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Wiretapping Bill Passes Swedish Parliament, 143 to 138

timothy posted more than 6 years ago | from the henceforth-it's-orkbay-orkbay dept.

Privacy 326

Assar Bruno Boveri writes "Swedish lawmakers came down in favour of a fiercely debated surveillance bill in a vote at the Riksdag on Wednesday evening. Despite some cosmetic changes, Sweden's proposed surveillance law is still a monster, writes Pär Ström from the independent New Welfare Foundation." The Swedish newspaper DN (in Swedish; translations welcome) compares the implications of the proposed law with activities carried out by East Germany's Ministerium für Staatssicherheit (STASI).

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326 comments

Wiretap this! (-1, Offtopic)

davidwr (791652) | more than 6 years ago | (#23845461)

Wiretap this [slashdot.org] .

Not Funny. (0, Flamebait)

Odder (1288958) | more than 6 years ago | (#23845815)

The whole world is starting to look like East Germany and you make a joke about coffee machines? The only thing less tastefull is the second poster's joke about fake Sweed [slashdot.org] . Humor is good but this is a dark day for freedom.

Re:Not Funny. (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23846007)

Moderators: Please do not reward people who do things like these [slashdot.org] by modding them up.

Re:Not Funny. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23846479)

Why not, and what does this have to do with anything?

Neither are you (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23846507)

You don't seem to have a problem with dispensing some humor [slashdot.org] yourself under much more somber situations, I don't see why the OP should be punished just because you think his joke is unfunny.

By the way twitter, how many Slashdot accounts do you have now? 15? 20?

Obligatory (4, Funny)

oahazmatt (868057) | more than 6 years ago | (#23845475)

There was considerable outrage among the Swedish. One vocal protestor was quoted as stating: "B'york b'york! Mmb'york york burdy hurdy m'yurdy!"

Re:Obligatory (3, Funny)

everphilski (877346) | more than 6 years ago | (#23845537)

Wi nøt trei a høliday in Sweden this yer?
See the løveli lakes
The wonderful telephøne system
And mani interesting furry animals

Re:Obligatory (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23845785)

The O-letter you used is Norwegian and it is not used by Swedes. And no I am not Swede nor Norwegian this is just common knowledge outside the USA.

Re:Obligatory (2, Funny)

tmosley (996283) | more than 6 years ago | (#23845803)

He's obviously a Norwegian living in Sweden, you insensitive clod!

Re:Obligatory (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23845995)

why would Norwegian live in sweden?
Norway produces oil and Sweden does not.

Re:Obligatory (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23846021)

Meat.

Re:Obligatory (3, Funny)

irondonkey (1137243) | more than 6 years ago | (#23846459)

Including the majestic møøse

Re:Obligatory (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23845605)

Dammit, I was able to get Gootle to translate the source language (&sl=sv) Swedish to translated language (&tl=en) into English, but I couldn't get it to work with tl=xx-bork, so I had to do it manually.

Sveden's oovn Stesee

Fur tvu deys, oon Vednesdey, is ixpected perleeement tu geefe-a Emereecun intelleegence-a tu scun ell i-meeels, text messeges und telephune-a treffffeec crusseeng zee burders ooff Svedee. Chreestuph Underssun remeended ooff öferfekneengsepperetee in furmer Iest Germuny - und esk vhere-a zee persunel integreety gu.

Re:Obligatory (5, Insightful)

Penguinisto (415985) | more than 6 years ago | (#23845625)

Swedish Chef muppet jokes aside (damn, I'm old)...


There would likely be a lot less outrage from folks outside of Sweden, except for The Pirate Bay, Relakks, and a whole flock of other Swedish-related services that most of the entire Internet-using planet has an interest in.

/P

Well... (4, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23845485)

there has to be at least one country out there that cares about the people, right?

Right?

Hello? Anyone there?

I foresee some interesting torrent developments. (5, Interesting)

Rod76 (705840) | more than 6 years ago | (#23845517)

This is sure to have some interesting effects on The Pirate Bay. I wonder if there was any **AA money's or support in getting this passed.

Re:I foresee some interesting torrent developments (2, Interesting)

digitrev (989335) | more than 6 years ago | (#23845559)

Probably, but good luck finding the paper trail. As for TPB, it'll just migrate. There's enough countries who aren't exactly friendly to US copyright that are chock full of people willing to run Pirate Bay servers.

Re:I foresee some interesting torrent developments (1)

snemarch (1086057) | more than 6 years ago | (#23846197)

It's not like TPB is hosted in sweden anyway, after the raids against www.prq.se (where TPB was originally hosted)... and obviously wiretapping won't help against terrorists using encryption. So, we welcome you, or alien overlord big brothers.

