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New Grads Shun IT Jobs As "Boring"

timothy posted about 6 years ago | from the work-from-home-chicks-dig-it dept.

Education 752

whencanistop writes "Despite good job prospects, graduates think that a job in IT would be boring. Is this because of the fact that Bill Gates has made the whole industry look nerdy? Surely with so many (especially young) people being 'web first' with not just their buying habits, but now in terms of what they do in their spare time, we'd expect more of them to want to get a career in it?"

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752 comments

'boring'??? (5, Interesting)

avandesande (143899) | about 6 years ago | (#23918867)

And good riddance! We don't need 'shiny object' people in this business.

Most jobs are boring (5, Insightful)

Brain-Fu (1274756) | about 6 years ago | (#23919325)

If jobs were very exciting and fulfilling in and of themselves, we wouldn't need to pay people to do them.

Life requires labor. Civilized life requires even more labor. Most of that labor is unpleasant in some way. We face the grind anyway, day after day, because it keeps the ball rolling, and because it gives us the money we need to do the things we actually like doing.

If you manage to find a job that you actually like a lot, that's great. If not, hopefully you will be strong enough to accept the realities that most people face, get a boring job, be useful, and earn a decent living.

Re:Most jobs are boring (4, Interesting)

Bandman (86149) | about 6 years ago | (#23919421)

I've always found that it pays to like boring jobs ;-)

It's only rarely that we admins get to do heroics [blogspot.com] .

Re:Most jobs are boring (4, Interesting)

Surt (22457) | about 6 years ago | (#23919515)

I don't think that's true. I've always thought fortune 500 CEO would be really exciting and fulfilling, and yet you have to pay those guys a fortune to do the job. Maybe it sucks a lot more than I thought.

On the other side of things, it seems like 'janitor' or 'farm hand' would pretty much maximize boring/unfulfilling, and yet those guys get paid next to nothing.

Re:Most jobs are boring (1)

ktappe (747125) | about 6 years ago | (#23919583)

If jobs were very exciting and fulfilling in and of themselves, we wouldn't need to pay people to do them.

You have a point that the more exciting and fulfilling the job, often the more the employer makes use of that fact and lowers the pay. The most recent example, from just last week, is how Apple pays $20K less per engineer than Google and other valley competitors. Apple jobs are apparently exciting and fulfilling. But it's not a boolean. Pay can vary between 0 and 1 (that is, low to high). So that doesn't, per your axiom, equal no pay. Just lower pay.

Five Years Into the Job (5, Funny)

Van Cutter Romney (973766) | about 6 years ago | (#23918889)

I'd probably agree with them.

Re:Five Years Into the Job (5, Insightful)

jorghis (1000092) | about 6 years ago | (#23919479)

Even if you dont find it boring to begin with you really need to ask yourself the question "where will I be in five/ten/twenty years?". For the majority going into software engineering or IT the answer is "prettymuch the same thing I was doing two weeks after I graduated college". You might be better at it and you might be leading a team of people, but you will still be doing about the same thing.

You see this at big companies too, its much more common to promote a software engineer to a "software engineer level 2" or something similar than it is for them to move on to something else. The career path is usually designed to keep you doing the same thing for a long period of time. For many other types of jobs (such as consulting) the entry level position is seen as stepping stone to bigger and better things.

Now I know that there are a lot of exceptions to this rule, but generally speaking 90% of people who start out in a company as an entry level software engineer or IT guy dont move on to anything else. Thats why people get bored with it imho.

Re:Five Years Into the Job (2, Insightful)

an.echte.trilingue (1063180) | about 6 years ago | (#23919511)

I disagree. I do the IT for a small business, and I love what I do. There are aspects that I don't enjoy, especially as far as managing hardware and user support are concerned, but usually it is just downright interesting. I have had the chance to learn a few programming languages and write a couple of specialized applications, which I loved. Aside from the fact that I learn something new every day, besides the fact that every new job is an interesting puzzle, the decisions I make have a real impact on the direction of the business and the well-being its employees, and the feedback from a job well done is immediate and sincere.

On the other hand, I know people who would die of frustration in my job: there is no direction from higher and you have to write your own job description on a monthly basis.

I think the IT industry is like any other: you need to find the company with a corporate culture that is right for you. If you like independence, you work for a place like mine. If you like structure, you get a job with one of the bigger code factories. Once you have found the right place, you will like what you do.

