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Lego Secret Vault Contains All Sets In History

kdawson posted more than 6 years ago | from the memory-lane dept.

Toys 266

An anonymous reader writes "Gizmodo has an exclusive video and feature of one of the most heavily guarded secrets in Lego: the security vault where they store all the Lego sets ever created, new in their boxes. 4,720 sets from 1953 to 2008. Really amazing stuff and a trip down memory lane to every person who has played with the magic bricks. All combined, the collection must be worth millions, not only because of the collector value, but also because Lego uses it as a safeguard in copyright and patent cases."

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cool tour, but no real surprise (4, Insightful)

zappepcs (820751) | more than 6 years ago | (#23921411)

FTFS

but also because Lego uses it as a safeguard in copyright and patent cases
This is why this is no surprise to me. I believe that pretty much every manufacturer does this.

Re:cool tour, but no real surprise (4, Insightful)

WaltBusterkeys (1156557) | more than 6 years ago | (#23921507)

Still, it's pretty cool. Even if it is useful for trademark cases, you have to figure that sets from 50 years ago are there mostly just for the awesome historic value and as inspiration to the engineers.

Re:cool tour, but no real surprise (5, Funny)

berwiki (989827) | more than 6 years ago | (#23921587)

I heard Microsoft burned every copy of Windows-ME. Along with all their source-code. That way, they are committed to using the same binaries forever.

Re:cool tour, but no real surprise (0, Redundant)

Bob-taro (996889) | more than 6 years ago | (#23921921)

I heard Microsoft burned every copy of Windows-ME.

Modded "Informative"? Really? It sounds like it was meant to be a joke.

Re:cool tour, but no real surprise (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23922083)

no karma for funny.

Re:cool tour, but no real surprise (5)

Amouth (879122) | more than 6 years ago | (#23922157)

that is why i use underrated

Re:cool tour, but no real surprise (5, Informative)

spun (1352) | more than 6 years ago | (#23922273)

No karma for underrated, either, because there is no meta-moderation on under and overrated.

Re:cool tour, but no real surprise (2, Interesting)

Mikkeles (698461) | more than 6 years ago | (#23922207)

'Modded "Informative"? Really? It sounds like it was meant to be a joke.'

You obviously don't know Microsoft ;^)

Re:cool tour, but no real surprise (5, Funny)

MrNaz (730548) | more than 6 years ago | (#23922641)

Given Microsoft's history on security, if they *did* have a vault, I'd guess it would be made from Lego.

Re:cool tour, but no real surprise (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23922865)

I'm shocked the /. crowd can turn even a story like this into a MS bash.

I'm sure some of you would be in marketing now if you hadn't encountered those little bricks when your brains were still in the mold. Show some f*ing respect.

Re:cool tour, but no real surprise (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23922881)

I heard Microsoft burned every copy of Windows-ME.
Just like all their customers.

Re:cool tour, but no real surprise (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23923043)

Actually, it was the customers who got burned.

Re:cool tour, but no real surprise (5, Informative)

Speare (84249) | more than 6 years ago | (#23921675)

One would think this is the case, but many companies fail this. It takes an archivists' mindset to institute this as policy in the early days of a small company.

In fact I know that Microsoft was pretty bad about this in years past. Even though storage is cheap, they have had to ask employees for old products like MS-DOS 1.1 or MS-DOS 2.0 floppies from time to time, as the official archivists were unable to produce the "silvers" (copies from their golden masters sent to reproduction) or in fact any boxed copies at all.

Re:cool tour, but no real surprise (1)

morgan_greywolf (835522) | more than 6 years ago | (#23922389)

I wonder how much they'll pay me for my copy of Windows 1.0....

Re:cool tour, but no real surprise (3, Interesting)

sm62704 (957197) | more than 6 years ago | (#23921955)

I'm wondering what Lego holds patents on? Also, what patents they once held that have expired? I remember Legos from when I was a kid, and I'm over 50. The design patent on the original blocks has to have expired long ago.

