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The real question is... (5, Funny)

Zosden (1303873) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868043)

Is there oil?

Re:The real question is... (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23868127)

No. If there was, Brave President Shrubbery would have already launched a preemptive strike to libertyifacate and democratyatize the natives.

Re:The real question is... (4, Funny)

gyrogeerloose (849181) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868555)

There's no such word as democratyatize. It's democratalyze. Sheesh.

Re:The real question is... (3, Insightful)

4D6963 (933028) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868605)

No. If there was, Brave President Shrubbery would have already launched a preemptive strike to libertyifacate and democratyatize the natives.

If everytime we talk about Mars or Titan we must make jokes about oil and America we might as well pick the one jokes which were proven to be funny.

"If that was oil the US would plan a manned mission for next year. They'd send the marines claiming that the Martians were hiding weapons of mass destruction." [slashdot.org]

"Well clearly we now need to spread Freedom and Democracy to the poor oppressed [Martians], who will welcome us with roses and be able to finance their own reconstruction." [slashdot.org]

"By an amazing coincidence, [Mars] doesn't actually have democracy over there... Yet." [slashdot.org]

You're welcome.

Re:The real question is... (5, Funny)

morari (1080535) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868771)

Sailors
Fighting in the dance hall.
Oh man!
Look at those cavemen go.
It's the freakiest show.
Take a look at the lawman
Beating up the wrong guy.
Oh man!
Wonder if he'll ever know
He's in the best selling show.
Is there ice on Mars?

Re:The real question is... (0, Offtopic)

PeolesDru (535625) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868797)

Wow. I checked this discussion thinking that surely it wouldn't have any political comments and lo and behold, it's almost full of such comments. Far be it for anyone to throw around some "irrelevant" mod points.

Re:The real question is... (0)

ILuvRamen (1026668) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868389)

well it'd be cheaper to go there for it. Of course then we'd crash the oil spaceship into comets aka "the icebergs of the sky" and cause a catastrophe for all the moon weasels.
btw, I feel the need to mention that H2O ice doesn't sublimate, CO2 ice does.

Re:The real question is... (4, Funny)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868539)

btw, I feel the need to mention that H2O ice doesn't sublimate, CO2 ice does.
*Whoosh*! (That was the sound of all the world's freeze dryers [wikipedia.org] stopping working simultaneously...)

Re:The real question is... (4, Informative)

JebusIsLord (566856) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868553)

Yes it does and can, at low atmospheric pressures (such as there is on Mars).

Re:The real question is... (5, Informative)

GeffDE (712146) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868567)

H2O ice does sublimate. Here's an easy way to prove it. All you need is a freezer and an ice cube tray.

1. Fill ice cube tray with water (liquid, H2O water) and put it in freezer.
2. Go back in a day and mark the level of the ice in the tray.
3. Return later (preferably at least a week) and marvel at how the ice is below the level marked.
4. ???
5. Profit.

The ice was in the freezer the whole time, so it didn't melt (assuming the freezer was set correctly and continuously powered). Therefore, the solid water lost must have changed to water vapor.

Re:The real question is... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23868675)

I thought that was from asshole roommates.

Re:The real question is... (0, Flamebait)

Oktober Sunset (838224) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868775)

I want a moon weasel and I want one now!

Re:The real question is... (-1, Flamebait)

ChuckSchwab (813568) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868421)

Hey fuckhole! In case you hadn't heard, even if there were solid platinum bars on the surface of the moon, covering the whole place, it STILL wouldn't be profitable to collect them!

Now, think about how much cheaper oil is per unit weight. Think about how much more it costs to make it to Mars.

Yeah, let's try that one again.

Re:The real question is... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23868447)

So, when that joke went over your head, did it make a 'Whoosh' sound or was it more of a sonic boom?

Re:The real question is... (3, Insightful)

Ortega-Starfire (930563) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868469)

No, you fail it. Heinlein figured out how to move things from luna to terra cheaply a long time ago, if Platinum was just lying about on the moon, we would catapult it to earth with little cost. Moving oil on the other hand might be a more dangerous endeavor.