Re:I foresee some interesting torrent developments (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23846409)

All they would have to do is turn on SSL.

tor (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23845527)

http://www.torproject.org/

Countdown. (1)

Penguinisto (415985) | more than 6 years ago | (#23845531)

RIAA/MPAA (esp. the Swedish equivalent) coming up with some sort of legal-sounding excuse to set up ongoing packet-sniffers inbound/outbound of TPB.org in 3... 2... 1...

/P

Re:Countdown. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23846503)

Sniffing here.

I do not think that the RIAA will work in your country, because that is in the US. That is like an RIAA reversal here, and I don't know where you would here the rationale.

TPB

- The Demertius -

Dear Sweden... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23845535)

Your freedoms feel very good on my dick.

Sincerely,
Uncle Sam

Translation (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23845539)

DN, "Dagens Nyheter". Translates exactly to "The days news", meaning "this days news".

for those of us who can't read sweedish (3, Informative)

wizardforce (1005805) | more than 6 years ago | (#23845547)

google translate sweedish is *right there*
http://translate.google.com/translate?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.dn.se%2FDNet%2Fjsp%2Fpolopoly.jsp%3Fd%3D2502%26a%3D794124&hl=en&ie=UTF8&sl=sv&tl=en

Re:for those of us who can't read sweedish (2, Funny)

JCSoRocks (1142053) | more than 6 years ago | (#23845687)

It's also helpful for people that can't read Swedish.

a href, for father Dagon's sake! (2, Informative)

KiloByte (825081) | more than 6 years ago | (#23845935)

Well, copy&paste on URLs is a bitch, especially for long URLs which get mangled. Could you please read about an invention called the hyperlink [wikipedia.org] ?

Here's an example [google.com] .

Re:a href, for father Dagon's sake! (2, Funny)

wizardforce (1005805) | more than 6 years ago | (#23846039)

you mean you're not using the linkification extension or selecting the text and dragging it to open in a new tab?

Re:a href, for father Dagon's sake! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23846483)

I don't use extensions or tabs, you insensitive clod.

Re:for those of us who can't read sweedish (5, Informative)

omglolbah (731566) | more than 6 years ago | (#23846495)

A slightly better translation.
Done by a human! :D

In two days, on wednesday, it is expected that Riksdagen will give the swedish intelligence service the right to scan all email, sms and telephone traffic that passes swedish borders. Christop Andersson is reminded of the surveillance in the old DDR and poses questions regarding privacy.

In the east-german security-police archive are shelves of yellow, redish or dark brown files. The total length of which is 110 miles. Here there are transcripts of regular east-german telephone conversations and long logs of people's phone use with timestamps. Especially interesting to Stasi was the telephone traffic across the east-german borders.

The giant system of surveillance had as a purpose to protect "Democracy" in DDR against "hostile negative forces" and "terrorism". The threats gave Stasi the right to check up on everyone.

Since 1989 the Stasi is gone. Yet, a similar but perhaps worse system of surveillance is about to be created. This time in Sweden. For this purpose the Forsvarets Radioanstalt (FRA) has aquired a monster computer worth millions of SEK according to Computer Sweden. It is expected to get company in the near years.

With help of the computers FRA will scan through all emails, all sms and all telephone calls that cross swedish borders. Every day, every hour, every minute and every second. Just like in the old DDR the purpose is to prevent "terrorism" and prevent outer threats against society.

The system will be fed search-word both in Swedish and other languages. Further the FRA will search after text strings with randomly selected words and numbers.

Encryption, the defense minister closest man state secretary(?) HÃ¥kan Javrell in a video interview shown at the group "Gravande journalisters"(investigating/digging journalists) seminar in Gotenburg in april.

In the interview he makes it clear that mail with encrypted contents are of special interest to the FRA. Possible terrorists would likely not use clear-text naming of where they will strike and with what sort of force. Supposedly encryption applications like PGP are hard to break but with one or more computers in the million SEK range it will be possible to break everything from encrypted love-letters to journalist correspondance with protected sources. The latter is protected by constitutional rights. FRA can not know anything about the content before the encryption is broken. Thus a catch-22 is created. In practice the constitutional paragraph regarding protection of sources worthless.

The only thing required for the green light for FRA is the approval of Riksdagen for "En anpassad forsvarsunderettelsestjenst". "An adjusted defense intelligence service". Behind the inocious title is a breach of swedish privacy without comparison in the swedish history. FRA will not just search for terrorism but will also search for "forsorjingskriser", ecological imbalance, threats to the environment, ethnical and religious conflicts, large scale refugee and migration and economic cases like currency and interest rate speculation. The mind wanders back to the Stasi system of surveilance.