Re:cool tour, but no real surprise (5, Informative)

Mikkeles (698461) | more than 6 years ago | (#23922325)

I don't think they had patents. They tried using Trade Mark infringement law to prevent competition, but lost [www.cbc.ca] in Canada.

Re:cool tour, but no real surprise (5, Informative)

Mikkeles (698461) | more than 6 years ago | (#23922391)

Whoops! I'm WRONG. They did have patents which expired in Canada in 1988. The Trade Mark dispute they did lose, however.

(Goes and beats himself with fanfold paper).

Re:cool tour, but no real surprise (2, Insightful)

Bombula (670389) | more than 6 years ago | (#23922249)

I believe that pretty much every manufacturer does this.. Exactly. So what gives with this line in the article summary: one of the most heavily guarded secrets in Lego? Why would either the existence or the location of such a vault be a secret? That's like saying the vault at a major bank is a heavily guarded secret - it makes no sense, since you expect major banks to have vaults. Heavily guarded, yes. Secret? No.

You would think that but this is not the rule... (5, Insightful)

gmezero (4448) | more than 6 years ago | (#23922433)

What Lego has here is more the exception to the rule.

And on a separate note, am I the only one here horrified to see these people handling these boxes with their bare hands. For crying out loud, I hope they at least made that guy wash his hands first before letting him finger everything up.

Sheesh.

Re:cool tour, but no real surprise (2, Insightful)

foobsr (693224) | more than 6 years ago | (#23922931)

I believe that pretty much every manufacturer does this.

Indeed?! [genua.de]

CC.

In Korea... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23921415)

Lego bricks are for old people.

Bonus points if... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23921469)

They would have totally gotten bonus points in my book if the vault and locking mechanism were actually made of Legos. It's totally doable (people have made far bigger things out of Legos), but probably insecure if you can just cut through the Legos with a Sawz-All. Still, it would have been nice if they'd made it LOOK like it were made of Legos. The Lego signs are a nice touch along those lines.

Re:Bonus points if... (1)

Chris Burke (6130) | more than 6 years ago | (#23921671)

It's totally doable (people have made far bigger things out of Legos), but probably insecure if you can just cut through the Legos with a Sawz-All.

Would it be considered cheating to make the vault legos out of steel, or any other non-plastic material? I personally think that'd be fine. And yes, it would be worth a lot of bonus points. :)

Re:Bonus points if... (2, Interesting)

Amouth (879122) | more than 6 years ago | (#23921947)

i would love to have a set of metal legos

get them in diffrent alloys.. make a car.. could be fun

Re:Bonus points if... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23922329)

Wow, look at this [antiville.fr] ! Awesome!

Re:Bonus points if... (1)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 6 years ago | (#23921879)

I doubt they designed it with public presentation in mind.

Re:Bonus points if... (3, Funny)

Gewalt (1200451) | more than 6 years ago | (#23922151)

Even a Faux wall would have been sweet. Or a decorative mount for the passkey device... something... anything. ugh, why'd you have to mention that!?!?!?

Re:Bonus points if... (4, Funny)

steelfood (895457) | more than 6 years ago | (#23922769)

It'd be even more awesome if they had to assemble/disassemble the pieces in just the right way to gain access. And probably even more secure.

Additional Photo Of Vault and Facility... (4, Funny)

TheLazySci-FiAuthor (1089561) | more than 6 years ago | (#23921471)

It looks Impenetrable! [hoernersburg.net]

Re:Additional Photo Of Vault and Facility... (5, Funny)

eastlight_jim (1070084) | more than 6 years ago | (#23921661)

Not to mention highly confusing [artinthepicture.com] once inside and ringed by a darstadly innescapable staircase [umich.edu] that's been baffling would-be thieves for many a year.

And the asshole handled it without gloves??? (4, Funny)

johnny cashed (590023) | more than 6 years ago | (#23921513)

That's a 928 Galaxy Space Explorer, too bad it isn't in the original shrink wrap....

