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GoDaddy VP Caught Bidding Against Customers

timothy posted more than 6 years ago | from the strong-accusations-so-consider-the-source dept.

The Almighty Buck 222

An anonymous reader writes "A GoDaddy Vice President has been caught bidding against customers in their own domain name auctions. The employee Adam Dicker isn't just any GoDaddy employee; he's head of the GoDaddy subsidiary that controls the auctions. Dicker won some of the domains he bid for, and pushed up the bid price on auctions he didn't win. The conflict of interest is unethical, but could this practice also be illegal? Said a representative for a competitor, 'Even if controlled, that practice has bad news written all over it.' This comes hot on the heels of news that despite earlier promises to ICANN to end their 60-Day ban on transfers, GoDaddy quietly circumvented it by forcing customers to agree to the ban anyway. ICANN doesn't appear to be investigating or asking follow-up questions about this. What can be done to force ICANN to police the registrars for which it is responsible?"

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Its legal (0)

Iamthecheese (1264298) | more than 6 years ago | (#23989295)

Far be it from me to defend GoDaddy, but bidding on one's own auctions is, as far as I know, a common business practice. Unethical, but not the slightest bit illegal. (IANAL)

This is called 'shill bidding' (5, Interesting)

Man On Pink Corner (1089867) | more than 6 years ago | (#23989301)

... and it is, roughly speaking, illegal as hell in many jurisdictions.

Re:This is called 'shill bidding' (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23989331)

This Is A Job For Super Gore!

Re:This is called 'shill bidding' (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23990385)

Looks and sounds like price gouging, only there is one organization competing. I guess as long as it is just the one org, then I guess there is nothing really wrong with this. Of course, except the rapidly rising cost of doing business with GoDaddy.

Now that I know and will investigate them farther, I will not send anyone their way.

Yeah, GoDaddy, exit stage-left thank you!!!

Comcast seems better for hosting my site now? NEVER, thought I'd see the day when I can get better personal services from Comcast, than a personal services provider. Something like that!

Re:This is called 'shill bidding' (1)

jrumney (197329) | more than 6 years ago | (#23990949)

It doesn't look much different than insider trading to me. It should be illegal in all jurisdictions.

Re:Its legal (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23989347)

Its Certainly Unethical, sometimes illegal. Where I Live, If you do it in Real Estate Auctions, you can loose any profits, and get a few fines, Auctioneer can loose their license.

Re:Its legal (4, Insightful)

Yahweh Doesn't Exist (906833) | more than 6 years ago | (#23989407)

it should be illegal (depends where you live).

if you want a minimum price then set a reserve, not all this BS.

or just make this a law; if you are in any way financially associated with the auction, it must be declared on every bid you make.

otherwise, how is this not bait and switch or thuggery?

thug: "give me $10!"
person takes out wallet containing $30
thug: "give me $30!"

Re:Its legal (1)

dimeglio (456244) | more than 6 years ago | (#23989623)

If it's up front and the bidder identifies him/herself as a such, it should be O.K. What borders on fraud is the possibly deviant nature of the bidding. I only see this tactic as a way to artificially increase the potential value of a domain. I have no pity for domain speculation or domain squatters. This will certainly be bad for Godaddy's reputation.

Re:Its legal (5, Interesting)

Alibaba10100 (1296289) | more than 6 years ago | (#23989833)

Don't set a reserve, set the minimum bid. I never got he point of a reserve, its just a hidden minimum bid. Buyers should be able to see the minimum amount they would have to pay for something. Hiding it is just dishonest.

Re:Its legal (1)

sumdumass (711423) | more than 6 years ago | (#23990269)

A reserve verses a minimum bid works in that lower amounts of bids can be placed to sort of determine a value of the item without an influence of the seller. A reserve price doesn't influence the end price and locks out some people not sure about taking a risk.

If you were selling a T-shirt or a book signed by someone famous and set a reserve price, I can offer money below the reserve comparable to what I think it might be worth to me. Someone else comes around and offers more and so on until the reserve price is met and/or the auction closes. with a reserve price, you are saying essentially it is worth at least this much. If I disagree, I have no change of being persuaded otherwise by others biding it up. I also won't want to go much over the minimum bid because it already costs that much.

To me, and probably a lot of others, the reserve signifies that you need to get that much out of it to recover costs or make it worth your while to sell it. A minimum bid seems more like going to the corner store and attempting to outspend another customer on the purchase of the last snickers bar in the store. In the previous, you can change your mind on the reserve, in the later, we know the worth is $1.25 (whatever) and will eventually reach a point where it is easier to simply go somewhere else and get it.