At the same time HÃ¥kan Javrell and the right wing politicians promise that the public has nothing to fear. The only traffic that will be scanned is the traffic that crosses the swedish border and not traffic inside the country. The problem is just that even email within the country will pass the border. Partially because businesses and organizations use foreign email-servers, partially because email does not heed borders. The email between Lulea and Malmo could just as well go through the US if there is available bandwidth.

Stricly by the rules any information gathered from in-country traffic should immediately be destroyed if it is cought in FRA's net. The problem here is that there is no way for FRA to know if the data is covered by this rule.

Further vagueness in the proposed law conserns the protection of sources in the press. The law does require such information be destroyed if it is caught by the FRA. The question is who will check if such material is really destroyed. Also how will information stored in the heads of FRA servicemen be destroyed. Their knowledge of the content remains, even if the email itself or the tape of the conversation is destroyed.

Put simply: In the end the information could end up in Sapo or other government branches.

Of course sweden must protect itself from terrorist threats and other serious crimes.

But it is unacceptable that the fight against terrorism warrants surveillance of everyone who use email, sms or uses the phone. This without any suspicion or decicion by a court.

As an additional layer of irony the law is expected to be put into action in 2009. The same year as Germany celebrates the 20 year anniversary of DDR and Stasi's collapse and the end of mass surveillance. This time it is in swedish hands though.

Christoph Andersson, Journalist in the Documentary department, P1

Quick and dirty translation by Kjetil Seim Haugen.
ps,
I'm norwegian, not swedish so dont shoot me for some inaccurate single word translations. The meaning of the sentences should match fairly good.

Wha? (1)

pushing-robot (1037830) | more than 6 years ago | (#23845577)

Okay, I'm trying to figure this out. This is Reverse Sweden, right? Not the regular Sweden?

Re:Wha? (3, Insightful)

The Fanta Menace (607612) | more than 6 years ago | (#23845635)

This is what happens when countries vote in right-wing governments. Yes, that's right. Sweden has a right-wing government. Maybe not by US standards, but certainly by European standards.

Re:Wha? (5, Informative)

init100 (915886) | more than 6 years ago | (#23845863)

This is what happens when countries vote in right-wing governments.

Actually not. This bill was originally created by the previous Social Democrat administration (which was supported by the Green Party and the Left Party), while the current administration voted against the bill in parliament. Pretty quickly after gaining being voted into power, the current administration resurrected the scrapped social democrat proposal as their own, and put it before parliament. The opposition (the previous administration) used a law that enabled them to defer a decision for one year, and voted against the proposal today.

The only reason for the opposition's no-vote seem to be that they would prefer to vote it into law when they are in power themselves.

Re:Wha? (2, Informative)

Tege (687436) | more than 6 years ago | (#23845921)

You surely are aware that this law in its original form was proposed by social democrats. This law would have been passed by any ruling party, with protest coming only from real lefties. The right-wing parties sold old tonight. I always believed in the moderate party's talk about individual freedom et.c. But not after tonight. Not anymore. We don't need neo-cons in Sweden. We need real conservatives or neo-liberals that can stand up for basic ideas like individual freedom. But tonight I'm with you. Thanks.

Re:Wha? (1, Informative)

malavel (994441) | more than 6 years ago | (#23845925)

The proposal was originally written by the socialist party when they were in power.

Re:Wha? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23846051)

This is what happens when countries vote in right-wing governments you say?

Would you rather have a left wing government and be forced to change your religion and work for free at hard labor?a, pray 5 time a day smelly barefooted on a rug facing East ?
Sweden has a county to their south called France , who if they don't wise up will likely be renamed to New Mecca .., watch them
France has a nice left wing government.. See how that works ?
Think man.
Not only that, in past history Sweden would have been be a possession of the third Reich today if we had left wing kooks in the USA and the UK during WWII.
What want is a Combination of left and right
wing/ brained people to govern , then they check each other do you see?

Re:Wha? (3, Interesting)

Arthur B. (806360) | more than 6 years ago | (#23846303)

France has a load of crappy problems, the influence of islam is far, far down the list. The country actually has a strong belief in statism... it's a whole religion, with its dogmas, its heretics, etc. Islam is merely a puppet brandished - right and left - in France so that people turn back to "the one, true religion, that of the State"

Re:Wha? (4, Insightful)

ArcherB (796902) | more than 6 years ago | (#23846071)

This is what happens when countries vote in right-wing governments. Yes, that's right. Sweden has a right-wing government. Maybe not by US standards, but certainly by European standards.
Yes! And the far left wing governments, like those in Soviet Russia, China, and Cuba are known for their championing of civil rights.