Re:And the asshole handled it without gloves??? (1)

192939495969798999 (58312) | more than 6 years ago | (#23922125)

I had a Lego Space Galaxy Explorer, but I didn't even know it until I saw the box in this picture, and I remembered building the damned thing. It looks easy now but I remember it being pretty hard, which is a testament to how long ago it really was... way cool. I bet I can finally get the missing satellite dish pieces to my lego moon set in there!

Re:And the asshole handled it without gloves??? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23922347)

I think you might be able to find that part on BrickLink (sp?). I'd love to find you a link, but I'm betting that it's not work safe.

Re:And the asshole handled it without gloves??? (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23922381)

I don't think it came shrinkwrapped. The cardboard flap opened so that buyers could see the parts.

Re:And the asshole handled it without gloves??? (1)

LordNimon (85072) | more than 6 years ago | (#23923009)

I have a 928 Galaxy Space Explorer at home. What's so special about it?

Storage (3, Interesting)

Solokron (198043) | more than 6 years ago | (#23921521)

I like how each of the storage isles are compressed against each other initially and can then be opened with a crank.

Re:Storage (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23921777)

It's called compact shelving. Libraries have been using it for decades.

Re:Storage (1)

colmore (56499) | more than 6 years ago | (#23922105)

I'd love to know how many people have been accidentally crushed in that kind of shelving. It's probably not zero.

Re:Storage (1)

fishbowl (7759) | more than 6 years ago | (#23922533)

>I'd love to know how many people have been accidentally crushed in that kind of shelving. It's probably not zero.

Most designs have an interlock to prevent this. The real problem is that in areas with seismic activity, the tracks
warp. This can be a serious nuisance.

Re:Storage (1)

isorox (205688) | more than 6 years ago | (#23922767)

I'd love to know how many people have been accidentally crushed in that kind of shelving. It's probably not zero.

Yup, it's less than that.

Re:Storage (1)

6Yankee (597075) | more than 6 years ago | (#23921795)

Had those in the stockroom, in the McJail where I did my servitude.

If you got assigned to clean the freezer, it was a miserable task: -18C in a thin uniform for at least an hour. But if you volunteered, saving someone you really hated from having to do it and giving them your stockroom detail instead, then it was bliss.

"Virtue is its own reward"? Hell no. It had more to do with the ten-litre bags of ketchup you'd burst by ramming the stockroom shelves together. :D

Re:Storage (1)

zippthorne (748122) | more than 6 years ago | (#23922223)

And you didn't call OSHA, because??

Re:Storage (2, Informative)

eastlight_jim (1070084) | more than 6 years ago | (#23921821)

That's a pretty standard layout for many archival places. Library stacks are nearly always like this - there's too many journals and books in most large libraries for open shelf access for all so the older stuff is graded by size and put into stacks. Often, you can approach nearly complete space usage with well designed shelves and identical volume sizes. Tours of the Bodleian library book stacks in Oxford are available to members of the University. They're really something to behold.

Re:Storage (1, Redundant)

Dekortage (697532) | more than 6 years ago | (#23921869)

High-density moveable shelving [google.com] is common in companies with lots of things to file. Check a hospital records office, for example.

Re:Storage (0, Redundant)

DerekLyons (302214) | more than 6 years ago | (#23922511)

Compact Shelving [google.com] . It's been around for years now and is pretty much standard for archival storage. It can be a pain to operate and slows access down somewhat, but it is extremely space efficient.

Star Wars models (1)

CosaNostra Pizza Inc (1299163) | more than 6 years ago | (#23921543)

Wish they still sold the X-Wing and Tie-Fighter models.

Re:Star Wars models (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23921583)

shut up, tard.

Re:Star Wars models (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23922001)

There are a few sites out there that still have them. It will cost you probably about 50-80 bucks each. The BIG one probably 200 or more. http://www.bricklink.com/index.asp [bricklink.com]

But for free there is
http://www.ldraw.org/ [ldraw.org]
and
http://www.peeron.com/ [peeron.com]

I have been having so much fun with this these programs recreating virtual lego sets and I dont have to DIG through my massive box of em. Plus the programs are more cad like (and have more pieces) then the offical lego editor.