Different perspective (5, Funny)

thegameiam (671961) | about 6 years ago | (#23918937)

Then again, if most folks look at computers as an appliance, who wants to be an appliance repairman? Seriously - how many folks wanted to work for the phone company in the 60s and 70s?

Re:Different perspective (5, Interesting)

omeomi (675045) | about 6 years ago | (#23919209)

You mean during the heyday of Bell Labs, when they were dumping money into R&D, and inventing things like a little language named C, a little operating system named Unix, the electret microphone, the CO2 LASER, and the first 32-bit microprocessor? Yeah, who would want to work there?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bell_Labs#1960s [wikipedia.org]

Re:Different perspective (2, Insightful)

thegameiam (671961) | about 6 years ago | (#23919683)

Bell labs in its heyday was a couple thousand people. Ma Bell as a whole was nearly a million. I somehow think that most people's idea of what "work for the phone company" means is more like the guy who installs phones or the one who runs a switchboard...

Besides, alongside the Bell Labs reputation for brilliance was their reputation as the alpha geeks of their day...

If I had the power to do it all over again... (5, Insightful)

vertinox (846076) | about 6 years ago | (#23918939)

I would have gone into Economics.

Or maybe Forestry...

If I had only known the IT world would turn into what it is now, I'd do something else. Too much politics... To much hype...

Re:If I had the power to do it all over again... (2, Insightful)

sm62704 (957197) | about 6 years ago | (#23919189)

If I had only known the IT world would turn into what it is now, I'd do something else. Too much politics... To much hype

That's going to be the case in any field. I would imagine that economics would be worse than most in those respects, so you may be lucky. Forestry might limit your job opportunities.

Re:If I had the power to do it all over again... (5, Funny)

wolfen (12255) | about 6 years ago | (#23919199)

I... I wanted to be! A lumberjack!

Leaping from tree to tree, as they float down the mighty rivers of British Columbia!

Re:If I had the power to do it all over again... (1)

SatanicPuppy (611928) | about 6 years ago | (#23919355)

Sibling poster is right about forestry being limited, and I'll tell you, it's rife with politicing as well...Any field that depends on the gov't for money is going to be rife with it.

And economics? Jesus. If you wanted to go into brokerage or something, maybe, but pure economics is an extremely limited niche field where people dismiss you if you don't say what they want to hear. Or you could teach.

Re:If I had the power to do it all over again... (4, Insightful)

jorghis (1000092) | about 6 years ago | (#23919567)

Economics is an extremely limited niche field? Have you heard of wall street? All those big investment banks and trading firms look first to economics grads when they go hiring. Wall Street grabs just as many economics grads as Silicon Valley does CS majors.

Is this an intentional but subtle ob-Python? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#23919413)

[If I had the power to do it all over again...] I would have gone into Economics.

Or maybe Forestry...

Sounds like you didn't want to be an IT drone. You wanted to be.... a lumberjack!

Re:If I had the power to do it all over again... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#23919601)

You think there would be less politics in Forestry? You'd find yourself either trying to get more reserves to cut down, fighting against those damn environmentalists, or trying to get more reserves protected, fighting against those damn loggers. There are lobbiests, unions, and politics from small towns to nations and the United Nations.

Re:If I had the power to do it all over again... (1)

Huntr (951770) | about 6 years ago | (#23919647)

In Forestry, basically you cut down trees and you grow trees (among other duties, but that's the gist of it). Lemme explain something. Not everyone wants trees grown or cut down. Where do you think the term treehugger comes from? Forestry is highly political.

Let's spice up IT (4, Insightful)

Lord Grey (463613) | about 6 years ago | (#23918941)

According to Computer Weekly, this is apparently not a new trend. In the TFA they link to one of their own articles [computerweekly.com] from 2001 that says basically the same thing.

The TFA goes on to quote someone as saying, "We need to show [young people] the variety of roles in IT and the importance that IT carries today. IT is at the heart of business these days and there are real opportunities now to have a career in IT which will ultimately lead to a position on the board."

A position on the board? That is supposed to be "not boring"?

Re:Let's spice up IT (1)

Interl0per (1045948) | about 6 years ago | (#23919283)

If a board position is what you are after, there are fast-track positions for that sort of thing that don't involve 24x7 on-call work fixing OS installs for shops' on-site technician (brother-in-law) at the fabulous rate of $25k/yr (with experience). I guess education really is good for something, these grads are pretty smart ;)

Re:Let's spice up IT (1)

tattood (855883) | about 6 years ago | (#23919307)

A position on the board? That is supposed to be "not boring"?

