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A Video Game To Teach AP Level Immunology

timothy posted more than 5 years ago | from the next-up-should-be-history dept.

First Person Shooters (Games) 158

kilrathu writes "Longtime proponents of using video games as sources of learning, the Federation of American Scientists put its money where its mouth is. FAS released Immune Attack, an educational video game designed to teach immunology to AP level high school students and combines the most current research on teaching methodologies with a 3D first-person shooter game. 'The key to the game was making sure it was fun while also covering accurate and complex immunology topics,' said Dr. Michelle Lucey-Roper, director of the FAS Learning Technologies Program. The game is free, although not open source, and can be downloaded here. Sorry, no Mac version yet."

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158 comments

Way to go (4, Funny)

Daimanta (1140543) | more than 5 years ago | (#23993123)

Posting a link to a 500 MB file. That won't be a problem ;)

Re:Way to go (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23993271)

Posting a link to a 500 MB file. That won't be a problem ;)

http://immuneattack.info/ImmuneAttack10/ImmuneAttackSetup.exe

Re:Way to go (1)

FlyingBishop (1293238) | more than 5 years ago | (#23993469)

I'm getting 3mb/sec, and all I've got is this dinky old fiber optic line.

Seriously though, I think whatever server's hosting this thing could slashdot Slashdot if it wanted to.

Re:Way to go (3, Insightful)

sunwolf (853208) | more than 5 years ago | (#23993929)

I know you jest, but I find the linked ABC article more disturbing - half of it doesn't even talk about the game, but about how evil videogames like Halo and Grand Theft Auto have deteriorated public trust in the medium. I could have honestly used a more thorough review of the game in question instead of more meandering over media-generated FUD.

Re:Way to go (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23996269)

TORRENT LNK PLZ OMGWTFNETPACKETRATEDROPLIMITZSUKBIGTiME!!!

Ahem...wouldn't this be one of those "legitimate" uses for peer-to-peer technology we keep hearing about? Just a thought...

Insert standard replies here... (5, Funny)

gbulmash (688770) | more than 5 years ago | (#23993125)

The game is free, although not open source... Sorry, no Mac version yet.

  • Obligatory comment about how the PC needs an immunology lesson much more than the Mac does.
  • In Soviet Russia, your PC immunizes you.
  • 1) Create immunology game, 2) make it PC only, 3)???, 4) Profit
  • I am intrigued by your ideas and would like to subscribe to your newsletter.
  • If they would only open source it, we could usher in a new Eden.
  • Immunology, bah... Just more FUD from the medical industry.
  • They had this on the Amiga 20 years ago.

Re:Insert standard replies here... (1)

cayenne8 (626475) | more than 5 years ago | (#23993259)

I'm wondering what an AP level high school student is??

AP? Never heard the term..what does it mean?

Re:Insert standard replies here... (5, Informative)

you-nix-boy (698814) | more than 5 years ago | (#23993311)

Advanced Placement. It's a program offered by the College Board that allows high school students to receive college credit for courses completed in high school, teaching college-level curriculum, and evaluated by a test (that the College Board administers and scores). The number of credits and exact course translation toward your university is usually determined by your AP test score (on a scale of 1-5). Shaved close to a year off college with these puppies :)

Re:Insert standard replies here... (1)

maxume (22995) | more than 5 years ago | (#23993369)

The number of credits and exact course translation toward your university is usually determined by your university.

They use the score, but it is entirely up to them what they do with it.

Re:Insert standard replies here... (1)

gbulmash (688770) | more than 5 years ago | (#23996113)

It's interesting... I took AP Computer Science in 11th grade and AP European History in 12th.

At the school I eventually graduated from, they'd fallen prey to the multiculturalism angle of political correctness, so though I got credits that counted toward the X credits needed to graduate for my AP European History exam, it didn't count toward my History requirement and I was forced to take "World History" (which was 80% stuff I covered in AP European History and 20% covering the rest of the world).

On the other hand, this school let you take a Computer Science course to satisfy the Math requirement, so my AP Computer Science score made it possible for me to graduate college without ever taking a Math class (not even Stats).

- Greg

You forgot the other reason (2, Informative)

Ethanol-fueled (1125189) | more than 5 years ago | (#23993395)

To pay money to inflate the living hell out of your GPA so that you can have a 5.0 GPA your senior year(yes, AP classes are one point higher than your standard prole classes). AP calculus is a good idea but classes like AP history are more like tangential trivia that you will soon forget after you pass the exam.