IP (3, Interesting)

bjackson1 (953136) | more than 6 years ago | (#23921545)

When I first read it, I assumed it was going to be a data store of all possible combinations of every Lego block ever created so that all possible designs were prior art and their property.

Lego needs to work on this.

Re:IP (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23922327)

My first year teacher at mathematics (Soren Eilers at University of Copenhagen) has put a lot of work into the counting problem of combining six two-by-four Lego blocks. It's a huge problem to figure out how many ways you can combine six of those, and he describes how he with mathematics and programming methods approaches this problem at http://www.math.ku.dk/~eilers/lego.html [math.ku.dk] .

Lego themselves computed in 1974 that the ways you can combine those six blocks is 102,981,500 - and that number has been referenced ever since in different media - and it's wrong.

Now, if you want to compute the total number of possibilities, bear in mind what Soren Eilers writes on his site:

the mathematics of the total number of combinations is so irregular that it is very difficult to come up with a formula for it. Thus one has to essentially go through all the possibilities. Based on our data, we estimate the total number of ways to combine 25 two-by-four LEGO bricks to be a 47 digit number.

With the current efficiency of our computer programs we further estimate that it would take us something like

130,881,177,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000

years to compute the correct number. After some 5,000,000,000 years we will have to move our computer out of the Solar system, as the Sun is expected to become a red giant at about that time.

The space sets were the best (5, Interesting)

pudding7 (584715) | more than 6 years ago | (#23921559)

Oh man, the Galaxy Explorer was the best! Seems like after the space sets, all the pieces started getting to specialized. Giant plates that could hardly be used to make anything other than what the instructions said.

I remember having dozens of little bins full of the hinge pieces, light bulb looking things, and space man helmets.

Good times.

Re:The space sets were the best (2, Interesting)

owlstead (636356) | more than 6 years ago | (#23921995)

Yup, I dub that. Everytime that I take a look at Lego nowadays I can see tons of figures and stuff, but few pieces. Of course I changed that for my nephew when I bought a very big "Lego 25 years" box of standardized Lego. There were too few "plates" though. The grey plates were excellent to build on, both for technical Lego as well as for castles and the like.

But the galaxy explorer hit the spot, no need to take out the other sets. I went right back to the time that I and my brother were building cable cars right between the stairs and the table on the opposite of the room. Of course this memory includes many crashes and half strangled adults (I won't repeat my fathers rather good humored curses here). Good times indeed.

Re:The space sets were the best (1)

93,000 (150453) | more than 6 years ago | (#23922367)

Still have the galaxy explorer, and a bunch of other space and castle sets from when I was a kid. It's just that all of the sets are in a box. One box. Mixed together. Still have the instructions though, so in theory I still have the 'sets' (sorta).

Introduced my kids (6 & 9) to lego last year, and we play with my old ones all the time. I know, that makes me a substandard nerd, but what the hell. Lots of fun.

God damnit (5, Funny)

sunami88 (1074925) | more than 6 years ago | (#23921577)

Now I have to go change my pants. Thanks Slashdot.

Re:God damnit (4, Funny)

UnknowingFool (672806) | more than 6 years ago | (#23921805)

Now I have to go change my pants. Thanks Slashdot.

Now I can never play with Legos again without throwing up a little in my mouth. Thanks, sunami88.

Re:God damnit (4, Funny)

rodney dill (631059) | more than 6 years ago | (#23921843)

Jees guys, I'm never gonna be able to eat Legos again.

Edible Legos "cuz we've got too many 3-year olds" (1)

James McP (3700) | more than 6 years ago | (#23922319)

Sure you can. They even come in fruity flavors. [consumerist.com]

Re:God damnit (1)

andphi (899406) | more than 6 years ago | (#23921951)

Clearly, I'm not enough of a geek. All I did was get a little misty-eyed when they showed the Castle and Pirate sets. Those were my favorites.

Re:God damnit (2, Interesting)

CowboyNealOption (1262194) | more than 6 years ago | (#23922179)

At least now I have item number 40 on my "list of things to do when I am the last person on the planet". How cool would it be to build a life sized house out of these legos???