Re:Its legal (3, Interesting)

Firethorn (177587) | more than 6 years ago | (#23990785)

At least to me, your minimum/starting bid is the same as what you said.

I think that reserve amounts are set in the hope of getting a 'bidding war' started, get more people interested and bidding, and therefore end up running the price above what the item would have sold for with a minimum bid.

Re:Its legal (1)

Yahweh Doesn't Exist (906833) | more than 6 years ago | (#23991033)

reserves are not known by the people in the auction. minimum bids are. when the information available to you changes, so does the 'game theory'.

Re:Its legal (3, Interesting)

sumdumass (711423) | more than 6 years ago | (#23991141)

I generally am never on the owning side of an auction. I'm typically on the bidding side with the exception of one thing that went through a real auction house which I got roughly 200 times what I expected.

But from my perspective, a reserve means I need to cover at least this much or I take a loss. A minimum bid says it is worth this much at least. Perhaps it is more perspective then anything and some could be wanting to start a bidding war. And your right in that the reserve promotes bidding were it wouldn't be possible with a minimum bid. All the auctions I have been to, the reserve price has always been a secrete until after the item has been auctioned too. It might be different at some auctions but from my perspective, I see it differently. I can see however, where your opinion is just as valid if not more giving some insight into the owner's mental workings as mine.

BTW, the piece I auctioned was an antique dresser I got as partial payment for helping the family of an elderly neighbor clean up after she passed on. I only took the thing because they were talking about not having any place to store it and they didn't like the looks of it. I traded $25 of the $125 I got for moving stuff into a truck after they packed it up and it sold for $7,000 plus at auction because the maker was local and in demand. I though it would bring a couple hundred or maybe even close to a grand if someone was crazy. I never saw seven grand coming from it.

Re:Its legal (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23990841)

Look at it this way if I have something to sell and I want at least $500 - the reserve. Are you going to bid to $2000? Not knowing the reserve means you bid what you think it's worth, not the lowest I would let it go for.

The reserve could well mean taking a loss, but then it releases cash for something else, turnover they call it.

Re:Its legal (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23989577)

A first post that is neither insightful, nor interesting, nor flamebait nor troll! Will this be the FP to not be modded at all!?? The world looks on with baited breath.

Re:Its legal (3, Insightful)

strabes (1075839) | more than 6 years ago | (#23990099)

The question is whether it's just for the government to enforce "ethical" or "moral" behavior that doesn't directly harm others. Examples include bidding on one's own auctions, lying, and cheating on one's spouse.

Re:Its legal (5, Insightful)

mckyj57 (116386) | more than 6 years ago | (#23990937)

It may be legal, but it is unethical.

And when you are a registrar, by far your most important asset is trust. GoDaddy no longer has mine, and I will no longer recommend them.

Re:Its legal (2, Interesting)

binaryspiral (784263) | more than 6 years ago | (#23991005)

Indeed. I was a big GoDaddy fan until I found out they are the largest domain squatters in the world. Then I did some shopping around and found out I was paying $20/year for WhoIS privacy protection that my webhost / registrar includes for free with every domain.

I've attempted many times to migrate my main domain away from GoDaddy to my current webhost and for some reason it fails. The webhost says that GoDaddy is blocking the transfer - even though I've unlocked the domain and followed the rules.

Come to find out, it's due to the fact that I renewed it less than 60 days ago... now I get to wait.

This story is just another reason to suspect the largest and most visible company in the particular market - absolute power corrupts.

Re:Its legal (5, Insightful)

GoRK (10018) | more than 6 years ago | (#23991021)

Well, in the simplest terms you are wrong, but the explanation is more complicated.

Knowing allowing shill bidding (whether by yourself or others) is cause for revocation of an auctioneer's license or fines by state regulators. The state law most often says that a business cannot conduct auctions without an auctioneer's license, so the leverage for fines and punishment is generally against continued ability to conduct auctions and not strictly a legal matter aside from maybe breach of contract claims or similar.

Shilling itself may or may not be illegal state by state, but just because you can't go to jail for it alone does not preclude you having your ass handed to you in a courtroom. Again, you can be sued under breach of contract or for violation of the UCC for which law may allow certain claims.

In this particular case, ICANN probably has some type of contract governing the auctions that GoDaddy is probably also violating. I would imagine that their hole is pretty deep in this matter.

Here's What Can Be Done... (3, Funny)

BlueStrat (756137) | more than 6 years ago | (#23989303)

Pay a Congressman.

