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Seagate Announces First 1.5TB Desktop Hard Drive

timothy posted more than 5 years ago | from the they-had-to-count-them-all- dept.

Data Storage 383

MojoKid writes "Seagate announced three new consumer-level hard drives today, which it claims are the 'industry's first 1.5-terabyte desktop and half-terabyte notebook hard drives.' The company claims that it is able to greatly increase the areal density of its drive substrates by utilizing perpendicular magnetic recording (PMR) technology that is capable of delivering more than triple the storage density of traditional longitudinal recording. Seagate's latest desktop-class hard drive, the Barracuda 7200.11, will be available in a 1.5TB capacity starting in August. The 3.5-inch drive is made up of four 375GB platters and has a 7,200-rpm rotational speed."

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383 comments

that's a lot (4, Funny)

jgarra23 (1109651) | more than 5 years ago | (#24141831)

of pr0n!

Re:that's a lot (5, Funny)

Izabael_DaJinn (1231856) | more than 5 years ago | (#24142155)

You guys mod this funny, but it's a little known fact that the terabyte was actually named after Tera Patrick in deference to her online body of work.

Re:that's a lot (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24142487)

And what a body it was!

Re:that's a lot (1, Informative)

BobMcD (601576) | more than 5 years ago | (#24142735)

You guys mod this funny, but it's a little known fact that the terabyte was actually named after Tera Patrick in deference to her online body of work.

You must be joking.

When Resolution 6 was accepted, she was sixteen years from being born...

http://www.bipm.org/jsp/en/ViewCGPMResolution.jsp?CGPM=11&RES=12 [bipm.org]

Re:that's a lot (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24142885)

Big deal, Traci Lords started making movies before her own parents were born.

great (4, Funny)

Adult film producer (866485) | more than 5 years ago | (#24141837)

more storage for nerds to steal and archive the work I produced. Damn them.

Re:great (1)

TheMiddleRoad (1153113) | more than 5 years ago | (#24142027)

Do people really archive that much porn? That's insane. Frankly, 500GB of porn is enough. Barely. For today.

Finally... (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24141841)

I will be able to store all of my porn!

Obligatory... (3, Funny)

thatskinnyguy (1129515) | more than 5 years ago | (#24141851)

1.5TB... Who will ever need more than that?

Re:Obligatory... (2, Insightful)

jonbryce (703250) | more than 5 years ago | (#24142069)

Me. I already have 2TB across 4 drives here.

Re:Obligatory... (1)

thatskinnyguy (1129515) | more than 5 years ago | (#24142181)

You do and I do. But does Joe Everyman really need that much space?

Re:Obligatory... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24142341)

The question is WHEN do Joe need that much space? Lets talk about this question in a couple of years...

Re:Obligatory... (1)

Bomarc (306716) | more than 5 years ago | (#24142159)

For me, hard drives are a comity. I need 750GB / month to handle the recording that I do. This number went up 'recently' when I started recording in HDef. With this drive offering, I can reduce my hard drive need to once every other month -- until all broadcasts are in HDef. I've still not sure what I'm going to do with 20 copies of "Enterprise" that I've been recording on the SciFi channel though.

Re:Obligatory... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24142769)

I've still not sure what I'm going to do with 20 copies of "Enterprise" that I've been recording on the SciFi channel though.

Delete them?

Re:Obligatory... (2, Funny)

jbeaupre (752124) | more than 5 years ago | (#24142241)

It will take a while, but 1.5TB will seem like nothing. But no one will need more than 640TB. Ever.

Re:Obligatory... (1)

homes32 (1265404) | more than 5 years ago | (#24142309)

1.5TB... Who will ever need more than that?

16mb of RAM! Who will ever need more than that?

Moar datas plz! (0, Redundant)

ibanezist00 (1306467) | more than 5 years ago | (#24141865)

Cool, my porn collection was already growing a bit large as it is.

Seriously though, how much is one of these things going to cost? And what benefit does it have for someone like me who is not an avid PC gamer (more of a console guy), but more of a multimedia buff? I have tons of multimedia, but not 1.5 TB worth.

I can't imagine even losing that much data if there's some kind of mechanical failure... I would rather have 500 gig disks with redundancy, myself.

Re:Moar datas plz! (4, Interesting)

Zymergy (803632) | more than 5 years ago | (#24142219)

When you start ripping your Blue-Ray HD Movies to store on a disk-less HDD share (at about 25GB to 50GB a pop) and then you conveniently convert them into mountable ISO images, you will then know why you bought that 1.5TB HDD.