Re:The real question is... (1)

amdpox (1308283) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868661)

Indeed, it would be profitable to transfer even iron ore from the moon... mass drivers are great.

Re:The real question is... (1)

rossdee (243626) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868667)

Which would you rather have land on top of you at re-entry velocities? 1000 tons of oil, or 1000 tons of Platinum ?

While moving stuff from Luna with a mass driver might be cost effective, Mars is a lot more delta V (in orbit) and theres also twice the gravity.

Re:The real question is... (1)

camperdave (969942) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868535)

Is there oil?

So what if there was. There's not enough oxygen in the atmosphere to burn it. About the only thing it would be good for is lubricating the odd rover wheel.

Re:The real question is... (-1, Redundant)

ignavus (213578) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868557)

If there's oil, there's bound to be weapons of mass destruction. I say we invade Mars!

Yes, it's right below the WMD (0, Offtopic)

GNUALMAFUERTE (697061) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868703)

You will also find Jimmy Hoffa, Elvis Presley and Osama Bin Laden playing strip poker :D

Oil, Water, Life on Mars? So what?! (-1, Troll)

Simonetta (207550) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868729)

Maybe water on Mars? Maybe, so what? If you want water, we have plenty of water here.

Oh, I'm so excited. Ice on Mars could actually mean LIFE on Mars! Maybe, and maybe after spending billions of dollars of other people's money you might find certain combinations of chemicals that would appear to indicate the possibility of pre-existant conditions that could preclude the factors that may have had influence on the development of life on Earth! WoW! Holy Smokes! We definitely need to spend another twenty billion dollars to really check this out! I tell you, man, I am so excited about this that I could just shit!

    Chill out, amigo. If you want life, you got all the life here that you can handle. Yes, right here on Earth; right in your backyard. You don't have to go a hundred million miles to find it. And not little bacterium either, but real big thinkin', drinkin', and stinkin' human beings. Billions of the fuckers, right in your face; on mother Earth. All the life that you could ever hope to know and love. You don't have to spend billions of dollars of other-people's-money to look for life on for what is nothing more in reality than just a bright dot in the night sky.

  "Man, You are so short-sighted! Life is dying on the Earth. We fucked up the whole planet. We need space exploration to seed the cosmos. Can't have all eggs in one basket. Think...Noah...Think ark, man!"

    You watch too much television, amigo, and you get too many government grants. All the bad things about climate change, economic collapse, and overpopulation are happening here and now. The ability to use space exploration technology to address these problems won't be realistic for hundreds of years, if ever.

    If you are involved with space exploration to the point where you are actually being paid by the government or a government-funded corporation to do so, then you are just a chickenshit leech who is pissing away public funds that are desperately needed for more important things in order to finance your own private Tom Swift-Star Wars fantasies.

    You're a fucking twit. Grow up and contribute to the real world where real adults deal with real issues and solve real problems.

  Gracias.

Was there ever doubt? (5, Interesting)

Gewalt (1200451) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868049)

Haven't we known for a good many years that there was water ice at the cap?

Re:Was there ever doubt? (5, Insightful)

WaltBusterkeys (1156557) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868121)

Yes, we've even mapped the ice at the poles [nasa.gov] . But this is still important for a couple of reasons.

First, it's confirmation that the white stuff at the poles really is ice (and not some unknown martian substance that just looks like ice).

Second it means that the lander is digging in the right places to find all of the interesting stuff that goes along with water. It's tremendously interesting to discover whether there's carbon-based fragments in the water (suggesting life did or could exist) and to figure out what else is in the water.

Re:Was there ever doubt? (2, Interesting)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868395)

It's tremendously interesting to discover whether there's carbon-based fragments in the water (suggesting life did or could exist) and to figure out what else is in the water.
This is too shallow to be fossil ice. It has to be brand new precipitated water. It should be pretty pure, unless something is living in the ice right now.

Re:Was there ever doubt? (1)

Ethan Allison (904983) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868739)

Or does exist...