Personally, I think a board position would be boring, but that's me. And, how long does it take to get to that position? You'll probably have to spend 10-15 years working your way up through the IT chain to get to CIO/CSO before anyone is going to consider you for a board position. I don't think a board seat is the top of the list for most IT people.

Re:Let's spice up IT (3, Funny)

Tubal-Cain (1289912) | about 6 years ago | (#23919505)

You'll probably have to spend 10-15 years working your way up through the IT chain to get to CIO/CSO before anyone is going to consider you for a board position.
That depends on how many people you have above you, your ability to fill their roles when they are gone, and how many you can eliminate in a day.

It;'s All Relative (5, Funny)

Nerdfest (867930) | about 6 years ago | (#23919411)

I was once chatting with someone at a party. They asked me what I did. I said I wrote software. They then said "Isn't that boring?". I said "No, it's generally interesting, and even fun on occasion. What do you do".

"I'm an accountant."

Re:Let's spice up IT (5, Funny)

Bandman (86149) | about 6 years ago | (#23919481)

This isn't a lot different than the general decline of math and science careers in general. It's just a small sign that we're moving away from skilled knowledge-based industries into crap-service based industries.

Would you like fries with that?

Re:Let's spice up IT (4, Funny)

happyemoticon (543015) | about 6 years ago | (#23919609)

My IT job is plenty spicy after I figured out how to make my desktop loop Destination Calabria [youtube.com] .

Well, many IT jobs ARE boring (4, Insightful)

elrous0 (869638) | about 6 years ago | (#23918945)

Sure, there are plenty of jobs in IT that allow for creativity (game design, many coding projects, etc.). But, in fairness, a lot of IT jobs involve running cabling, fixing routers, database entry, coding really dull projects, etc. that most people WOULD find pretty fucking boring.

Re:Well, many IT jobs ARE boring (5, Insightful)

jo42 (227475) | about 6 years ago | (#23919091)

Hate to piddle in your soup, but most jobs in the world are "pretty fucking boring". Welcome to reality.

Re:Well, many IT jobs ARE boring (1)

jedidiah (1196) | about 6 years ago | (#23919465)

...yeah but most of them don't cost you 50 grand up front just to get started.

You don't need to waste 4 years of your life just to be miserable at your job.

Re: 2 words down. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#23919679)


Either use all 7 of the words or leave george alone.

Oh come on now... (5, Insightful)

geminidomino (614729) | about 6 years ago | (#23918953)

"Spair time?"

Seriously, this is ridiculous.

Re:Oh come on now... (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#23919161)

Sairiously, this is ridiculous.
Fixed that for you.

Re:Oh come on now... (2, Funny)

NitroWolf (72977) | about 6 years ago | (#23919491)

Seriously, this is ridiculous.

Oh come now, you and I both know it's really rediculous ... Spair me.

Spelling (5, Funny)

ledow (319597) | about 6 years ago | (#23918969)

"spair time"? Seriously, who edited or approved an article with that in the summary, not to mention the punctuation?

Maybe THAT's why IT jobs are boring - you're required to spell!

Re:Spelling (1)

whencanistop (1224156) | about 6 years ago | (#23919287)

"spair time"? Seriously, who edited or approved an article with that in the summary, not to mention the punctuation?

Ok, I may not be able to spell, but there is nothing wrong with my punctuation. Unless you are suggesting I have an overuse of commas. But then you've done the same in your comment and I am sure pots and kettles wouldn't come to mind.

Re:Spelling (1)

NitroWolf (72977) | about 6 years ago | (#23919555)

Ok, I may not be able to spell, but there is nothing wrong with my punctuation. Unless you are suggesting I have an overuse of commas. But then you've done the same in your comment and I am sure pots and kettles wouldn't come to mind.

Yeah, but he didn't submit a story to /. You should be held to a higher standard than a random commenter.

Re:Spelling (5, Funny)

damn_registrars (1103043) | about 6 years ago | (#23919451)

Perhaps that (mis)-spelling was chosen because you can't spell despair without "spair".

Which of course is what oh-so-many IT jobs are - a source of despair.

And they would be right. (1)

LWATCDR (28044) | about 6 years ago | (#23918971)

We are all using X86 CPUs. It looks as is we will all use Windows or a version of Unix.
Yea it has become a stable and rather dull industry.

Speak for yourself (2, Insightful)

Bandman (86149) | about 6 years ago | (#23919535)

That's the kind of dull I can get behind.