Cheers!

Strat

Re:Here's What Can Be Done... (4, Funny)

TheVelvetFlamebait (986083) | more than 6 years ago | (#23990519)

Yeah, but I hear that even congressmen are bidding for themselves these days...

Get the word out (5, Insightful)

Monoman (8745) | more than 6 years ago | (#23989329)

At a minimum, get the word out so everyone knows about it. Also, vote with your dollars by taking your business elsewhere.

Re:Get the word out (4, Informative)

loraksus (171574) | more than 6 years ago | (#23989593)

Problem is... all the domain auction sites are full of scumbags.
Virtually all of the "buy a lapsed domain" sites use a "give us a number, we won't tell you if you've beat the other bidder - or even if there is another bidder, but we will let you increase your bid if you want" bidding method. Oh... and you have to pay to for the privilege of bidding.
Fucking scumbags, pure and simple.

BTW... If you're considering Godaddy's "expiring domain" service, don't - because you might as well just take a $20 bill and burn it in a sacrifice to the domain gods.

Godaddy tells you that if you don't get the domain you want, you can try another. Of course, they virtually never win anything (as the big domain auction houses get most domains, something that GoDaddy is well aware of) and when you try to register another domain, "it doesn't qualify" or you will be told you have to try and find another domain (which, of course, you also won't get) and so on and so on. I'd be surprised if godaddy has even caught a single expiring domain (from another registrar) in their entire history.

Domain registrars are all scum.

Re:Get the word out (1)

Monoman (8745) | more than 6 years ago | (#23990363)

I agree and my original post is still relevant. What are the alternatives?

Re:Get the word out (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23990499)

Godaddy is giving me hell transferring my domains elsewhere. It's disgusting. They already screwed up one domain of mine -- wouldn't renew it, and then sold it to someone else.

Re:Get the word out (1)

arth1 (260657) | more than 6 years ago | (#23991161)

The now corporate and corrupt (but, I repeat myself) ICANN doing nothing is just a big a problem. And you can't choose another Internet governing board.

if there was an equal price competitor ... (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23989339)

I would ditch my 200+ domains at GoDaddy in a heartbeat.

The company is rife with unethical business practices.

I have experienced this same thing where GoDaddy bid against me in an auction.

They will also purposely not update your contact information / credit information for certain domains where they can grab them and sell them off at a profit. Which has also happened to me.

For whatever reason, there doesn't seem to be an equal price competitor to GoDaddy. That's a shame as there are many people who want to leave.

So... (4, Insightful)

dreamchaser (49529) | more than 6 years ago | (#23989379)

In other words, you would take a stand on principle, but not if it costs you a bit more money. Heh.

Re:So... (2, Informative)

Ninjy (828167) | more than 6 years ago | (#23989427)

Well, unfortunately, this "money" you speak of is not of infinite supply. Some people might make decisions on principle, but most people either can't be bothered or simply can't afford to. Life usually isn't that convenient, and companies know it.

Re:So... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23989443)

I would take a stand on principle, but there's no place to stand.

It's what happens when you take justice away from the people.

Given the proper application of street justice, every company would be principled, regardless of price.

Your implication that people have endless dollars available to buy principle... a nice idea, but not part of reality for most of us.

Re:So... (5, Insightful)

Vellmont (569020) | more than 6 years ago | (#23989641)


I would take a stand on principle, but there's no place to stand.

You're complaining about $2 a year per domain? Even for 200 domains that's only $400 more a year. If you really can't cover these costs, I have to wonder why you've got some many domains in the first place.

Your implication that people have endless dollars available to buy principle... a nice idea, but not part of reality for most of us.

You're really just thinking short term. How much is it going to cost you if godaddy suspends one of your domains because they want to? How much is it going to cost when you have to bid against godaddy? How much is it going to cost when they apply any of their other unethical practices?

If you can't afford $400 a year to not deal with scumbags, get out of whatever business you're in. Scambags always screw you over in the end.

Re:So... (2, Interesting)

yabos (719499) | more than 6 years ago | (#23989813)

Where are you getting a price of $2 per year for a domain? I just renewed mine at godaddy and it was about $9 per year for each. Godaddy sucks you in with initially cheap prices but their renewal isn't as cheap.

Re:So... (5, Informative)

Vellmont (569020) | more than 6 years ago | (#23989933)


Where are you getting a price of $2 per year for a domain?

$2 a year is the DIFFERENCE between the $10 godaddy price, and other registrars which charge $12 a year (I know Joker.com is $12/year).