Re:Was there ever doubt? (3, Insightful)

NotZed (19455) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868815)

"First, it's confirmation that the white stuff at the poles really is ice (and not some unknown martian substance that just looks like ice)."

Or perhaps it is just weird martian substance that still looks like ice, even close up?

Re:Was there ever doubt? (4, Funny)

NMerriam (15122) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868225)

Indeed, we've known this for several presidential administrations:

If there is water, that means there is oxygen.

If oxygen, that means we can breathe.

Re:Was there ever doubt? (1)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868267)

Indeed, we've known this for several presidential administrations: If there is water, that means there is oxygen. If oxygen, that means we can breathe.
Only if you separate the oxygen from the hydrogen first. That takes energy. Since the atmosphere is mostly carbon dioxide you might as well plan to split it into carbon and oxygen.

Re:Was there ever doubt? (4, Informative)

pokerdad (1124121) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868457)

Only if you separate the oxygen from the hydrogen first. That takes energy. Since the atmosphere is mostly carbon dioxide you might as well plan to split it into carbon and oxygen.

I'm pretty sure the poster (and anyone else who would be browsing slashdot) knew that; the quote is from Dan Quayle, he's the one who needs help.

Re:Was there ever doubt? (1)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868701)

Only if you separate the oxygen from the hydrogen first. That takes energy. Since the atmosphere is mostly carbon dioxide you might as well plan to split it into carbon and oxygen.

I'm pretty sure the poster (and anyone else who would be browsing slashdot) knew that; the quote is from Dan Quayle, he's the one who needs help.

Ah right thanks. I am not up to date on Dan Quayle quotes.

I am surprised we didn't see him running for President this year ;)

Re:Was there ever doubt? (1)

Gewalt (1200451) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868785)

I wasn't either, had to look it up [quotationspage.com] . Glad I did tho.

Re:Was there ever doubt? (2, Interesting)

joocemann (1273720) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868755)

I don't know, but I do know that 'knowing' that water is on mars is a big objective. I'm curious why they are observing and interpreting strange data instead of applying some (probably easily produced) technical gadget to detect the presence of water.

It can't be that hard to make the device. You'd think that if they put so much importance on whether or not water is on mars, that the rover would be equipped with something to test that. Guess not.

Re:Was there ever doubt? (1)

tverbeek (457094) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868787)

This doesn't prove that there is water ice on Mars. It only proves that there was water ice on Mars: We just vaporized it!

This is much like the experiments conducted by ye olde Viking landers in the 1970s, which didn't test for the presence of life, but tested (inconclusively) for the presence of life-which-has-just-been-killed. I find myself uncertain whether anyone at NASA has ever heard of Heisenberg!

Rubbish. (5, Funny)

jd (1658) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868061)

The white things were Martian beach loungers. And as they were there first, I strongly suspect they were German-speaking Martians.

Couple more things... (5, Funny)

Bandman (86149) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868073)

Excellent. Some coke and rum and we've got ourselves a party!

Re:Couple more things... (1)

Yvan256 (722131) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868269)

Let's build a martian lander with blackjack and hookers!

In fact, forget the martian lander and the blackjack!

Great (1)

TornCityVenz (1123185) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868079)

Now all we need to do is ship some vodka and vermouth there and we can call Mars civilized.

Re:Great (2, Funny)

maxume (22995) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868239)

Yeah, but how do you shake an entire planet?

Re:Great (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23868359)

REALLY big subwoofer.

Re:Great Scott !! (5, Funny)

sjf (3790) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868451)

You see, you had a splendid joke there, and then you went and spoiled it.
Any truly civilized individual knows that a Martini is made with gin, not vodka.

Sheesh, when will these damn colonials ever learn ?

Re:Great Scott !! (5, Funny)

flewp (458359) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868705)

Sure, Martinis may be made with gin, but martiantinis are made with vodka. Duh.

pictures don't lie? (2, Insightful)

notgm (1069012) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868089)

but super scientific ovens do? i suppose the ice melted before they could cook it?