Re:You forgot the other reason (1)

RockoTDF (1042780) | more than 5 years ago | (#23993439)

Depends on the school district, some only give meager weights of .025 like my district...

Re:You forgot the other reason (1)

Ethanol-fueled (1125189) | more than 5 years ago | (#23993517)

Thank you for the clarification. I'd also like to point out that you don't pay money for the grade inflation, you pay money for the college credit(that is, to take the test).

Re:You forgot the other reason (1)

jandrese (485) | more than 5 years ago | (#23995485)

Shoot, my school district gave you a big fat nothing extra for taking AP classes. The only advantage was that you could get college credit, at the risk of lowering your GPA because the material was more difficult. Of course then I got to college and discovered that almost none of them take AP credit. I think I got a grand total of 3 college credits for taking AP classes for my entire senior year, unfortunatly unless you know a full year in advance where you're going to be accepted to college, it's impossible to plan and only take the AP classes that your university will accept.

Re:You forgot the other reason (1)

cayenne8 (626475) | more than 5 years ago | (#23993693)

"To pay money to inflate the living hell out of your GPA so that you can have a 5.0 GPA your senior year(yes, AP classes are one point higher than your standard prole classes). AP calculus is a good idea but classes like AP history are more like tangential trivia that you will soon forget after you pass the exam."

Interesting...they didn't have anything like that when I was in high school. I took advance classes as a senior IN high school....my chemistry was pretty much the same thing I took first year in college, and my calculus teacher in high school pretty much took us through Cal I and half way through Cal II. I almost breezed through those in college, but, there was no special credit for those classes in high school.

Re:You forgot the other reason (1)

ChangelingJane (1042436) | more than 5 years ago | (#23994457)

but classes like AP history are more like tangential trivia

It's true. AP history should be renamed "AP Jeopardy Prep". It's nothing but memorizing names and dates.

Re:You forgot the other reason (1)

denton420 (1235028) | more than 5 years ago | (#23995047)

Strange, I passed the test with a 4 by sleeping in class all day and not knowing a specific detail about a specific name or date. I do not even know when the constitution was signed, early 1800s?

The test does a great job of not grading for rote memorization but rather of understanding of the fundamental historical trends.

Sure you have to remember some terms and events to pass but no details really at all. Even in physics you must remember what variable means what and what F means depending on your course.

Re:You forgot the other reason (1)

Koiu Lpoi (632570) | more than 5 years ago | (#23994683)

To pay money to inflate the living hell out of your GPA

Most major universities "deflate" the GPA when determining admissions.

Re:You forgot the other reason (1)

Actually, I do RTFA (1058596) | more than 5 years ago | (#23996485)

(yes, AP classes are one point higher than your standard prole classes).

Depends on the state, or maybe within a state. I know that the local schools here don't, and when I was in school they didn't.

To pay money to inflate the living hell out of your GPA

You have to pay money to take the test, not to take the class.

classes like AP history are more like tangential trivia that you will soon forget after you pass the exam

Meh, I still remember my AP classes.

Re:Insert standard replies here... (1)

rpillala (583965) | more than 5 years ago | (#23994255)

Depending on where you apply to college, you may get no credits for your AP courses, as the program has been diluted by schools' efforts to get more students enrolled in them.

Re:Insert standard replies here... (1)

ChangelingJane (1042436) | more than 5 years ago | (#23994445)

The AP classes at my school were notorious for being harder than (undergraduate) college level. Now that I'm in college myself, I've seen it's totally true. Those were some crazy freaking classes.

Re:Insert standard replies here... (1)

mako1138 (837520) | more than 5 years ago | (#23995945)

Consider yourself lucky it wasn't the other way around. I had really easy AP classes (except for maybe AP Spanish) which led to the development of some bad habits.

Re:Insert standard replies here... (1)

catmistake (814204) | more than 5 years ago | (#23995827)

Too bad they can't use this for remedial immunology... those students are way too slow to play a game.

Re:Insert standard replies here... (1)

AaxelB (1034884) | more than 5 years ago | (#23993321)

Advanced Placement [collegeboard.com]

It's a program where high school students can take a test in a certain subject and gain college credit for it (if they score well and they go to a college that accepts it). Many high schools have classes which teach specifically to these tests.

It's a pretty good program, if the courses are taught well. The tests I took seemed pretty well-written to test actual ability in a subject (much better than most standardized tests). I was able to enroll in college with 30 credit-hours off the bat.