Hell, even the left wing states like California, where they want the government to control the thermostat in your own home are known for their personal freedom records.

Re:Wha? (4, Insightful)

ArcherB (796902) | more than 6 years ago | (#23846371)

This is what happens when countries vote in right-wing governments. Yes, that's right. Sweden has a right-wing government. Maybe not by US standards, but certainly by European standards.
Yes! And the far left wing governments, like those in Soviet Russia, China, and Cuba are known for their championing of civil rights.

Hell, even the left wing states like California, where they want the government to control the thermostat in your own home are known for their personal freedom records.
Only on slashdot, does the truth get modded troll.

I think this exchange is proof that RightBad=Insightful and LeftBad=Troll in the minds of some mods.

Remember, the first part of freedom is tolerating those that have different opinions than yourself and even defending their right to have those opinions. When I get downmodded for something like this, it proves to me that regardless of all the talk, /.'ers don't give a rat's ass about freedom of speech unless the speech agrees with them.

Re:Wha? (1, Insightful)

Arthur B. (806360) | more than 6 years ago | (#23846241)

Actually, as is pointed out, the law was drafted by the socialists. The left has the worst possible track record when it comes to spying on people (nazis, communists, etc). Yes, the neocons are doing it as well, but that's a rather recent phenomenon, and if you ask me, they're left-wing.

Re:Wha? (4, Insightful)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 6 years ago | (#23846425)

Umm... you are aware that the nazis ain't exactly what you'd call left wing, right? Just checking...

Re:Wha? (3, Informative)

Wildclaw (15718) | more than 6 years ago | (#23846387)

Not right wing, authoritarian.

The two biggest parties in Sweden, the right wing Moderates and the left wing Social Democrates are both authoritarian.

And several other parties have authoritarian pressure coming from their party tops.

Re:Wha? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23846431)

Well, the Idea is originally from the social democrats, so, more or less all parties except the communistic party (or, well, the most communistic party, as sweden is more or less communistic) are in favour of this kind of law. And, well, you can't really vote for the communistic party for obvious reasons.

So, well, tor and strong crypto, here we come...

I got an idea (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23845579)

As a Swedish citizen, I'm thinking of doing the following idea;

Put up a couple of SMTP servers, and creating a script that makes them email each other unprotected emails in plain text with headers like "bomb" "nuclear bomb" "jihad" "destroy the Swedish government" "bomb assembly guide" "kill Fredrik Reinfeldt"

If the government intend to fuck me with, I fully intend to fuck with them back.

And have them operate from within... (1)

RustinHWright (1304191) | more than 6 years ago | (#23845663)

Sounds like a plan. Now if you can have it work from bots within the Swedish government and the offices of the MPAA/RIAA's paid legal whores, we'll be good to go.

Botnet idea (1)

azzuth (1177007) | more than 6 years ago | (#23845895)

Perhaps some crafty hacker can persuade the botnets to start spamming the government redflag words. Overwhelm the servers with flags and they might think twice about this type of spying.

Re:I got an idea (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23845675)

Or you can just cc Mr Reinfeldt everything.

Re:I got an idea (4, Interesting)

RingDev (879105) | more than 6 years ago | (#23846313)

Or you can just cc Mr Reinfeldt everything.
That's actually not a bad idea...

I'm not even in Sweden (My great-great-grandfather was kicked out for marrying a Norwegian lass), but I think Mr Reinfeldt might like to know about my emails.

All of them.

Every day.

Including system notices.

Sure, my emails aren't that great in number, but what if a couple hundred people were to do such a thing? A couple thousand? Hundreds of thousands?

-Rick

Re:I got an idea (1)

scubamage (727538) | more than 6 years ago | (#23846177)

I like this idea. Since the government is already spying on everything we type in the US, I'd love to set up one of these SMTP bots to help with the flooding.

Re:I got an idea (1)

Znork (31774) | more than 6 years ago | (#23846379)

The ole keyword overload is probably something they filter against; they probably run some linguistic structure scan for valid sentances.