I have a buddy that does this and he uses a 1TB HDD to store the ripped & converted ISO HD movie images. He then mounts them over his wireless N network on his Multimedia PC attached to his living room's 60" HDTV or he mounts the images on his HD laptop anywhere he feels like round his home. Very cool, and he NEVER scratches or loses one of his Blue-Ray disks... (Thank You SlySoft and Elby)

Re:Moar datas plz! (2, Informative)

ibanezist00 (1306467) | more than 5 years ago | (#24142255)

Wow, I'm braindead today. I didn't even think of high-definition content. What a disappointing nerd I am...

Re:Moar datas plz! (1)

Hatta (162192) | more than 5 years ago | (#24142389)

Seriously though, how much is one of these things going to cost?

Probably a couple hundred dollars, like high end hard drives usually do.

And what benefit does it have for someone like me who is not an avid PC gamer (more of a console guy), but more of a multimedia buff? I have tons of multimedia, but not 1.5 TB worth.

Well if you have xvids encoded at around 350mb/hr, that's around 4285 hours of media. Sure that seems like a lot, but I already have about 4000 hours of music on my computer and I still hear repeats when I put it on shuffle.

This is going to be a much bigger deal if you're into HD media, or if you ever work with uncompressed video.

I can't imagine even losing that much data if there's some kind of mechanical failure... I would rather have 500 gig disks with redundancy, myself.

I'd rather have 1.5TB disks with redundancy.

$349 (1)

Overzeetop (214511) | more than 5 years ago | (#24142483)

It will come in at just above the current retail pricing on TB drives, but below the ridiculous level. A TB drive will cost $200 (nominally, $150-175 on sale) and to get the 1.5 will set you back an extra 20% or so per gig. They'll be $225-$250 for Black Friday, limit 1, 3 per store.

Flash video (4, Funny)

bigstrat2003 (1058574) | more than 5 years ago | (#24141879)

For some reason, I can't stop thinking of this Flash cartoon I saw once about perpendicular hard drive recording, with cartoon dudes singing, "Get perpendicular! (Get perpendicular!)".

...I need a life.

Re:Flash video (1)

johnw (3725) | more than 5 years ago | (#24142019)

As soon as I saw the headline for this article I thought of the same cartoon. Does anyone know if it's still available on-line anywhere?

Get Perpendicular! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24141881)

Get Perpendicular [hitachigst.com]

If you haven't seen it, it's School House Rock meets How It's Made meets Engineering 101. Very cool stuff.

omg (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24141893)

HI MOM!

Half-Terabyte? (1)

MrKane (804219) | more than 5 years ago | (#24141899)

Isn't that 500GB's?

Looks like the marketing speak for harddrives is about to change up a gear...
;?P

PMR has been around for awhile... (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24141901)

In true slashdot fashion I have not read the article.

This technology was first introduced commercially in 2005. All new drives use PMR.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perpendicular_recording

Sounds killer! (4, Funny)

DanWS6 (1248650) | more than 5 years ago | (#24141903)

I can't wait to try out ReiserFS on it.

4 platters (1)

crow (16139) | more than 5 years ago | (#24141907)

Isn't their current 1TB drive only 3 platters? So this isn't really a big increase in density, just adding a platter with a slight density increase. Regardless, I'm disappointed. I was hoping they would be coming out with 2TB drives this year. At least it's coming out in August, in time for the new TV shows in the fall (I need to upgrade my MythTV). Even if I don't buy one, it will help push down the prices on the 1TB drives.

Re:4 platters (1)

whiskey6 (1172575) | more than 5 years ago | (#24141985)

so that's what 1.2tb in real life? can someone please post the equation to calculate drive space? thanks!

Re:4 platters (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24142059)

>can someone please post the equation to calculate drive space?

fake capacity * (1000/1024) ~= real capacity

Re:4 platters (2, Informative)

compro01 (777531) | more than 5 years ago | (#24142465)

that's only valid for the kilobyte level. for this drive, your result is off by about 100GB high.

correct generic formula would go

fake capacity*(10^3x/2^10x)=real capacity, where x is the unit stepping (1 for KB, 2 for MB, 3 for GB, 4 for TB, etc.)

Re:4 platters (1)

crow (16139) | more than 5 years ago | (#24142191)

1.5*10^12/2^40

So they announced a 1.36TB drive, while the current highest-capacity drives hold 0.909TB (or 931GB).