Dry ice? (4, Insightful)

zygotic mitosis (833691) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868103)

In such a carbon dioxide rich atmosphere, how do we know it is water ice and not frozen CO2? What do we know of the Martian surface and subsurface temperatures?

Re:Dry ice? (5, Informative)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868313)

In such a carbon dioxide rich atmosphere, how do we know it is water ice and not frozen CO2? What do we know of the Martian surface and subsurface temperatures?
Its too warm for solid CO2. Even at night [nasa.gov] the temperature is barely cold [wikipedia.org] enough for carbon dioxide to solidify.

Re:Dry ice? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23868623)

You can also figure out substances from far away places like mars by looking at them in the infrared

Cocaine from Mars (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23868107)

No it's coke it's cocaine in its purist form. So all you druglords should build a ship and go there and bring them here. I could use of them.

They are one step ahead of you (1)

davidwr (791652) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868361)

Why do you think it disappeared so fast?

co2 ice ? (1)

cats-paw (34890) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868125)

TFA does not discuss whether or not in might be frozen co2.
I thought there was still some question as to whether the poles were covered in water ice or co2 ice.

Can anyone enlighten me ?

Re:co2 ice ? (3, Funny)

sjf (3790) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868349)

Since CO2 sublimates, and water does not. (It shouldn't even melt at these temperatures,) I assume that they mean CO2.

Re:co2 ice ? (2, Informative)

Teilo (91279) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868425)

Since CO2 sublimates, and water does not.
Sorry to have to break it to you, but water ice sublimates [wikipedia.org] also.

Re:co2 ice ? (3, Informative)

sjf (3790) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868537)

You are correct. I had not realized just how low the air pressure was on Mars: it can be around 0.006 atm which is exactly the point where ice will sublimate.
Cool. Thanks !

Why the f*ck was I moderated troll ? I was wrong, but trolling ? Sheesh, get a life.

Re:co2 ice ? (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23868613)

Why the f*ck was I moderated troll ? I was wrong, but trolling ? Sheesh, get a life.
Yeah I saw that too and thought it was some poor moderating. Only malicious postings should be moderated down. Factual errors that are on topic should just be discussed and not moderated down and jokes that you think are not funny should also not be moderated down, but ignored. Yeah like the whole thing about sublimation of ice would lead someone to read up on it, and it was totally on topic. And really, you did raise a good point about ice not sublimating readily. If it doesn't sublimate at 0.006 atmospheres or higher, then it probably isn't going to sublimate very quickly at any pressure.

Incorrect might not be equivalent to Troll (0, Offtopic)

Gary W. Longsine (124661) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868733)

Moderators, please get a grip. sjf is wrong, but if you look at their history, and consider the simplicity of the incorrect factual statement they made, they probably are not Trolling. Overrated, sure, but Troll is pretty harsh.

Good News (1)

mathgeek13 (1287912) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868171)

This is what the scientists were looking for, so they should be happy.

Re:Good News (2, Funny)

Yvan256 (722131) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868323)

Prof: Good news everyone!
Bender: Uh oh. I don't like the sound of that.
Prof: Today you'll be making a delivery to the planet Mars!
Bender: Bo-ring. Let's go get drunk!

sulfur cones 10 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23868175)

They knew there must be ice when they found a sign that read "sulfur cones, 10"

Re:sulfur cones 10 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23868263)

I'm leaving a note to future generations. May you always be aware that Slashdot won't include the "cent sign" in any of your postings. If the use of the "cent sign" is central to your joke, then you better try that joke somewhere else.

Oh noooooo (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23868185)

Can the "Wall Drug" billboards be far behind?

Not exactly scholarly (1, Insightful)

Le Marteau (206396) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868189)

These images show sublimation of ice in the trench informally called "Dodo-Goldilocks" over the course of four days.

Oh really? No qualification there? No "this appears to be sublimation of ice" but a definite "this is a picture of ice"? The dumbing down of the net is officially complete.

Ice Alright! (0, Redundant)

Timberwolf0122 (872207) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868203)

now if the lander can just uncover some gin and tonic and we are in business!