Having to support 10 different wonky platforms and trying to make a cohesive infrastructure from them?

I'm glad those bad-old-days are over.

Well, it is boring. (1)

Animats (122034) | about 6 years ago | (#23918975)

Well, what do you expect? IT today is boring. It was exciting once, but today, it's routine. Especially at the lower levels.

Irony? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#23918981)

Does it strike anyone else as ironic that a site that proclaims that it delivers news for nerds appears to be accusing Bill Gates of making the IT industry appear nerdy?

What's IT? (4, Interesting)

qw0ntum (831414) | about 6 years ago | (#23918989)

What's IT? I'm about to be a new grad. When I hear "IT" I think of tech support for a company, keeping machines running, or working in a data center. Those all sound pretty boring to me (except the last one, if the data center were sufficiently large).

I'd rather do software development, CS research, something along those lines. Heck, my dream job would be working on low cost communication infrastructure in the third world. While I'm sure that all technically falls under the realm of IT, to me that's always be something different. Maybe that's just me, but "IT" to me has always been the boring stuff.

Re:What's IT? (1)

SatanicPuppy (611928) | about 6 years ago | (#23919185)

It's all a generalization. I do "IT" and my current niche is perfect for my weird ass brain; I have different stuff to do all the time. I get to code, I get to work with hardware infrastructure and crazy high-end hardware. I get disaster recovery and security auditing and hardening. Minimal supervision, and a purchasing card with a daily limit so high I could buy myself a car.

It's more about the job than anything else. My primary field of study was cognitive science, which deals with computers only peripherally. You get some skills, and then you find a job that you want to do, that uses those skills. Or one that you want to do that requires a non-specific degree, whatever.

Re:What's IT? (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#23919463)

What's IT? I'm about to be a new grad. When I hear "IT" I think of tech support for a company, keeping machines running, or working in a data center. Those all sound pretty boring to me (except the last one, if the data center were sufficiently large).

I'd rather do software development, CS research, something along those lines. Heck, my dream job would be working on low cost communication infrastructure in the third world. While I'm sure that all technically falls under the realm of IT, to me that's always be something different. Maybe that's just me, but "IT" to me has always been the boring stuff.

to each their own cup of tea...
I got my bachelor's in computer science. I found programming boring as can be, so when I got out, I stayed on as a systems administrator building servers / networks, etc. It's a heck of a lot of fun because you never know what that next phone call will bring!

Maybe a pig will step on a laptop, or a printer is out of toner, you never know with the people I work for (ag research... yes there is a lot of IT in ag research).

Re:What's IT? (4, Interesting)

bestinshow (985111) | about 6 years ago | (#23919485)

That's why any software developer/engineer/designer will never describe their role as IT. And I think that's fair enough really.

Mentally, I think business IT - point and click Windows administration, network maintenance, exchange account setup, etc, as tasks that someone can be trained to do. You see adverts for IT training, and that's the type of stuff they're talking about.

So yeah, there's a superiority complex if you actually studied CS, program for a living, know the insides and outsides of Unix and several languages, etc. Of course, you're still creating some internal business application for the most part ... Of course it helps if you actually get excited (mildly) by designing things properly, be they databases, program architectures, and so on.

Outside people find it hard to see the difference, it's computers, innit.

Re:What's IT? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#23919579)

What's IT? I'm about to be a new grad.

My company defines what IT is pretty well. On our department layout, we have one big department called IT, and under it we have two smaller departments called IT and Development. The IT subsection does what you listed above, and the larger IT section includes all the other, "not boring" things you mentioned. So, that's what IT is. Pretty simple, huh?

Proofreading (1, Offtopic)

coulbc (149394) | about 6 years ago | (#23919001)

I'd say timothy must find proofreading to be boring.

Re:Proofreading (2, Funny)

Mr. Sketch (111112) | about 6 years ago | (#23919225)

It's not that, he just doesn't have any spair time.

Spair?? (3, Interesting)

mpapet (761907) | about 6 years ago | (#23919007)

I loose my mind!

Seriously though. I don't know if I should be concerned or not. Part of being young is working with the mistaken belief they can become millionaires working for World Peace. (or whatever their heart's desire) Part of it also is they don't comprehend the complexity of the underlying delivery systems.

Now, if the Bank of Mom and Dad does not sustain their magical thinking, then they'll get in line pretty fast once they have to choose between washing their clothes or eating.

Re:Spair?? (0)

Farmer Tim (530755) | about 6 years ago | (#23919611)

Wait...you can wash clothes?