AP ~ IB (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23995365)

I'm wondering what an AP level high school student is??

International Baccalauriat for dummies.

Re:Insert standard replies here... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23993581)

Netcraft confirms... the patient is dead.

You forgot one.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23994253)

Can you imagine a Beowulf cluster running this?

Re:Insert standard replies here... (1)

Koiu Lpoi (632570) | more than 5 years ago | (#23994701)

I am intrigued by your ideas and would like to subscribe to your newsletter.

Huh, this is the only one I don't know the origin on. Anyone mind filling me in?

Re:Insert standard replies here... (2, Informative)

Zencyde (850968) | more than 5 years ago | (#23994939)

Another Simpsons meme. : ) Nothing to see here, move along.

Associated Press or Access Points? (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23993141)

And which 3D FPS runs on APs, FFS?

So will it have... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23993155)

God Mode if they want to use it in Louisiana?

Re:So will it have... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23993765)

I'll check it out after I finish my GTA: San Andreas driving lessons.

haha (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23993199)

she said phagocytosis!

but seriously, she says her name is something like Neisha Elam and the caption says Jessica. They can't get her name right?

Imagine a million highschooled controlled nanobots (3, Interesting)

CrazyJim1 (809850) | more than 5 years ago | (#23993227)

If someone gets some sort of hard to cure disease, just let the internet controlled nano bot pilots fix it manually. All they need to do is fly around and shoot the bad cells.

Re:Imagine a million highschooled controlled nanob (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23994007)

and when they accidentally shoot the good ones?

Re:Imagine a million highschooled controlled nanob (3, Funny)

CrazyJim1 (809850) | more than 5 years ago | (#23994409)

and when they accidentally shoot the good ones?

Accidentally?

"Sorry, no Mac version yet." (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23993233)

Only a Windows version, is more accurate.

Re:"Sorry, no Mac version yet." (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23993361)

This is why macs suck :P

Re:"Sorry, no Mac version yet." (1, Insightful)

Joe Tie. (567096) | more than 5 years ago | (#23993667)

It thought it was a bit odd in this day and age to not even acknowledge that linux exists.

Re:"Sorry, no Mac version yet." (1)

Leonard Fedorov (1139357) | more than 5 years ago | (#23993699)

You must have not received the memo - this year isn't the year of the Linux desktop as it happens.

Joking aside, it does seem quite odd. Although, if they're aiming at an education market, then they're probably right in thinking the vast majority of their user base is locked into some MS license scheme.

Re:"Sorry, no Mac version yet." (1)

Narpak (961733) | more than 5 years ago | (#23994911)

I live in Europe and I consider this sort of software highly interesting. However Norway is making moves toward open source software by among other things declaring that ODF will be an official format from 2009. http://www.skolenettet.no/templates/News.aspx?id=46186&epslanguage=NO&scope=ScopeLaerAns [skolenettet.no] (in norwegian).

And http://www.skolelinux.org/ [skolelinux.org] is a Linux distribution developed in Norway primarily for the use at schools. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skolelinux [wikipedia.org] With the continued move towards open source and software that does not require expensive licenses (thus reducing costs for the educational system) using this for new computers is already undergoing serious consideration.

I use this only as an example.

My point is that the creation of educational software should and could be done by multiple nations in co-operation. Something made in the US or EU (or anywhere in the world for that matter) could be made to benefit all education institutions regardless of location. Make things in open source (and with Linux support) is simply the best course of action.

I apploud the makers of this program, it is a very good concept and I hope improved versions (and Linux clones) will be avalible for everyone everywhere who sees benefits to their education or lectures. Further more I hope projects like this get all the attention they deserve, regardless what subject they focus on, as interactive forms of education could be a benefit to all who wish to learn.

Well, no duh. (4, Funny)

Valdrax (32670) | more than 5 years ago | (#23993869)

Only a Windows version, is more accurate.

How would you create a game about fighting off viruses without an environment that's hospitable to them?

But Macs are in the Video?!? (1)

dingleberrie (545813) | more than 5 years ago | (#23994655)

It is odd that as the game is shown under play with about 3:20 to go (as my media player shows it), that only Macs are used for playing the game. This trend continues to the end of the video. I don't get it.