Re:Ice Alright! (0, Redundant)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868351)

I am sure gin and tonic is available on Mars, but it might be known by a slightly different name.

Insert K'breel reference here (1)

Spy der Mann (805235) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868207)

Any volunteers? :)

This is why robots aren't great for science (5, Interesting)

putaro (235078) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868221)

We often see the scientific community putting manned spaceflight down, saying that it is not useful for scientific research. Had we sent people, with even a minimal laboratory, we'd have known within about 15 minutes whether what they were digging up was ice or not. Since the lander doesn't have an "ice" experiment/module on board, we're reduced to guess work.

The reality is that manned spaceflight is not *economical* for scientific research at this point. We should be working on getting our launch costs down so that we could actually send people to do things, build factories in space, and start getting some real benefit out of space.

Re:This is why robots aren't great for science (4, Interesting)

CrazyJim1 (809850) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868301)

Come on please. It is easier to get stuff there than to get stuff there and return it. Maybe a robot isn't perfect in its science capabilities, but it is well armed with equipment. Robots are great to go dangerous people. Which do you think is better for science: A: Robot lander crashes, retry again in a few months B: Philip Fry crashes on moon and dies a death, are we ever going to try that again?

And there is always C & D. C: Robot lander lands on Mars and completes mission. D: Philip Fry completes mission, but the return module will not leave Mars. Will we ever try that again?

I'm a big fan of robots to do stuff like this.

Re:This is why robots aren't great for science (5, Funny)

Loadmaster (720754) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868355)

B: Philip Fry crashes on moon and dies a death
Oh! Had they only built the ship with 6000 and 1 hulls this would have been avoided. When will they ever learn?

I agree though; this robot isn't as good as a human, but the folks at NASA are pretty bright. It's speculation now but after a few more tests they'll have the data they need for a solid conclusion. It's still very early in the lander's mission on Mars. We need to have a little patience.

Re:This is why robots aren't great for science (1)

CrazyJim1 (809850) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868445)

Robots are great to go dangerous people.

I meant: Robots are great to do dangerous jobs instead of people

Re:This is why robots aren't great for science (4, Interesting)

Bartab (233395) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868547)

Come on please. It is easier to get stuff there than to get stuff there and return it.

Find a couple astronaut capable people who have recently been diagnosed with cancer. Couple years to live, don't bring them back.

A little cold hearted to design, but I'd guarantee you would have no lack of volunteers.

Re:This is why robots aren't great for science (2, Funny)

Ironlenny (1181971) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868549)

Are you refering to the Philip J. Fry from universe A or universe 1?

Re:This is why robots aren't great for science (1)

Oktober Sunset (838224) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868751)

according to this coin toss, universe A.

Re:This is why robots aren't great for science (1)

zerkshop (1222778) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868753)

Cmon. Where's the fun in exploration if its not risky enough you may very well die doing it?

Whats the difference from dieing in Iraq as a soldier but not in space as an explorer? We send soldiers to die all the time, but all of a sudden if it was someone who died going to the moon in your scenario we pack up and don't try again?

When the space draft comes, I'll be ready to be flung off this planet for science :)

Re:This is why robots aren't great for science (1)

Fear the Clam (230933) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868319)

We should be working on getting our launch costs down so that we could actually send people to do things, build factories in space, and start getting some real benefit out of space.

Space: Because India's getting too expensive.

Re:This is why robots aren't great for science (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23868405)

Hey look! It's another idiot babbling about sending people to Mars!

putaro, leave space science to the smart grownups, k?

Re:This is why robots aren't great for science (4, Informative)

CraftyJack (1031736) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868407)

the lander doesn't have an "ice" experiment/module on board
TEGA [arizona.edu] has that capability. Verifying the presence of water ice is an explicit science objective [arizona.edu] of this mission.

Re:This is why robots aren't great for science (3, Interesting)

Narpak (961733) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868429)

Not to mention discover better ways of maintaining the integrity of the human body. Apparently Zero Gravity isn't exactly reckomended for your health.