Of course IT is boring! (5, Insightful)

mrchaotica (681592) | about 6 years ago | (#23919009)

And it's not because it's nerdy (as the summary opines). It's simply because its about maintenance of poorly-designed shit. You might as well call it glorified janitorial work.

In contrast, creating new stuff, as actual programmers and engineers do -- that's interesting!

Re:Of course IT is boring! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#23919383)

but if your saying that the stuff people have to maintain is poorly built then wouldn't it mean that those things people are making are poor and ill-designed. I've worked both kind of jobs and the keeping it running job is a bit better than creating the ugly system

Re:Of course IT is boring! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#23919425)

Only if you're given new and interesting things to code. Most of us (at least from my experience) are code firefighters, doing little else than monstrous amounts of bug fixes.

But then again, maybe that's just because all the other programmers before me got too excited and forgot to actually code properly.

Re:Of course IT is boring! (2, Insightful)

NeoSkandranon (515696) | about 6 years ago | (#23919587)

Not necessarily.

Wait till you get a programming job that consists of coding the same thing over and over for a series of your company's clients.

Of course it's boring (4, Insightful)

Overd0g (232552) | about 6 years ago | (#23919019)

All you do is sit and type all day and have absolutely no respect from society. It's worse than being an accountant.

Is this news? Is this bad? (4, Insightful)

swm (171547) | about 6 years ago | (#23919031)

FTA:

        Non-IT graduates think a job in IT would be "boring,"
        despite its good career prospects.

IOW:

People don't enter fields that they aren't interested in.
Film at 11.

Re:Is this news? Is this bad? (1)

Bandman (86149) | about 6 years ago | (#23919619)

I don't know, I think it goes a little beyond that. I think paleontology would be really interesting, but I have no desire to learn the biology that comes with that field.

Same with some of the theoretical math and physics, but I don't have the strong math background to do that.

The overall view of our field as boring probably just means that it's not generally understood what we do. Probably related to the view of computers and IT as a utility rather than a department.

Web users. (-1, Offtopic)

suck_burners_rice (1258684) | about 6 years ago | (#23919035)

Most web users can easily look up how to spell spair, but don't.

As opposed to... (5, Insightful)

SatanicPuppy (611928) | about 6 years ago | (#23919037)

Shit, I wish my job was boring. When something breaks it gets so exciting I worry that I'm going to keel over dead.

Anyway, the damn snowflakes need to suck it up. What entry level job isn't boring? You put in your crappy dues, so that you get a better job down the road. I've worked all kinds of jobs, and they're pretty much all boring, even things you wouldn't think would be boring. I did a stint doing wildlife tagging, where I got to roam around on a four wheeler shooting things with a tranq gun, and that was astoundingly boring...99% of the time you just sat and waited and let the mosquitos gorge themselves on your blood.

Passion (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#23919241)

What entry level job isn't boring? You put in your crappy dues, so that you get a better job down the road. I've worked all kinds of jobs, and they're pretty much all boring, even things you wouldn't think would be boring.

Well, you get folks like Steve Jobs and other employers who only want folks who are passionate about their work. It's really hard to be passionate about something you don't like. You can't have it both ways. Either pay your dues and be bored with a sucky job, or do something you're passionate about.

Re:As opposed to... (1)

Bandman (86149) | about 6 years ago | (#23919673)

It depends on the day, but my job is boring probably half the time. At least, boring as would be considered by non-IT people. Fighting low-level fires is pretty mundane for the most part. The really interesting problems, or the ones that stretch your knowledge are the good ones. They just don't come along that often.

Surely!!! (3, Insightful)

mtconnol (1170419) | about 6 years ago | (#23919045)

Surely with the number of young people who crave their very own automobile, you would have a large number who want to become mechanics! read: consumption of a commodity != desire to produce commodity. If it did, I would be in the petroleum business.

Thank goodness (4, Insightful)

MBGMorden (803437) | about 6 years ago | (#23919051)

Back in the late 90's/early 2000's WAY too many people were jumping into IT because it was the new field du jour which was supposed to make those starry eyed high school kids (some even drop outs) rich with no real effort. Them oversaturating the industry with underqualified and uninterested workers half-killed IT over here. It almost felt unfair working on my Computer Science degree with people who flat out hated computers and always wanted to copy each other's programming projects to pass classes, simply because they though that was the way to go for a good job. The industry could use a bit of thinning out if it means that we're left with actual bright and enthusiastic people who really do like doing this type of work.