Re:God damnit (2)

superslacker87 (998043) | more than 6 years ago | (#23922307)

My wife gets mad at me every time I mention doing the exact same thing. I have enough room in the back yard to emulate my home exactly. She just doesn't get the geekiness sometimes. </sigh>

Re:God damnit (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23922175)

Now I have to go change my pants. Thanks Slashdot.
Did you soil the front or the back?

Legos (5, Interesting)

Dave Tucker Online (1310703) | more than 6 years ago | (#23921699)

That was fun to watch.

I never followed any of the Lego instructions, though. So while I owned many of those sets, I never built any of those things.

Was there anybody else who would just dump open the packages, mix it in with all your other pieces, and build random crap...like flying boats that deploy ninjas?

Re:Legos (2, Insightful)

peragrin (659227) | more than 6 years ago | (#23921801)

I would build the intended item in question and then start to modify it, mixing, adding and rearranging pieces until I was happy for a week or two.

Lego the ultimate toy for those with ADD. It is never done.

Re:Legos (5, Funny)

pomegranatesix (809489) | more than 6 years ago | (#23921983)

Funny. My flying lego boats deployed pirates. I think we may have to have a throwdown.

Re:Legos (1)

Amouth (879122) | more than 6 years ago | (#23922451)

same here.. i liked jsut having the random blocks and building what i could.. my favorite was a sub i built.. it worked quite well

Re:Legos - free form creation (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23922927)

That was the entire point of the earlier lego sets, and why so many of the newer sets are so crappy. If you buy a lego set where you snap seven pieces together to make Darth Maul's speeder bike, all you have is a crappy Star Wars (TM) toy. Legos are imagination toys.

easier for objects than data? (3, Insightful)

peter303 (12292) | more than 6 years ago | (#23921737)

I've been in several organizations from universities to oil companies where large amounts of data have been lost due to system conversions, downsizings and geographic moves. I find it remarkable if a company can save several decades of history.

My favorite Lego kit.... (5, Interesting)

joeytmann (664434) | more than 6 years ago | (#23921749)

By far, the Auto Chassis. Rack and pinion steering, v-4 motor with moving pistons, 3-speed gear box, fully independent front and rear suspension, oh and adjustable seats. Was an awesome kit to put together.

Re:My favorite Lego kit.... (1)

6Yankee (597075) | more than 6 years ago | (#23921875)

If you liked that one, try this one: http://guide.lugnet.com/set/8448 [lugnet.com]

V-6, 5-speed box (plus reverse), suspension... My favourite, definitely.

Re:My favorite Lego kit.... (1)

joeytmann (664434) | more than 6 years ago | (#23922829)

Wow! That is cool. probably hard to find now.

Re:My favorite Lego kit.... (1)

Sabz5150 (1230938) | more than 6 years ago | (#23922355)

My favorite set went by the name "Dacta". Legos + computer = geek heaven.

Lego Colorado (5, Interesting)

smellsofbikes (890263) | more than 6 years ago | (#23921855)

When I was a kid, LEGO decided to license out their manufacture to a Samsonite factory in Loveland, Colorado (right next door to the Hewlett Packard facility that was the first place HP had outsourced from its birth in Silicon Valley, as it happens.) The factory also made luggage and kids' bikes. It was cool because up until 2006 it still looked like it had been made of LEGO bricks: the windows were 2x4 clear bricks on-end, 12 feet high. They made all sorts of weird LEGO stuff, and I wonder sometimes if it was all official -- the injection molding dies came straight from Denmark, and were very, very carefully accounted for, but the plant also built other unusual LEGO sets like big crude-looking gears that only sort of meshed with the standard LEGO bricks.
My childhood was filled with disappointment because no matter how many LEGO kits I managed to get, some of my friends, whose parents worked at the plant, had trash-bags full of floor sweepings and could make playhouses we could crawl into with their bricks. (Including a lot of weird off-colors and bricks that weren't shaped quite right.) The local library had, and probably still has, several LEGO buildings the size of cars, beautifully designed and put together. I was upset that they were glued together, making all those parts worthless. Okay, I'm still upset by that.
Anyway. I've just always wondered if the rumors were true and the little Colorado plant did create some graymarket LEGO kits that Billund doesn't have. LEGO yanked their license after only a few years because they were doing a poor job, but maybe, just maybe, I have a couple LEGO pieces that aren't represented in that vault in Billund.