The most significant adverse effects of long-term weightlessness are muscle atrophy and deterioration of the skeleton, or spaceflight osteopenia. These effects can be minimized through a regimen of exercise. Other significant effects include fluid redistribution, a slowing of the cardiovascular system, decreased production of red blood cells, balance disorders, and a weakening of the immune system. Lesser symptoms include loss of body mass, nasal congestion, sleep disturbance, excess flatulence, and puffiness of the face. These effects begin to reverse quickly upon return to the Earth.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zero_gravity#Health_effects_of_weightlessness

I imagine that traveling to Mars and staying there to do serious research would, without significant advances, mean a shorter lifespan and for some; a martian burial.

Re:This is why robots aren't great for science (1)

Sparohok (318277) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868545)

Nobody's saying that manned spaceflight wouldn't be useful for science. However, it certainly isn't cost effective.

We could invest in lowering launch costs, but we could also invest in improving robotics. Based on the last few decades of experience, in which the economics of spaceflight have barely changed, while robotics capabilities have improved by many orders of magnitude, I know where I'd put my money.

In the meantime, with today's technology and today's budgets, there is not the slightest doubt that unmanned science provides better bang for the buck.

Martin

Big Freakin Deal (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23868241)

Woohoo! Ice. We've got a pile of that here on earth. Liquid water too. And water vapor. We've also got things that swim in the water. We've got stuff that walks on the ice. We've got stuff that moves through the vapor. It's a technical achievement to be able to find ice on Mars, but really is it that big a deal? Someone explain the significance of ice sublimating on Mars as compared to vast number of (might I add, multicellular) organisms here on Earth.

Re:Big Freakin Deal (1)

Zosden (1303873) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868277)

One world aliens. Enter dramatic gopher.

Re:Big Freakin Deal (1)

xSauronx (608805) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868287)

now we can wash off the rovers?

Re:Big Freakin Deal (1)

Yvan256 (722131) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868365)

We've also got things that swim in the water. We've got stuff that walks on the ice. We've got stuff that moves through the vapor.
Submarines, ice skates and airplanes!

What do I win?

what they should do (3, Interesting)

Adult film producer (866485) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868249)

is send a dozen or two probes to Mars full of bacteria/fungus and whatever other DNA based lifeform that shown ability to live in extreme conditions and populate the planet of Mars. A few of the probes should carry heavy drilling equipment.. bore into crust of mars and dump a few loads of bacteria..

its pretty obvious we'll fuck this planet up sooner rather than later so its probably a good idea to spread the seeds of life somewhere else. Maybe in 100 million years new life forms will thrive on Mars.

Re:what they should do (1)

Zosden (1303873) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868335)

We as a species have decieded it is unethical to do anything like that. That is why when they build these things they do it so there is no possiblity of life or even human signs on the equipment.

Re:what they should do (3, Insightful)

Adult film producer (866485) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868517)

Why is seeding a dead planet with life considered unethical? Since when? You say that we decided as a species that doing so was against our moral conduct but I've gotta ask.. when did that debate take place? By who? The supreme court of the world?

Maybe you have a problem with it but the Chinese and Indians wont. So much for your supreme court ruling.

Re:what they should do (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23868627)

We don't know the planet is dead yet, doofus. There is still a very real possibility of extremophile microorganisms existing on mars.

Re:what they should do (1)

rubycodez (864176) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868757)

even if there were, what's the big deal about seeding a rock populated with a bunch of freakin' weirdo germs with something more useful to us? Germs have no rights.

Re:what they should do (4, Funny)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868437)

I bet you could write about three thick books on that theme. You could pit a bunch of conservative geology types against power mad engineers with a small group of middle ground heroes in the middle

But what would you call it. Something Mars. I know Red Mars, then the next book gets a slightly different name.

The only problem is that the third book would probably run out of ideas about 10% of the way through.

Maybe its not such a good idea to after all...

INVISABLE WATR (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23868325)

Ceilin Cat put invisable watr on Mars.