Re:4 platters (1)

compro01 (777531) | more than 5 years ago | (#24142329)

actual capacity is 1.364TB

to get that, just take the number of bytes (1.5 trillion for this) and divide by 2^10x, where x is the unit. 1 for KB, 2 for MB, and so on.

Re:4 platters (5, Informative)

AKAImBatman (238306) | more than 5 years ago | (#24142419)

Copy the following into your URL bar and press Enter. The code will allow you to compute the real amount.

javascript:var capacity=window.prompt("Enter the capacity in TB.");capacity=capacity*0.9094947;alert("Real capacity is "+capacity+"TB");

real life (1)

speedtux (1307149) | more than 5 years ago | (#24142877)

Well, in real-world units...

It's like the number of pinheads in a football field, stacked two packs of cigarettes high.

Or it's like the text in the volumes of the Encyclopedia Britannica when stacked as high as the walnuts filling a swimming pool, laid end-to-end.

I hope that clears THAT up.

Re:4 platters (2, Insightful)

WizADSL (839896) | more than 5 years ago | (#24142123)

Well, they ARE cramming another platter into the drive, surely they mean platter density inside the drive case.....

Frist Psot (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24141929)

Frist Psot!!!111AOL111!!!---Lost Signal

1.5TB Desktop Quality (1)

nurb432 (527695) | more than 5 years ago | (#24141949)

That burns up just outside of 90 days..

Warranty (4, Informative)

Dracker (1323355) | more than 5 years ago | (#24142527)

Actually, Seagate offers a 5-year warranty on their hard drives. It's a major reason why I usually buy from Seagate instead of going to Western Digital or Samsung, which usually only a offer 3-year warranty. Still, it's always best to keep backups. How nice the company is about replacements says nothing about how likely the drive is to fail.

Rip your DVD collection (1)

TheMiddleRoad (1153113) | more than 5 years ago | (#24141953)

One hard drive in your case takes up less space than 166 dual layer DVDs. Realistically, you can probably fit 300-400 DVDs of data on, since so many don't use all of a single layer, let alone all a dual. Or you can pare down your 2000 CD collection.

Re:Rip your DVD collection (0, Redundant)

Zymergy (803632) | more than 5 years ago | (#24142367)

When you start ripping your Blue-Ray HD Movies to store on a disk-less HDD share (at about 25GB to 50GB a pop) and then you conveniently convert them into mountable ISO images, you will then know why you bought that 1.5TB HDD.

I have a buddy that does this and he uses a 1TB HDD to store the ripped & converted ISO HD movie images. He then mounts them over his wireless N network on his Multimedia PC attached to his living room's 60" HDTV or he mounts the images on his HD laptop anywhere he feels like round his home. Very cool, and he NEVER scratches or loses one of his Blue-Ray disks... (Thank You SlySoft and Elby)
(NOTE:I posted this comment earlier and it got buried as the parent was modded 0)

1.5TB (1)

COMON$ (806135) | more than 5 years ago | (#24142023)

wow, first time I read that I read 1.5TB notebook drive....guess you read what you want to :)

I need one! (1)

Bryansix (761547) | more than 5 years ago | (#24142029)

I'm trying to recover email out of an .edb file and the file is 76 gigabytes. I need to run the recovery on a desktop and I'll need to save the .pst files to that desktop hd as well. I REALLY could use one of these RIGHT NOW!

What I really want... (4, Insightful)

Chordonblue (585047) | more than 5 years ago | (#24142055)

How about a drive that advertises longevity instead of storage density. Seriously, I'd take half that storage if there was more assurance of my data integrity.

Losing an 80 GB HD nearly broke my heart, I can't imagine what losing 1.5 TB would do...

Re:What I really want... (4, Insightful)

bigstrat2003 (1058574) | more than 5 years ago | (#24142121)

Losing an 80 GB HD nearly broke my heart, I can't imagine what losing 1.5 TB would do...

/.: the only place where one gets a broken heart from a hard drive instead of the opposite sex.

Re:What I really want... (2, Funny)

Wooky_linuxer (685371) | more than 5 years ago | (#24142381)

How do you know it wasn't a female HDD? /*ducks*/

Re:What I really want... (1)

the_B0fh (208483) | more than 5 years ago | (#24142493)

Have you not look at the back of a hard drive before? Unlike bees, all hard drives are male.

Now, as to whether Chordonblue is female or not, that's a separate question.

Re:What I really want... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24142387)

Losing an 80 GB HD nearly broke my heart, I can't imagine what losing 1.5 TB would do...