In order of increasing annoyance level I'd suggest you follow these procedures:
a) Use a Slavic or Arab sounding email address. Then use GPG to encrypt the content (suggested content: How much did it cost the taxpayers to let you read this?).
b) Run a TOR node to encourage encrypted comms passing their way.
c) Start an ABF (workers education union) class on how regular users can encrypt their communications with their friends and family.
d) Write a roleplaying game where the players are rebels fighting against a fascistic system, but they can only communicate with eachother online. Enjoy the lawsuits when the judicial system contorts in agony trying to deal with obviously made up, obviously completely innocent and private activities... except the spooks wanted to make it not private and it's almost indistinguishable from crap that they get in their too widely trawling nets. And imagine the fun and excitement. Will the guys in suits knocking on the door be the other roleplayers? Will they be the FBI?

There are simply so many ways to make the whole effort completely worthless. Which is just yet another reason why it's an very unconstructive law.

Re:I got an idea (1)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 6 years ago | (#23846451)

Actually a sound idea. The best couter against spying is overloading the system with false positives, so they can't discriminate anymore between noise and data.

I'd use other keywords, though. Like "crack", "decss", $new_movie_name...

Someone please remind me... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23845591)

...why sweden matters other than this torvalts character?

Re:Someone please remind me... (1)

SteveAstro (209000) | more than 6 years ago | (#23846103)

He's Finnish

So... (1)

Knara (9377) | more than 6 years ago | (#23845621)

How does judicial review compare in Sweden to the way it works in the US?

Re:So... (5, Informative)

SwedishPenguin (1035756) | more than 6 years ago | (#23845883)

There is no constitutional court in Sweden. The law can be tried in the European Court of Justice though. So if the law, as has been claimed, violates the European Convention it can be still be overturned.

Also the left party and the green party wants to rip up the law when power shifts (the right-wing government isn't very popular right now and this isn't going to make them any more popular), the question is if the social democrats will agree to that.

This is truly the worst behaviour of any Swedish government I've seen yet. The government didn't really have any arguments for the law, just the general "The terriorists are coming to get you" propaganda.

To add to that, the law was voted to go back to committe this morning, and by nightfall, the "new" law, with minor modifications was passed.

The Left Party made an official complaint about the law and the government to the constiutional committe, but it would appear that they didn't do what they should have.

Right now there are two parties in parliament that I can trust. That would be the left party and the green party. The social democrats won't say no to wiretapping, they just said no to this specific proposition. The left and green parties and some great people up there debating against this and really kicking right-wing ass, not that it mattered in the end.

The only right-wing party where some members had the courage to stand up to this proposition was Folkpartiet (aka Peoples Liberal Party, though I certainly wouldn't call them very liberal after this), where one member voted no and one abstained.

Re:So... (4, Interesting)

init100 (915886) | more than 6 years ago | (#23846059)

Right now there are two parties in parliament that I can trust. That would be the left party and the green party.

On this matter, there is only one party that I trust, and that is the Pirate Party. They might be most well-known for their views on non-commercial file-sharing and copyright laws, but they also have really sane views on protection of privacy, something I care a lot about.

Re:So... (1)

Andtalath (1074376) | more than 6 years ago | (#23846273)

There was only one member who voted against, actually. A few lay down their votes as well though.

Re:So... (3, Informative)

init100 (915886) | more than 6 years ago | (#23845971)

You mean like a constitutional court? We don't have one. The only instance that vaguely resembles one is the joke that is the Committee on the Constitution [wikipedia.org] . They have no power to rule any law as unconstitutional, they just argue among themselves with no actual results.

Ironically, the current administration has actually argued for setting up a constitutional court when they were in opposition. When they were voted into power, those arguments seemed to be forgotten.

Re:So... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23845987)

At current I'd say it is probably pretty solid. And FRA, the agency responsible for the surveillance in question has behaved very well so far with every thing else they do.

So, (as a Swede) I don't think anyone is actually worried about the immediate future.

What worries people is what might happen further down the line. That the law side steps our constitutional laws concerning privacy and freedom of communication, and that this might be a slippery slope.

It shifts the balance between the peoples power over the state vis-a-vis the states power over the people, and you have to assume that our population will at some point elect someone willing to exploit that.

And what worries me personally, is that the system will flag on encryption. Which is to say, if you don't submit to having your communications scanned, you are more or less assumed to be up to no good.

But, nothing special will come of it in the short term. And hopefully, we will manage to get rid of it before we have to worry about the long term problems.

Re:So... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23846137)

opps.. you said review. I was thinking oversight.

They added some additional stuff about oversight to the bill to placate certain MPs.

The bill essentially failed this morning but was voted in tonight after said changes.

Re:So... (4, Interesting)

init100 (915886) | more than 6 years ago | (#23846281)

And FRA, the agency responsible for the surveillance in question has behaved very well so far with every thing else they do.