Re:So... (2, Informative)

LVSlushdat (854194) | more than 6 years ago | (#23990167)

Back in my early naive days, I signed up with GoDaddy for several domains. When I began hearing all the hoopla about GoDaddy, I yanked my domains from them (was a bit of work.. They don't want to make it easy for you to leave...), and moved them to 1and1.com. Only $6/yr and MUCH better ethics on their part...

Re:if there was an equal price competitor ... (5, Insightful)

iamdrscience (541136) | more than 6 years ago | (#23989437)

The company I buy my domains from is only $12/year for a .com, just $2 more than GoDaddy (even less difference if you register for a longer period of time). I consider $2/year difference to be a pretty inconsequential amount of money, especially considering that it also keeps me from worrying about getting fucked over by my registrar.

Re:if there was an equal price competitor ... (1)

cloakable (885764) | more than 6 years ago | (#23989499)

On the other hand, for 200+ domains, that $2 becomes a $400+ price difference. Suddenly not so inconsequential.

Re:if there was an equal price competitor ... (3, Insightful)

Xanius (955737) | more than 6 years ago | (#23989555)

If you are maintaining 200+ domains then you should be making enough profit over the course of the year that it's registered to negate the extra price.

If all of them are personal domains then I'd just have to say what the hell? Why would you need 200 personal domains?

Dude... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23989651)

"The company I buy my domains from...

But you don't even say which one... what a dork!

Re:if there was an equal price competitor ... (1)

Skylinux (942824) | more than 6 years ago | (#23989845)

$12/year ouch, give http://www.omnis.com/ [omnis.com] a try. They charge $7.95 for QTY 1-49 and give price discounts after that.

Combine that with with VPS hosting from http://www.slicehost.com/ [slicehost.com] where you can get VPS slices starting at $20/month.

Fuck Godaddy and the likes, there are other (good) alternatives out there you just have too look.

Oh and while I am at it, don't use Dotster either! Unreliable service, horribly SLOW shared SSL server ..... just plain sucks.

Re:if there was an equal price competitor ... (1)

praseodym (813457) | more than 6 years ago | (#23990797)

I'm using Namecheap [namecheap.com] ; they're reselling eNom and never had any problems with them. Domains are $9.29 and often less with coupon codes.

Re:if there was an equal price competitor ... (1)

transami (202700) | more than 6 years ago | (#23989441)

1&1 has better prices.

Re:if there was an equal price competitor ... (1)

yabos (719499) | more than 6 years ago | (#23989829)

Looks like 8.99 pounds for a .com domain from them which isn't cheaper. At least you get email accounts with that though.

Re:if there was an equal price competitor ... (1)

foniksonik (573572) | more than 6 years ago | (#23990803)

$5/year for all domains (that's what I pay, YMMV).

Re:if there was an equal price competitor ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23990885)

Make sure you don't let your credit card on file expire when domain renewal time is near. They won't tell you. And they'll renew you automatically for one year, lock you out of your account, and demand a $30 reactivation fee.

I guess that's better than letting it expire, but why can't they notify us when our CC expires?!

Re:if there was an equal price competitor ... (2, Interesting)

indian_rediff (166093) | more than 6 years ago | (#23989445)

Isn't it possible that the only reason they have these 'low' prices is because they are ripping off customers by bidding against them?

So you save with one hand, and pay for it with the other.

Dubious savings.

Re:if there was an equal price competitor ... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23989547)

This is a huge troll here.

All of this is BS, and you are trying real hard to lie through your teeth.

Why would you ditch that many? WTF is GoDaddy trying to do by rotating around that many domains? Do the operators even know this.

Raping domains, especially your own will never fly in my book, or this world for that matter.

- The Demetrius -

Re:if there was an equal price competitor ... (4, Interesting)

pvera (250260) | more than 6 years ago | (#23989635)

You sir are the perfect candidate to own a micro domain registrar.

I got mine about four years ago. I was frustrated with both NetSol ($$$$), GoDaddy (liked to play cat and mouse games with their customers) and the many hosts that included free domain names with terrible strings attached. A reseller web hosting account was $15/month (after four years they just raised it to $20), and a registrar account with an Indian domain wholesaler was free.

On day one I was able to sell domains for under $10 and still make money in every transaction. My then boss immediately stopped using NeSol, so as each of his 20+ domains needed a renewal, he transferred them to me. My friends took notice, so every single one moved his domains with me.