/.: the only place where one gets a broken heart from a hard drive instead of the opposite sex.

Maybe there was a lot of opposite sex on it.

Re:What I really want... (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24142425)

Losing an 80 GB HD nearly broke my heart, I can't imagine what losing 1.5 TB would do...

/.: the only place where one gets a broken heart from a hard drive instead of the opposite sex.

That isn't fair. Why don't you go to your parents or grandparents house... Grab a box of their favorite pictures, cover them in a flammable liquid, then drop a match in there? Do you think that they would be broken hearted about the event?

Re:What I really want... (1)

bigstrat2003 (1058574) | more than 5 years ago | (#24142577)

It's a joke. I'm taking a lighthearted jab at my fellow nerds (and myself). Just laugh, or if you don't find it funny, at least don't take it seriously.

Re:What I really want... (3, Funny)

Jherek Carnelian (831679) | more than 5 years ago | (#24142757)

/.: the only place where one gets a broken heart from a hard drive instead of the opposite sex.

Wait! There are places where a hard drive will get you someone of the opposite sex?

Re:What I really want... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24142273)

So you're saying it's not how big it is, but it's how long it will last?

Re:What I really want... (1, Informative)

dave420 (699308) | more than 5 years ago | (#24142305)

get yourself some RAID and that won't be an issue. All hard disks, no matter how well-made they are, will fuck up one day. All of them. Every single one. With RAID you can take advantage of standard desktop HDDs, AND get the data longevity you want, all with existing hardware.

Re:What I really want... (1)

morgan_greywolf (835522) | more than 5 years ago | (#24142495)

All hard disks, no matter how well-made they are, will fuck up one day.

I put it this way: all things mechanical are doomed to fail...eventually.

Re:What I really want... (4, Insightful)

Reality Master 101 (179095) | more than 5 years ago | (#24142863)

get yourself some RAID and that won't be an issue.

RAID is not a substitute for backups!

All hard disks, no matter how well-made they are, will fuck up one day. All of them. Every single one.

Crucial corollaries:

1) All file systems, no matter how well-made they are, will fuck up one day. All of them. Every single one. And that fuck up will be propagated to your RAID array.

AND: 2) All RAID controllers, no matter how well-made they are, will fuck up one day. All of them. Every single one. And that fuck up will hose your RAID array.

And let's not get into fires, theft, lightning / voltage spikes ...

Re:What I really want... (1)

thatskinnyguy (1129515) | more than 5 years ago | (#24142313)

Losing an 80 GB HD nearly broke my heart, I can't imagine what losing 1.5 TB would do...

Nearly break your balls. Or in some cases, business.

Re:What I really want... (5, Insightful)

Reality Master 101 (179095) | more than 5 years ago | (#24142359)

Seriously, I'd take half that storage if there was more assurance of my data integrity.

How does more assurance of your data integrity obviate the need for backups? In other words, how does your behavior change even with those assurances?

Losing an 80 GB HD nearly broke my heart, I can't imagine what losing 1.5 TB would do...

Yeah, it'd be nice not to have hard drive failures, but don't blame the drive manufacturers for your lack of backups. There is no data solution so good that it doesn't need redundancy in some manner.

Re:What I really want... (1)

drsmithy (35869) | more than 5 years ago | (#24142407)

How about a drive that advertises longevity instead of storage density. Seriously, I'd take half that storage if there was more assurance of my data integrity.

RAID1. Your prayers are answered.

Re:What I really want... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24142457)

Buy two 750GB HDDs and mirror them.

Re:What I really want... (1)

jbeaupre (752124) | more than 5 years ago | (#24142509)

Hmmm, gives me an idea for a product: Figure out how to cram 3 notebook drives into a 3.5 form factor. A bit of circuit wizardry to make it look and act like a regular SATA drive for the main controller, but have it run as a RAID 5 internally. Yes, that will do nicely. More expensive, weird, but added reliability. A fine niche product. By version 2 or 3, it might even work. The real money would be when a drive dies and they send it in for "recovery service"

Re:What I really want... (1)

Hao Wu (652581) | more than 5 years ago | (#24142515)

Losing an 80 GB HD nearly broke my heart, I can't imagine what losing 1.5 TB would do...

They'd rather you purchase two, three, or four...

Cars rust, clothes pill, and hard drives break for one reason: so you will go buy more.