Not much of a secret (1)

slashkitty (21637) | more than 6 years ago | (#23921859)

now that there is a video of it. Do you think they just put the word secret in the title to get more clicks?

My first toy (1)

wandazulu (265281) | more than 6 years ago | (#23921917)

The first toy I can remember was a small Lego police car set. I think it was comprised of a black "plane", two opaque, slanted pieces, two sets of wheels, and I believe it was labeled as police car because the pieces were black and white. I have never ever ever forgotten how much fun I had, and I can still see my parents now, giving it to me, in a little white box. I think I was maybe, maybe, 4 years old.

It's really nice to know that there is a place that has that exact set, and maybe, if I'm really lucky, I'll be able to see it again.

This journalist is so emo (3, Insightful)

superskippy (772852) | more than 6 years ago | (#23922005)

Here he is in this vault of cool stuff, and all he can talk about his his "feelings" and how life is all so hard.

Remember journalists! The first rule of journalism is "Nobody cares about you and your life. If you are really lucky, they might just be interested in your subject, but they certainly aren't interested in you!"

Re:This journalist is so emo (2, Insightful)

syrinx (106469) | more than 6 years ago | (#23922117)

If you're reading Gizmodo (or Slashdot, for that matter), and you're looking for good journalism, you've made a wrong turn somewhere.

Re:This journalist is so emo (5, Insightful)

jamrock (863246) | more than 6 years ago | (#23922563)

Here he is in this vault of cool stuff, and all he can talk about his his "feelings" and how life is all so hard. Remember journalists! The first rule of journalism is "Nobody cares about you and your life. If you are really lucky, they might just be interested in your subject, but they certainly aren't interested in you!"
Are you disappointed that he didn't just present an illustrated list of all 4,720 sets? This wasn't scientific reporting, or a dry treatise on new mathematical discoveries, and even then the very best journalists do include a subjective element in order for other humans to connect to the story. The journalist was attempting to express how the tour took him back to his childhood, and judging from many of the comments here, he succeeded in evoking the same feeling in others. The best journalism has a human reference, and strikes a fine balance between being too removed and being too involved. Maybe he strayed too far over the line, but it's not true that the journalist's feelings about a subject don't matter or are unimportant to the story.

Not a journalist - a blogger (1)

DerekLyons (302214) | more than 6 years ago | (#23922565)

He's not a journalist, he's a blogger. For bloggers it is all about them.

That Big Yellow Castle (2, Funny)

cattlemaster (1311511) | more than 6 years ago | (#23922033)

Man, that big yellow castle really makes the old memories rush back. That one was my first and favorite Lego set. Nice to see it again. I remember modernizing my castle with some computer unit pieces borrowed from a space set.

Building instructions from 1958 to 2007 (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23922073)

Building instructions from 1958 to 2007 on this site:
http://www.hccamsterdam.nl/brickfactory/year/index.htm

My favorite part (4, Funny)

ScentCone (795499) | more than 6 years ago | (#23922079)

My favorite part was where they showed the bodies of the eBay Power Sellers that had been caught trying to tunnel in. They hand them upside down on big plastic stakes outside (the original Lego Vlad The Impaler kits are very scarce, but they work great).

Hardly a secret... (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23922103)

The vault is hardly a secret if you're an avid Lego fan. For additional pictures and some fairly interesting discussion about unreleased sets, etc., check out this discussion (from 4 years ago):

http://news.lugnet.com/general/?n=47132 [lugnet.com]

(please don't kill Lugnet or Brickshelf, /.!)

Re:Hardly a secret... (1)

belg4mit (152620) | more than 6 years ago | (#23922551)

Maybe you should link through coralcache then?