Behaved well? The leader of the Pirate Party, Rick Falkvinge, in a conversation with the director of FRA back then (which was secretly recorded by Rick) got a confession that the FRA has been tapping the wires for many years already. The Pirate Party filed a complaint with the police shortly afterward.

And what worries me personally, is that the system will flag on encryption.

If we could get enough people to encrypt their communications, such a flag would be worthless. They would have to break an enormous number of encrypted messages (which is hard work even for the biggest supercomputers in the world) just to find out that they are not relevant.

Re:So... (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23846217)

I'd say "Not at all." We do not have a Court of Constitution first of all, but an incredibly pointless "committee" usually used as a stage for political bickering, all seats being proportionally dispersed among the parties. So since the majority usually becomes the government, the majority in the committee... tada! represents the government. It has also very little teeth (basically none) should any miracle happen and they should actually decide to reprimand anyone.

The real control is SUPPOSED to be with the "riksdagen", which basically is the equivalent to the congress. This is where things go seriously south. Riksdagen is supposed to censor the government and make sure it doesn't get out of line. HOWEVER, since the government is made up from the parties representing the majority of the riksdagen, and voting against your party is a huge no no, (basically kills your political career real dead instantaneously) the riksdagen has become just another rubberstamp instance with no real function either. Our system is fucked up, our government is out of control, and it's 2 years to the next election. :( The only hope, however faint is that people neither forgets nor forgives this treason, and remember who the traitors were the next time elections are coming up.

Re:So... (1)

init100 (915886) | more than 6 years ago | (#23846417)

The only hope, however faint is that people neither forgets nor forgives this treason, and remember who the traitors were the next time elections are coming up.

That won't help. The previous social democrat administration created this proposition, and they aren't going to throw out this law unless held by their throat by the greens and/or the left party. And the only way that could happen would be if the lefts/greens would threaten to unseat the social democrats by siding with the (assumed) right-wing opposition. And that is highly unlikely, especially for the left party, because regardless of how much they dislike the social democrats, they dislike all the right-wingers much more.

Last Bastion? (1)

z00_miak (1305831) | more than 6 years ago | (#23845651)

It's unfortunate to see even the forward thinking Scandanavian country implement something so Gestapo-like.

Where does it end?

Re:Last Bastion? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23845875)

It's not a matter of "where", but "when". And the answer to the question is when people start giving a shit.

Translation (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23845659)

DN = Dagens Nyheter (in English approx. "News of the Day"). /Buzzy

The register says rejects????!!!??? (4, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23845671)

No that their a Swedish news source or something, but for what it's worth, the register says something completely different [theregister.co.uk] :

A controversial law in Sweden which would have allowed Sweden's National Defence Radio Establishment (FRA) to monitor all outgoing and incoming communications crossing Sweden's borders didn't get enough votes in parliament today.


or am I confused?

Re:The register says rejects????!!!??? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23845887)

It was re-worked during the day.

Re:The register says rejects????!!!??? (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23845903)

It was blocked earlier, they made some cosmetic changes and voted on it again.

Re:The register says rejects????!!!??? (1)

malavel (994441) | more than 6 years ago | (#23845981)

From the article:

"the draft has been sent back to the committee for revision. Government representatives have pledged to build in more protection for personal privacy."

They made some changes and came back the day after.

Re:The register says rejects????!!!??? (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23846185)

That's from yesterdays vote which was about withdrawing the law as it read then. Some very hastily made meaningless changes was made after that. The cosmetical changes were not even available in any other form than in handwriting in the margin of the old law proposal, even as the law was voted on today.

The major motivation for the law, as the Swedish government sees it, is to enable the FRA to lawfully continue to do what they've been doing illegaly over the last 10 years or so (now a police matter, after it was revealed two days ago in the major TV news). One of their targets is the Russian internet traffic, as about 80% of the Russian internation internet traffic passes through Sweden. The Swedish spooks at RFA hope, among other things, to exchange information extracted from that traffic for information obtained by organizations such as ECHELON [wikipedia.org] and others.

Re:The register says rejects????!!!??? (1)

Andtalath (1074376) | more than 6 years ago | (#23846187)

The proposal has been accepted, what was voted for this morning was to postpone it until this evening with somv ery minor changes.

news (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23845673)

the Local, swedish news in english...

http://www.thelocal.se/12534/20080618/ //W

Sad sad sad day (2, Insightful)

Tazor (775513) | more than 6 years ago | (#23845681)

This is insane. Newer thought this could happen in Sweden.

Now it will only be a matter of time before the government in my country (Denmark) will try to pass the same kind of law, i'm sure.