As I kept selling domains, the registrar moved me up in their sales tier, every time shaving a few cents off the wholesale price for each domain. I did not get greedy, every time I got a cut, I shaved my prices a little bit.

I call it my micro registrar company because we are talking just a few hundred domains scattered across 30 or so customers. But they love me because whenever something goes wrong, all they have to do is either IM, email me or even call me, and they get much better support than what they would get from NetSol or GoDaddy. In the rare case that I actually need the help of the wholesalers, their turnaround is pretty decent, and they are extremely polite and professional.

I am not saying that everything is perfect, or that it is a piece of cake, but it does not take a lot of work to make it happen. At least two of my friends liked it enough that they made their own micro registrars too, and as far as I know they are happy with it.

As for what the GoDaddy asshat did, it is at the very least a breach of trust. If one of my customers asks me to check a few domains for her and she tells me she wants to think about it, I am not going to buy them for myself and then ask her for more money, that's just wrong.

Re:if there was an equal price competitor ... (0, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23989715)

try namecheap.com i have 100+ domain by them and they are far better than Godaddy.

Re:if there was an equal price competitor ... (2, Insightful)

Alibaba10100 (1296289) | more than 6 years ago | (#23989849)

Perhaps the answer is that the only way godaddy can afford to price domains so low is by implementing a basket of shady policies that make them money on the side.

Re:if there was an equal price competitor ... (2, Interesting)

db32 (862117) | more than 6 years ago | (#23989855)

There are a few. I switched to Monicker. Nodaddy.com has some suggestions for places to switch to.

Re:if there was an equal price competitor ... (2, Funny)

Robber Baron (112304) | more than 6 years ago | (#23989939)

The company is rife with unethical business practices.

Yes, but they have sweaty, scantily clad babes in their commercials!

Re:if there was an equal price competitor ... (1)

the eric conspiracy (20178) | more than 6 years ago | (#23990201)

You can watch the commercials without registering your domains there.

Re:if there was an equal price competitor ... (1)

fluffman86 (1006119) | more than 6 years ago | (#23990087)

For whatever reason, there doesn't seem to be an equal price competitor to GoDaddy. That's a shame as there are many people who want to leave.

I have my hosting and domains both registered at Site5 [site5.com] . Hosting is the best deal around (if you buy several years at once), and once you have an account there you can buy domains for $8.88/yr. It's much more convenient than GoDaddy, and well worth the extra buck(ish).

Re:if there was an equal price competitor ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23990369)

www.name.com [name.com] , good company, been around a while, and cheaper than GoDaddy.

Re:if there was an equal price competitor ... (3, Informative)

MidnightBrewer (97195) | more than 6 years ago | (#23990911)

I was personally burned by GoDaddy when I did a search on a name, waited to purchase it, and then came back a week later to find out that GoDaddy itself had purchased it (using a "private" WHOIS registration). Thing of it is, the name only means something if you happen to be a speaker of Japanese. I hardly think that somebody working for GoDaddy in the southwestern United States would appreciate the significance. Of course, the name still remains unused, except to generate ad revenue by showing the GoDaddy "parked domain" page.

Unbelieveable... (4, Funny)

canUbeleiveIT (787307) | more than 6 years ago | (#23989341)

What an appropriate last name!

Adam Dicker? (5, Funny)

jollyreaper (513215) | more than 6 years ago | (#23989345)

Wow, if Charles Dickens were writing today, he'd be all over that name.

Adam Dicker, quicker with the clicker than the clients he dicks o'er
Mr. Pinchloaf, known as a tight-ass most horribly, whose pucker snaps shut audibly
Nadia Rotchacokoff, who gives her love freely and her diseases venerally
Steve Ballmer, a rabid wombat would be much calmer, screaming, hurling chairs against the wallmer
President Bush and Vice President Dick, with names like that, someone's getting fucked right quick

Re:Adam Dicker? (1, Insightful)

aussie_a (778472) | more than 6 years ago | (#23989459)

I doubt Charles Dickens would comment on anyones last name.

Re:Adam Dicker? (1)

rhizome (115711) | more than 6 years ago | (#23990075)

I doubt Charles Dickens would comment on anyones last name.

Yes, how dare he besmirch the stylistic tropes of Mr. Dickens in the name of humor.

The mere thought gives me the vapors.

Thank you for doing your part to make the world right again, citizen.

Re:Adam Dicker? (1)

sumdumass (711423) | more than 6 years ago | (#23990353)

Charles Dickens? Is he the guy who created "Dickens' cider"?