Re:"Sorry, no Mac version yet." (5, Informative)

kilrathu (1270456) | more than 5 years ago | (#23995213)

We at the Federation of American Scientists (the non-profit group that made this) are working on a way to make it run under WINE but we don't have it quite yet. We hope to have it up by the end of the month. Sorry.

The reality is we made this with a very limited budget and for that reason we have not not yet implemented a mac/*nix version yet. This is primarily a research project to show that students can learn from video games. The goal is to prove to policy makers that technology can be used to improve education. FAS is open to any feedback you can give them about the game or if you can help get it into the classroom.

If you really need a different version consider donating or joining FAS [http://fas.org/member/index.html] so that we can continue development.

Wha? (1)

Ethanol-fueled (1125189) | more than 5 years ago | (#23993237)

This sounds a lot like the "X-treme" fad of yesteryear. Take a few quizzes and be rewarded with shoot-em-ups between exams. FPS make great teaching tools for, say, military tactics and strategy but I think the field of immunology would be best left to a puzzle game like an adanced version of Dr. Mario. What's next, DOOM: The Calculus? The more pieces you blast something into, There could be a "delta-epsilon" meter for blasting your enemies into smaller and smaller pieces.

Re:Wha? (3, Informative)

porcupine8 (816071) | more than 5 years ago | (#23993525)

This sounds a lot like the "X-treme" fad of yesteryear. Take a few quizzes and be rewarded with shoot-em-ups between exams.

Did you actually read/view anything beyond the summary? This looks nothing like those. Absolutely nothing. It IS more of a first-person puzzle game than a first-person "shooter." In fact, if you look at the controls, [fas.org] there's not even anything to "shoot." You go through and find the necessary chemicals to activate the various parts of the immune system.

Re:Wha? (2, Funny)

Ethanol-fueled (1125189) | more than 5 years ago | (#23993551)

Damn. The one time that I didn't RTFA and I get called on it. Thank you, sir, for bruising my fragile ego!

Re:Wha? (1)

Tom9729 (1134127) | more than 5 years ago | (#23995079)

Damn. The one time that I didn't RTFA and I get called on it. Thank you, sir, for bruising my fragile ego!

Apparently you didn't read her signature either. ;-)

Re:Wha? (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23993967)

Also the video introduction says they're focusing on the innate immune system. That's fine but the adaptive immune system is totally cooler and where most of the sexy research happens.

What does AP mean? (2, Insightful)

Mex (191941) | more than 5 years ago | (#23993243)

Forgive the ignorance but I am not american, what does AP stand for?

Re:What does AP mean? (1)

genericpoweruser (1223032) | more than 5 years ago | (#23993283)

I'm not positive (and didn't RTFA because I never do =P ) but I'm pretty sure it's Associates [degree] of Psychology.

Re:What does AP mean? (5, Informative)

ubergamer1337 (912210) | more than 5 years ago | (#23993323)

I cant tell if your being sarcastic or not, but it stands for Advanced Placement. Its a program that allows High School students to get College Credit by taking courses taught at a College level, and then taking a test which determines how many credits you get (if any).

Re:What does AP mean? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23993293)

AP = "Advanced Placement" usually in the American mis-education system.

Re:What does AP mean? (2, Informative)

elnico (1290430) | more than 5 years ago | (#23993405)

It stands for "Advanced Placement," which is typically the highest level of a course offered by a high school. High scores on AP tests (standardized tests given by College Board, the same group that does SAT testing) normally translate to credit for introductory level classes at most universities in the US.

Re:What does AP mean? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23993509)

It stands for "Advanced Placement," which is typically the highest level of a course offered by a high school. High scores on AP tests (standardized tests given by College Board, the same group that does SAT testing) normally translate to credit for introductory level classes at most universities in the US.

Which is still pretty dumbed down from a European education.

Re:What does AP mean? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23993903)

Thank you for that example of a complete sentence as taught in the European education system.

It also stands for... (1)

DeadDecoy (877617) | more than 5 years ago | (#23993623)

Academic Probation :).
I've gotten into confusing conversations where one person was referring to it as this definition with a semi-apologetic nonchalance and I thought they meant Advanced Placement.

Re:What does AP mean? (0, Redundant)

Nimey (114278) | more than 5 years ago | (#23993493)

Advanced Placement. AP classes are high school (ages 13-18) classes with more advanced topics, aimed at kids who want to go on to university. Sometimes the classes are offered with college-credit hours for a much cheaper rate than a real college would charge.

