactica?

Cost? (2, Interesting)

Straterra (1045994) | more than 6 years ago | (#23791917)

10Mbit switch? Am I the only one who thought "Gee, I would have though NASA could have afforded at least 100Mbit!"

The only reason I can come up with is the possibility of higher packet loss with all of the radiation. Does anyone know for sure?

Re:Cost? (1)

kju (327) | more than 6 years ago | (#23792205)

WTF are you talking about? This is a 10/100 Switch.

Re:Cost? (4, Funny)

JustOK (667959) | more than 6 years ago | (#23792229)

Bits weigh less in space, so they're easier to compress.

Re:Cost? (1)

The Psyko (11244) | more than 6 years ago | (#23792283)

AND half-duplex

Why is this news? (2, Interesting)

thesandbender (911391) | more than 6 years ago | (#23791943)

Seriously... zero-g has no effect on this equipment. Yes it has to have more radiation shielding and has to be shock mounted to survive the launch but other that it could be an iPod or a DirectTV DVR. There's nothing innovative about this. They shot an ethernet switch into space... big deal. Call me when someone invents a way to use quantum entanglement to communicate faster than light. That's news.

Re:Why is this news? (1, Informative)

ahecht (567934) | more than 6 years ago | (#23791993)

Zero-G has a HUGE effect on anything relying on convective cooling. There is no convection in zero-g, so EVERY hot component needs forced air cooling, which you rarely find in a switch.

Re:Why is this news? (1)

brxndxn (461473) | more than 6 years ago | (#23792105)

I found a fan in my HP Procurve 2524.. maybe that's how it passed all those amazing tests.

Re:Why is this news? (1)

Mattsson (105422) | more than 6 years ago | (#23792179)

EVERY hot component needs forced air cooling, which you rarely find in a switch.
That's only true for basic edge switches and stuff targeted at home-users.
Most professional switches rely on fans for cooling.

Re:Why is this news? (4, Informative)

thesandbender (911391) | more than 6 years ago | (#23792397)

You can't be serious. Almost every enterprise Ethernet switch has fans. Including the terrestial model of the ProCurve 2524.

Re:Why is this news? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23792407)

What rack mount switch doesn't have an annoying fan droning on and on and on?

Re:Why is this news? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23792519)

Bollocks. You ever bought a switch that wasn't a $5 one?

Re:Why is this news? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23792563)

I'd say you're quite wrong about not finding forced air cooling in a switch. Almost every managed rackmount switch with integrated power supply has fans for cooling. Desktop switches or switches with external "brick" powersupplies are something entirely different.

Re:Why is this news? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23792661)

Rarely? Just about every 24-or-greater-port enterprise-class switch I've ever worked with has fans...

Re:Why is this news? (1)

mbone (558574) | more than 6 years ago | (#23793151)

The ISS has lots of fans. Listen to a TV broadcast from there sometimes.

In space, the use of heat pipes [wikipedia.org] is also fairly common - I wonder when this technology will start being used with blades in colos, given the density you can rack mount blades.

the answer is no. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23791975)

I'm looking for a man with more artistic and outdoorsy interests. Besides, Hewlett Packard really gave Carly a raw deal.

-Reb

Token Ring? (2, Interesting)

aggles (775392) | more than 6 years ago | (#23792609)

Wasn't the first network for the ISS based on Token-ring? I participated in an Ethernet vs Token-ring RFP in the mid-80's against IBM and we lost the bid. We didn't play golf as well.

Re:Token Ring? (1)

cyclone96 (129449) | more than 6 years ago | (#23794015)

The Space Station Freedom network design was token-ring, but that design was scratched when the redesign happened in the '90s. The McDonnell-Douglas/IBM avionics team was also dropped in favor of Boeing/Honeywell. The only IBM equipment that was used on ISS were Thinkpads.

Cisco Equipment on ISS (1)

Timoteo47 (1080787) | more than 6 years ago | (#23792659)

When I was at Cisco a few years ago, the VP of Corp. Marketing sent out a mysterious e-mail message about Cisco winning a big government contract. The conditions of the project prohibited Cisco from disclosing that they won the contract and Cisco could not publicly mention the "ISS" project.

The general assumption in the company was that that NASA was using Cisco routers and switches in the International Space Station. I volunteered to be the on-site SE.

So I doubt that the ProCurve switch is the first ethernet switch in space.

Delay Tolerant Internet (1)

mbone (558574) | more than 6 years ago | (#23793105)

Delay Tolerant Internet [dtnrg.org] (or DTN) is the current version of Vint Cerf's
"Interplanetary Internet" - basically, making a TCP-like protocol in situations where there may be long delays and no end-to-end connectivity. I thought that there was a test of this on a shuttle flight but cannot find a link, Vint Cerf last year talked [www.cbc.ca] about a test in 2010.

To me, that is a lot more interesting than just having a switch in LEO.

Which is it? (1)

roblaird (633935) | more than 6 years ago | (#23793501)

From TFA: The switch was taken straight off the conveyor belt without modification.

Also from TFA: The switch underwent three years of development, configuration and qualification testing before it journeyed into space.

Huh?

Re:Which is it? (2, Funny)

SBrach (1073190) | more than 6 years ago | (#23793787)

That's what you get for reading TFA.

Re:Which is it? (1)

Jerry Smith (806480) | more than 6 years ago | (#23794355)

From TFA: The switch was taken straight off the conveyor belt without modification.

Also from TFA: The switch underwent three years of development, configuration and qualification testing before it journeyed into space.

Huh?

I understand they took off-the-shelve hardware, and ran tests on it for 3 years. No hardware modification, no tweaks etc.

Radiation (1)

PacketScan (797299) | more than 6 years ago | (#23793745)

Hmm wonder if it would with stand an emp blast.
Tell me the only network up will be hp switches, I'll just kill myself now.

A HP Procurve 2524!!! (0, Troll)

jabuzz (182671) | more than 6 years ago | (#23794531)

It's a nice switch, but for goodness sake. This switch has been obsolete for at least three years!!!

It's a 24 10/100 port managed switch, with *optional* uplink modules at 1Gbps; fibre and copper available or some propriety stacking modules. It also has a couple of fans!!

There are far better switches that are passively cooled, use less power, are cheaper and better performing...

Re:A HP Procurve 2524!!! (1)

MadnessASAP (1052274) | more than 6 years ago | (#23795601)

Passive cooling doesn't work in space. Here on earth hot air will rise away from a hot component, but in 0G it acts like an insulator and blankets to component in heat.

Re:A HP Procurve 2524!!! (1)

mrbooze (49713) | more than 6 years ago | (#23795747)

It's a nice switch, but for goodness sake. This switch has been obsolete for at least three years!!!
"The switch underwent three years of development, configuration and qualification testing before it journeyed into space."

So I guess it now drops packets (1)

rwwyatt (963545) | more than 6 years ago | (#23794569)

in style!

meanwhile on MIR (2, Funny)

GregNorc (801858) | more than 6 years ago | (#23795299)

The Russians used a pencil

More related (but older) (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23795471)

Real-time encoding and streaming from space.

http://www.digital-rapids.com/News/PressArchive/NASA.aspx [digital-rapids.com]

Damn you NASA (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23795921)

I will never hear the end of this from my HP reps..
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