Re:What I really want... (4, Informative)

CopaceticOpus (965603) | more than 5 years ago | (#24142531)

Any data you truly care about needs to be on at least three devices, which are in at least two different buildings. Increasing the reliability of current drives won't be as helpful as bringing down prices so that multiple copies are more affordable. No amount of reliability will account for theft, fire, and human error.

I use a set of three hard drives. One internal drive is in primary use. I back that up to an external drive frequently. Every couple weeks or so, I take that external drive to my remote location and swap it with another external drive, which then becomes my local backup.

All copying is done with rsync to minimize drive wear and copy times. I just plug in the drive and run a batch file.

Re:What I really want... (1)

John Whitley (6067) | more than 5 years ago | (#24142579)

How about a drive that advertises longevity instead of storage density. Seriously, I'd take half that storage if there was more assurance of my data integrity.

Nothing any storage manufacturer will EVER do will beat buying three drives and running regular backups of the primary drive to the spares. Remember to always keep one of the spares off-site. There's nothing like the feeling of non-panic when a drive buys the farm and you've got a recent (bootable!) backup. With cheap drives and external enclosures, keeping robust and up-to-date backups has never been easier.

Re:What I really want... (1)

babyrat (314371) | more than 5 years ago | (#24142645)

So instead of buying one 1.5TB drive, buy 3 500MB drives (it should cost about the same) and back up your stuff up on two other drives.

If enough people cared about longevity they would advertise that, but because you should have backups anyway (no amount of 'longevity' is going to protect against your PC being burned up in a fire) longevity doesn't matter as much.

Re:What I really want... (1)

Orgasmatron (8103) | more than 5 years ago | (#24142651)

They all advertise longevity, and they all lie, the legal way; with statistics!

The whole Barracuda line has an advertised MTBF of 750,000 hours (yes, 85+ years, really [seagate.com]) and an annualized failure rate of 0.34%. That is actually pretty much typical of hard drive advertising. Most people don't have the balls to advertise product lifetimes more than about twice as long as the basic technology has been in around, but hard drive makers don't even blink.

Of course, MTBF and AFR are actually technical terms, with very specific meanings that are wildly different from what you'd think they meant if you didn't already know better. I wonder if the marketing department is using the confusion between the proper and assumed meanings of those terms to, ahem, "let" people think that drives are more reliable than they really are...

Re:What I really want... (1)

istartedi (132515) | more than 5 years ago | (#24142875)

Seriously, I'd take half that storage if there was more assurance of my data integrity

You mean, like, with 750 GB drives and RAID-1?

Without increasing rotational speed & seek tim (1)

dilan (73502) | more than 5 years ago | (#24142089)

Now although this will be welcome news to a lot of people looking to pack more into less, for me it doesn't do any good. If you fill one of these drives with data (eg. photos) it is going to take a long time to do anything with it. Unless more is done to increase the rotational speed and thus increasing seek times it is not going to deliver a whole lot more.

Re:Without increasing rotational speed & seek (1)

Tanman (90298) | more than 5 years ago | (#24142201)

Just a minor correction, but you want to increase rotational speed to *decrease* seek times. Small, but important :)

Re:Without increasing rotational speed & seek (3, Informative)

crow (16139) | more than 5 years ago | (#24142369)

Seek time and rotational speed are mostly independent.

Seek time is the time that it takes to move the head to the desired track (including time for the vibrations from the movement to settle down). This is mostly independent of how fast the disk is spinning.

Rotational speed determines how long you have to wait, on average, for the data you want to read to show up under the head.

So a random read will take one seek, plus half a rotation, before the drive can read the data.

Re:Without increasing rotational speed & seek (1)

rrohbeck (944847) | more than 5 years ago | (#24142859)

Power goes up with the square of rpm. That's why 15k drives have 3" platters - otherwise they'd burn too much power.
Also, it's pretty hard to accelerate the heads any faster than they do now - it would required stronger actuator magnets which would be too costly. Also you'd have to devote more surface area to servo bursts so the heads know where they are during those very short seeks. That would cost capacity.
There's a tendency towards 2.5" drives for high performance. 3.5" is becoming the new 5.25".

Are the increases slowing down? (4, Interesting)

Orange Crush (934731) | more than 5 years ago | (#24142257)

This could be a factor of my faulty memory, but a quick bit of googling didn't turn up anything useful. Is it just me, or has the rate at which storage capacity increases been slowing in recent years? It seems like we had a very rapid run-up to the 300gig mark (in a 3.5inch drive) then a much slower crawl to a terabyte and beyond.