BriX (1)

BeoCluster (995566) | more than 6 years ago | (#23922199)

Bricks where shat

Reverse Compatibility (1)

Composite_Armor (1203112) | more than 6 years ago | (#23922229)

The Duplo vault will be built in future upon the foundations of the Lego vault. To save construction costs the engineers designed all of the Duplo vaults' HVAC, electrical and security systems to be easily integrated once placed on top of the existing building. Plans were changed from the origional, reverse design upon discovery that building the Lego facilities upon the Duplo vault would not integrate well structurally.

Re:Reverse Compatibility (1)

danbert8 (1024253) | more than 6 years ago | (#23922645)

Of course... Everyone knows you had to use the Duplo blocks at the bottom and then use 2x4 thick pieces to cap them to make them integrate. The thick lego blocks (in even numbered dimensions) fit great onto Duplo blocks, and they were much easier to use for long spans. My brother had a huge lego base that was elevated off the big gray square bases by enough to allow a parking garage below by using Duplo blocks.

Okay, this calls for a heist. (0)

Sarusa (104047) | more than 6 years ago | (#23922313)

Okay, that's it. We're breaking in. All The Italian Job (1969 version). Everyone all driving little Lego Moonbuggies. Who's with me?

Indiana Gnome... (1)

MRe_nl (306212) | more than 6 years ago | (#23922453)

and the lost Shrine of TooMuchLego.

Oceans 14, anyone? (1)

robcosgrave (1313545) | more than 6 years ago | (#23922371)

Sounds like a good target for an Oceans/Heist movie. Something actually worth stealing...

I feel old (1)

Altesse (698587) | more than 6 years ago | (#23922457)

Oh God, the Galaxy Explorer and the rocket were my favorite sets when I was a kid... Feels weird to see them presented like that.

They make it look like they were recovered from under Stonehenge or the Pyramids.

I feel old.

moving to a country.... (1)

Unsichtbarer_Mensch (710092) | more than 6 years ago | (#23922465)

"I don't particularly like". If by this country he means Denmark then OH BOY ... is this guy fastidious or what?! Denmark has got one of the highest friggen living standards in the world!

Oh hey (1)

kjzk (1097265) | more than 6 years ago | (#23922543)

"Lego Secret Vault Contains All Sets In History"

Do I smell a National Treasure 3?

Tearing Up. (5, Insightful)

thesolo (131008) | more than 6 years ago | (#23922555)

For Christmas in 1990, my dad bought me the Legoland pirate ship (#6285), as shown in the video, and a few other pirate sets. I put them together immediately and played with them for hours on end.

My dad died suddenly in early 1991. Those lego sets were the last thing he ever gave me.

Seeing that original box on the video made me feel 10 years old all over again. Thanks Gizmodo & Slashdot.

What's the story with the Yellow Castle? (2, Interesting)

Hellad (691810) | more than 6 years ago | (#23922571)

I imagine it must be rare, but does someone want to put some context on it? How rare is it? How valuable is it?

Re:What's the story with the Yellow Castle? (1)

mrslacker (1122161) | more than 6 years ago | (#23922947)

US version, but:

http://www.bricklink.com/search.asp?itemID=38390 [bricklink.com]

Really, it depends on what condition it's in. Some old/rare lego sets are more expensive in new condition, but not many. Many sets said to be "rare" aren't really, just eBay hype.

Lego-brand building blocks (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23922669)

One of my friends wrote a fan letter to the company when he was very young, basically just a "I really love Legos, they're my favorite toy, I like building castles and spaceships!". Something like that.

The response he got was a brief reply along the lines of: "Please refer to our product as Lego-brand building blocks." I don't know the exact wording, but it was a rather terse trademark defense letter.

I understand you have to defend your trademark to keep it, but it's one of those sour feelings that he's remembered ever since.

Wow (1)

grodzix (1235802) | more than 6 years ago | (#23922781)

My bro had the castle they've showed briefly :D

4x2 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23922937)

man we were so broke, we just had a bucket with a bunch of standard bricks. The things you could do with the regular 4x2s.

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