Re:Adam Dicker? (1)

brouski (827510) | more than 6 years ago | (#23990559)

No no, you're thinking of Charles Dikkens, the well known Dutch author.

Re:Adam Dicker? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23989807)

Something tells me that you've never actually read any Dickens since he doesn't use rhyme in his writing.

ICANN? (2, Interesting)

Tumbleweed (3706) | more than 6 years ago | (#23989367)

More like ICANN'T!

Why is anyone surprised at unethical behaviour by GoDaddy?

Re:ICANN? (1)

somersault (912633) | more than 6 years ago | (#23989487)

Even worse, they are a 'trusted' SSL Certificate Authority. Someone pointed me to GoDaddy for SSL before, I was wondering why they were so cheap compared to more respectable looking sites.. well, at least they pass savings on to some customers while screwing over others :s

ICANN is I couldn't. The GoDaddy list: (5, Informative)

Futurepower(R) (558542) | more than 6 years ago | (#23989627)

ICANN is a TERRIBLY badly managed organization, in my opinion.

I'm keeping a list of stories about GoDaddy on Slashdot, in order by date:
Go Daddy Usurps Network Solutions [slashdot.org] (2005-05-04)
GoDaddy Serves Blank Pages to Safari & Opera [slashdot.org] (2005-12-08)
GoDaddy.com Dumps Linux for Microsoft [slashdot.org] (2006-03-23)
GoDaddy Holds Domains Hostage [slashdot.org] (2006-06-17)
GoDaddy Caves To Irish Legal Threat [slashdot.org] (2006-09-16)
MySpace and GoDaddy Shut Down Security Site [slashdot.org] (2007-01-26)
That incident prompted this web site:
Exposing the Many Reasons Not to Trust GoDaddy with Your Domain Names [nodaddy.com] . According to this March 11, 2008 story in Wired, GoDaddy shut down an entire web site of 250,000 pages because of one archived mailing list comment: GoDaddy Silences Police-Watchdog Site RateMyCop.com [wired.com] . See below for Slashdot's story about RateMyCop.com.
Alternative Registrars to GoDaddy? [slashdot.org] (2007-02-03)
GoDaddy Bobbles DST Changeover? [slashdot.org] (2007-03-11)
850K RegisterFly Domains Moved To GoDaddy [slashdot.org] (2007-05-29)
GoDaddy Silences RateMyCop.com [slashdot.org] (2008-03-12)
ICANN Moves Against GoDaddy Domain Lockdowns [slashdot.org] (2008-04-08)
GoDaddy VP Caught Bidding Against Customers [slashdot.org] (2008-06-29)

Any error or stories not included?

GoDaddy's reputation is not just one of a negative stories. In my opinion, GoDaddy tries to confuse non-technical people by offering services they don't need that are presented as valuable.

Here are some of the opinions of Bob Parsons, the owner of GoDaddy. He is pro-violence: Close Gitmo? No way!! [archive.org]

Re:ICANN is I couldn't. The GoDaddy list: (0, Offtopic)

sumdumass (711423) | more than 6 years ago | (#23990381)

What amazes me is that even though they are a US quasi government company performing this badly, people still seem to think moving it to a more complexed international structure subject to the whims of 20 different countries at once or the corruption at the UN would be a good thing.

Employees (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23989373)

It is common practice at GoDaddy to bid on domains and resell them. So much so that the unwritten word was to open an account under a family members name in order to make it harder to trace back to yourself.

Who's yo GoDaddy? (1)

retech (1228598) | more than 6 years ago | (#23989375)

Their name speaks for itself. Cheap and sleazy sounding and living up to it with each turn.

Digg (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23989399)

Re:Digg (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23989429)

AIDS

Re:Digg (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23989469)

By your powers combined, I am Wilford Brimley!

Re:Digg (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23990615)

lol

Market Mess (3, Insightful)

transami (202700) | more than 6 years ago | (#23989433)

The whole domain name market has gotten out of control. Most unused domain names are now being used as nothing more than garbage linklists to generate ad revenue, while they sit at auction sites for $1,000 or more. It amazes me to think these garbage sites can generate more revenue than it costs to register the name. And then to sit on these names waiting for thousand dollar payoffs is outrageous. If ICANN intends domain names to be like real-estate then they need to provide permanent ownership. Otherwise they need to raise their own registration fees to prevent this kind of domain abuse. I for one tire of Google searches that return a list of b.s. sites.

Recommendations for reputable registrars? (1)

blankoboy (719577) | more than 6 years ago | (#23989449)

Can anyone recommend a reputable alternative registrar that is similar in terms of pricing but without the "evil"?