Re:Are the increases slowing down? (1)

ibanezist00 (1306467) | more than 5 years ago | (#24142429)

My best guess would probably be that data density without going into the realm of nanotech has it's theoretical limits; there's only so much you can pack into a fixed amount of physical space, right? From what I've been seeing, it seems like the new developments now are different recording and reading methods, seeking algorithms, rotation speeds, etc etc...

Re:Are the increases slowing down? (1)

AllIGotWasThisNick (1309495) | more than 5 years ago | (#24142521)

I'm guessing we're experiencing the intermediate stage -- without high-bitrate content (eg) videos, 500GB is beyond any reasonable needs for software on a single system. Until everyone starts using their computers for digital video storage/editing or something else similarly high-bitrate, such as 3-D models + textures + sounds + scripts = virtual world, the larger hard drives won't see mass adoption. Of course, the new lower prices on TB hard drives will continue to encourage wider adoption of the new media.

big wow (1)

machinecode (409342) | more than 5 years ago | (#24142439)

toshiba had perpendicular storage covered a few years back... or have seagate bought/licensed the tech from toshiba ?

Post is inaccurate (1)

srmalloy (263556) | more than 5 years ago | (#24142451)

Seagate announced three new consumer-level hard drives today, which it claims are the 'industry's first 1.5-terabyte desktop and half-terabyte notebook hard drives.'

Unfortunately, as TFA notes, Seagate is not the first one on the market with a 500Gb laptop drive:

Despite Seagate's claims, the new 500GB Momentus are not the first "half-terabyte notebook hard drives." Not only have Hitachi and Fujistu already announced their 500GB, 2.5-inch hard drives earlier this year, but Samsung's 500GB, 2.5-inch, Sprintpoint M6 (model HM500LI) has been shipping since March.

Re:Post is inaccurate (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24142899)

Yes, I was surprised to see that as well, given that I'm typing this on a Macbook Pro with a 500GB Samsung drive.

new editor pl0x? (1)

Endo13 (1000782) | more than 5 years ago | (#24142463)

Apparently, slashdot isn't the only site that can use some help in the proof-reading department.

Seagate's new Momentus drives are lean on power consumption, allowing notebook users to work longer between battery charges, and are virtually inaudible thanks to Seagate's innovative SoftSonic fluid-dynamic bearing motors and QuietStep ramp load technology."

Despite Seagate's claims, the new 500GB Momentus are not the first "half-terabyte notebook hard drives." Not only have Hitachi and Fujistu already announced their 500GB, 2.5-inch hard drives earlier this year, but Samsung's 500GB, 2.5-inch, Sprintpoint M6 (model HM500LI) has been shipping since March. Oh well, you can't blame Samsung(??) for trying. Both of Samsung's(?!?) 2.5-inch, Momentus drives are expected to start shipping sometime in the fourth quarter of this year, and pricing has not be set yet.

More on topic, 1.5TB drives are awesome. Can't wait to pick one up. My current 600 gigs of space is constantly filling up. :-(

Re:new editor pl0x? (1)

Overzeetop (214511) | more than 5 years ago | (#24142659)

Even better, this means the TB drives will start falling in price (actually, they have in the past 2 months). I've got an unRaid box with 3 TB drives and 2 500G drives. I'm good for capacity now, but as soon as they get the hot spare feature up, it'd be nice to have a spare in their ready to go. Since I'm cheap, the lower the cost of a TB, the happier I am.

Huge size increments (1)

caywen (942955) | more than 5 years ago | (#24142541)

It's usually a good time to upgrade your hard drive when their size increases (500MB in this case) are way bigger than your current hard drive's entire capacity (250MB).

misread (1)

Nate Fox (1271) | more than 5 years ago | (#24142775)

anyone else misread

greatly increase the areal density

as

greatly increase the anal density

??
then I looked at the porn tag and realized that I wasnt the only one.

Home Movies (2, Interesting)

InlawBiker (1124825) | more than 5 years ago | (#24142793)

I don't think HD movies and the like are the main reason. A ripped Blueray movie for instance is really huge, but you just need enough work space to rip and compress it down to something usable.

Home movies is a legit use. I recently converted all of my home movies to digital, from Hi-8 through a capture card. The raw, uncompressed data is really huge. My once "massive" 500GB drive is about full.

Plus you need more disk space to edit the movies, and a way to back it up (compressed), but it's much easier to work on uncompressed video.

I'm still recording on mini-dv. Now imagine the space you need for HD home movies.

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