CO2 (1)

Taibhsear (1286214) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868381)

Um, we know that dry ice (frozen CO2) is on the poles. Bright white chunks that sublimate are dry ice. Ice tends to be clear and rarely sublimates. It would most likely melt first then evaporate. How about next time you see bright white chunks you analyze them. (disclaimer: I did not RTFA of course)

Re:CO2 (1)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868465)

Um, we know that dry ice (frozen CO2) is on the poles. Bright white chunks that sublimate are dry ice. Ice tends to be clear and rarely sublimates. It would most likely melt first then evaporate. How about next time you see bright white chunks you analyze them. (disclaimer: I did not RTFA of course)

The air pressure is too low for ice to be liquid And the temperature is too high for CO2 to stay solid. There is a small overlap during the night where the atmosphere is cold enough for dry ice to form but the most you would get is a bit of frost.

Re:CO2 (1)

Teilo (91279) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868479)

Go study [wikipedia.org] . It will do you some good.

Re:CO2 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23868565)

Observe your ice cube tray over a while in your freezer. You will observe the ice sublimating.....

We Blew It (5, Funny)

Doc Ruby (173196) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868413)

After all this time and effort, we finally found water on Mars, and we let it get away!

fake picture? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23868483)

is it just me or does the picture look fake.. being black and white.... and then a cream yellow... doesnt make much sense to me

Another article... (4, Informative)

yorugua (697900) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868489)

Another article about the same news: http://blog.wired.com/wiredscience/2008/06/mars-phoenix-tw.html [wired.com]

There is water ice on Mars within reach of the Mars Phoenix Lander, NASA scientists announced Thursday.

Photographic evidence settles the debate over the nature of the white material seen in photographs sent back by the craft. As seen in lower left of this image, chunks of the ice sublimed (changed directly from solid to gas) over the course of four days, after the lander's digging exposed them.

"It must be ice," said the Phoenix Lander's lead investigator, Peter Smith. "These little clumps completely disappearing over the course of a few days, that is perfect evidence that it's ice."

The confirmation that water ice exists in the area directly surrounding the lander is big and good news for the Martian mission. NASA's stated goal for the Mars Phoenix was to find exactly this -- water ice -- and then analyze it. With the latest news, the first step is accomplished. All that's left now is to get the water into the Phoenix's instruments, a task which has occasionally proven more difficult than anticipated.

Still, this is the best opportunity that humanity has ever had to analyze extraterrestrial water in any form. That had the Phoenix Lander's persona fired up.

"Are you ready to celebrate? Well, get ready: We have ICE!!!!! Yes, ICE, *WATER ICE* on Mars! w00t!!! Best day ever!!" the Mars Phoenix Lander tweeted at about 5:15 pm.

Their suspicions about water ice beneath the surface of Mars confirmed, scientists and the world will have renewed interest in the outcome of the soil analyses currently being conducted by the lander.

The samples are being examined for traces of organic molecules, among other substances, but the lander does not have instruments that could directly detect life.

See the full announcement from NASA.

One down, three to go ... (0, Redundant)

rlp (11898) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868543)

Call me when they find salt, tequila, and Margarita mix. I'll bring my own glass (and lime).

From global surveyer to today (2, Interesting)

heroine (1220) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868573)

Still remember when global surveyer first released the picture of massive amounts of water below the surface. It was too good to be true, no-one believed it, and it got put away.

Now we've found massive amounts of water just below the surface, enough water to make huge amounts of rocket fuel, and it didn't even make a buried link on CNN. Where in Calif* can you find water just 2" below the surface?

Super colonization plan (1)

caller9 (764851) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868647)

I remember a few years ago someone proposed a phased terraforming operation. Send a lander, have it do phase 1...step 2... big profit.

So lets get this going. I wanna see some of that big profit.

Great! (1, Offtopic)

PPH (736903) | more than 6 years ago | (#23868669)

Now we can send a manned mission over there and use the H2O they find for fuel for the return trip. Just drop itr right in the tank. Just like all those e-mails say I can do to run my car on water.

It must be true. The InterWeb never lies.

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