Re:What does AP mean? (1)

kramerd (1227006) | more than 5 years ago | (#23993955)

What high school do you go to in the US that has 13 year olds? I'm fairly certain the youngest in my high school were 15. Since Kindergarten starts at age 6, and high school starts at grade 9, that would mean you could be 14 in high school, for the one month variant between the beginning of school and the October 1 deadline for hitting 15. AP classes are not advanced topics, just advanced material. The reason that some AP classes are cheaper than at a real college is because they are given at a community college (think trade school for those not from the US). When I was in high school, I took college classes, and paid college prices, because I took them at a college.

Re:What does AP mean? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23994187)

I started high school at 13, graduated at 17. Birthday in late september.

Re:What does AP mean? (1)

darthdavid (835069) | more than 5 years ago | (#23994241)

The minimum age for Kindergarten in my district is 5 and my birthday was just before the cutoff so I ended up starting with school at 4 and subsequently starting 9th grade at 13.

Re:What does AP mean? (1)

freyyr890 (1019088) | more than 5 years ago | (#23995233)

Here up north in Canada, entry grade is decided by year. ie: My tenth grade class is composed almost exclusively of students born in 1992 (except for special cases such as acceleration and out-of-country transfers).

Re:What does AP mean? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23994601)

International Baccalaureate for dummies.

Windows only (1)

GuidoJ (231456) | more than 5 years ago | (#23993391)

The game is free, although not open source... Sorry, no Mac version yet.

Actually the game was "designed to run on Windows operating systems only", so forget about a version for Mac, linux, or anything else for that matter.

Re:Windows only (1)

Joe Tie. (567096) | more than 5 years ago | (#23993725)

But they offered a helpful suggestion on the site for how to run it on a mac! Remove the operating system and install windows, and it should work! That got me blinking in confusion a few times.

The medium is the message. . . (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23993419)

If this is what it takes to teach, so be it.
However, for those with limited time and a real desire to read up on the subject, couldn't the information also be presented in some more traditional formats. The game didn't spring into being without storyboards, outlines and lots of other resource material in traditional format, so where is it?

I would like to learn more about what is being taught, but I have a slow connection and an old computer. I can read quite well, thank you.

And thank you, Marshall McLuhan.

Re:The medium is the message. . . (3, Insightful)

shawb (16347) | more than 5 years ago | (#23993811)

The information you're looking for can be found here [google.com].

Re:The medium is the message. . . (1)

chadruva (613658) | more than 5 years ago | (#23994629)

I would recommend to read the book "Immunology" from Lippincott's Illustrated Review series, is a great comprehensive introduction, covers the topic very well but does not get too complicated or deep.

If you prefer something more deep maybe Basic Immunology from the author Abul K. Abbas, Cellular and Molecular Immunology, of the same author, from Elsevier Saunders. I used the last one on my Immunology course.

Toothless antitrust (1)

FlyingBishop (1293238) | more than 5 years ago | (#23993485)

We find MS guilty of antitrust violations, and then fund programs developed exclusively for their platforms.

My government needs to get it's act together.

Fun? (2, Insightful)

BenoitRen (998927) | more than 5 years ago | (#23993579)

If they wanted to make it fun for everyone, they should have made it a fun puzzle game or something instead of an FPS.

Re:Fun? (1)

Khyber (864651) | more than 5 years ago | (#23995005)

It *IS* a puzzle game. There's nothing to shoot, hell there isn't even a shoot command! Had you bothered to download the thing you'd know that.

Re:Fun? (1)

PieceofLavalamp (1244192) | more than 5 years ago | (#23995901)

whoo hoo yet another educational puzzle game. I'd be sure to stay as far aways as possible. The only educational game i've ever found to be fun was Age of Empires series.(which im sure is debatable as to its educational value but it was at least fun)

No Mac (1)

KasperMeerts (1305097) | more than 5 years ago | (#23993617)

And more important: no linux version. I'll think I'll Wine it maybe.
By the way, the game is built on DirectX so don't expect any other platform anytime soon. Seriously, why do people still code with DirectX.

Re:No Mac (1)

Shados (741919) | more than 5 years ago | (#23993737)

Because its quite a decent bit easier, if for nothing else that DirectX covers everything from image to sound to input. The alternative is to combine multiple librairy... so that raise the barrier of entry right there. Also (I don't know if its what they did), but for simpler games, you can use Managed Direct X in .NET with performance more than good enough to make a game like this one (and then some), with 1/10th the effort.