IT folks (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#23919561)

You only have a problem with it because you're in the industry. You see, a bunch of us who really liked other things discovered that we needed to make a living, so we went into IT. You people here on /. love to make jokes about liberal arts majors saying "You want fries with that?" because that's all that they're qualified for. Well, I got news for you. A well paying career is going to attract folks who need something to pay the bills. Just ask Doctors and Lawyers. I would LOVE to be a full time artist but the field is so saturated that there are 3 qualified people for every job. No thank you! I knew a Doctor who is a classical pianist - a very good one. But he wanted a family and he knew that he couldn't have one on a musician's pay. What, you want him to go on welfare because he followed his passion?!?

So you "they only got into it for the money" people should shut up.

Re:Thank goodness (1)

BoyIHateMicrosoft! (1044838) | about 6 years ago | (#23919565)

I completely hear ya on that one!!! When I started school in 2002, the signed me up for a computer networking degree because they told me programming wasn't for girls. They said women had a better success rate as Network Administrators. Anyways I had to take it because it's all they offered at night and I couldn't quit my full time job. Anyways to your point, and mine for that matter, I went to school with this lady who's only reason for getting into computers AT ALL was because the school promised to find her a 40,00 USD per year job when she got her bachelors. She was ALWAYS begging me to do her programming and basically all of her homework. People like that were all over my school. I had this strong urge to create a virus and give it to one of them as their programming homework and see if they could ruin the school's computers. Never did though. Didn't feel like going to jail and all. The lady I went to school with now is a substitute teacher and hasn't worked in IT ever. So glad she got to go to school free and I had to pay.

Re:Thank goodness (1)

myenigmaself (602643) | about 6 years ago | (#23919653)

Agreed, and beyond that a little thinning of the herd makes developers less of a commodity. Cash money.

The truth is not stranger than fiction (1)

wombatmobile (623057) | about 6 years ago | (#23919057)

"Despite good job prospects, graduates think that a job in IT would be boring. Is this because of the fact that Bill Gates has made the whole industry look nerdy?"

Could be because "IT" includes mundane jobs.

Um qualified even? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#23919085)

Just b/c these younger people buy and live online does not mean they're in any way qualified to work in IT. Sure, they might not be interested, but lets not make an unnecessary connection that they should be in IT b/c they grew up with a mouse at the end of the umbilical cord.

not really (1)

moankey (142715) | about 6 years ago | (#23919101)

Boring no, repetitive yes.

I suppose repetition could lead to boredom.

Ok nevermind.

It is (2, Insightful)

Thelasko (1196535) | about 6 years ago | (#23919103)

Is this because of the fact that Bill Gates has made the whole industry look nerdy?
It is nerdy. Also, from my limited experience in the area, most of the tasks are repetitive.

My limited experience was installing new machines in an office building one summer. For the first few weeks, I imaged disks. This consisted of reading The Ultimate Hitchhiker's Guide and pushing enter when prompted. The rest of the summer was spent teaching people how to use their new machines. I'm sure there is more to it, but I have a suspicion most of the work is dealing with PEBKAC.

Good job prospects? Wtf? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#23919113)

I don't have enough fingers and toes to count all the IT folks I know that are unemployed or underemployed right now. This article is more mystifying than all the "engineering shortage" bullshit I've seen thrown around.

yeah, there are jobs out there if you want to make a crappy salary and work in a military regime. If not, might as well go for a different line of work.

Who cares? (5, Insightful)

gsslay (807818) | about 6 years ago | (#23919117)

"But over 60% of non-computing students do not wish to enter the sector because they think it will be boring."

Who cares what non-computing students think? I can think of dozens of other job sectors that I suspect would bore me stupid, that's why I had the sense not to study for qualifications in them.

I suspect that these graduates all have a nasty shock coming to them anyway, courtesy of real life. Most jobs are "boring" in some way. That's why you get paid to do them rather than doing them for fun.

Re:Who cares? (1)

Sockatume (732728) | about 6 years ago | (#23919417)

I imagine if you ask most people why they went into field Z and not fields A through Y, the answer is that they thought they'd be boring, or something along those lines. Especially graduates - you want to be out there doing tree surgery, that's what you're really excited about, and management or high energy physics or engineering sound dull to you.

Over 60% (1)

QuietLagoon (813062) | about 6 years ago | (#23919133)

From TFA, But over 60% of non-computing students do not wish to enter the sector because they think it will be boring.

That means about one-third of the non-computing students think IT is exciting.