Tomorrow I'm calling my mobile phone company (Telia) and making sure that none of my calls are routed through Sweden.

I hope ThePirateBay.org will start to educate the swedish people on how to encrypt their communications, because they will need it.

Re:Sad sad sad day (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23845755)

This just set the groundwork for all other EU countries. The rest will just follow suit.

Re:Sad sad sad day (5, Funny)

Tazor (775513) | more than 6 years ago | (#23845777)

Maybe it is time to move to China where my rights are secure..

Re:Sad sad sad day (1)

Lord MuffloN (1310101) | more than 6 years ago | (#23845781)

Don't worry, this will be implemented in 2009, and it's a new election in 2010, and believe me when I say that the current government won't make it, giving the left/socialist plenty of time to rip it apart.

Re:Sad sad sad day (3, Informative)

init100 (915886) | more than 6 years ago | (#23846111)

giving the left/socialist plenty of time to rip it apart.

Unless forced to by the greens and the left party, the social democrats won't rip it out, quite the contrary. They will say thank you to the previous administration, for implementing and taking all the heat on a proposition that was originally created by the social democrats.

Re:Sad sad sad day (3, Interesting)

Imsdal (930595) | more than 6 years ago | (#23846161)

There is exactly zero (0) chance the social democrats will remove this law. After all, it was their idea from the beginning.

Solution... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23845729)

I live in Sweden. As long as they don't perform man-in-the-middle attacks on encrypted connections (which I would never spend my time on trying to detect), I'm safe. In the same way, the "terrorists" are safe as long as they hire someone who knows about heavy encryption. Those who are NOT safe, on the other hand, are normal citizens who don't even know how to SPELL encrpyption.

There is, however, an easy solution to this problem... Assasinate each of the 143 who voted "yes". OH WAIT, THEY JUST WIRETAPPED ME WRITING THIS, SHIT THEY'RE HERE ALREADY, HELP MEEEE I'M GETTING ARRESTED1!!!!!!!!!!!!!!1

More Coverage (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23845735)

More stuff with more of the Swedish stuff translated into English.

'Ja' to Lex Orwell [radsoft.net]
Lex Blair [radsoft.net]
Orwellian Update I [radsoft.net]
To the Vote [radsoft.net]
Lex Orwell & Intent [radsoft.net]
Lex Orwell - No for Now [radsoft.net]
'I Have To Be Able to Look Myself in the Eyes' [radsoft.net]

FRA holds the 11th place on top500.org (5, Interesting)

bo-eric (263735) | more than 6 years ago | (#23845763)

If anyone wondered what FRA will be using its fairly new 13728-core, 102 Tflop/s (Rmax) Xeon cluster [top500.org] for, I guess this is it. When it was new on the previous list (November 2007), it held the fifth place. Here [computersweden.idg.se] is an article about it in Computer Sweden (in Swedish). Maybe now is a good time to upgrade to 2048-bit keys...

Re:FRA holds the 11th place on top500.org (3, Interesting)

init100 (915886) | more than 6 years ago | (#23846143)

I got my free S/MIME certificate from Thawte today, for encryption of email, and so did all my co-workers.

Re:FRA holds the 11th place on top500.org (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23846453)

Which is kind of funny because when they bought (ordered) it, they said it would not be used for this purpose (link [nyteknik.se] ).

Anonymous Coward (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23845841)

The entire Swedish government (okay, a distinct 143+ members) have just proven they are extremely hostile to the will, freedom, and safety of the Swedish people.

They should be voted out of power immediately by No Confidence/Popular Referendum/whatever. Now!

What they have just done goes against Everything the public has told them! They only succeeded by suppressing all media outlets for months - something so blatantly and grossly corrupt does not call for grumbling; it does not call for petitions; it calls for the immediate dis-bandment of the parliament, and re-election of public representatives; NOW ! Today/Tomorrow/Within the week !!!

    Also, the dominant party must not be voted into office next election.

Re:Anonymous Coward (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23846201)

it calls for the immediate dis-bandment of the parliament, and re-election of public representatives; NOW !

You seem to feel pretty strongly about this. I do hope you are doing a little more than posting on slashdot.

Re:Anonymous Coward (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23846393)

goodluckwiththat

When I was young, I used to think... (5, Insightful)

Ortega-Starfire (930563) | more than 6 years ago | (#23845893)

...that the US government really had it in for its citizens. Then later I discovered that even now in this post 9/11 world, we in the USA don't even hold a candle to the abusive modern governments that are out there, such as the UK, Australia, Sweden, and more!