Re:Recommendations for reputable registrars? (1)

bcoff12 (584459) | more than 6 years ago | (#23989553)

I'd like the same info. I'd prefer a registrar that is happy to make money doing what they are supposed to do and not $#^*&^ over their customers at the first opportunity.

Re:Recommendations for reputable registrars? (3, Informative)

Organic Brain Damage (863655) | more than 6 years ago | (#23989575)

In my very limited experience, I've had no problems with domaindirect.com.

Re:Recommendations for reputable registrars? (3, Informative)

Skylinux (942824) | more than 6 years ago | (#23989921)

See my post further up, I have tried Godaddy, Dotster, Yahoo, Google, Dreamhost and a few other but now use http://www.omnis.com/ [omnis.com] exclusively for Domain purchases.

http://tech.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=598685&cid=23989845 [slashdot.org]

And just think... (4, Insightful)

QuietLagoon (813062) | more than 6 years ago | (#23989473)

GoDaddy once had my credit card information. I am so happy I left them behind and found another domain name service.

With this recent disclosure, I can no longer trust them. In my opinion, unethical is not a strong enough word to describe the act being reported.

Superbowl (3, Funny)

Ritz_Just_Ritz (883997) | more than 6 years ago | (#23989597)

They've got to pay for those Superbowl adverts somehow. :)

Go Daddy is absolutely immoral (0, Troll)

alxtoth (914920) | more than 6 years ago | (#23989605)

These are nothing, remember when they stopped using Apache, only to go for IIS ?

Not Surprising (2, Interesting)

Amamdouh (1130747) | more than 6 years ago | (#23989617)

I used GoDaddy to register two domains and the whole process was spread on too many steps because at each step they bombard the buyer with advertisements for extra paid services in a very persistent way. This approach along with the site design look so chabby that it's not surprising the least that they would engage in such practice. Whether it's legal/ethical or not is a different story after all an auction is a process designed to reach a fair price that the buyer agrees to pay. It does not make a lot of difference who bid against the buyer because no one forced to him to pay this price. The big problem is that in this case GD have big advantage because if they bid too high and the real buyer does not increase the price then they do not lose a lot but in a real auction if you bit on your items and no one overbids then you would have to buy the item and pay the auction house commission out of your own pocket which might be a substantial percentage of the sale price.

Move domains from GoDaddy to ? (4, Interesting)

moxley (895517) | more than 6 years ago | (#23989645)

I have about a hundred domains with GoDaddy.

This is the last straw - the company is entirely unethical and I wish to no longer support them, or take chances that their unethical bullshit will one day burn me.

The reason I originally chose GoDaddy (which was quite a while ago when they were smaller) was because they had good prices and seemed reputable enough. If anyone has any auggestions on where the best place to move my domains to would be I woluld love to hear it.

I would like to avoid Network Solutions and their ilk, between their pricing, alphabet agency ties (and other things) it does not appeal to me - I would also like to avoid small fly-by-night "register your domain for 69 cents" places that may disappear or be purchased by other companies. Basically I am hoping to find a reputable, ethical registrar.....Any suggestions?

Re:Move domains from GoDaddy to ? (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23989787)

We use joker.com based in switzerland.

Re:Move domains from GoDaddy to ? (3, Informative)

Skater (41976) | more than 6 years ago | (#23989857)

I've been using pairnic.com for all of mine. No jerking around, multiple warnings in advance of expiration, and I think I paid $50 for 5 years last time I renewed.

Re:Move domains from GoDaddy to ? (2, Informative)

Anoraknid the Sartor (9334) | more than 6 years ago | (#23990309)

I use Joker.com and have done for many years - and have not had problems with them as a registrar (though see below...). They have replied to my (very) occasional emails in a timely and rational manner.

They are $12 for a .com, but if you have a lot of domains you can set yourself up as a reseller and pay around $7.20.

They did get DDOSd a few years ago, which WAS a problem for a day or two but I guess they have better redundancy sorted out now. They don't mess you around with trying to add on loads of extras when you buy a domain and there are no hidden gotchas.

The $12 includes full use of nameserver, email forwarding, etc. They are zero hassle and I have never felt that trust has been an issue.

(I have no association with them, I am just a satisfied customer)

Another option is (Pairnic.com?) who are very reputable, but a bit more expensive. than Joker.com

Re:Move domains from GoDaddy to ? (1)

LVSlushdat (854194) | more than 6 years ago | (#23990605)

1and1.com FTW!!