Nothing to see here, move along....

Low unemployment and kids these days (3, Insightful)

rumblin'rabbit (711865) | about 6 years ago | (#23919135)

This is what happens when you have 5% unemployment over a sustained period of time. In my neck of the woods, where unemployment is even lower, high school kids have their pick of summer jobs. They learn they can be picky about where they work.

This is not necessarily a bad thing (low unemployment is better then the alternative) but it does bring with it a certain attitude in the young.

Those young whippersnappers should try haying in 95 F (35 C) weather. They would learn to appreciate an IT job, I tell ya.

Re:Low unemployment and kids these days (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#23919661)

Oh man, I've done haying in the middle of August, and yes, it does suck more than finding WTFs in code you're maintaining.

Oh come on! (3, Insightful)

Junior J. Junior III (192702) | about 6 years ago | (#23919145)

Computers were nerdy WAAAAY before Bill Gates came on the scene.

Seriously, BillG gets way too much recognition and way too much blame. All he is is an obscenely rich, lucky bastard who happened to be in the right place at the right time and played his cards just about perfectly.

Ummmmm.... (5, Funny)

rindeee (530084) | about 6 years ago | (#23919181)

I'm not a big fan of Bill, but blaming him for making IT look nerdy....? C'mon. I think we as a community handle that pretty well ourselves.

Re:Ummmmm.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#23919681)

I think we should Blame should be placed on George W. Bush...

they're right (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#23919219)

There are some exciting jobs in IT. Unfortunately they fill fast, so the vast majority of us are stuck with the tedious ones. (CareerBuilder is filled with database administration jobs. Frown.)

Thank god for Slashdot (3, Funny)

xpuppykickerx (1290760) | about 6 years ago | (#23919245)

or the day would drag on for even longer.

Good money for creative work in decent conditions (4, Informative)

bestinshow (985111) | about 6 years ago | (#23919259)

Sadly many IT jobs are boring, consisting of pressing F5 repeatedly on various websites throughout the day.

Some jobs within IT are very interesting, because they are creative and require actual brain utility. Programming is the obvious example. Hell, even coming up with good configurations for sysadmin can be interesting. Point-and-clicking windows admin stuff must be dire though, and is probably where this negative image is coming from.

In much the same way as I find car mechanics boring, I can see why some people would find programming boring, because they don't appreciate the creative aspect. However being paid a reasonably good wage in an in-demand industry to sit inside at a computer is pretty damned good, even if you don't get to ride a road crusher or steamroller, or fly fighter jets (which I imagine is pretty boring for the 95% of the time you are on the ground actually).

Oh, and memo to students: Work is that boring thing we'd rather not do that allows us to pay the bills, buy that exciting car, buy that house to do up, eat that thrilling meal with friends and have a great time, etc. Get over it, but if you do stay away, demand will surely mean higher wages for us already in the industry.

yes it is. (4, Insightful)

Maxo-Texas (864189) | about 6 years ago | (#23919277)

For the first 20 years, being a developer was cool. You were a hero, you worked during emergencies, you had a bit of freedom as a result, the pay was decent- never superior unless you became a contractor. And there is/was a problem with constantly becoming obsolete and having to retrain a lot more than other professions.

I finally left to be project leader and then a team leader. I see my developers suffering from the boredom.

It's mostly SOX. It's also a view of developers as generic by management. Executives do NOT WANT heroes. They want grey reliable processes that consistently take 3 times as long (and are not random between 1/10th as long and 10 times as long without anyway to predict it).

Programming in business is just not fun like it used to be. It's okay- but you code about 1/10th as much as you used to because of all the paperwork overhead. And you are a LOT more accountable. this is a good thing for slackers but it stifles the good people.

This is good news. (1)

Tubal-Cain (1289912) | about 6 years ago | (#23919361)

This means I get to be a bit picky when I need a job.

The Places with lots of PHBs and TPS report driven (1)

Joe The Dragon (967727) | about 6 years ago | (#23919363)

The Places with lots of PHB's and TPS report driven office are boring. Even more so when you spend more time of paper work then real work.

IT just can't compare to..... (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#23919377)

the exciting fast paced life of working the drive through at the local burger barn for minimum wage.

That's why they're NON IT grads (-1, Offtopic)

gelfling (6534) | about 6 years ago | (#23919379)

I would rather catheterize my own penis than become a CPA. That's why I didn't go to accounting school.