It makes me want to go into politics, try and change the system for the better, protect the liberties we still have here before even those get stolen by those in power, but each time I consider it, I think, "Do I want to let myself become like them?"

How does one change one's government without being corrupted by the system? This is not just a question for those in any specific country to answer, but one every man and woman must consider.

Re:When I was young, I used to think... (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23846091)

Do it.
Get involved.

If you don't, who will?
  Think about the children. Your children.

Seriously, bad apples are drawn to authority like hornets; we need you in there, bud.

Re:When I was young, I used to think... (1)

SteveAstro (209000) | more than 6 years ago | (#23846117)

This from a citizen of a country where you can still get hauled before the judge for walking across a road !
Steve

Re:When I was young, I used to think... (1)

Eco-Mono (978899) | more than 6 years ago | (#23846171)

By designing the new system to be robust in the face of corruption, we can ensure that those in power never have an incentive to become corrupt. E-mail me.

This may have wider political ramifications (1)

HeavyMS (820705) | more than 6 years ago | (#23845999)

[Bad English and grammar a head] I believe that the passing of this bill will have an "interesting" effect on the political climate in Sweden in the following years. The process that lead to the bill getting passed have exposed sevral rather embarrassing facts about the political system - We have a thing called "perssonval" is mean when you vote for a party they have a list of candidates and you can mark one of them to give them a personal vote. This can in turn change the list so people that have allot of personal votes gets to sit in parliament despite the fact that the party did not want them to. This has been exposed as an elaborate ploy since the delegates are "whipped" the Swedish word ruffly translate to "the party whip". This alienates the younger generation further as the se this process as an way to the younger persons in the parliament . But since they can't act according to there election platform it's FUBAR. - The bill is out of sync with the rest of the country and peopel are asking who really is behind it (tin foil hat alert). This will off course make the current problem of mistrust politicians even bigger. This feeling is the strongest amongst the young. -The current right wing (using US standard extreme communist) government have lost a lot of face an will most likely loose a lot of votes to the left wing (using US standards extreme communist 2 burnout the revenge next generation 2). -It has effectively shown the Swedish people that politicians are lying bastard. What they say in public policy documents are worth nothing and they only act in self interest. Not that i had any illusions of the opposite. This is results in a rather interesting election in 2010. And what was the prime minister when the most important bill in years was debated.. looking at soccer... Ja'La dh Jin the Game of Life indeed.

In Soviet (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23846003)

In Soviet Sweden, erotica watches YOU!

There goes sweden (1)

unity100 (970058) | more than 6 years ago | (#23846135)

the pinnacle of what europe can accomplish, and accomplished. a bunch of STUPID IDIOTS which are chosen as 'representatives' have totally fucked up the ideals of personal rights, freedoms and handed the whole country to whomever at the helm at any point to be abused. clearly shows representative democracy does not work. you elect the person, then that person can vote as s/he wishes, not how you wish. we need to get rid of all those faggots and start direct democracy.

Re:There goes sweden (1)

plasmacutter (901737) | more than 6 years ago | (#23846377)

. we need to get rid of all those faggots and start direct democracy.
Think of how many people go nuts when they can't watch american idol and dancing with the stars.

Think of the nearly 50% of americans who believe the horse crap the intelligent design people are shoveling.

No, this is not what you want.

what you want is a meritocracy. Specifically, you want to amend constitutions world-wide to require a Ph.D. to run for office, but exclude the business and law fields.

DN (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23846207)

Footnote: DN = Dagens Nyheter = News of the day (Daily News)

So... where should I move? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23846269)

Sad day for us Swedes... This is really a monumentally stupid effort. To hear a member of the Swedish parliament claim that a "no" to this law would "endanger the lives of our sons and daughters in Afghanistan." really destroyed my day. Why the HELL would Afghani terrorists exchange emails with their presumed brethren in Sweden before attacking some convoy?

In two years I have my degree and I guess this really is the last argument I need to get the hell outta Dodge.

Control agency... riiiiight (1)

Tazor (775513) | more than 6 years ago | (#23846419)

Oh, dont be alarmed.. they will put up an agency to monitor the surveillance activities:

An external group comprising members appointed by the government will monitor privacy and integrity issues
The Register [theregister.co.uk]

sarcasm
I'm sure they will appoint people with real objectivity to this agency
/sarcasm

Why have politicians at all? (1)

Stormwatch (703920) | more than 6 years ago | (#23846441)

Sometimes, when I see politicians writing bad laws like this one, I wonder... what if we found a perfect minarchist core set of laws, then said: this is the final version, no updates allowed.
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