Re:Move domains from GoDaddy to ? (4, Interesting)

mattsim (819368) | more than 6 years ago | (#23990611)

I've owned a web hosting business for a decade (hobby) and worked in the hosting industry for 13 years. I manage hundreds of domains on my personal name servers and at the turn of the century, I managed 500,000 zones on my employers DNS servers. I still work in the hosting industry and I also maintain a side business that consults with both large and small ISPs and web hosts. I regularly work with registrars and consult for clients of registrars. In all of my experience, I've only run across two registrars I'd highly recommend. I use eNom and couldn't be more pleased. Many of my clients use eNom as does my current employer and I've never heard an ill word against them. The other registrar I'd recommend is Tucows/OpenSRS. My clients who use them are rabid fans, something you just won't ever hear from a GoDaddy client.

Re:Move domains from GoDaddy to ? (4, Informative)

kchrist (938224) | more than 6 years ago | (#23990665)

I've had good experiences with both PairNIC [pairnic.com] and Gandi [gandi.com] . I wrote up some information [inmostlight.org] about them, and compared them to a couple other registrars (including Netsol), but the upshot is that after doing a good deal of research I was unable to find any significant complaints about either one of them. They're both a little more expensive than the low-end registrars like Godaddy, but by nearly all accounts the extra cost is well worth it.

My domains are all at Gandi currently.

enom (1)

unity100 (970058) | more than 6 years ago | (#23991197)

get an enom reseller account for $9.95 or something. if youre lucky, you can get one for $8.95

I Think He Should... (0, Offtopic)

FurtiveGlancer (1274746) | more than 6 years ago | (#23989671)

Go... Daddy.

Not forced to agree to 60 day lockdown (1)

linuxgurugamer (917289) | more than 6 years ago | (#23989691)

Slghtly off topic, I just renewed a domain on GoDaddy for a year. Other than being offered additional domains, I did not have to agree to a 60 day lockdown, just the terms of service. I read the TOS and didn't see anything about the 60 days. So it may be gone.

NoDaddy (5, Informative)

sega01 (937364) | more than 6 years ago | (#23989809)

http://nodaddy.com/ [nodaddy.com] has plenty of GoDaddy horror stories, along with recommendations and experiences for alternative companies. I say that we should all boycott GoDaddy.

I finally escaped GoDaddy a couple of weeks back.. (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23989937)

Transferred my last seven domains away from that awful place. I can't stand their attitude and customer-unfriendly literal interpretations of ICANN's rules.

The last straw was when they were going to cancel my domains because my phone number was invalid. "Update immediately or we will seize your domains!" an ominous email reported.

Well, my area code changed and well -- there you have it!

Rather than let them "seize" my domains, I moved them over to another registrar. They are much smaller (only maybe half a million domains), but they are so less bullshit than GoDaddy...

Vultures, where are thou? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23989941)

Milstein Weiss, can't you profit from this?

But who is really responsible? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23990119)

Oh the poor customers... But aren't those situations actually caused by the customer who let the domain name expire in the first place? I've used GoDaddy for quite some time now and so far I'm pretty happy with their services.

I also wonder if this accusation actually holds any real facts. I mean; its all based on a single forum post [namepros.com] by someone who thinks to be dealing with the guy from GoDaddy. But I have to wonder; how many people called "Adam Dicker" live in Canada? So how can you be sure its really him?

I, for one, welcome (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23990231)

our overbidding VP.

It's called "shilling" and it's illegal (4, Interesting)

Tsu Dho Nimh (663417) | more than 6 years ago | (#23990521)

GoDaddy keeps all the spoils to themselves Which means that his bidding was driving up the auction house's income. It's illegal as hell in any state I can think of.

Selling Domains (3, Interesting)

Lachlan Hunt (1021263) | more than 6 years ago | (#23990943)

I can't believe GoDaddy is still in business. I can't remember ever reading anything good about them and every time I do see some article, it's always about their unethical business practices.

However, I think the core of the problem is that something ICANN needs to sort out by forbidding the resale or auction of domain names. They should only be allowed to be leased from accredited registrars at a fair price, with clear restrictions on artificially inflating the price. IMHO, the auDA has got this right for all .au domains.

consider dyndns.org... (1)

capsteve (4595) | more than 6 years ago | (#23991071)

they're $15 for com/net/org domains and offer custom dns and mail hop/relay services at varying prices. dns changes propagate quickly, and their servers are stable and reliable...

at the end of the day, you get what you pay for, so why would anyone be surprised that the street whore of registrars would actually try and fuck over their clientele?

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