I did! (4, Interesting)

everphilski (877346) | about 6 years ago | (#23919381)

In 1999, I was debating what to do for my college career, aerospace engineering or IT. I had two jobs in high school, one working for a mom and pop ISP, the other working for a software company as a "junior network administrator", and was programming in c++ for fun, so I knew what IT was about. I also had an extreme love for space.

I figured, push comes to shove, IT was something I could pick up without a 4 year degree, if I needed something to fall back on, but aerospace engineering you really needed that piece of paper (and then a masters, and probably a PhD if you want to do the cool stuff). Plus, as an engineer, a lot of times you get to write or maintain code if you are in the design world, so you can incorporate elements of IT into your job as needed.

I have never experienced an ounce of regret.

Expectations (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#23919409)

It's all about expectations held by new grads.

New grads expect to be given the lead developer role, the keys to the server room, and a license to print money.

Guess what? It doesn't work that way.

You will start by being the windows reinstaller, cable puller , desktop lugger, etc.

Pull your weight, and then you graduate to 2nd level helpdesk.

Still pull your weight, good, now you can do some php development work for the web guys.

You have a useless piece of paper, and most of you have little to no experience. Expect to start at the bottom of the ladder/food chain.

Re:Expectations (2, Insightful)

jedidiah (1196) | about 6 years ago | (#23919599)

> You will start by being the windows reinstaller, cable puller , desktop lugger, etc. ...ah, no.

If that's all that you can manage after getting out of school then you wasted your time.

bill gates reference (1, Insightful)

192939495969798999 (58312) | about 6 years ago | (#23919419)

1. bill gates doesn't work in IT, he was the CEO of a huge company, which couldn't be less related to IT.

2. bill gates is worth billions of dollars. There's nothing boring about having billions of dollars.

3. IT jobs are boring but they beat the crap out of day labor, warehouse, etc. in about every way... so I would seriously consider how much work you think a job should be before you turn down an IT job.

I want to be a toaster when I grow up (1)

DustoneGT (969310) | about 6 years ago | (#23919435)

People working in IT are like appliances. You do what you are programmed to do and get no respect. I had several IT jobs and finally realized that I had to leave the field. The job sucked and everybody was an asshole when things broke.

Are you seriously blaming Bill Gates for this? (1)

Ecifer (953262) | about 6 years ago | (#23919453)

I mean really? The man is the poster child for why you SHOULD get into IT... I don't think anyone looks at Bill Gates, with his billions of dollars, happy family, and from an outsider's point of view "good life," and says "Nope... don't want to be a nerd like that!"

People think it's boring because, generally speaking, it can get VERY monotonous. If you don't like programming (regardless of how you define the word), you won't like IT. If you don't like long hours trying to figure out why something isn't working on 1 out of 1000 machines, you probably won't like IT either. I'm not going to get into a "You might be a redneck if..." stream here, but I think you get my point.

If the corporate world is honestly having problems finding IT people, they should either (A) Outsource to a reliable partner, or (B) offer more money. Long story short, IT is like any other job on the planet, if you offer people enough money, they'll gladly do it.

Oh Yeah?!?!?!?! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#23919477)

I't OK that I'm "bored".

I'M RICH BITCH!!!!

Really? (1)

CrazyTalk (662055) | about 6 years ago | (#23919589)

Mod article headline as "Obvious"

Who cares? Let the market decide (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#23919593)

Boring or not, IT is the core of many a business now so it's not like it's going anywhere. If new grads look upon it as boring and choose to stay away from it, fine. Those already in the industry will have better job security and those willing to enter can expect better benefits and pay. Supply and demand, baby.

So ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#23919605)

I am curious, some people sound like the only entry level IT jobs available is support? I am too old to understand, my first programming job was not exactly easy to find, I spent a couple of months, 6 maybe. After that, I am on easy street.

Maybe these new grads are in smaller city? I live in large city all my life, and have no idea how tough it could be in smaller city.

At the risk of sounding bitter (1)

daveatneowindotnet (1309197) | about 6 years ago | (#23919607)

GOOD, get out of my vocation. Go flood the nursing schools or whatever is the flavor of the week profession at the moment. Now if we can get around to clearing up all these Paper Certifications floating around we can really get to business.

Spair? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#23919649)

Maybe they avoid IT because so many people like the submitter don't know how to spell "spare".

Well, look at that... (1)

Turiko (1259966) | about 6 years ago | (#23919655)

I think IT would be the perfect job for me. I'm very interersted in it, and next year, i'm going into network management, wich is more about computer hard- and software then just networks ;).
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