Re:No Mac (1)

KasperMeerts (1305097) | more than 5 years ago | (#23994411)

So why not SDL?
That's easy and Microsoft is discontinuing parts of DirectX making it more and more necessary to combine libraries?

Re:No Mac (1)

Shados (741919) | more than 5 years ago | (#23994497)

Isn't SDL not even object oriented? That would make the barrier for entry pretty high. Also, its really lacking in the feature department. Fine for a small game like this one though, I'll give you that. Total joke for most real applications though (there are exceptions).

And for all of the modules that are discontinued in DX, there are replacements.

Win XP 64 (1)

redcaboodle (622288) | more than 5 years ago | (#23993639)

This game does not install on Win XP 64 (de). It says the game needs Windows XP. I assume it will not run under Vista either.

AP Immunology (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23993845)

I had no idea there was an Advanced Placement test for Immunology.

No Mac version... (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23993977)

... but the video shows a classroom of students running the game on a lab of iMacs! Are they really dual-booting Windows or running a VM on all those Macs just to play the game? Sounds expensive from a licensing perspective.

  Also odd, in the video when the teacher is introduced she says her name is Netia (as do the credits) but the text overlay introduces her as Jessica. Those two are not even close.

  Funny enough, a Netia Elam appeared as a contestant on a TV game show called "Love's a Trip" according to IMDB [imdb.com]

  Wonder if it's the same woman, she's not bad looking :)

Glad to see this... (1)

blahplusplus (757119) | more than 5 years ago | (#23994145)

... even if their first attempt isn't great, I've often wondered if one couldn't make a puzzle game out of teaching basic electricity and electronics. I was playing bioshock with the little 'hacking' tubes game and thought "wouldn't it be cool if this was about electronics, in 3D, and you could make stuff!"

Re:Glad to see this... (1)

pbaer (833011) | more than 5 years ago | (#23996235)

Logisim is like that but for circuits, except it isn't a game. But I could see someone making a game off of that.

Putting their money where their mouth is eh? (1)

PaganRitual (551879) | more than 5 years ago | (#23994443)

I won't be impressed until they shell out for Dennis Quaid and Martin Short to be voice actors.

Awww (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23994565)

The game is free, although not open source

:(

Bugs and Drugs in Orange Plasma (4, Interesting)

kmahan (80459) | more than 5 years ago | (#23995027)

PLATO had a game/training program called "Bugs and Drugs". It was a 2D dungeon game where you ran into various organisms and had to prescribe the correct medicine to kill them. The best group to be a member of was the Bedpan Commandos.

It was written back in 1978 by Mike Gorback, Dave Tanaka and Paul Alfille.

Working Title: Organ Trail (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23995611)

Organ Trail: Guide your white blood cell from the pancreas through the marrow to reach the brain. Will you successfully ford the lower intestine? Thrill in excitement as you shoot antibodies at far too many bacteria to carry back! Face dread diseases on the way such as cholera and whooping cough.

The game crashes (1)

Mishotaki (957104) | more than 5 years ago | (#23995671)

The game is crashing when i try to start the "campaign" on my computer, does that mean that i'm not worthy of saving human lives?

Re:The game crashes (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23996049)

The game is crashing when i try to start the "campaign" on my computer, does that mean that i'm not worthy of saving human lives?

Yes

AP Bio Immunology doesn't include T cells? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#23995693)

Not to nitpick, but as someone who studies T cells, I'm kinda upset to see they were left out of the game (along with the rest of adaptive immunity). I haven't played it yet (still downloading), but from what I saw in the walkthrough, it's all innate immunity (monocytes, neutrophils, etc). Since the adaptive immune system is the hallmark of the more "advanced" immune systems and is really fascinating, why was it left out? Where's the adaptive love?

I think it's an awesome idea though. Maybe it was too much work for one game and they'll have "Immune Attack Part II: The Adaptive Response" or even "Immune Attack II: When Things Go Wrong" (autoimmunity?)

T Cell Pride!

Aperture Science Handheld Immunity Device (1)

Bushido Hacks (788211) | more than 5 years ago | (#23996447)

"Welcome to the Aperture Science Immunity Research Center. Today we are going to infect you with a cocktail of horrible uncurable diseases. Fortunately, we have developed the new Aperture Science Handheld Immunity Device. It is currently in beta stage. If this device fails, you will die of a horrible combination of ailements. If it is successful, you will then proceed to the next room where cake and emotional conseling will be served."
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